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Found 123 results

  1. Hi All, title is already self explanatory. I know that it is possible to connect powered up motors to a buwizz using dedicated adapters. What about controlling a powered up servo with buwizz? Is that possible? I did I quick search but did not find anything so specific. Thanks.
  2. Recently we have seen quite a few PF Controllers popping up. Some more interesting than others. This project was launched on Kickstarter today and I think it's worth sharing. Since we are not fond of people promoting their Kickstarter or LEGO Ideas on Eurobricks, I have taken the liberty to promote this project myself. Kickstarter description A compact, high performance remote control system for LEGO® models. With embedded battery, precise servo control and huge power. Technical information BuWizz is a four channel high performance controller for LEGO® Power Functions, with embedded battery and a Micro-USB charging port. Paired over Bluetooth with smartphone or tablet, BuWizz is compact yet powerful. BuWizz: has 4 channels can be charged with any Micro-USB charger - even with a powerbank while you drive your model.- has several speed modes: in fast mode, the motors receive 2x more power than other solutions with LEGO batteries - enables great speed or better obstacle climbing - in slow mode, the PF servo motor can move very slow - for realistic motion of railway crossing gates, convertible roof, etc. can drive 2 XL motors on each channel in high speed mode- delivers 8 times more power (4 channels combined) than any solution with LEGO battery- is compact: 8x4x3 bricks size, 2x IR receivers footprint replaces battery box + 2x IR receivers can be embedded deep into your model - all you need is access to Micro-USB charging port powerful enough for large models, yet small enough to build a very compact model Dimensions It has the same dimensions as the rechargeable battery, which is quite convenient. Controls Example implementations Kickstarter Check out the project on Kickstarter Reviews Sariel has received a copy and he is quite enthusiastic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdPduWEk7H4 I will receive a copy soon, after which I will share my thoughts.
  3. Then I realized, that this chassis behaves really well, and started thinking about it as about my new Overland Expedition (or Kostky Trophy) truck. (later I got reminded, that buggy motor is quite hungry, so it can not be used in this kind of event. But, with bigger battery... Have to try.) So, next step was the body. You can see that I experimented with new tire-rim combo. Too heavy, but not bad. And then I finally bought Buwizz. Laziness and worries about custom RC recievers and batteries won. (hope that not for all times :D) I also installed LEDs to the truck. And bought new tires. And finally, last week I took it outside. Hope you like it. :) More upgrades are slowly on the way. ;)
  4. Here is my take on the motorization of the 42110. Basically the whole model was lifted to accomodate the bigger wheel, motors and BuWizzes. Model is powered by a total of 8 motors, 4L motors for RWD, 2L motors for FWD, one servo and one M motor. Total gear ratio is 1:3. It uses custom portal hubs in the front which have a pivot even closer than normal ones thanks to the new rims. Rear uses normal hubs and wheels, since they are sturdier. Axles use the original suspension's upper arms as mounting points along with a pair of 9L links for each axle. The original gearbox is connected to the rear drive, so it works normally. Steering is also connected to the original links, so steerign wheel and HOG also turn when steering Winch is motorized using an M motor. Video coming soon.
