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Found 98 results

  1. The go-kart is one my most ambitious projects. To build it, it took over 7000 Lego pieces, 32 L motors, 8 BuWizz bricks, one BuWizz app update and hundreds of man-hours. The final build, can easily drive a 60+kg person with the top speed of 4km/h. The story of the go-kart starts right after finishing the video shoot of pulling the train card with the heavy transporter. The heavy transporter showed me that Lego pieces have the needed strength to carry and transport the weight of a person, albeit in that case quite slowly. So I got an idea to create a carrier which would use a higher amount of motors than the heavy transporter and have a higher speed. Unlike the 24 small wheels the transporter used, the new model would only use 4 wheels based on the Technic Gear rack 11 x 11 Curved. Work first began on the wheels. They had to be capable of carrying a total weight of around 60 kilograms. When dealing with such heavy weights and forces, the only way to succeed is to distribute the load over a high amount of bricks. In this case the wheels were designed with multiple parallel rings, each carrying part of the weight: The rings would be stacked onto each other to form the finished wheel: Each wheel is powered by a total of 8 L motors through a gearbox. The original idea was to gear the 8 L motors up 3x times using a combination of 24 and 8 tooth gears. But after testing the wheels I soon realized that we will need a lower gear ratio, so a combination of 20 and 12 tooth gears was used to gear up the motors by a factor of 1,67. The resulting gearing gave each wheel a top speed of around 4 km/h The wheels were further optimized during testing to use clutch 20 tooth gears as the main weight-bearing wheels instead of the original 12 tooth gears. This change helped the wheels to spin more even and it allowed the load-carrying axle to be stationary, reducing wear and tear. Since each wheel used a total of 8 L motors, a total of two BuWizz bricks were needed to power each wheel. With the wheels finished, it was time to build the frame of the go-kart. The frame is based on two main pieces, a 1x15 Technic beam and 7x5 Technic frame. The 7x5 frames are crucial to the rigidity of the frame, while the beams connect them all together. Of course there were also thousands of pins used to attach everything together. With the help of Lego Digital Designer I created the first sketch of the go-kart's frame: With the virtual model created, I now had an estimate of the needed parts. With that information, I started looking for the cheapest deals on Bricklink, updating the digital model was I got along. Red beams turned out to be the cheapest solution, and we ended up ordering around 850 of them. Total number of parts ended up at around 7000-8000 with over half of them being pins. Once the ordered parts were received, it was time to build the massive model, which took several days: During the assembly process, the frame and model have been further improved and reinforced in order to carry my own weight without excessive bending. The wheel rims were covered with adhesive window rubber insulation to add grip: The rear axle was flipped 90 degrees in order to increase its rigidity and the whole kart was split into several modules for easy assembly and maintenance. In fact the whole cart can be taken apart to a couple of modules and assembled in less than 10 minutes. A couple of custom stickers and the Go-Cart was finished: With all the mechanical problems solved, it was time to turn attention to the control of the model. Since each wheel uses a total of 2 BuWizz bricks, the whole model used a total of 8 BuWizz bricks. This resulted in a problem with control, since Android based phones can connect to a maximum of 7 Bluetooth devices at once. We decided to try to use an Apple based device to see if we can connect to 8 BuWizz bricks at once. There were no issues, so a simple Iphone 5 was chosen for main controller. The phone was integrated into the steering wheel: The control device also had to compensate for the difference of motor speeds when taking a corner. Due to the load on the wheels, a simple sharp turn could cause them to fail if we would not slow the inner wheels down when turning. We needed a way for the BuWizz app to know that the wheels are being turned. This is where I came up with the idea to use the phone's own internal accelometer to detect the steering position. Since the phone turns along with the steering wheel, it always knows in which position of the steering wheel. We asked our app developer to add a simple gyroscopic command to the app, which we then used as an input for our tracked steer mixer. I experimented with different mixer steering ratios and in the end settling with the factor 0,1. The finished model was also duplicated in LDD, where the final piece count is around 7500 bricks: Now that our go-cart was fully functional, it was time to head outside to give it a final test run in the real world and the record the following video: Few weeks later the Go-kart was also driven by kids on the Brick Planet exhibition: All the long hours designing in LDD, building, rebuilding, fixing, optimizing, the blood, sweat and tears, they were all worth it when you see how happy kids are driving the Go-kart!
  2. BrickController2 is an Android and iOS application that allows you to control your Lego models using a compatible gamepad. It supports the following devices: - SBrick - BuWizz 1-2 - Lego Powered-Up devices: Boost, PUP HUB and Technic HUB (or Control+) - PF infrared (on Android devices having infrared emitter). Features: - Multiple profiles for a single creation - Multiple motor (or output) assignment to a single controller event - Different types of devices can be used at the same time - The same motor (or output) can be assigned to multiple controller events - Different joystick characteristic settings - Different button modes: normal button, simple toggle, ping-pong toggle, carousel toggle, ... - Train mode on joysticks - Normal and servo mode for the new Control+ motors BrickController 2 on the Google Play Store: BrickController2 android BrickController 2 is also available on the Apple App Store. BrickController2 iOS Video tutorial created by @kbalage (many thanks for this): And another great video by @kbalage: Older versions: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.6 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  3. I need some help with my buggy. I can’t figure out how to get Ackermann geometry on my front steering unit and previous steering systems were either too large or unusable. I have been heavily inspired by didumos’s greyhound 4wd rc buggy. photos on bricksafe: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Clev/#
  4. I'd like to present my latest BuWizz creation: I like to think of it as a tribute to my beloved 8366 and 8475 sets, which I never get to play with, because i need their motors for other projects, projects like this..It also explains the somewhat cheesy name of the car.. This is a 8475 / 8366 hybrid on steroids and the most fun i have had with an RC car in ages! Here is the video: i hope you like it!
  5. MichaelWareman

