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Found 148 results

  1. G%$ #@&% it. Thanks to Akiyuki, The Rebricker, and the rest of you &%$*ers, I've now caught the GBC bug and it is going to cost me a lot of time and money. It all started with Akiyuki. Well, GBC didn't start with Akiyuki, but I was more or less "meh" on the whole concept until he came along. His ingenious mechanical solutions are mesmerizing, perplexing, and wonderful. Although I admired them from the start, I figured there was more or less no chance of me replicating them from the videos, especially since the one I was most interested in was also the most complicated: the ball factory. My involvement therefore remained stagnant (and non-existent) for a couple of years until The ReBricker showed up and proved that you really could reverse engineer the Ball Factory and then went one step further and posted video instructions for the whole thing. "Fine", I thought, "I'll just build that one." A few months of LDraw modeling, part collecting, building, testing, and display case building later I was hooked. It was one of the greatest building experiences I've ever had. This forum has repeatedly wished for a comprehensive set of instructions for the GBC modules of Akiyuki, and I've decided it is my responsibility to help make your dreams come true. With that in mind, I've compiled a list of all of Akiyuki's 28 non-Mindstorms modules with the goal of creating and/or finding complete PDF instructions for as many of them as possible and compiling the resources here. I've made a lot of progress already. Here is the list along with whatever I know about building material available. (currently 30 of 30 complete) Pinball PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 992 parts Presentation Topic Zigzag Stairs PDF instructions available from Courbet 481 parts Presentation Topic Cup to Cup - Type 1 v1 PDF instructions available from djm v2 PDF instructions available from Blakbird 1089 parts Presentation Topic Cup to Cup - Type 2 PDF instructions available from Courbet 1222 Parts Presentation topic Elevator Module PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 1621 parts Presentation Topic Marble Run PDF instructions available from Blakbird and legolijtje 1140 parts Presentation Topic Catch and Release PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 711 parts Presentation topic Ball Factory Video instructions available from The Rebricker PDF instructions available from Blakbird 4428 parts Detailed review by Blakbird Spiral Lift Short Version 876 parts PDF instructions available from Blakbird Presentation Topic Tall Version 1455 parts PDF instructions available from Blakbird and 9V System Presentation Topic Pneumatic Module PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 543 parts Presentation Topic Archimedes Screw - Type 1 PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 995 parts Presentation Topic Archimedes Screw - Type 2 PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 739 parts Presentation Topic Archimedes Screw - Type 3 PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 768 parts Presentation Topic Zig-Zag Lift PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 800 parts Presentation Topic Basket Shooter PDF instructions available from Blakbird and djm 2226 Parts Presentation Topic Train Module - Type 1 PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet Motor (157 parts) Switch (167 parts) Unloader (324 parts) Siding (106 parts) Loader (603 parts) Crane (3046 parts) Complete Set (4569 parts) Presentation Topic Train Module - Type 2 PDF instructions available from Courbet Motor (160 parts) Unloader (751 parts) Siding (178 parts) Loader (835 parts) Presentation Topic Wheel and Steps PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 1198 parts Presentation Topic Step Module PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 1785 parts Presentation Topic Fork PDF instructions available from Blakbird 878 parts Presentation Topic Six Heads PDF instructions available from Blakbird 1696 parts Presentation Topic Bucket Wheel Tower PDF instructions available from Blakbird 1415 parts Presentation topic Lifter Triggered by a Stuck Ball Video instructions available from The Rebricker PDF instructions available from Blakbird 1068 parts Presentation topic Spiral Staircase PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 1923 parts Presentation topic Tilted Rotors PDF instructions available from Blakbird 1223 parts Presentation topic Invisible Lift Video instructions available from The Rebricker PDF instructions available from Blakbird 3203 parts Presentation topic Cycloidal Drive PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 2081 parts Presentation topic Fork to Fork PDF instructions available from Blakbird and jesuskyr 1743 parts Presentation topic Planets PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 1558 Parts Presentation topic Strain Wave Gearing PDF instructions available from Blakbird and Courbet 2789 Parts Presentation topic Here's a montage of some of the LDraw work I've done so far which also gives you an idea of the relative scale of the modules: I'm not going to post any actual instruction files until I (or someone else) has tested them by physically building the model and proving that it works. I'm a stickler for accuracy, so I'm trying to get as close to Akiyuki's originals as possible. I already have PDF instructions ready for 4 of them and just need to test them out. As I build each model, I'll post a mini review about what I've learned and then I'll post links to the instructions and parts lists so anyone else can build them too. (Update: See bulleted list above for which instruction files are currently available.) As always, help is welcome. If you have successfully built any of these modules and are willing to share your information, please let me know here. In particular, I need LDraw files to make instructions. In a pinch, I can make them myself if you have detailed photos. In an even tighter pinch, I'm making everything myself from the videos, but it is slow going. Enjoy!
  2. Hello, all! After a year and many months with lots of hard work, the instructions to construct my UCS Venator-Class Star Destroyer are now complete thanks to Thire5! I would like to give massive thanks to Thire5 for designing the instructions, but also to KrisandKris12 and Anio for helping me construct a more accurate and awesome looking Venator. Check their work out they have all constructed some fantastic Venators too! -Model is composed of 2849 pieces. -80cm long (100 Studs) -41cm wide (51 Studs) -23cm high (30 Studs) -The price of the instruction is: 17.50 GBP/20 EUR/25 DOLLARS. -Included with your purchase is a HD PDF file with 298 Pages and the parts list for Bricklink. -Please email me: brickforcetoys@gmail.com to purchase! Kind regards, Ellis.