  5. BrickController2 is an Android and iOS application that allows you to control your Lego models using a compatible gamepad. It supports the following devices: - SBrick - BuWizz 1-2 - Lego Powered-Up devices: Boost, PUP HUB and Technic HUB (or Control+) - PF infrared (on Android devices having infrared emitter). Features: - Multiple profiles for a single creation - Multiple motor (or output) assignment to a single controller event - Different types of devices can be used at the same time - The same motor (or output) can be assigned to multiple controller events - Different joystick characteristic settings - Different button modes: normal button, simple toggle, ping-pong toggle, carousel toggle, ... - Train mode on joysticks - Normal and servo mode for the new Control+ motors BrickController 2 on the Google Play Store: BrickController2 android BrickController 2 is also available on the Apple App Store. BrickController2 iOS Video tutorial created by @kbalage (many thanks for this): And another great video by @kbalage: Older versions: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.6 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  6. I was planning to build an improved and updated version of my old 6x6 from 2013 when i got an offer for cooperation from Mouldking which gave me an additional motiviation to design this model. I decided to go with a 1:10 scale, which would be perfect for the Unimog tyres. The final model dimensions are 60 x 22 x 24 cm Thanks to the all the amazing work done by fans updating the LDD, I was able to design the model as a modular build made out of a total of over 3100 pieces: A high number of pieces was needed to made this as detailed representation of the real model as possible. Starting under the hood, there is a detailed working V8 engine connected to the 2 drive motors: Inside the cabin there is a working steering wheel connected to the servo motor along with a detailed center console: Rear seats and the console between them can be folded to access the BuWizz bricks from the inside: Or you can simlpy fold down the rear wall inside the bed: The rear suspension and axles have been designed in such a way to maximize the volume of the bed, which is 15 studs wide, 20 studs long and 6 studs deep, making it my biggest truck bed to date: As you can see all the doors, hood and tailgate can be opened. The front doors even feature limiters: Now going from the aesthetics to functionality: The model features a 6x6 drive which can be powered by a pair of RC, Monster or upcoming BuWizz motors. Power is transfered to all the axles via a 2 speed gearbox. Each axle has a 1:12,6 gear ratio, allowing the 3kg heavy model to crawl over larger obstacles with ease. Low gear has a 1:12,6 gear ratiom while the high gear is overdrive, featuring a gear ratio of 1:7,56, allowing for higher speeds. Just like the real vehicle, the model uses live axle suspension with different spring rates. First and second axles use hard shock absorbers while the rear-most axle uses the soft version. Each axle uses a panhard rod with the rear axles uses two for even greater robustness Of course, I can't forget the most important photo: And finally here's a video of the model in action:
  7. This is my first buwizz creation. Toyota AE86 initial-D drift machine Allmost other AE86 mocs are small scale but this is 1:10 scale large model and even that size, model can still drifting. Mechanisem is secret now but I will make video and instruction soon. Now I thinking how to take video. I use custom made part for some part because studio don't have PF switch and 44777 pure plastic wheel. The interior was not put in because the secret mechanism occupied almost the entire center of the vehicle. Motor used 2 L for driving 2 servo for steering(cause one motor's power is not enough) 1 servo, 1 switch, 1 light for pop-up headlight 1 Buwizz Now I take video! Instruction finish!
  8. I think it's time to update and rebuild the legend.. Differences between the old and the new model: Because the model will be powered by 3x BuWizz instead of 4 AA battery boxes, it will be at least a kilogam lighter. Independent suspension will be changed to a live axle suspended pendular type. This will allow for much more movement when going offroad and more even weight distribution on the axles. Gear ratio will be changed from 1:3 to 1:1,677 due to the increased power of the motors, decreased weight and improved suspension - making the model 80% faster. NO MORE U JOINTS. Since no U joint, or CV can withstand the torque of an XL motor powered by BuWizz, the motors are now directly mounted on the hubs and steer with the wheels. Because there are no U joints the axle can be narrower by 4 studs, but I had to sacrifice a stud of ground clearance comapared to the old one. Servo steering - steering is now updated with 2 servo motors, each in their own axle. Front-most axle's steering angle is 25 degrees. Rear axles no longer need steering due to... Differential steering - since all motors can be individually controlled, the BuWizz's app allows for automatic correction of motor speeds when steering. This means the model can steer even tighter by reducing the speed of the inner motors when steering. Improved wheel mounting points using parts 24122 - the torque is now sent directly to the inside of the wheels without having to use 24 tooth gears and pins. I ordered the missing components and will send photos of the build as it progresses. For the bodywork I am thinking about a red cabine, but not sure which style - high and flat, or low which stick out in front further. Additional functions will be a winch in the front and possibly a crane arm in the back - I will decide on that after I see how it performs.