    buwizz and camera

    Hello: Has anyone had any success connecting a camera to the buwizz app to live stream the model's action? If so, what camera model are you using? Mike,
  6. I have only been building my creations with EV3 but for a long time now I thought about getting a BuWizz. It's a good price right now. I'm really interested in how amazing this product is and I would be excited to make the transition to PF/BuWizz powered cars, so I have to get a servo motor and a few L motors to go with it. What is your opinion on buying a BuWizz 2.0? What PF parts should I buy to go with it to make car MOCs? Thank you for your feedback.
  7. Zerobricks

    Mini 4x4 racer

    For an exhibition I made a small Corvette-scaled car with an RC motor powering rear wheels. Powered by Buwizz, that model turned to be totally uncontrollable, with epic amount of oversteer at low speed and underster at high speed. So I got an idea. Why not make a 4x4 version of a miniature car? My worries were that the added complexity needed to power the front wheels will increase the complexity, weight and reduce the performance... But I decided to give it a shot anyway. The first version used a chain drive to front the front wheels from the rear axle, but that was soon scrapped due to the poor strength of the chain. So after replacing the chain drive with an axial driveline, I came up with this little, yet powerful model. The front wheels are an older 49,6 x 28VR type which use softer rubber than the rear ones. This way the car tends to oversteer less: In the rear DUAL 49,5 X 20 are used to give it as much traction area as possible: The bodywork can easily be removed to expose a torque-tube sytled chassis and a simple interrior: A servo motor steers the front wheels via a rack. Maximum steering angle is around 22,5 degrees: 3x11 panels are used as the main chassis, giving the model very high rigidity, while keeping the weight low: According to LDD the model is made of less than 400 bricks, less than to the upcoming 42109: The front wheels are powered directly by the rear axle via 20:12----12:20 gear sequence. There are no differentials, since the model reaches high enough speeds for wheels to understeer and slip in the corners anyway. Technical specs: Length: 25 cm Width: 14 cm Height: 10 cm Weight: 575 g Theoretical top speed: ~18 km/h Even with 4x4 drive, the racer still powerslides all 4 wheels even in just the normal mode, as you can see in the quick and drity slo-mo gif I made: I was pleasantly suprised by the amount of control you get with the added FWD. No longer am I at the mercy of the rear wheels to stop the car from crashing into a wall. Accelreation is of course much better, making this one of the fastest accelerating models I made. Oversteer has been reduced, but there is still plenty of power left to powerslide the model with all 4 wheels spinning. Stay tuned for a proper video showing off the performance soon.
  8. Zerobricks

