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Found 629 results

  1. (Putting this together rather hastily) There has been very brief mention in the Creator thread of a new 18+ Titanic model for 2021, rumours having been leaked in the last 24 hours. Considering that the last ship LEGO made in an expert style was the Maersk one, which I missed, I'm particularly excited about this one. Thanks to @VanIslandLego for this one. No other info is known. Discuss below.
  2. I’m designing a 1:200 scale model of the Queen Mary 2 with full interior (except the hotel rooms, 1300 identical rooms would get redundant). I’m using LDD to design it and hope to buy the 19,228 pieces and build it over the next 2-5 years. It will have working elevators, cargo doors, passenger doors, and all 17 decks with machinery and public spaces. Let me know what you think.
  3. Greetings, shipwrights. Whether a novice, an apprentice, a master, or a veteran shipwright, following the process of others, sharing your own, and giving and receiving feedback can help everyone improve. What's the point? This is just a place for all of us liberally to post WIP's for feedbacks, tips, suggestions, and questions, without otherwise littering the BoBS forum with WIP's. You can post just one step in the process, or several over a period. It's all up to you. So I am working on a vessel/ship - what do I do? Post one or more pictures, questions, ship-plans, descriptions, etc. here, and hopefully someone will step in with some wonderful advice. At least, I expect to do so. I know NOTHING about ships - can I comment, and how do I do? Everyone with something constructive to say can comment. No need to be a scholar in historic vessels, medieval carpentry or sail making. Sometimes it might just be aesthetics, a crazy idea, a suggestion for a technique, use of a specific brick, or whatever you can think of. Just keep it nice and constructive. In return, builders posting here will pwomise not to take offense! I'd suggest tagging the builder you are commenting on. But I am not an expert - the arrogant elite will laugh at my puny attempts at shipbuilding! First of all, the arrogant elite was not invited. In fact, they have been given specific instructions to go back to their fancy little elitist coffee houses to talk about how brilliant they are. Secondly, regarding puny attempts, take a look at my first attempt at a ship just two and a half years ago... Well, you really don't have to look. Move along... Nothing to see here... The rather obvious point being, we all start somewhere, and no matter where you start, or how steep your learning curve is. The only requirement is that you want to share your process, learn from others, share your ideas, and/or improve. Soooo, is this something official? What will I gain from participating? EGS bonuses? HAH! This is merely me gone rogue - and I may hang from my toes for it! No official bonuses here. However, I'd like to see a bit more focus on the process and techniques of building here, and I think ships is an interesting place to start. This is, however, quite likely to be replaced, superseded, or added to by something official at some point in the future. Who manages this and keeps the record? Manages? Keeps records? Bwahahaha - forget it! Just post your WIP's and comments. Don't overthink it! ________________________________________________________________________ Kick off! Oooohkay, here we go: I have been working on a 4th rate, circa 50 guns on two decks. I present to you: The HMS Endeavour. Started here: Went here: And have ended here: She is supposed to be the first in a series of 4th rates designed for colonial waters. A 4th rate is a small ship of the line between 46 and 60 guns, just above frigate size. This one is (IC) specifically designed to serve as flagship for colonial squadrons, sailing in consort with frigates and sloops. Looking forward to hearing your comments! And to see your WIP's!
  4. Cruisers of Terra Nova Citizens of Corrington, shipwrights of the Brick Seas. The Royal Navy has decided to outfit several ocean-going cruisers for Terra Nova to counter the build-up of Olean, Eslandian, and Mardierian Forces. These cruisers will be sixth rate frigates, flanked by smaller consorts may be heavy sloops or post-ships. 6th rates and post-ships (bobs class 6) will be bought into service for a net of 100 dbs, while heavy sloops (bobs class 5) will be bought for 75 dbs. All vessels will be licensed by the crown as necessary and be granted the honour of bearing the prefix “HMS”. For each three vessels submitted, the best will be awarded a choice from the list of captured prizes. Signed Rear-Admiral Fletcher Commander, Royal Terra Novan Fleet Pledged vessels: HMS Wentham ( @Flavius Gratian), Brig-rigged sloop HMS Royal Oak by sir Dirk Allcock (@Ayrlego), 6th rate HMS... by sir Micah of Wolfhaven (@SilentWolf), 6th rate HMS... by Sir Aidan Coyle (@Mike S) HMS… by Sir Dee ( @Captain Dee) HMS... by the Montoya Estate ( @Bregir), 18 gun ship sloop under construction The crown aims at commissioning these vessels as they are launched to give the Royal Terra Novan Navy the means to protect the interests of Corrington in New Terra. Sign up now to help shore up the Oaken Wall protecting our freedom of thought and action. All vessels will be used for a wide variety of tasks including combat patrols, pirate hunting, escorts and assisting our land forces.
  5.  Hi all! With great pleasure I present to you this terrifying ship! Hope you like it! More on Instagram! 
  6. Brick Car