  9. Dear trainheads, Finally, my new locomotive is ready! This time, I chose a prototype from quite a distant edge of the world - an articulated narrow-gauge (1067 mm) 0-6-6-0T "Kitson-Meyer" engine belonging to the Chilean "Ferrocarril de Taltal" (FCT; written as "Ferro Carril Taltal“ on locomotive number plates), or "Taltal Railway". Ten of these locomotives were delivered to the FCT by Kitson & Co. (Leeds, UK) between 1904 and 1907, and further eight engines later acquired second-hand. Over the years, several modifications were carried out: For example, all engines were converted to burn oil soon. Water and fuel capacity of some locomotives (including No. 50, the prototype for my model) were increased by adding welded enlargements on top of the side and rear tanks. "The Railway Magazine" gives a short description of the FCT (Vol. 90. No. 551, May-June, 1944, pp.158—159): More detailed information can be found in the books "The Taltal Railway" and "Kitson Meyer Articulated Locomotives", both by Donald Binns, which were my two principal sources. In general, very few technical information about the FCT locomotives can be traced. Despite searching for months, I wasn't able to find a detailed drawing. So I had to largely rely on taking measures from photos and on one single, distorted sketch on a data sheet describing the near-identical engines from the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco" - see below. (While there are numerous photos of the sole surviving FCT Kitson-Meyer, no. 59, nearly all of them were taken during the engine's last years in service, when it was already in a very poor state of maintenance, or since it has been on display as a monument. Because of that, it's difficult to conclude how it looked in better days. Nevertheless, I hope - and believe - that the model's overall impression comes close enough to the real locomotive's appearance.) The model is held in accurate 1/22.5 scale. It consists of quite exactly 3,000 parts and weighs in at 2.4 kg. The engine is powered by two L-motors (one mounted vertically in each bogie); each motor has its own BuWizz as a power supply and R/C unit (technically, one BuWizz would suffice, but this configuration allows for longer running times). The wheels come from BBB and the lighting equipment was purchased from Brickstuff, as usual, while the rods are 3D-printed parts of my own design. Enough said – enjoy the photos! Data sheet for the similar engines (though with different brake equipment and cab) of the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco": Detailed cab... ... and also smokebox interior, showing the exhaust nozzle, the base of the chimney and the boiler tubes: The cab roof is detachable. The ventilation flap really opens, you can see the lever for the steam whistle through the hole: The top of the Belpaire firebox is also detachable, giving access to the charging sockets and the power buttons: The lower part of the cab ladder is attached to the bogie and turns with it. Note also the chain which prevents the bogie from jackknifing in case of a derailment. Advanced lighting functions, controlled via two BuWizz channels: Before starting their daily trip into the Andes, engineer and fireman still have enough time to pose for a photo with their trusty old lady... ... while one of the brakemen uses the unexpected spare time in a different way. Well, but not for long. Soon "El Jefe" arrives in his flashy Chevrolet and critically watches his employees' activities... A few shots from the building phase, showing further details. First, the bogies with the motors. You can see the leaf springs underneath, as well as the brakes and (as on the real thing) only one single sanding pipe in front of the first wheel: The firebox once again: The main frame. The ashpan contains two weight bricks, which help to keep the centre of gravity low and thus to prevent the model from tipping over. And a view of the complete technical layout with batteries and motors. The multi-coloured bricks underneath are just the building stand. Full-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder. At the moment, it’s too hot in my attic for filming, and I’ll go on holiday next week; but when I’m back, of course I'll shoot a video of the locomotive and its train, so stay tuned! Last but not least, I'd like to give my heartfelt thanks to all those AFOLs who attended the development of this model with their feedback and encouragement; and especially (though we've never met in person) to my dear "pen-friend" Sergio Monai @monai, whose multilingualism and commitment were an invaluable help during the research phase. Comments and criticism are of course most welcome! Thanks for stopping by! Best regards, Sven Edit: Video now available here!