    Tiger 6x6

    This is an expansion, upgrade and update of the Tiger 4 x 4 x 4 The idea was to improve certain aspects of the 4x4 version: 1. The bewel gears were the weak part of the driveline, so the 6x6 uses additional 12:20 gearing after bewel gears, increasing available torque by 67% 2. Adding a second rear axle additonally helps to spread the load while climbing, increasing available overall torque by another 50%, allowing for a total of 2,5x more torque than 4x4. 3. Using defender wheels, and self-built hubs the pivot point is now a stud closer to the steering wheel and steering angle is increased from 18 to 25-30 degrees, removing the need for rear steering. 4. Center section was widened by 2 studs, allowing both gearboxes to be placed in parallel and the steering servo motor low in the center. Total gear reduction has been increased to 1:5 in high gear and 1:15 in low gear. Gear switching mechanism is now faster and more reliable. 5. Suspension is now pendular with a shock absorber in front and tandem axles with shock absorbes in the back. This allows the suspension to smoothly adjust to the terrain at slow speeds without wasting energy compressing the shock absorbers. At high speeds the shock aborbers smooth out the ride. In the picture below you can see the blue 1x7 beams which swing and allow the front suspension to act like pendular: 6. The model now has working fake engine(s) and steering wheel.I'm thinking of adding a hook arm with a winch in the back, so I can use this model to pull others out during trial truck races 7. Number of motors have been reduced by removing rear wheel steering and having one motor for the gearbox, allowing to add aditional functions as before mentioned hook arm. So...that's all about it for now, I'm only missing defender wheels to finish this monster. Yes it's going to be heavier and slower, but I expect it to be even more capable and reliable.
  9. Recently we have seen quite a few PF Controllers popping up. Some more interesting than others. This project was launched on Kickstarter today and I think it's worth sharing. Since we are not fond of people promoting their Kickstarter or LEGO Ideas on Eurobricks, I have taken the liberty to promote this project myself. Kickstarter description A compact, high performance remote control system for LEGO® models. With embedded battery, precise servo control and huge power. Technical information BuWizz is a four channel high performance controller for LEGO® Power Functions, with embedded battery and a Micro-USB charging port. Paired over Bluetooth with smartphone or tablet, BuWizz is compact yet powerful. BuWizz: has 4 channels can be charged with any Micro-USB charger - even with a powerbank while you drive your model.- has several speed modes: in fast mode, the motors receive 2x more power than other solutions with LEGO batteries - enables great speed or better obstacle climbing - in slow mode, the PF servo motor can move very slow - for realistic motion of railway crossing gates, convertible roof, etc. can drive 2 XL motors on each channel in high speed mode- delivers 8 times more power (4 channels combined) than any solution with LEGO battery- is compact: 8x4x3 bricks size, 2x IR receivers footprint replaces battery box + 2x IR receivers can be embedded deep into your model - all you need is access to Micro-USB charging port powerful enough for large models, yet small enough to build a very compact model Dimensions It has the same dimensions as the rechargeable battery, which is quite convenient. Controls Example implementations Kickstarter Check out the project on Kickstarter Reviews Sariel has received a copy and he is quite enthusiastic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdPduWEk7H4 I will receive a copy soon, after which I will share my thoughts.
  10. EDIT: Model's latest revision HERE! Dear train community, a while ago, I presented my model of a small industrial shunting engine (for information about the prototype, and to compare the pictures below with version 1.0, please see here). However, although it proved to be a strong and reliable little locomotive, I was never entirely happy with it: The roof turned out to be very flimsy, and the battery box and IR receiver were completely blocking the view through the cab. So when BuWizz was announced, and I realized that its height would be considerably lower than that of 84599, and it would need no additional receiver, I thought I should give it a try and rebuild my MOC (even though this meant that I had to get a smartphone… ). The revised model has been completed for a couple of weeks now, but it wasn’t until last week that a BuWizz app version was released which allowed to control two output channels via one slider, so I couldn’t let the engine run until then… (By the way: One more thing that I would really wish for would be an option to „lock“ the slider in a given position, so that you don’t have to keep your finger on the phone all the time when the engine is running. Maybe someone from BuWizz will read this… ) Following alterations have been implemented: - BuWizz replacing the rechargeable battery box - boiler diameter increased by one plate for better scale accuracy and a brawnier appearance - slightly larger, smoother side tanks - revised colour scheme without black striping (thus adding to the stouter look) - additional small windows in the cab front - completely redesigned cab roof with more prototypical profile and no longer needing transparent plates to support the door openings - handrails below the buffer beams for the shunting men - strings as sand pipes - improved shape of the cylinders - smaller headlights - (at least rudimentary) cab interior thanks to the reduced height of BuWizz But unfortunately, still no opening doors – sorry, Sergio! (I promise my next model will have them. And it will be a BIG model. REALLY big!) With BuWizz set to „slow“ mode, gentle and precise shunting becomes possible; something one couldn’t even dream about while using Lego’s IR remote control system. As always, you will find larger versions of the images in my Bricksafe folder. Comments are of course most welcome. Thanks for stopping by! Best regards, Sven EDIT: Model's latest revision HERE!
  11. This is my attempt at building a proper and most importantly; fun to drive ripsaw with somewhat realistic performance. The 8 buggy motors and 4 BuWizz seem to do the trick.. I tried to replicate as much as i could from the original design, obviously the drive-train works differently; the real EV1 has 1 motor with a clutch system in the rear differential to power the tracks from the rear alone, which i did try to replicate by adding the fake V8 and rear diff, which does function, but i disconnect it most of the time while drive outside because it has a habit of getting jammed by leaves, rocks and twigs, the gears used to connect to the fake V8 are all exposed. Here the sprockets are powered in the front and rear and each is connected directly to the slower output of 2 buggy motors, giving this thing crazy speed and torque. The suspension is set up like the real EV1 and works fine, but does require a track tension system, the real thing has a suspended front sprocket to keep tension on the tracks, in this case it would mean loosely suspended buggy motors, an idea i did not like and did not try, yet. I am using a simple lever, spring and wheels to keep tension on the track but it works fine and looks ok. For the body i tried to capture the look and feel of the real thing, using as little as possible panels and using beams for the boxy look with just the exposed framework seemed the right thing to do, i am sure it is filled with illegal connections, i go by the rule: "if it fits without force, it fits". The body is surprisingly solid, it can be lifted from several positions and it can take some abuse from driving, and abused it, i have.. The are 2 seat for Technic figures and the electrical wiring functions nicely as a seat-belt for them. I have added 2 sets of LED's on the top bar, i do not think the real EV1 had that, but it seemed the most "natural" position to me and it works nicely since they are aimed down a bit. And here you can see it in action! please leave a like if you can and help out my tiny channel: I hope you like it!