  3. Great Ball Contraption (GBC) - General Discussion and Index This is a topic used for GBC general conversation, questions, hints, tips, etc. This first post will be used to maintain an Index of GBCs here on Eurobricks or other websites. Eurobricks topics LEGO GBC 8 + Building Instructions (5 modules - 2 motors) New Akiyuki GBC Instruction Index Other sources Greatballcontraption.com
  4. This creation is ispired by the Star Wars universe and condensed in the LEGO format of a Skyline Architecture set. There are a lot of scenes, locations and vehicles recreated from the first two trilogies. If you can't spot them all there is a list in the following link. Instructions There are more than 790 pieces so it's jam packed :) Dimensions 792 pieces cm 37.5x 10 x 19 inch 15 x 4 x 7.5 studs 47 x 12.5 x 23.5 weight 388 gr / 13.7 oz The vehicles design have been inspired by advent calendars and other creations in microscale I found around the web. Most (if not all) of them needed to be reduced in size to fit the Skyline or adapted to be attached firmly and integrated in the little scenes that have been recreated. Hope you like it! Let me know what you think about it :) P.S. I know that maybe one for trilogy would be better or even one for movie You can find more images on my flickr page
  5. This is the final version of my Imperial TIE Fighter based on original LEGO sets. I've made PDF step-by-step instructions as well. If anyone would like to build this one, instructions are available at rebrickable.com for 6,99 Euro here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-19900/barneius/imperial-twin-ion-engine-fighter/#comments Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr Imperial TIE Fighter Lego MOC / MOD by barneius, on Flickr
  6. It feels strange... but it seems to be done :) I don't know if anyone is still waiting for this, but if so, hear me out: The instructions are completed and available! Model Specifications: 1580 pcs./pzs. (1491 without stand) Weight: approx. 1 kg (2 lbs) Length: 44 cm (17 2/8") Width: 22 cm (8 5/8") Height: 13 cm (5 2/8"), + extra 10 cm (4") with stand I tried my best to design a detailed and accurate, yet relatively sturdy and swooshable model. Important (for me anyway) aspect is the exclusive use of currently produced and available parts (as of 2018). The average part cost I obtained during several attempts using BrickLink 'Easy Buy' option applied on the part list was ~ $180 + S&H from 2-5 stores. That's based in central Europe, buying only NEW parts and not optimizing for arbitrary colors of some parts. The lowest cost I have been able to reach was $140 + S&H, when buying all internal parts as 'non applicable' color. Safe to say I was pleasantly surprised by both price and the low number of required orders. Sure I might have been lucky, but over several tries in the span of last month or so, the number of different stores required to get the complete part list stayed consistently low. Building Instructions: 235 page high quality .pdf file Carefully crafted Stud.io based quality (if I say so :D) step by step instructions Preface containing (perhaps interesting) information about the model development, and helpful build notes and tips for increased building comfort Two part lists in .XML format are included, one for the ship, the other one for the stand I took way more time with this than I should have and a lot of that time was spent on inefficient fiddling with some unimportant detail :) Sorry about that, that's simply how I am. I hope that at least some of the effort was worth it ant someone will appreciate it. I decided to price it at $20 If you are interested in getting the instructions, please email me at kristofpucejdl@gmail.com Cheers! Kristof
  7. Hello everyone! After receiving so many enquiries seeking instructions for my Zeta-class cargo shuttle, I am pleased to announce the release of a professional 768 page instruction manual for purchase. The final piece count is 4418, just surpassing 75159 Death Star. The completed model measures 70 x 56 x 38cm (wings upright). I have put together a package that includes the 768 page pdf instruction manual, parts list and LDD file. All of it is available for 25 British pounds (£25). If you would like to purchase the plans, please either PM me or contact me at renegadelight@googlemail.com. I will have a public parts list uploaded to rebrickable very soon (for simplicity, red coloured pieces can be anything you like, they are not visible from the exterior). I’m sure everyone appreciates the long hours that went into designing both the physical model and step-by-step build. I had a lot of fun putting this one together and hope others will too! The Rebrickable parts list is now live here. Here is the original thread from February 2017 and the Flickr album. I have revised the attachment between the wings and main body, but not been brave enough to motorise it - I'll leave that to someone else to try! Below are a few excerpts from the manual: Please feel free to use this thread to discuss anything about the model design, building steps, part substitutions, etc.
  8. Hello everybody Does anyone here have the book 'Getting Started with LEGO Trains' by Jacob Mckee from 2003? If so, Would they be able to post a PDF of the instructions and parts list for the reefer boxcar? I've seen pictures of it and would love to build one myself but paying $60 for the book is a no go. Also, if the other instructions were posted this thread could be a good reference for anyone else who would like to build the other models from the book. Thanks in advance
  9. Instructions available here. I'm sure I'm not the only who on one hand appreciated the different direction Lego took with the DD design, but on the other hand found it hard to incorporate seemlessly into an existing town layout, since the architectural style is so distinct. So I set out to rebuild the set in a style more resembling the other modulars. And the result is the Internet Café Corner Modular. I almost gave up halfway through when I realized there wasn't enough bricks to build all the side walls I wanted, but in the end I managed to scrape together enough pieces to build everything I set out to. The first floor contains a couple computers to use for internet access and a small café with free Wi-Fi. The second floor has some living space and the rooftop a small garden.
  10. 8450 The mission was released in 1999, and contains 643 pieces. Although it was originally intended as an expansion set for the cybermaster series, it is mostly listed as a Technic set. Being part of the cybermaster, it is also the biggest set by far in the Competition subtheme. It was 60$ on release, and I ended up paying $300 for mine MISB. I have no idea what it's worth, because it's been such a long time since I saw any for sale. The box The box is of a theme similar to the 8448 and 8458 sets, with silver/grey and yellow colors. The front shows the main model, and the flip-top lid unveils the disc needed to see the instructions, as well as the features of the plane. The weird-looking guy in the upper picture is commander Jack. The boss tells him to get ready for his new, dangerous mission. I'm scared already. It takes me a while to dare to open the box. Once opened, the box has a plastic inlay which holds the disc with instructions. Here you can see all the brochures and various papers included. Maybe this was the reason for the lack of paper instructions. There is a value coupon, a 1999 service catalog with part numbers, a mindstorms booklet which presents all the sets of the year, and TWO sticker sheets. The instructions Well, what can I say. The main reason why I got into Technic was to get away from the computer. Then this happens. Not only are the instructions supplied on a compact disc which can only be run on a win98 machine, they are also with tiny, tiny steps just to make you watch the animated menu. 376(!) steps for the main model, and 195 for the alternate. I figured some people may get frustrated(like me) over this, so I've uploaded the whole instruction set to my Brickshelf folder. Additionally, when I was building this set I found a lot of errors in the instructions, misaligned pieces, wrongly oriented connectors and so forth. Even wrong pieces were rendered. Therefore I had to pay extra attention when building this set. Still, there is a small booklet included which contains axle measures and an introduction to the software. The parts The parts come in nicely numbered bags from 0-10. Once opened, these parts stand out from the rest of the friction pins, beams, axles and bricks: There is a dampened spring included. This is a 1 x 11 link in black. Only seen in this set, it fetches 2$. A