    [MOC] Microscale Offshore Powerboat

    A tiny microscale Offshore Powerboat!!! It contains 33 pieces without the base.Fast,tiny and yellow,the king of the sea. Offshore powerboat new_4 by Antonis Papastergiou Offshore powerboat new_3 by Antonis Papastergiou Offshore powerboat new by Antonis Papastergiou Offshore powerboat new_4 by Antonis Papastergiou Ofshore powerboat_6 by Antonis Papastergiou Ofshore powerboat_7 by Antonis Papastergiou Ofshore powerboat_8 by Antonis Papastergiou Ofshore powerboat_9 by Antonis Papastergiou, on Flickr
  7. Sebeus I

    [MOC] Broadside Brig

    My second entry into the 90th anniversary contest at LEGO Ideas. This build are actually two builds, One is based on the classic pirates set Broadside Brig (although it might as well be Lagoon Lock-up, the two are conceptually very similar)... ...The other is based on 6265 Sabre Island. But the real star of this creation is the little ship! The hull is very similar to my earlier one (Cross Bone Clipper) Only the Broadside Brig part has an interior, although there's plenty of space to make some on Sabre Island as well.
  8. It's been a long time coming, but i finally present my first ship moc, the Andromache. Equipped with a set of 7 sails and a broadside of nine 18 pounder cannons, the Andromache’s speed and maneuverability coupled with her firepower, makes her a dangerous opponent even for bigger ships. However in order to obtain such a high firepower while maintaining it's speed, compromises were made : The ship has very little cargo space which affects both her range and crew size. But that is of no concern to Scarver, as her main purpose will be to serve as escort or to hunt down enemy ships around Corrington Settlements. While sailing to Spudkirk the Andromache fell upon some rather unlucky Lotii raiders ---------- I'm very pleased with how the ship came out, it's based on the french Cutter "Le Cerf" from 1779. A special thanks @kurigan for pushing me in the right direction while building the ship She will be licenced as a Class 4.
  9. Eki1210

    Anti Gravity Racing Ships

    In this topic i´d like to show you some AG Racers i came up with. Designwise they are inspired by the Wipeout game series. Anti - Grav - Racing by Henrik S, auf Flickr Racing through the Living Room by Henrik S, auf Flickr Racing through the Living Room by Henrik S, auf Flickr Anti - Grav - Racing by Henrik S, auf Flickr Anti - Grav - Racing by Henrik S, auf Flickr Hope you enjoy!
  10. Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 On July 31st, 1715 one of the wealthiest Treasure Fleets in history wrecked off the coast of Florida. Millions of Spanish coins, jewels, and other valuables littered the shallows. After months of Spanish recovery efforts a small fortune remained lightly guarded on the beach, open to anyone daring enough to steal it. In early 1716, a small group of pirates lead by Henry Jennings, Sam Bellamy, and Benjamin Hornigold raided the small Spanish garrison and made off with a haul equivalent to 10 years of wages for only a single nights 'work'. The wealth of this raid and the inspiration it provided for would-be pirates across the New World, kicked off the final stages of the Golden Age of Piracy. Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Treasure of the Spanish Plate Fleet, 1716 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  11. ClassicLook