  12. HI, I wonder if anyone has some experience with using buwizz with Lego trains? I am attracted by the small form factor and the opportunity to design profiles, but over 120 Euros is a lot to risk without asking advice here ...
  13. Dear trainheads, Finally, my new locomotive is ready! This time, I chose a prototype from quite a distant edge of the world - an articulated narrow-gauge (1067 mm) 0-6-6-0T "Kitson-Meyer" engine belonging to the Chilean "Ferrocarril de Taltal" (FCT; written as "Ferro Carril Taltal“ on locomotive number plates), or "Taltal Railway". Ten of these locomotives were delivered to the FCT by Kitson & Co. (Leeds, UK) between 1904 and 1907, and further eight engines later acquired second-hand. Over the years, several modifications were carried out: For example, all engines were converted to burn oil soon. Water and fuel capacity of some locomotives (including No. 50, the prototype for my model) were increased by adding welded enlargements on top of the side and rear tanks. "The Railway Magazine" gives a short description of the FCT (Vol. 90. No. 551, May-June, 1944, pp.158—159): More detailed information can be found in the books "The Taltal Railway" and "Kitson Meyer Articulated Locomotives", both by Donald Binns, which were my two principal sources. In general, very few technical information about the FCT locomotives can be traced. Despite searching for months, I wasn't able to find a detailed drawing. So I had to largely rely on taking measures from photos and on one single, distorted sketch on a data sheet describing the near-identical engines from the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco" - see below. (While there are numerous photos of the sole surviving FCT Kitson-Meyer, no. 59, nearly all of them were taken during the engine's last years in service, when it was already in a very poor state of maintenance, or since it has been on display as a monument. Because of that, it's difficult to conclude how it looked in better days. Nevertheless, I hope - and believe - that the model's overall impression comes close enough to the real locomotive's appearance.) The model is held in accurate 1/22.5 scale. It consists of quite exactly 3,000 parts and weighs in at 2.4 kg. The engine is powered by two L-motors (one mounted vertically in each bogie); each motor has its own BuWizz as a power supply and R/C unit (technically, one BuWizz would suffice, but this configuration allows for longer running times). The wheels come from BBB and the lighting equipment was purchased from Brickstuff, as usual, while the rods are 3D-printed parts of my own design. Enough said – enjoy the photos! Data sheet for the similar engines (though with different brake equipment and cab) of the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco": Detailed cab... ... and also smokebox interior, showing the exhaust nozzle, the base of the chimney and the boiler tubes: The cab roof is detachable. The ventilation flap really opens, you can see the lever for the steam whistle through the hole: The top of the Belpaire firebox is also detachable, giving access to the charging sockets and the power buttons: The lower part of the cab ladder is attached to the bogie and turns with it. Note also the chain which prevents the bogie from jackknifing in case of a derailment. Advanced lighting functions, controlled via two BuWizz channels: Before starting their daily trip into the Andes, engineer and fireman still have enough time to pose for a photo with their trusty old lady... ... while one of the brakemen uses the unexpected spare time in a different way. Well, but not for long. Soon "El Jefe" arrives in his flashy Chevrolet and critically watches his employees' activities... A few shots from the building phase, showing further details. First, the bogies with the motors. You can see the leaf springs underneath, as well as the brakes and (as on the real thing) only one single sanding pipe in front of the first wheel: The firebox once again: The main frame. The ashpan contains two weight bricks, which help to keep the centre of gravity low and thus to prevent the model from tipping over. And a view of the complete technical layout with batteries and motors. The multi-coloured bricks underneath are just the building stand. Full-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder. At the moment, it’s too hot in my attic for filming, and I’ll go on holiday next week; but when I’m back, of course I'll shoot a video of the locomotive and its train, so stay tuned! Last but not least, I'd like to give my heartfelt thanks to all those AFOLs who attended the development of this model with their feedback and encouragement; and especially (though we've never met in person) to my dear "pen-friend" Sergio Monai @monai, whose multilingualism and commitment were an invaluable help during the research phase. Comments and criticism are of course most welcome! Thanks for stopping by! Best regards, Sven Edit: Video now available here!
  14. Hi everybody! Half a year ago, the Suzuki company released a new generation of their famous mini SUVs - Suzuki Jimny and Suzuki Jimni Sierra(Wide edition). I, as a caring lover of this particular model, tried to repeat the same thing in Lego. That's what came out of it Specifications: 1:10 Scale All wheel drive 1.55 DC Chequired flag all terrain A/T tires (copy of BF Goodrich A/T KO2) Solid Axles Constant rear diff lock The modular design (body and chassis are separate elements connected by 6 points. The body and chassis, in turn, consist of smaller modules - doors, hood, axles etc) Electrics: BuWizz brick (or AAA Lego battery box/LiPo unit + IR V2 Reciever/Sbrick) – battery and receiver 2L motors - movement Servo motor – steering 2 LED lights iOS/Android smartphone/pad with BuWizz app – Remote control Life’s too short to stay stock! Therefore, in this model I use tires DC CHEQUERED FLAG All-Terrain T/A (87x26x1.55), that are an exact copy of BF Goodrich T/A KO2. This gives the model more realism and improves off-road performance compared to original tires. For the same reason, I recommend to using alternative power sources, in this case BuWizz, which significantly expand the functionality of the model, reduce its weight and increase the power of the motors. At the same time, the design of the model allows the use of original Lego batteries (AAA or LiPo unit) together with the V2 receiver of Lego Power Functions More photos and building instruction you can find on my personal blog page Video review:
  15. Here is my take on the motorization of the 42110. Basically the whole model was lifted to accomodate the bigger wheel, motors and BuWizzes. Model is powered by a total of 8 motors, 4L motors for RWD, 2L motors for FWD, one servo and one M motor. Total gear ratio is 1:3. It uses custom portal hubs in the front which have a pivot even closer than normal ones thanks to the new rims. Rear uses normal hubs and wheels, since they are sturdier. Axles use the original suspension's upper arms as mounting points along with a pair of 9L links for each axle. The original gearbox is connected to the rear drive, so it works normally. Steering is also connected to the original links, so steerign wheel and HOG also turn when steering Winch is motorized using an M motor. Video coming soon.
  16. Zerobricks