lot of Dark Turqoise parts are seen here, and most of them are also featured in the other CyberMaster and ROBOLAB sets. This is a Technic Ball Joint 2 x 7 with 2 Ball Joints, which only comes in this Technic set. It is mostly seen in the Competition range. Tubes and flex axles helps forming the lines of the plane, and the 19L axles seen at the far right are unique to this set. If you're looking to buy some, they come at 15$ a piece. Probably one of the rarest parts availible. Okay, that's it for the parts. Moving on to the build, starting with... A model: The Mission The main model has four sub-assemblies which are combined into a big plane. The build starts with the front canopy, which is not a particularly interesting build. The yellow double pins in the back is for connecting it to the rest of the aircraft later. The Technic slope/wing is stickered with some handrests with controls. The canopy is made with axles and connectors. It has some stickered instrument panel in the roof. Two big panels are used to close up the sides. Now for the main part of the fuselage. The links are used to synchronize the landing gear. The landing gear is powered by a damped spring. Next is the mount for the canopy. You can see where the yellow double pins will fit. A set of 4 16T gears transfers the drive from the spring driven axle and forwards. The yellow thin liftarm with the axle and bush pushes the damped spring so that it expands and turns the two 16T gears.Here is the completed landing gear assembly. The wheels turn against eachother into the hull. The damped spring is nearly invisible when the landing gear is retracted. Some aesthetic details on the main bodyusing flex axles and ribbed hoses improves the models look. The rear wing is made of axle connectors and regular axles. Another part finished. The only thing remaining are the wings. The engine rotates freely in a rack which also supports the wing. The engine is hidden away behind a panel with a sticker showing the fuel intake and other features. The left wing is made the same way. This plane has several attachments; a winch, a drill, a bomb dropper and a claw. The bomb release mechanism works by turning the lever, which returns to its original position with aid of the rubber band. Next is the grab arm, drill and winch. The arm makes extensive use of the bionicle pieces to achieve full freedom of movement in all directions. The claw closes by use of 2 rubber bands. The drill is a worm gear on an axle driven by a knob. The winch is operated by cranking the yellow axle and pin connector, and the rubber band provides stopping power. The last thing to be done is combining all the different chassis parts into the finished plane. The finished model is a beauty! Features Opening canopy, which fits a technic figure. The wings are synchronized with the landing gear. This plane lands like a harrier. The different attachments can be mounted on the front of the plane: Winch Dropping bombs Drill and claw The claw is capable of lifting the 8209 Future F1, weighing 72 grams. Comparison 9394 Jet Plane: 8855 Prop Plane: 8480 Space Shuttle: B model: Chopper The chopper in this set consists of two smaller builds, which are combined near the end similar to the main model. We start with the bottom. An axle with two 3L axle and pin connectors runs through the centre. The landing wheels are placed, and a rubber band provides suspension. The canopy is made of axles and connectors like the main model. Sadly, it does not open. First part of the assembly is complete. The yellow Double pin allows it to be attached to the body later. The rear base starts with the input axle for the main prop. It has a 12T bevel gear on it. Next is the retractable landing gear, driven by a dampened spring. A set of cams pushes the spring so that it expands. Here is a pic of the function. As the axle with the cams pushes the spring away, it expands, turning the 4 16T gears. This assembly extends the prop driveshaft, and adds another connecting point for the canopy. The propeller itself is made of axle connectors and flex axles. Now that the rear part of the model is completed, we can join the two pieces. This is a very odd looking chopper. It has wheels in the front, but the claw in the back prohibits it from rolling. Features Turning either of the yellow knobs rotates the main propeller. Pushing the dampened spring activates the grabbing arm. The arm is very strong, and was able to lift this 8294 Excavator. It weighs about 1 kg. It is minifig compatible, and seats one in the cocpit. When he's tired of flying, he can disconnect the cabin, and drive around the area. The buggy has suspension, but no steering. Comparison 8068 Rescue Helicopter: 8412 Nighthawk: Conclusion As strange as it may look and function, this is my new favourite plane. It's swooshable, even by a kid's standards, and the various attachments makes for a nice selection of playing scenarios. A big bonus is that the landing gear works by a push of a button. The ability to seat a Technic minifig is always nice to see, and the attachments are a nice touch. I know this is suppose to fit in with the Cybermaster sets, but since I don't have any I'll just have to compare this to the other planes I have. I'm a bit puzzled by the bomb dropping feature, since Lego toys are almost never violent, except when it fits the certain theme. From a innovating perspective, the building is also an interesting one, making separate assemblies and combining them in the end. This is fairly common nowadays, but when this set came out, it wasn't. Too bad I can't say the same about the instructions. For the alternate model, it could have been its own set. Diving in and grabbing something with the claw is great fun, especially since it is able to lift something big. Comparing the looks to other Technic planes, this is definately one of the better looking of the bunch. Overall, it stands nicely out in my collection with the black/green/yellow color scheme. The functions aren't all that special, but the tilting rotors are better executed than the 8434 Aircraft. Overall you can say that these two sets are pretty much alike, but this one is better. Get it if you can. You wont regret it. Hope you enjoyed the read. As always, source pics are here. The instructions can also be found there. Look in the "misc" folder, you will find the pics and a PDF for the booklet and one for the instructions.
  11. Finally, an official addition to your Rebel Fleet is here! After over a year of tweaks and specifics, mortesv's CR-90 Corvette is officially ready to be released to the public! The MOC itself contains 2,808 parts, and its manual is 133 pages long. The MOC is built to the same scale as the Nebulon-B, making a perfect addition to a rebel fleet. Lots of interest has been generated for this MOC, and mortesv and I are really glad to make its release to the community! Looking forward to seeing all of the improved fleets as well as those that will begin with this ship. If you would like to build this MOC, we are happy to share it with you in exchange for $30. Included is the pdf instruction manual, an xml part list, LDD files, and any help you need throughout the process of making the MOC. For more information please PM me or contact me at chrdvorak@hotmail.com A rebrickable page will be available soon, but for now the xml part list will be included Here are some pictures of the MOC and of the pdf manual: https://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/139982-moc-ucs-cr-90-corellian-corvette-–-blockade-runner-tantive-iv/
  12. This is my version of the iconic RV from the hit television series Breaking Bad. The Fleetwood Bounder, better known as the RV, was a motorhome that served as a mobile laboratory in which Walter White and Jesse Pinkman cooked methamphetamine. Jesse nicknamed the RV "The Krystal Ship." The model includes detailed interior, and has an opening side door. I created the model in Stud.io and then ordered the pieces to build it in real life :) Hope you like it, contact me if you are interested in gettin' the stud.io file and offer me a beer *minifigs are custom
  13. craigslegostuff

    HOW TO BUILD....A drinking fountain!

    Hi everybody! I've decided to start sharing a few ideas and tips for building some of my own creations - starting with this minifig-scale drinking fountain. Why not have a go?! Uses less than 30 pcs.... https://flic.kr/s/aHsmqDoDnP (click this link, not the pic, for full instruction pics)
  14. TheBuildingBlock

    [MOC] Motorcycle Mania

    I've modified the motorcycle (part 52035), used since 2005, in three different ways - basic, long axle, and reverse trike. Expect an instruction video for the reverse trike to follow.