  10. Zerobricks

    Tiger 6x6

    This is an expansion, upgrade and update of the Tiger 4 x 4 x 4 The idea was to improve certain aspects of the 4x4 version: 1. The bewel gears were the weak part of the driveline, so the 6x6 uses additional 12:20 gearing after bewel gears, increasing available torque by 67% 2. Adding a second rear axle additonally helps to spread the load while climbing, increasing available overall torque by another 50%, allowing for a total of 2,5x more torque than 4x4. 3. Using defender wheels, and self-built hubs the pivot point is now a stud closer to the steering wheel and steering angle is increased from 18 to 25-30 degrees, removing the need for rear steering. 4. Center section was widened by 2 studs, allowing both gearboxes to be placed in parallel and the steering servo motor low in the center. Total gear reduction has been increased to 1:5 in high gear and 1:15 in low gear. Gear switching mechanism is now faster and more reliable. 5. Suspension is now pendular with a shock absorber in front and tandem axles with shock absorbes in the back. This allows the suspension to smoothly adjust to the terrain at slow speeds without wasting energy compressing the shock absorbers. At high speeds the shock aborbers smooth out the ride. In the picture below you can see the blue 1x7 beams which swing and allow the front suspension to act like pendular: 6. The model now has working fake engine(s) and steering wheel.I'm thinking of adding a hook arm with a winch in the back, so I can use this model to pull others out during trial truck races 7. Number of motors have been reduced by removing rear wheel steering and having one motor for the gearbox, allowing to add aditional functions as before mentioned hook arm. So...that's all about it for now, I'm only missing defender wheels to finish this monster. Yes it's going to be heavier and slower, but I expect it to be even more capable and reliable.
  11. I've been starting on the bodywork and have added a quick clip of a flush mounted door mechanism. I'll periodically add bits until it's done, enjoy (Above pic is a link to video) This is my current supercar WIP. It has fully independent suspension, torsion bar, cantilevered front, typical rear, and sway bars. steering with attached steering wheel one servo, drive 2x XL, custom miniature V12 engine on an AWD chassis with a remote driven four speed sequential gearbox powered by an M motor. Race jacks with remote compressor, adjustable rear wing, tilt steering wheel, pedals with feedback, adjustable with single lever tilt and slide seats. Photos: https://flic.kr/s/aHskUraaNt Flush mounted door hinge operation by Dugald Cameron, on Flickr Let me know what you think! Video edit and teardown to follow!
  12. Newest_Tech320

    Sbrick vs Buwizz

    Hi, Do u like Sbrick or Buwizz?
  13. Hi, I have 1 Buwizz and thinking of buying another or two more. Do you think Buwizz is worth it?
  14. Newest_Tech320

    Is the Buwizz website Down?

    Hi, Can you access the buwizz instructions page?
  15. Hi everyone, I have many lego technics sets and thousands of lego bricks for making MOCs and MODs. Therefore, I would like to share and introduce my new channel on youtube. I would happy to share and help or ask help from you by touching your interests what I did. Please subscribe and keep watching my videos, I will upload at least one video every week. Many thanks in advance for watching, Keep building and happy bricking!!