    [WIP] Fox 8x8 V2

    I think it's time to update and rebuild the legend.. Differences between the old and the new model: Because the model will be powered by 3x BuWizz instead of 4 AA battery boxes, it will be at least a kilogam lighter. Independent suspension will be changed to a live axle suspended pendular type. This will allow for much more movement when going offroad and more even weight distribution on the axles. Gear ratio will be changed from 1:3 to 1:1,677 due to the increased power of the motors, decreased weight and improved suspension - making the model 80% faster. NO MORE U JOINTS. Since no U joint, or CV can withstand the torque of an XL motor powered by BuWizz, the motors are now directly mounted on the hubs and steer with the wheels. Because there are no U joints the axle can be narrower by 4 studs, but I had to sacrifice a stud of ground clearance comapared to the old one. Servo steering - steering is now updated with 2 servo motors, each in their own axle. Front-most axle's steering angle is 25 degrees. Rear axles no longer need steering due to... Differential steering - since all motors can be individually controlled, the BuWizz's app allows for automatic correction of motor speeds when steering. This means the model can steer even tighter by reducing the speed of the inner motors when steering. Improved wheel mounting points using parts 24122 - the torque is now sent directly to the inside of the wheels without having to use 24 tooth gears and pins. I ordered the missing components and will send photos of the build as it progresses. For the bodywork I am thinking about a red cabine, but not sure which style - high and flat, or low which stick out in front further. Additional functions will be a winch in the front and possibly a crane arm in the back - I will decide on that after I see how it performs.
  17. Finished MOC Do you remember my Reform Metrac H7X ? Reform also produces the Muli: As the project of my Citröen DS doesn’t really progresses, I do this project in WIP, to compensate. ^^ The functions will be close to the Metrac ones: 4WD with a 4 cylinders fake engine Steering with 3 modes Front and rear PTOs And I add: A pneumatic pump to add pneumatic tools Central joint (it’s only the front axle on the Metrac) Openable cab with a lever and a pump actionning a pneumatic cylinder. The best function! But this MOC will not be manual, because there is not so much room in the chassis. (I think it’s possible, but the playability will be extremely bad) So it will be remote controlled, using the BuWizz. So: Driving by 1 XL by axle Steering: 1 servo by axle. To have the 3 steering modes: a M motors controls a PFs switch -> it changes the sens of rotation of the rear servo, or it stops it. The pneumatic pump is powered by a M motor That was the start: And now I’m here: On these two pictures, you can see the rear PTO. On this side, the pneumatic pump: And here is the mecanism which allows the possibility to get 3 steering modes: The chassis is very, very compact. I think you can put an elephant on it, it will not move at all. For the tools, I think I’ll make a pneumatic arm (The pneumatic cylinders of the Mercedes truck would be very helpful, but I don’t have this set) And for the front I don’t know, so if you have ideas, tell me!
  18. Welp, back onto 1/15 scale Made this little thingy in about 12 hours after Madoca's small supercar popped up in my YT recommended. BRICKSHELF (whenever uploaded) As with my Mini Nitro Menace, this year's Corvette wheelbase was taken as a base - should be compatible with the transporter truck - and so the build began. Of course, drive&steering has been done a million times already so this needed a cherry on top - the roof was what I was looking for. Making a chassis was dead easy with the slim wheels and by motorising each rear wheel independently, the need for a differential was eliminated. Thanks to the placement of the BuWizz in between the rear wheels, steering and roof motors could now populate the central tunnel and be hidden under the black 3x11 curved panels giving the interior a "cleaner" look. Now, bodywork ain't my strongest point, but I wanted it to be ferrari RED. This meant working with a very small inventory (for me) most of which you can see on the car Of course ricer butterfly doors were made to make it look cooler than it is. Have a nice weekend, Cya)
  19. desert752