  15. Finally, an official addition to your Collection is here! After years of requests and tweaks to the model, Cavegod's Sandcrawler is officially ready to be released to the public! The MOC itself contains 12,110 parts, and its manual is 645 pages long. The MOC is built to minifigure scale, and does a job in capturing the sheer size of the vehicle in a way that no Lego set ever has (Or likely will) ever done. Lots of interest has been generated for this MOC, and Cavegod and I are really glad to make its release to the community! Looking forward to seeing all of the improved collections and Tatooine MOCs. If you would like to build this MOC, we are happy to share it with you in exchange for $60. Included is the pdf instruction manual, an xml part list, LDD files, and any help you need throughout the process of making the MOC. For more information please PM me or contact me at chrdvorak@hotmail.com A rebrickable page with a parts list is available here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-13289/cjd_223/cavegod-ucs-sandcrawler Here are some pictures of the MOC and of the pdf manual:
  16. charlesp1138

    [MOC] Winter Village Cafe

    Finally finished this after 18 months of tweaks and fussing around. Due to requests, you can get the building guide/instructions here: http://www.brickmonster.toys
  17. After some tweaks and revisions to the model, Cavegod's First Order Special Forces Tie Fighter is ready to be released to the public! The MOC itself contains 1,691 parts, and its manual is 91 pages long. The MOC is built to match the scale of the UCS Tie Fighter released by The Lego Group in 2015. One of the big changes is that the wing color has been switched from white to Light Bluish Gray to better represent the true color of the wings. In some of the photos attached to this post you will see white wings, those photos are from the original model. It should be noted that this MOC can easily be converted into a standard First Order Tie Fighter by switching the red pieces to black. Lots of interest has been generated for this MOC, and Cavegod and I are really glad to make its release to the community! If you would like to build this MOC, we are happy to share it with you in exchange for $20. Included is the pdf instruction manual, an xml part list, LDD files, and any help you need throughout the process of making the MOC. For more information please PM me or contact me at chrdvorak@hotmail.com A rebrickable page with a parts list will be live soon, and will be posted here: {filler} Here are some pictures of the MOC and of the pdf manual:
  18. Backstory: Ever since I emerged from my dark age I was mesmerized by Designer Han’s models – especially dragline excavator. I like all kind of excavators so I was slowly gathering pieces for it to buy instructions and build it. I have realized over the time that building from instructions is not entertaining for me and that I can build almost anything if I have the drive (and parts). I still admire Han’s models, but I know that I would be disappointed because of his design choices. Don’t get me wrong – I still like his work, but I don’t want to build it anymore. Long story short – I wanted my own dragline excavator with truck transport. Preparations: First of all I had to pick a reference machine, in this case Sennebogen HD 670 tracked crane. Why this one? Sennebogen because it is not very known and because of this fantastic die cast model: http://www.cranesetc.co.uk/library/rosreviews/203/203review.htm . Such models are very good because you can see the machine from a lot of angles and you can replicate small details from them more easily. The model is however 690HD and I have picked smaller 70 ton 670HD. This is because of whole concept with transport truck. The scale is dictated by wheels, in this case by wheels on truck and wheels on excavator as well. Since TLG is making only two wheels for tracked vehicles it is simple choice. With bigger tracked wheels the scale is 21,5:1, meaning that 49,5mm tires for truck are perfect fit. 690HD with the same wheels would be closer to 23:1 and we do not have truck wheels for this scale. Features: Undercarriage Real crawlers have either retractable tracks or dismount them completely when transported. In order to achieve that I had to place all motors to superstructure and use single battery box. As you can see from datasheet, the tracks can be retracted so they are not wider than body. To replicate it I have built it in such way that both tracks are very easily detachable from central piece that can be swapped for narrow one. Replacing this central piece doesn’t take more than few minutes, it is only necessary to take apart two liftarms on each side as seen in the picture. Another stud or two narrower tracks would be probably better, but I would certainly lose the ability to swap it easily. All four wheels are driven by two shafts from superstructure connected to M motors; final ratio is 9,265:1. Wide track Narrow track IMGP5236 Superstructure The superstructure holds six motors (4x M-motor and 2x L-motor) – two M motors are for tracks, 1x M motor is for slewing via worm gear on turntable (56:1) and rest are for winches. Slewing gave me quite a headache because of the desired gear ratio. The real machine can rotate up to 4 revolutions per minute so I wanted to replicate that. In the end the only viable solution was to use older turntable driven by worn gear without further gear reductions. I use train PF remote to start and stop smoothly. The usage of older turntable meant I had to shorten boom because of its less stability as it bends significantly more than new type. The A frame is fixed – the boom is raised by pulling floating pulleys with attached ropes. Bigger machines uses movable A frame where the angle between A frame and boom is fixed. The A frame can be folded down when the crawler is transported. A frame is Pythagorean triplet with beams length 29-21-20. There are 3 winches for boom raising, bucket lifting and bucket drag. All three are equally geared 5:1. Counterweight is detachable as on real machine, it of course holds standard Technic battery box. Cabin features opening doors and foldable walkway. IMGP5220 IMGP5222 Ready for work side by side Boom Booms on real machines are made out of several truss elements bolted together. There is usually lower boom section that stays on crawler when transported, then are intermediate sections in various lengths (2,9m, 5,7, and 11,2m) and then headpiece section. I wanted to replicate this kind of boom so I focused on correct shape of each section and size as well. This mean that the lower boom section is pyramid-shape: 5x1 studs wide at crawler side and 9x9 studs at opposite end. I guess not all connections on it are TLG legal, but everything fits nicely without any stress and thanks to it truss-like constructions it is very sturdy. The same principle follows at intermediate section, in my case the shortest one (2920 mm => 17 studs). Boom ends with headpiece that is quite similar to lower section but ends with two pulleys. They are of course not real pulleys as TLG doesn’t make anything free-spinning in that size but size was more important to me. The drawback of such modular boom is its weight; it is almost double the weight of boom that would be built in one piece so I had to stay low with total length. There are also two pulleys serving as fairlead so the rope dragging the bucket goes to winch from top, the fairlead pulleys are mounted on lever so they stay in same position regardless of boom angle. Headpiece side comparsion boom Bucket It is brick-build and its size is only guessed from pictures and its volume, I was unable to find any datasheets with buckets. Bucket Greebling, look and difficulties As usually I pay a lot of attention to greebling like railings, mirrors, cabin shape, lights and other small details. I really had fun with this model as it is quite packed with it. The biggest obstacle during the build was constant lack of parts. Together with truck and low-loader it is reaching 4000 pieces and I was even running low on both 2l and 3l pins once. I had selected yellow color at the start, green would be certainly better for Sennebogen, but I already had some yellow parts and green technic is very expensive. Beside that I have seen pictures of Sennebogen machines in various colors like yellow, red and blue, so I think it is fine. The whole internal build is very symmetric; the only asymmetric is gearing on left side for slewing and gearing on right for drag winch. IMGP5223 Playability Honestly, playability sucks. There is one important feature of real dragline omitted – free fall winches. Without it you can place bucket too close and drag it only few centimeters. Grabbing anything with the bucket is also very difficult. Drive and slew works very well though. Truck The truck is very loosely based on this real counterpart: http://www.ditzj.de/html/en/trucks/scania/wiesbr500.html i.e. 8x4 tractor with short wheelbase, 2 steered