  16. The American Club Racing (ACR) model was introduced in 1999, starting with the Viper GTS (Phase SR II). Exclusive 1 by lachlan cameron, on Flickr This model had suspension and engine enhancements focused on maximizing performance in road racing and autocross environments. Horsepower was bumped to 460 hp (370 kW) in these models, while torque increased to 500 lb·ft (678 N·m). Weight was reduced by over 50 pounds (23 kg) by stripping the interior and removing other non-essential items such as the fog lamps (replacing them with brake ducts). Dodge Viper ACR by lachlan cameron, on Flickr In an attempt to stay true to its heritage, I've left this beast without bells and whistles in the name of speed.It sport a front clam shell hood, opening rear trunk, and spring back doors. The real catch here is in the speed and options. Dodge Viper ACR by lachlan cameron, on Flickr This Viper packs 2x Buwizz 2.0 (with Ludicrous mode) that power this monster directly to 2x Buggy motors. The gearing is accessible and can be swapped for a higher or lower gear in minutes. Ratios avail: 1:1 and 1:1.7. This model also has many build options: 1. 1 or 2 buwizz / 1 or 2 Lipo / 1 or 2 Sbrick 2. 2 Buggy motor or 2 XL motor 3. Fully manual car (just remove the electronics 4. Swap out the engine on the fly for a new one! Dodge Viper ACR by lachlan cameron, on Flickr The Viper also has a rake to it that I also replicated. 1 stud off the ground at the front, 2.5 studs at the rear. Dodge Viper ACR- open hood by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Its been a pleasure playing with this car OUTDOORS (don't even think of play indoors, I smashed it over 10 times) and I hope you guys enjoy the video! Dodge Viper ACR by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Dodge Viper ACR by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Dodge Viper ACR - Overlay by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Flickr Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmeHa4rL Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/loxlego Crash compilation: Dodge Viper - Crashes by lachlan cameron, on Flickr
  17. I'm thinking of getting a Lego device that will give my models more power and allow me to control them outside and from long distance using my smartphone. As far as I am aware the best two options are BuWizz and SBrick, however I am not sure which option is best, as comparisons I have seen have never determined a clear winner. SBrick is way more affordable, more compact and seems to be popular in the Lego Technic community. I only learnt about BuWizz recently, it seems to generate an insane amount of power but it costs over twice as much as an SBrick and is bulkier, plus I already have 6 Battery Boxes and it would be a complete waste not using them. Of course they are both clearly better than the Official Lego PF IR Sensors I am currently using, which are god awful past a 2m range and are useless outside, however I would like to know people's thoughts, opinions and experiences to help me decide which is best value for money before I blow loads of cash on a toy. Currently I am leaning towards SBrick, but from what I've seen online, BuWizz looks like a viable option also. Cheers
  18. Hello All. This is my newest little creation. Intended to rip it up indoors on flat floors, which it does. Powered by one (off-brand) buggy motor and a buwizz 2.0. Has 4wd with open differentials front and rear, and solid axles front and rear. The lack of suspension allows for a robust chassis which handles the power delivery with no drama. Front tie rods can disconnect if you run into something but is otherwise very reliable, and fun to drive.
  19. Here's a MOC on which I'm working since the end of the previous summer! After I have done the video of my DS3, I had the idea to do a new chassis with 4 wheel drive. I thought it would not be possible, but the first prototype was better than my DS3! Actually the MOC is not finished. The stickers are missing, and I'm continuing to develop the chassis (I'm adding a 4th L motor) Actually there are 1 L for the front, and 2 L for the rear. The great advantage of the 4WD is that it can take a great angle while turning, but it's always controllable. But, that can have an inconvenient: the understeering. For that, I did the same thing on the real RC drift cars: I added a free wheel. So when I do not accelerate, the front wheels are not braked and the car does not understeer. You can see this video on this video, done for BuWizz with Charbel. But this is one. It's the same thing, but there is only my car. The final gymkhana will be for the next summer, because that requires a lot of time, and with the school, I have not enough time at another moment of the year.