    [MOC] Tumbler

    Hi! Today I'd like to show very small MOC. This funny model has two motors, two wheels and one BuWizz :) Because of rotating center it's not easy to control it, but it is very funny. Instructions: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-28945/desert752/tumbler/#comments Thanks for watching!
  20. Good Day. Got inspired to build this after an in-game motorcycle from Honkai impact 3rd Original idea was to use 2x XL motors, but it was boring af. Next obvious step were buggy motors - allowing an approximate speed of 10km/h. It could probably pick up a higher speed with BuWizz 2.0's Ludicrous mode, but fast mode of BW v1.0 is enough to topple the bike over when taking high-speed turns. Unfortunately it does require "training wheels" to ride straight, as it would lean on one side without those after taking a curve without those. The bike does feature rear axle suspension, and small wheels have shocks as well. "01" stickers reused from MPATEV, "police" from 42047. Design-wise it belong to the same "universe" as my spaceship and racers - an Axos Police bike used to patrol within city high-speed tunnels and surface operations. Video&photos, C&C very welcome and appreciated))) Cya later!
  21. keymaker

    [MOC] KrAZ-255

    Hi, I would like to present you my last creation - russian truck KrAZ-255. I was inspired by the model which is available in PC game: Spintires. The truck is built in scale 1:23. I tried to implement some key features of real truck, like suspension, drive train, details like engine and easy aplicable additions, which are present in the game. Enjoy :) Some details: - weight: 995g - dimensions LxWxH: 49x15x18 studs (without mirrors and additions) - live axle suspension - separate drive shaft for each axle - 6x6 drive, no diffs (L motor) - steering (M motor) - front and rear lights - working fake V8 engine - openable hood and doors - additions! There are some additions too! All of them are easy to connect or disconnect to swap to another. The first is simple crate: The second addition is prepared to wood transportation: The last one is the most advanced one - the crane. It is also partially remotely controlled. Functions: - rising/lowering two sections of the arm - crane rotation - gripper rotation - gripper closing/opening - extendable and lockable outriggers - openable maintenance section More photos: https://bricksafe.com/pages/keymaker/4.-kraz-255 Video: I hope you like it :)
  22. Zerobricks