axles, high cabin and tower behind it. It is driven by L-motor and servo is used for steering. Both steerable axles use the same configuration like in my previous truck – 5l steering arms and hubs with 3 ball joints. There is of course Ackermann steering and different angle on both axles. Rear axles are connected to fake V6 engine. Cabin features two seats, IR receiver between them and steering wheel. Whole cabin can tilt to reveal engine. Gear ratio from L motor is 7:1 because it is meant to haul quite a lot of weight. The truck can be easily modified to low cabin version as the high roof is only held by four pins. The tower is too high then so it is replaced with bare battery box. The whole truck is quite heavy on front and it have sometimes trouble with driving when it is without load so it is possible to add ballast box on its fifth wheel. There is also coupling for draw ball trailer, but it is not meant for pulling. I think the most difficult part of design was not to copy my previous truck. The cabin is still quite similar, I’m aware of that, but in the end I’m happy with other small details that makes it different – flags on front, mud flaps, detachable roof, etc. IMGP5248 IMGP5249 Working fake engine Low cabin Ballast box Low-loader Low loader with detachable gooseneck is based on Motomat’s trailer because in the end you realize there is only one viable way how to build it – two technic beams with plates between. A little challenge was how to mount wheels without using single axle for both sides. The frame between wheels can be only 4 studs wide meaning the axle can be supported by 2 studs. I have used 8L axle with stop supported by thin liftarms. In the end the wheels are supported enough, they can rotate freely and you can take them apart without axle. IMGP5260 Lowloader with detachable gooseneck Instructions I have made instructions for dragline and truck as well. Lowloader will follow soon. Both will appear on Rebrickable soon, I will add link here later. Due to amount of work it took I will sell instructions for dragline for 10€ and truck for 5€. Lowloader will be free as it is not something trully mine. Both instructions are as usually PDF generated by LPub3D. Especially the dragline is compressed into as few steps as possible, with only 115 pages (~2400 parts), so if you don't like TLG instructions for beeing too easy this might be something for you. Dragline rebrickable link: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-17193/Ivan_M/dragline-excavator/#parts Video & gallery Whole gallery is here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskDJiTT8 And one crappy video for end:
  19. Book Review (Review by Thorsten Benter) Almost a year has passed since initial publication of this book. There are a number of on-line reviews available – this one on EB seems to come in a bit late. Well, I don’t think so, in contrast. This book is a comprehensive how-to-build-a-train resource rather than a compilation of what is out there. And this sets the book aside from so many others. It will be up-to-date as long as The LEGO Company produces bricks and sets. Plus, with the arrival of the Powered Up system, more space becomes available inside the train body as compared to comparable PF functionality: The dedicated receiver becomes obsolete and no line of sight is required for communication creating some additional space – space for sophisticated building techniques! This books tells you everything you need to know about the historical LEGO train theme development at TLG, about scales and widths, about pivot points, microstriping, SNOTing and offsetting, and so much more with relevance to train building! (Note: A PDF copy of this review with higher resolution pictures will be shortly available at Holger’s website) Summary: A must-have for every LEGO train fan, for people entertaining the idea of getting into LEGO trains, and for people who still don’t know that they will become train fans after reading the book Superb photography of LEGO models, outstanding renders of CAD models In-depth analysis and assessment of the different LEGO train eras Demonstration and teaching of advanced building and design skills My personal LEGO book score: 10/10 About the book: Author: Holger Matthes Published: Oct. 2017 by No Starch Press Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA. Hardcover, 135 pages + 90(+) pages reserved for 4 full building instructions (ICE train, gondola car, Swiss Crocodile, and a vintage passenger coach), 150+ most relevant and educational figures (excluding the beautiful chapter openers or page breakers as well as the set building instructions), 20+ tables including bulleted lists. ISBN: 1-59327-819-5 Price: € 14 (Kindle edition, Amazon); € 23 (Print edition, Amazon) both as of 9-2018. $ 19 (ebook only), $ 25 (ebook and print edition, nostarch.com) both as of 9-2018. The present English edition published by No Starch Press is based on the initial German edition “LEGO Eisenbahn – Konzepte und Techniken für realistische Modelle”, which was originally published by dpunkt Verlag Heidelberg, ISBN: 978-3-86490-355-7. The initial German edition of the book based on Holger’s manuscript composed in 2015/16 caught the attention of foreign publishers: It began with the present English edition in 2017. It then took a bit longer until the Chinese publisher “Posts & Telecom Press” (who has already published a bunch of LEGO books written by fans) very recently released the Chinese version: http://www.ptpress.com.cn/shopping/buy?bookId=0ed0cd68-ca59-41fc-9bf9-193b06089996 (ISBN: 978-7-115-48419-2): After publication in 2017, No Starch Press’ English version became the reference for further translations. In summer 2018, the Spanish (“LEGO TRENES”; LEGO TRENES https://www.amazon.es/TRENES-Libros-Singulares-Holger-Matthes/dp/8441540179) and the Italian (“TRENI LEGO”; https://www.amazon.it/Treni-Lego-colori-Holger-Matthes/dp/8868956411) editions became available. And the Russian version is on its way (sorry, Holger couldn’t tell me any further information about its availability): (Note that the Russian cover on the right is purely made up by me – Google translator says the Cyrillic headline reads “in preparation” – but who knows …) About the author Holger Matthes is a hobbyist who has been building with LEGO since 2000. He was involved in the creation of various official LEGO projects such as the Hobby Train set #10183 and frequently presents his models and gives workshops at LEGO exhibitions worldwide [copied from Amazon website]. Table of content of the book (short version) Part 1: Overview and history Introduction A history of LEGO trains Part 2: Building your own train models (My own creations – MOCs) Basic principles Designing your own models Case studies in design Part 3: Building instructions A note on the included building instructions Appended to the body of the book, you’ll find four high quality and carefully composed instructions in addition to two free online instructions: Inter-City Express (ICE; driving and trailer cars, PF motorization, windshield designs) Gondola car Swiss electric Be 6/6 “Crocodile” Vintage passenger car Steam Engine BR 10 (as bonus online available at http://holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/br10.php) Steam Engine BR 80 (as bonus online available at http://holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/br80.php) There is further information available online. Holger directs you to https://www.nostarch.com/legotrains; but most of the very valuable stuff is actually hosted on his website. I highly recommend to visit his site: http://www.holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/index.php. You will find a wealth of background information, tips&tricks, how-to, and much more. The Book Let’s face it: Almost one year after initial publication, Holger still sets the stage with this book for LEGO train fans. It will be tough to get it much further; not on 135 pages (not counting the instructions pages), not with regard to the topics covered, not with regard to the width of the audience addressed. This book provides diverse perspectives on the art of building LEGO trains, coaches, and rolling stock – and is at the same time always determined, focused, and addresses most relevant “issues”. Train builders repeatedly face tough challenges: A train is not a building, which simply resides in all its beauty; rather trains are work horses – either hauling heavy cargo loads or endless passenger coaches, or switching rolling stock for hours and hours in a train show – or on your personal layout. At the same time, a LEGO train is “beautiful” and “esthetic” in the recognition of a train fan - as a building is for City fans. However, to be able to render real trains into LEGO models, regardless on the scale used, requires some serious knowledge about the myriads of LEGO bricks available, about advanced building techniques, and even electrical wiring skills. There simply isn’t much space in a LEGO train. Space as