  20. EDIT 08/22 - CURRENT STATE : Here is a truck I just made (well, it actually took me several days) while being confined. I don't like to take apart my sets on display to MOC so I had to do with just a bunch of spare part I had, hence the strange color scheme and some questionable building technics and aesthetic choices (for example, I didn't had anything to make the front radiator grill so i had to improvise...) I wanted to make an American style Truck, inspired by the 5571, 5591, 8285 and more recently 42078, and remote controlled so I can have a little fun with it. Please don't be to harsh, this is my first Technic MOC that didn't end at the prototype status. The original goal was to test my new Buwizz but I finally used only original Lego PF element, because I rather use a physical remote than a smartphone. It is powered by a L motor (with the drivetrain as follow : Motor---16T / 16T---20T / differential / 20T--20T / differential) ) and steered with a servo, with a decent speed and a good steering lock. The IR receiver and standard AA battery box are housed in the back of the cab, and the latest can slide up for replacement by tilting the foldable spoiler forward. The spoiler can also be folded all the way down to make the cabin roof flat. The doors can be opened and the hood can be lifted, even though there is no fake engine underneath because that's where I furst intended to put the Buwizz. (Actually there is still enough room for it so I could convert the truck to a Buwizz model and remove all the biggest section of the cab for a more lightweight truck. :-) I could also run an axle under the cabin to the engine compartment and run a fake engine from the exposed 16T gear... A lot of work, thoughts, trial and errors went into the building of this truck, so I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do. There is still A LOT room for improvement, but unfortunately I was limited by the parts I had. Almost all of my grey and black liftarms and technic connectors whereused in the process ! I am not entirely satisfied by the roof of the cabin in the IR receiver area, which is a bit messy, and I really wish I had DBG curved panel for the sides instead of LBG ones. And of course, I wish I could replace the ugly black plate at the front with a proper truck grill. I also have to add a fifth wheel, as it is not able to pull anything in this configuration. It should be easy anyway, as I have a lot of mounting option at the rear (the black panel is only there for aesthetic purpose). I just have to figure out something with the parts i have left... In the end I like very much how it turned out though, and I may consider a bricklink order to fix the aforementioned issues once the lock-down is over. In the mean time, any comment and suggestion for improvement is welcome ! :-) EDIT : now with a running fake engine !
  21. Inspired by @Sariel's book I've been trying to incorporate a 2-speed transmission into a very high-speed car I'm building. Here's the essence of how it works: Now, please believe me when I say that, in the actual car, everything is extremely well braced -- it's impossible for gears to skip, and in fact they don't. The actual problem is this: using the fast gear, at very high acceleration -- I'm talking 2x BuWizz in Ludicrous mode -- the driving ring is pushed out of the clutch gear , even when the driving ring is held in place by a rotary catch which is itself extremely well braced. The result is lots of clicking and little movement. I can already hear some of you saying "You just shouldn't apply so much force to ABS plastic; of course it'll bend!" Nonetheless, I'd love to hear if you know of any super robust way to hold a driving ring firmly inside a clutch gear!
  22. Zerobricks

    Tiger 4 x 4 x 4

    After completion and playing with the Leopard for a few months, I noticed the model had a few shortcomings which I wanted to eliminate with this version. These include: Suspension oscilations at high torque High center of gravity Instability on rough terrain at high speeds Most of these issues were due to the usage of the torque tube suspension which is simply too heavy and unresponsive at high speeds. What I needed was to replace the live axle suspension with independent suspension while keeping the articulation needed for offroading. Here's what I came up with: Let's break down the suspension to it's basic components to better understand how it works: Colored green are the main shock absorbers. These caryy most of the wight and provide a high suspension travel Colored orange are the gearbox transfer arms which fix each perpendicular gearbox firmly to the suspension, thereby reducing friction and fixing the U joints to keep them from popping out. Colored black are the side beams which help guide the transfer arms and hold the suspension together Colored in red and gray are the two independent drivelines powering the wheels. Finally in transparent, the suspension arms are made as long as possible for maximum suspension travel. I built the first version with this setup, but soon discovred a flaw. The torque from the drivelines would push the suspension arms down, causing the suspension to stop responding (indicated with red and grey arrows in photo above). In order to solve this problem I added the suspension bridge above, colored in pruple. The suspension bridge performs the following functions: Compensation of the driveline torque Supports 20% of the model's weight Improves articulation when going over rough terrain With the suspension solved, I turned my attention to the chassis. I wanted a model with high torque and high speed. To achieve that I installed a two speed gearbox for each independent driveline powered by a total of 4 RC motors: Finally a very sturdy chassis based on frames was built to support the model. Each axle was given it's own independent steering with servo motor and each driveline has an M motor for switching gears. This redundacy means that even if half of the model breaks down, it can still drive back home. Next step was building the model in real life. Thanks to ForwART's custom stickers the exterrior really came to life: The doors can be opened, revelaing two seats and the steering wheel: Each wheel has over 6 cm of wheel travel, allowing the Tiger extreme articulation rivaling live axle setups: And let's not forget the most important photo of them all: Finally, since there is only so much I can tell in words, enjoy the video experience: As usual the LDD file of the model is available by clicking the photo or link below: https://www.bricksafe.com/files/Zblj/tiger-4x4x4/Tiger 4x4x4.lxf To summarize, compared to the previous Leopard, the Tiger has the following improvements: Improved stability due to the independent suspension and low chassis Higher top speed due to the gearboxes Eliminated suspension oscilation Improved performance at high speed thanks to lighter and more responsive independent suspension Improved maneuverability thanks to all wheel steering Sadly there are also a few drawbacks which I plan to fix in the future version: When pushing the model hard in Ludicrous mode and in low gear the 12 tooth bewel gears can get damaged and need to be replaced Low steering angle (18 degrees) Because only one servo motor is used per axle, steering is more prone to be bumped out of center.