    [TC16] Hex rover

    For Mission to Mars I decidd to build more of a classical machine - a six wheeled rover. I was heavily inspired by the upcoming Mars 2020 mission (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_2020) and wanted to integrate a drone inside the model. First thing to build were the foldable Rocker-bogie suspension arms, which is unfolded with pneumatics Each bogie featurs a steerable front wheel which is steered using a worm gear mated to a small turntable. Drive power is carried through the turntable to the front wheel. The rear wheels are on their own bogie and are driven by a combiantion of Cv and universal joints: A longitudinal differntial is used on each drivetrain which allows for the speed differences between front and rear wheels when steering. Differential is especially required when steering at 90 degree steering angle, since the rear wheels do not turn at all. A driven differential is used to level the both sides of the suspension arms: Differential allows for the movement of suspension and keeps the body leveled. A single M motor is used to adjust the leveling angle via a worm gear. Suspension in action: In order to unfold the rover, a pneumatic compressor was installed near the front of the body: The same compressor also powers 4 small pneumatic cylinders which open up the tops sides of the rover: A large actuator lifts the base of the 3D camera (placeholder for Wi-Fi camera) on the top and reveals the propeller "drone" inside the rover: Since most rovers include some kind of an arm to dig and check samples, I decided to equip mine with claws. They are able to pick up and lift with the use of a single M motor: And finally the rover can launch the propeller drone using an RC motor powered by BuWizz: Here is the final wrap up of the features and characterisics: 38 x 25 x 15 cm when folded 41 x 25 x 57 cm when unfolded Weighs 1800 grams Powered by 5M, 2L and one RC motor Controlled by 2 BuWizzes Independent all wheel drive with longitudinal differentials Rocker-bogie suspension Pneumatic unfolding Raisable 3D camera arm - placeholder for a WiFi camera Leveling mechanism Drone launcher Working claws Unlimited steering angle And a quick video of the rover in action:
  23. Good Day. Continuing my futuristic series of racers (Ximos , Xonox & Azimus) is this one - popularly called "Bugeye" in Xalax races - Scarab in 1:10 scale Features: BuWizz v1 2x Buggy motors RWD independent suspension m-motor with return to center working steering wheel detailed 1:10 openable canopy light up power core and "dashboard" Overall this was just a filler build with very basic chassis that served as a test platform - bucket seat with actual driver, front suspension with only one shock (part #48912), independent suspension built around buggy motors. This was as well an excuse to use some "new" Bionicle parts on a build and SILVEEEEEEEEEEEEER!!!!!! In the end it turned out OK, but steering was somewhat weak leading to a crash into my pet roomba effectively destroying the car (driver was okay so crash safety test passed?). Incomplete LDD file (the chassis and seat is there, only missing bodywork, power core and steering wheel/dash assembly. download Bonus: Crashed car and fuming driver. Cya later!
  24. Dear train lovers, It's time for another locomotive MOC! As a tribute to my favourite holiday region (where in fact I am right now, writing this), I chose the Flensburger Kreisbahn's No. 1, a 0-8-0T narrow gauge locomotive, as a prototype. The Flensburger Kreisbahn ("Flensburg county railway") was a 1000 mm gauge railway in Germany's extreme North, with two lines (94 km in total) running through the hills of Anglia close to the Danish border. When the railway's older, saturated-steam locomotives became too weak to handle increased train loads, two new superheated-steam engines were ordered from AEG in Berlin - yes, there was a time when AEG, famous for its electrical devices, also built steam locomotives! Delivered in 1926, these 0-8-0T engines, numbered 1 and 2, were an immediate success. With approx. 300 hp and a permitted speed of 40 km/h, they were suited for both freight and heavy passenger trains and remained in service until the railway's closure in 1953. Sadly, both locomotives were scrapped. A substantial problem while designing the model was the almost complete lack of reliable sources. All technical information had to be derived from a short description, some b/w photos and a single small drawing in just one book (Schöning/Kupfer: Die Flensburger Kreisbahnen. Verlag Kenning, Nordhorn, 2004; the drawing is reproduced below with kind permission by Mr Kenning). Nevertheless, I'm confident that my model comes as close as possible to the real engines. The MOC consists of approx. 2,200 parts and weighs just under 1.5 kg. It is held in accurate 1:22.5 scale, therefore compatible with conventional garden railway equipment (45 mm G-scale track), and can be coupled to rolling stock fitted out with LGB link-and-pin couplers. My layout uses the LGB R3 radius (1195 mm), so the locomotive has to be able to negotiate these curves. However, as I wanted to avoid the use of blind drivers for aesthetical reasons, this required two little tricks: The last axle is slidable sideways by +/- 1/2 stud, and the second axle's wheels are slightly set inwards, resulting in an increased lateral track play. Although this arrangement causes some drag while negotiating curves, it nevertheless works. The locomotive is driven by two L-motors. A BuWizz functions as both a battery pack and remote control receiver. The lighting equipment was bought from Brickstuff, while the wheels are BBB XL drivers, as usual. Purists may kindly ignore the two following scenes... Of course, the engine crew was proud to pose for a souvenir photo. Even the local grocer came to have a look at the new locomotive. The engine frame: While my previous BDZ 606.76 had its focus on exploring the