in “Space … is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.” [Douglas Adams, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, 1979]. It is usually >extremely< packed inside a LEGO train model, particularly when electrifying it. Shaping the outer appearance with advanced building methods such as SNOT or angled and carefully secured pieces usually eats up all the space inside the hull. And lastly: Trains need to be sturdy. They not only haul heavy loads – they also have to run endless distances on track – in the best case on long stretches of straight track and smooth curves, here and there a bit bumpy – in the worst case negotiating endless and sharply bent curves and switch points in complex rail yards. This is exactly what Holger addresses in his book: How to achieve a sturdy, reliable, and at the same time esthetic and beautiful train. And we should just get it straight from the very beginning: Stickers are frequently recognized as the “icing on the cake”. And this is certainly true. BUT: Believe it or not, you can also legally “build” tiny lines, sloped coloring, narrowly split windows and much more when using advanced building techniques! And that sets aside this book from so many postings, building instructions, and other resources: Holger shows us how to accomplish “brick-built stickering” by using the endless variety of bricks and plates to build streamlined and nicely accentuated and smooth surfaces – rather than using the bulky, essentially non-LEGO-philosophy-but-by-TLG-released ICE #55768 nose with stickers attached all over it … There is so much more in the book. This is what I am trying to highlight in the following. Holger’s book is a must for us all: Beginners, advanced builders, as well as Train Tech gurus! And those who believe that they already are. One more thing to add: Photography and CAD image rendering. Or: A picture is worth a thousand words. Holger says: “The biggest thank you goes out to my old friend and master photographer Andy Bahler, without whose pictures this book would have been useless. His commitment, night after night, was above and beyond expectation …” The pictures are spectacular – you will notice right away. Organization of the book There are three parts in this book, although there is no such explicit assignment in the table of contents. Holger tells us on page 2 though: “The first part of the book gives an overview of LEGO trains over the different eras, covers some history, and answers questions about how to combine old LEGO trains from the attic with today’s kits. The second part of the book is about building your own LEGO train models, also known as My Own Creations (MOCs). Using my many years of experience building LEGO models, I’ll show you how to create proper train models, covering both the possibilities and the limitations. Finally, the book ends with step-by-step building instructions for several models.” Usually, the table of content is a good starting point for the organization analysis. However, this book is extremely focused and self-contained in each of the chapters of the three parts. This is very helpful (and also very different from other books), as the LEGO universe, including train worlds, is as diverse as it possibly gets. The number of pieces alone currently available through TLC’s official channels such as LEGO sets, PaB, and LEGO stores – or even more so – through the uncountable BrickLink stores around the globe is truly mind-boggling. Well, it is not only the sheer number, but more so the endless combinations possible – and what you achieve with such. Chances are: One gets rapidly lost and a little frustrated. Exactly this is NOT happening when “reading” this book. OK. We do it differently – as it seems appropriate for a “different” book: We walk through, as the very nice and focused organization of the book simply allows that. Part 1 “INTRODUCTION Decades ago, the toy designers at LEGO likely never imagined how durable their work would be. Today, parents can dust off their childhood LEGO trains and play together with their children who have just received their first brand-new LEGO train set. And fans of all ages can revive older sets and parts to create entirely new models.” In order to prevent such an almost natural “disorientation” or lost in parts and ways to connect them, in part one the book begins with a review of on-line resources. Information-, instruction-, and brick-availability-wise. Holger lists only the most relevant internet locations. Start here and progress further on your own. It makes your building life so much easier. As with every printed book, online references may become outdated at some point in time. Holger names thus only most reliable web portals, which will most probably exist for a long time. “A HISTORY OF LEGO TRAINS Let’s explore the evolution of the LEGO train systems from the earliest set to the present.” Next, there is a historical review of which type of train system was available at what time defining an era. This is rather significant. First of all, this approach results in a theme classification rather than a temporal evolution of sets: The blue, grey, 9V, RC, and PF era. As the pieces from different areas are naturally largely interchangeable (otherwise it would not be LEGO!), you may mix them as you see fit. Nevertheless, each era has a certain typical appearance – if you want to capture that, you need to know what was going on during that particular era. As an example, people in love with the grey (12 V) era often capture the look and feel of that time – for example studs everywhere, not many curved bricks/diverse slopes (as they were not available at that time) – rather limited colors schemes, black, red, and yellow ... The reader learns what has been produced when and in what color scheme. There is also ample of information on the technical features of each era – it appears as if the author is deeply involved and well connected in the LEGO train community – all the way up to participate in the design of selected sets. Holger shares his knowledge with the reader – always in a concise and focused way. It is pointed out that Holger is not even attempting to compile a complete list of sets available within the different eras – in contrast, he is summarizing the unique era characteristics and features. He focuses on power sources, tracks (including switches and crossings), and other elements (wheels, baseplates, in addition to unique features, such as trucks, couplings and buffers). The grey (12 V) era sections stands out of course, as this was the most diverse and most creative train theme ever (IMHO, of course!). Here you will find an – again unique – compilation of “remote-controlled accessories”, “windows and doors”, “light bricks”, “weighted bricks” … What I personally find extremely useful – and it must have been a considerable effort – is i) a summary table, listing the most important features of each era, and ii) Holger’s evaluation of these features he headlines as “Seen from today’s perspective”. Even long-time and experienced train enthusiasts will surely find valuable information in this chapter! Part 2 “BASIC PRINCIPLES Let’s dive into the world of LEGO elements and explore the endless ways to connect them.” Now that one knows the individual features of the different eras, Holger opens part two of the book with a compilation of relevant LEGO pieces for train building. It is really surprising how many there are! I have built trains myself – seeing all the various elements nicely grouped and organized makes it so much easier to get an overview of individual pieces, select the ones you may want to try out – and compare them to other options. This section is extremely helpful when you start off with a new model – or when you want to overhaul an already existing train. In the following section, Holger introduces typical train specific building techniques (although you can use many of them throughout the entire LEGO universe!). And is not surprising that there are eleven dedicated pages on SNOTing and fractional-plate offsetting in all three dimensions. These are the most crucial techniques when shaping the look of a train. SNOT (studs not on top) is a powerful technique and has become very popular among train fans. Originally rather restricted to a few elements, which allowed to “reverse” the building order, the LEGO Company has released a broad variety of SNOT elements over time. These are of course also shown in the preceding chapter on relevant LEGO train pieces. I’d say that this chapter is extremely important for beginners and of great interest to experts as there are various approaches shown side-by-side. At least for me this chapter is highly inspiring. The same is true for plate offsetting, i.e., building with only one half stud or even less displacement off the stud grid. First, the look of a train becomes much smoother even when not using curved bricks; secondly, this technique allows you to literally “build” colored surfaces with fine structures and