  23. Hi! When I received my BuWizz, I wanted to make a fast RC model. It had to be very light, so a kart was good to make that. The mechanic is very simple. There are just some gears to turn the wheels at a high speed. As you can see, the driving is powered by two L motors and the steering by a servomotor. According to the tyres, this kart is very fast!
  24. Edit: New video here. Dear trainheads, Some time ago EB member @Plastic_Goth presented his digital model of Ferrovia Eritrea's Gruppo R.202 shunter. I immediately fell in love with that cute little prototype, and I knew I had to build a model myself, in slightly larger scale for 45 mm garden railway track. Well, here it is! The prototype was built in 1927 by Breda in Milan, Italy, for shunting service on the 950 mm narrow gauge lines in Eritrea (which was an Italian colony at that time). In total, eleven class R.202 engines were built; several lococomotives are still in operation today (the „R“ stands for „scartamento ridotto“, narrow gauge). My MOC represents a R.202 locomotive in ca. 1936, after the original lifting injectors (inside the cab) had been exchanged for non-lifting ones (below the cab), but before a new numbering scheme was introduced, dropping the „R“ in the class designation. The model is held in accurate 1/22.5 scale and driven by a single L-motor working on the second axle. It features front and rear lights (from Brickstuff; separately controllable for the left and right engine side) and a Seuthe no. 99 smoke generator. All funcions are powered and remote-controlled by a BuWizz 2.0. The rods and valve gear parts are 3D-printed parts of my own design. The model consists of approx. 1,400 parts and weighs just over 1 kg. Compared to my previous models, it is much easier to handle and maintain, due to its "small" size, but still has amazing pulling power (10 four-axle LGB cars are no problem). So I think it will become my standard "everyday" engine... And here are the pictures: Prototype data sheet (drawing not accurate and not to scale): While the fireman is carrying out a minor repair on the smokebox door, an administrative officer arrives in his brand new Fiat Topolino (modified design by Peter Blackert): Two tiny Italians... Some views of the cab interior. As the BuWizz is located in the position of the firebox, the roof and the boiler backhead can be removed for access to the power button and to the charging socket: The frame: Three weight bricks are installed inside the frame and boiler, thus increasing traction: The half-plate offset in radius between smokebox and boiler required some unusual (but surprisingly sturdy) SNOT-work. A video of the model on track will follow. For now, here is a short sequence of the engine on the roller test bed: More and high-resolution photos can be found in my Flickr album. Comments and criticism are most welcome. Thanks for your interest! Best regards, Sven
  25. Hello there! American all-wheel drive pickup from GMC. The model is built as a continuation of the Chevy K30 Big Dooley published in 2019. Of the main differences - the muzzle of an earlier generation, a shorter base, the design of the frame and bridges was changed. Planetary hubs and CV joints are used in driveshafts from 42099. Drive - for each axle by L motor. Steering - M motor, Power - BuWizz, a canister with gasoline in the back, spare wheel, shovel and a box of lemonade More photos