possible level of detailing for a LEGO model, this time the goal was to design a simple locomotive for uncomplicated operation. Above all, the new model had to overcome the 606.76's proneness to tipping over. Thus, the frame houses two weight bricks for improved traction and a lower centre of gravity (highlighted in blue): Some views of the brake rigging and the two large vacuum-brake cylinders: All drivetrain components, including the BuWizz, are tightly packed and positioned as low and as close to the engine's centre as possible, again with the aim of optimizing the COG: The power button and the charging socket are accessible by removing part of the boiler top: The cylinders, closed-type feedwater heater (system "Knorr"), and generator: The upper part of the cab. While looking quite simple, the task to model the roof's half-stud offset and the vent hole in the cab front almost drove me nuts... But I think I found a satisfying solution: Cab interior and lights: This time there was no space for magnetic switches to control the headlights; so the coal bunker contains two small separate battery packs (with built-in switches) for front and rear lights. The cab is illuminated, too, when any of the two circuits is turned on. Realistic Winterthur valve gear. The basic dimensions are the same as on my BDZ 606.76: Originally, I had used zephyr1934's rods and valve gear parts again. But then I found them to be looking too massive , considering the rather delicate rods of the prototype. Besides, during the first functional testing sessions of the near-completed model, the flex elements which I originally used for the side rods proved too large by just a fraction of a millimetre - the cable connectors collided with the rear mounting of the crosshead guide, something which could not be foreseen in LDD. So I knuckled down to get used to Tinkercad and designed my own rods, including thinner, slightly tapezoidal main rods as well (both subsequently made by Shapeways). And for the first time - SMOKE (using a Seuthe No. 99 smoke generator, powered by the BuWizz via a modified PF cable): I finished the model just in time before going on holiday, so I had no time to shoot a video on track. Of course, I'll do this when I'm back home again. In the meantime, your feedback, comments and criticism are most welcome! As usual, high-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder. If someone should be interested in the LDD file, please contact me by PM. Thanks for stopping by! Best regards, Sven Edit: Now with on-track video - see here!
  25. Hi guys, I’ve been following the forum for some years not, but I’ve been mostly a “lurker in the dark”. But, after 2.5 years designing and building when I had some spare time, I can finally share my 1:20 crawler crane MOC with you. For now it has somewhere around 40.000-60.000 parts (don’t know exactly how many). I’ve tried to build it as close as possible to a real crane in terms of assembly and functionality, with the usual constrains that you have with building out of Lego at this size and scale. As a disclaimer (and as a direct apology to Lego purists), the slewing bearing is not lego, but a cross roller bearing. The drive of the bearing is Lego, using the ¼ gear racks from the 42055 BWE. Took me about 6 monts to find a bearing that fits in size with the internal gearing of the gear racks, so that the driving axles still fit trough. Also, if you look really close, there were some occasions where I got out the Dremel for some adjusting (mainly panels), as I didn’t want to sacrifice strength, or design. Again, sorry to the purists. The crane is powere by 4 BuWizz, one in each central counterweight (between the crawlers), and one in each superstructure counterweights. I love the fact that you can still operate the BuWizz while it’s charging, so I have a power bank battery next to each BuWizz. Like this you get hours and hours of play time even with a large heavy model like this. The drive is as follows: - Each crawler is powered by 4 PF XL Motors (and one BuWizz per crawler) geared down 240:1. The motors don’t drive the ends of the crawler, but 8 sets of 2 gears underneath each of the crawler chassis. Due to weight reasons I used metal axles from Eezo’s Brick Machine Shop from the US. -Slewing is done again by 4 PF XL Motors which sit in the base of the superstructure. - Each winch is driven by a PF L motor. They were powered by 2 PF L motors, but because the winches are worm-driven I had some issues with them not running synchronous and overloading the motors. The winches can be individually taken out from the superstructure for maintenance and use 1mm wax rope. Structurally the main building technique for the crawlers, undercarriage and superstructure is an array of 5x7 technic frames. I’ll come back on another post with some pics of the various building techniques and technical details. Maybe I’ll also do a more detailed video on this sometime soon. The crane is not finished yet. I still need to build the superlift tray and telescope, which will be EV3 controlled so that it self-adjusts, and sadly I need to rebuild all the boom. Until a main boom length of 4.5m everything is ok, but with more than that it starts to bend too much. In the video below I’ve build 4m of boom, because it was pretty windy when we shot the video. The goal would be 7m someday. I want to keep the boom in the main boom+short fixed jib configuration. A luffing jib would be easier to lift (most large Lego cranes that I saw are built in a luffing jib configurations), but as I work in wind turbine assembly, I want to build the boom configuration that we use mostly. Here some pictures from the assembled crane: https://www.flickr.com/photos/164584645@N03/ And here a video about the crane (without wanting to advertise for the channel) As mentioned before, I’ll follow-up with some more pics from the building phase and building techniques. I hope you guys like the crane.