even thin stripes (called microstriping). Without using stickers that is … Ever used minifig guns to create pantographs? Or ice skates as door handles? No? Well – Holger shows you! “DESIGNING YOUR OWN MODELS You might be wondering if you’re ready to begin making your own models. Which train should you build? Maybe you should start with the commuter train that takes you to work every day, or a freight train? And who hasn’t dreamed of a beautiful steam engine in LEGO?” Now we are getting down to business. The following two chapters of part 2 are not about “building a train” – they are about “how to do it right”. We are talking about scaling and modeling rather than “pushing along”. Before Holger goes into details though, he points out the importance of thoroughly choosing a scale. This is an extremely important decision to be made when attempting to model a real-world train. How much detailing is required? How much abstraction is allowed? Citing Holger again (page 73): “Building a recognizable model isn’t about scaling every part exactly, although proportion matters. Intentionally omitting some details or exaggerating others is usually necessary. Scale modeling with LEGO is a bit like drawing a caricature: the end result may not be an exact likeness, but it is recognizable and undeniable.” We learn about model scales (1, L, O, HO …), alternative approaches (scaling by wheel size) as well as choosing a model width (6-, 7-, 8-stud-wide). Don’t mix these up – almost any scale may be used for any track width! There are so many diverse examples here on EB. Holger narrows the scope of widths covered in his book to 6 - 8 stud wide (see cover page of the book), as these are the widths most builders choose – in addition to the official 6-wide LEGO models. He discusses the advantages and downsides of each of these widths in detail. A very important aspect when designing and building a LEGO train – regardless of the model scale – is the official LEGO track geometry. Maximum distances of fixed axles, alleviation of this rather restricted distance using articulated single trucks (a theme repeatedly discussed here on EB), sliding middle axles in three axle trucks – you will find all the answers in this book. When it comes to attaching cars to each other – even more design aspects have to be considered, which are all discussed: Pivot points vs car distance, additional pivot points to reduce car distance, the effect of pivot points on design issues, to name a few. And then: Steam engine design: 7 full pages! As far as I am concerned, steam engines are the most challenging models to render in LEGO. To say it with Anthony Sava’s words: “I'd buy a set with a steam engine in it, but I have little interest in buying a box on wheels.” (EB Forum, April 2nd 2018). Holger shows us all the challenges and caveats. The remaining sections in this chapter are: Power and Control, discussing mostly the implementation of PF elements, Modeling Details, and Track Design and Layout. Again, extremely valuable information and guides are given. One comment on third party suppliers: At the time of writing this book, both SBrick controllers (as a replacement for PF receivers, featuring wireless Bluetooth connectivity) as well as ME Models (as a supplier of wider radii curves) were actively present on the market. As of now (i.e., August 2018) though, the new LEGO Powered Up system introduced lately makes SBricks for trains almost obsolete – and Me Models have gone out of business some time ago. There are a good number of very good 3rd party alternatives for additional track pieces – large curve radii, complex switch point geometries to name only a few. They come as superb injection molded pieces which are almost indistinguishable from original LEGO track, as well as 3D printed varieties. I believe that a book of the format Holger has chosen simply does have to deal in-depth with such developments as they are much more volatile than almost any LEGO product. Taking aside the LEGO RC interim solution of course. But again, Holger gives a full account of why RC happened at all and why its lifetime was even shorter than that of many 3rd party small businesses. I really enjoyed this section very much. Regarding very recent developments by TLG naturally not covered in the book (the original German manuscript was written in 2015/16): The introduction of the Powered Up system leaves much more space within a train engine so that all the building tips and tricks provided in Holger’s book become even more intriguing! It appears as we can even more freely combine advanced power/remote control options with the present advanced building instructions. Which makes this book even more valuable! “CASE STUDIES IN DESIGN Armed with the tools and knowledge about LEGO modeling covered in the previous chapters, we’ll now take a closer look at the actual design process using some of my own builds as a guide.” This chapter needs to be explored – interpreted – by yourself. This is – as far as I am concerned – the heart of the book. Here you will learn how to begin designing a model. I find this part the most difficult: How to begin – looking at the all the bricks, plates, slopes, clips, there are so many of them … so we should take this to our heart: “Designing a model is a creative and personal process: there’s no right or wrong way to build a successful model. The guidelines in this section are meant to get you started. You’ll certainly develop your own strategies along the way.” Along with: Decide on a scale and choose the width: 6-, 7-, or 8-wide? Decide how the train will be powered and what type of track it’ll run on. Choose a target audience: should it be a realistic, recognizable model, or are play functions more important? You will notice: This is about >you<! Nevertheless, you will also learn a lot in this chapter. Holger has chosen a regional express train (Bombardier double deck train), a powerful electric locomotive (Siemens Vectron engine), and a (well, Holger is German after all …) steam engine (BR 10) as case studies. This is a very clever selection – as the techniques he shows apply to almost every engine I am aware of – including American diesels as well as American steamers … or all the various European trains, Emanuele (EB member LT12V) is currently presenting here on EB … And finally … Part 3 “BUILDING INSTRUCTIONS! Get inspired with these step-by-step instructions for building an Inter-City Express, a simple gondola, a Swiss Electric Locomotive Be 6/8 “Crocodile,” a vintage passenger car, and a steam engine.” From page 136 to 227 you will find first class, high(est)-quality building instructions for the above referenced models. There is nothing more to add. As said: This book is a must … Play Well! @Jim Thank you very much Jim for giving me the opportunity of writing this review for EB - it was a great pleasure. And for sending me this wonderful book! @HoMa Thank you Holger for writing this book. And for all the additional information you gave me when writing this review and for your comments! Thanks for reading, Thorsten
  20. All, After more then 2 year without working on a new Technic MOC I am now ready to present my new project: A classic roadster based on a Jaguar XK120. I managed to built it in white and separate the frame and the bodywork completety. Due to this there is also a frame version with full RC. It can be build in red and black as well without major adaptations. More pictures, video and instructions to follow.... Rebrickable instructions: https://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-10690/martijnnab/classic-jaguar-roadster/#comments Blog from The Lego Car Blog: https://thelegocarblog.com/2017/11/02/it-doesnt-matter-if-youre-black-or-white-2/ Blog from The Brothers-brick: https://www.brothers-brick.com/2017/11/09/jaguar-roadsters-technical-challenge/
  21. Thirdwigg

    [MOC] Unimog 437

    I guess you could say I couldn't make up my mind about the kind of Unimog I wanted to make next. So I decided to make a platform that would support multiple versions. Features: Interchangeable platform Long and short wheelbase options Standard and Doka cabs, removable Manual control PF control (drop in) Front and rear suspension Steering 4x4 with I-4 fake motor Opening doors and hood Tipper bed options Feel free to check out thirdwigg.com to learn more about the build. Manual SWB with tipper bed. Manual LWB Doka with tipper bed. Power Functions (XL drive, Servo steering) LWB with cover. Manual LWB with canvas bed showing the suspension travel. You can find more pictures on my flickr. I have been adding instructions for the various versions here, and more will be added over the coming weeks. Someday I'll make a camper, because, everyone needs a camper. This was a fun project, and I loved the way it turned out. I have the LWB on my desk right now, and I keep getting distracted from work. I hope to add additional options for the system at some point, and will take other suggestions for versions to add. Hope you enjoy.
  22. Yet another LEGO TIE Fighter. How far can this classic design be pushed? How many ways are there to build an eye sandwitched by hexagonal solar panels? Is there a perfect design already? This is where beauty of LEGO as form of modelling strikes with full power, as answers to these questions are: Very far, infinite ways, and no, there is no perfect design available and never will be. In 2014 I have built this: It worked, and I think for 2014 and what was available back then, it was pretty good. It had obvious flaw though: no space for a minifigure, and it was also a little too small in scale. I was limited mostly by the fact there were no proper cockpit pieces, and my attempt with literally the only other one was... not spectacular, not to mention it needed painting with A LOT patience required. The new model takes advantage of this cockpit piece, which allowed me to push that original 2014 design further. I know, I am late to the party, years - literally - behind other designers of great TIE models, like Bricks Feeder or Rebel Builder, yet I hope I can bring something new into the T/F building scene. Originally I thought I would just stretch the build here and there but no, heheh, no way. Literally the only unchanged parts are the eight quarter (or one-eighter?) dome pieces, which are to me still the only way to have smooth and roughly spherical design without holes all around. Unfortunately when we look at a closeup of a real movie-filming model of the T/F we see how far are we from true modelling but I say we're collectively inching towards it pretty nicely. I have said this plenty of times but original designers of TIE Fighters really did all they could to make them unbuildable properly, naturally unknowingly - who would think adult guys 30 years in the future would try to recreate the design using perhaps the weirdest medium available?. The T/F is just a sphere, two struts and two flat hexes. Except: 6-diameter central cokcpit piece would require a 9-diameter ball, minifig-scaled TIE would require an 8-diameter ball and don't even get me started on sources for TIEs dimensions. If you think that Illustrated Guide To Star Wars vehicles is helpful, well, not much. I dare to say this book did awfully lot of harm to LEGO Star Wars MOCing scene. So is my TIE perfect? No, not yet. I promise though, I did all I could to make it as good as possible, with no compromises made. And this time it houses a minifig! The design is super sturdy to my standards, nicely swooshable - for a reason, but I will get to that later. Naturally having a T/F built opens a way towards the Interceptor, which for me is among the best looking spaceship designs in any sci-fi. While the core design is similar, the ball has some differences, mostly to accomodate longer struts. This is because LEGO curiously didn't develop 2x9 plates and for once I was in a situation where I can't really replace 2x9 plate with anything without compromising structural integrity. Having that solved I went onto the wing design and OH GOD INTERNET WHAT HAVE YOU DONE. If anyone knows angle on the panels and can prove it, gets a free beer. With shipping. Because the wings are angled in all dimensions, good luck guessing proper values from photos. Because of the IGTSWV book, half of the models (and I don't even mean LEGO models) existing are wrong. And then because of SW animated series, the other half of the models are also wrong... ...so my source of reference was this: Then after having all that done, I experienced another unexpected problem: The ship is top-heavy and won't stand straight. I added tiny legs on the bottom edges of wings which help a bit, and because the design is quite sturdy, the T/I requires no stand. There you have it. Yet another T/F and T/I. I hope you like the designs and I hope I managed to introduce something new to the very competitive scene. Enjoy! ...but wait, there is more! I would not build these models if not a commission request from BrickVault: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrhb3SP2lZBgguLHIWWuHOQ Originally it was meant to be just a few TIE models based on the 2014 design I had, just LDD files, but over time we developed a much more interesting designs and... instructions for each of them! The instructions are paid and please understand, it took weeks to develop them, error-proof, make the experience enjoyable and builds sturdy enough to be handled easily. Normally I do not make instructions, as I prefer to build with real bricks than to do electronic designs. The instructions are designed to have dozens of simple to follow steps with just few pieces per step, have submodels where needed, parts list for each step and a total bill of parts at the beginning. Additionally, in few places, there are notes to watch out for some particular details. I can fully understand now what LEGO designers go through and I can imagine amount of effort required for making instructions for larger and more complicated designs. I am pretty sure it took more time to design instructions for the recent UCS Millennium Falcon than to design the model itself. Thanks for watching and Happy New Year!
  23. Hey guys, I’m searching MOC instructions and LDD files for my near-future huge Lego city. I plan of course doing some MOC modulars but there are some very nice MOCs created by other people! I made a list of all the designers I found, I hope that list helps some other people who search modular instructions! Here are the MOCers with instructions that are definitely worth looking at (with no particular order): —Brick Ative (by @lookl and @Pakita) ebay Rebrickable —SteBrick (by @stef2280) Bricklink Stebrick Rebrickable —Snaillad (instructions on sale by @2013-lego) (by @snaillad) ebay Rebrickable —Sheo (by @sheo) Rebrickable —peedeejay (by @peedeejay) ebay Rebrickable —bricksandtiles (by @Giacinto Consiglio) ebay Rebrickable —Kristel (by @Kristel) Rebrickable —brickcitydepot (by @brickcitydepot) brickcitydepot ebay Amazon no starch press Barnes and Noble —Ryan Taggart (by @ryantaggart) snakebyte.dk LDD File of Construction Site –geo.gr (by @Gunman) ebay —BrickToyCo (by @Tobysan) BrickToyCo —hermez (by @hermez) Rebrickable —mestari (by @Mestari) Rebrickable —Huaojozu (by @Huaojozu) Rebrickable —2013-lego (by @2013-lego) (his own designed modulars) ebay Rebrickable —Duncaadkin0 (by @Dakar A) ebay —BrickBuildersPro (by @lgorlando) BrickBuildersPro ebay Amazon —The Brick Show Shop The Brick Show ebay —andrepsramos ebay TISMSTORE Rebrickable –Brickstruct Bricklink Brickstruct —10214 Alternative Build (by Garom) Rebrickable —The Magic House (by valgarise) Smart Bricks —Bob's Burgers (by jtam1608) ebay —Villa Maison (by @marcosbessa) (found the LDD file on LDD gallery as it’s no longer available in his own website): LDD File —Train Station (by @LegoWolf) (link to download the LDD file is on his Flickr): LDD File Here are some other ones (those which doesn't really interest me but I'm sure that will interest many others): —SkywardBrick Rebrickable —TheUniqueBrick TheUniqueBrick Rebrickable ebay —A *Deal* 4 U (by waltzking) Bricklink —Bricker and Co Bricker and Co ebay —Bjor Schoute ebay —sabriyo Sabriyo Customs ebay —Bauanleitungenmartin ebay —Berth Rebrickable —Soar Brick soarbrick ebay —gryffindorcommonroom ebay —scottcdavid ebay —sodabilly ebay —bolbuyk Rebrickable —deconstructor1 ebay —jval (Need for Brick) Bricklink Rebrickable —Fully Brick Models Bricklink —Brick Vice Bricklink Rebrickable —BrickusMaximus Bricklink —SonicSunday Rebrickable —Brickalive Rebrickable BlocK Shop —custombricks.de CUSTOMBRICKS Rebrickable —The Royal Church (by ateameric) Rebrickable —Alternative for Town Bridge (by Albertovax Corner) Bricklink —Bowling Alley (by drtyksh) ebay —Book Store (by Lair of Maedhros) Bricklink So that’s all I found. Maybe you wonder “why he’s asking for new instructions, he already found enough!” I ask it because I’m just purchasing/will just purchase the instructions in the categorie “must-have” . In LDD gallery, there are some interesting MOCs, you can download them too. I hope that list helps some people and some people helps me by recommending/finding more modular instructions/LDD files Cheers!
  24. So far, only ONE AFOL has given me the right answer :-) Hi everybody, This one is a real challenge! After the quiz N2 that we had as warm-up, here we are with a harder quiz. I am really curious to know if anybody knows or can find the answer of this one. I would consider a prize for the winner(s). If you are sure you know the answer, please "DO NOT SPOIL", but only pm me. But if you have any guess together with some reasons for your guess, you are very welcome to comment under this post so that we can discuss about it and who knows, maybe we get multiple responses. Here is the question: WHICH INSTRUCTIONS have MORE THAN ONE VERSION? The sets in question are 7710, 7715, 7720, 7722, 7725, 7727, 7730, 7735, 7740, 7745, 7750, 7755, 7760. I believe you cannot find the answer by googling (I couldn't). Good luck :-)
  25. I have seen two variations of instructions 7860: 1) For the second release 1982-87, the code of instruction is 113483 ©1981. In the instructions, we can see this variation of "Straight Conducting Rail with Rail Interruption" 3242apb01: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=3242apb01&idColor=9#T=S&C=9&O={"color":9,"iconly":0} 2) For the third release 1988-94, it is 120622 ©1981 in which we can see this variation of "Straight Conducting Rail with Rail Interruption" 3242bpb01: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=3242bpb01#T=S&C=9&O={"color":9,"iconly":0} 3) What about the first release 1980-81? Is there any instructions for it (do you have it?) in which we can see "Straight Conducting Rail with Rail Interruption" 3242a: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=3242a&idColor=9