    [MOC] Skull's Eye Cutter

    Hi, Let me share with you my custom pirate ship. It's not actually an own creation, it's just a re-design, but I tried to build in some unique solutions, so I think it's in the right topic. I've always been a LEGO pirate fan, but I had only small sets. For a few months I returned to this passion and I started to collect bigger sets from 1990-1994. I prefer pirates and islanders subtheme. I've gotten the Renegade Runner, and I customised it (I've shared it in the improvements topic), but it wasn't enough! I wanted to have a more playable ship. I didn't have so much space and money to collect big ships like BSB or SES, but I really liked the dimensions of the 6271 Imperial Flagship, so I desided to transform it into a pirateship. I've seen good solutions on this site (for ex. from Cherno) and they also inspired me. A wanted to keep the shape of the original ship, with a design of the SES. The sails I've used are from RR (which are perfectly match to the 6271), completed with the main sail from SES (that's also the same size as the 6271's). I've added five minifigs from the SES and three animals too (monkey, parrot and rat). It's not as creative as some ships here, but I'm very satisfied with it. Here's an overview: IMG_4991 másolat by Gyula Herr, on Flickr Thanks for stopped by!
  12. Brethren of the Brick Seas: Class 7 Another MOC from the 21322 Barracuda Ship. Venezia 05 by Philippe, auf Flickr My first Barracuda Frigate had too many flaws and things that I didn't like. That's why I rebuilt this one. Venezia 06 by Philippe, auf Flickr The bug was completely changed. Venezia 07 by Philippe, auf Flickr The gradations and Tetris curves for the cannons remain. Venezia 13 by Philippe, auf Flickr The deck only has 3 levels. Before it was 7 and I was annoyed when I wanted to place something on the deck. Venezia 09 by Philippe, auf Flickr Ship railing now has no Tetris levels. Venezia 12 by Philippe, auf Flickr The masts and rigging were built more realistically. Venezia 11 by Philippe, auf Flickr For the sails I will use fabric ones. I only built it from Lego bricks so that the photos are more interesting. Venezia 10 by Philippe, auf Flickr A ship only comes to life with minifigures. Therefore, a crew that is ready for boarding. Some pirates have bottles-grenades. Venezia 14 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 15 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 08 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 04 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 03 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 02 by Philippe, auf Flickr Venezia 01 by Philippe, auf Flickr
  13. After months of work, the Royal Navy’s newest ship set sail from Quinnsville ! The Cutter was commissioned by the Admiralty Board in order to increase patrols around Corrington shores. Frederick Chapman had worked for several private investors in the past, even some of high standing, but never had he been contacted by agents of the Crown. The day he received the commission was the happiest day of his life, the honor to have been entrusted with the task of creating a ship for the Royal Navy, was beyond measurable. He swore he would not disappoint them, in fact, he convinced himself that he would create the fastest ship the Royal Navy had ever seen ! He spent weeks in his office making dusins of drafts and sketches. He combined ship designs he had learned from both Oleon and Elsandolan designers, even a few interesting elements he had observed on a Sea Rat ship. He wished he knew more about their ships, but Sea Rats are after all not the most common visitors of Corrington… For good reasons. Once his design was done, he was ordered to Queensville where he would oversee her construction. People from around all of Quinsville gathered at the docks to celebrate her launch. The ship was so light and sleek that when the crew opened her sails, she was immediately picked up by the wind and flew right through the waves. The crowd simultaneously reacted in aw, while Frederick, overcome by joy, jumped around and celebrated right there on the docks. The representative who had taken the ship on her maiden voyage, later admitted that she was so fast he feared they would take off and join the birds in the sky. He decided then and there to christen her HMS Peregrine, the fastest ship on the Brick Seas. ------- A new class 4 Cutter for the Navy. She is armed with 12 4-pounders and 6 swivel guns. My recommendations for her stats are : R M G C $ H 3 6 4 2 0 3 The ship being the fastest in brick seas is obviously just for story purposes and can't affect any game outcome, so don't take it too seriously
  14. cagri

    [MOC] TLG Rapier

    For my 7th birthday, my super cool parents took me to a toy store and let me decide between the TMNT Party Wagon and 6285 Black Seas Barracuda. As a child, that was the most difficult decision I had to make in my life and honestly, even as an adult I'm having trouble choosing either. Nevertheless, there was no wrong answer and I decided to get the Party Wagon and enjoyed it for years. Ever since this challenging choice, several beautiful ships have been procuded by TLG but I never splurged on them. Fortunately, I married the coolest person ever and she gave me 21322 Pirates of Barracuda Bay as a new year present! After decades of drooling over LEGO ships, I had the best one ever produced :) I loved it so much that it heavily inspired me to build my own ship. And here you may see the result: TLG Rapier More photos on my Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/legoadam/
  15. Samuel Scarver had been following Corringtons actions closely as the threat of the Lotii in New Haven grew bigger by the day... knowing that our leaders would never let them get away with it. When news of a planned invasion finally arrived, he knew he had to help. In his prime he would have taken a Letter of Marque and gone there himself, alas, his age would not allow him. However, retired from a successful trade company, Samuel owned a good handful of ships. So he had his best warship restored and ready for action. She was a Corvette he had captured on one of his trade expeditions all those years ago. The ship was fast and well armed, with a total of 18x 8-pounder guns, 4x 6-pounders : 2 bow chasers and 2 stern chasers, and to top it all off, 10 swivel guns to repel all boarders. She was the perfect escort, not a single piece of cargo was ever lost under her protection. In many ways she reminded him a lot of his mother, as she had always shielded him from danger, despite how hard he made it. So he named her, Alexandra, his mother's name, and had the figurehead represent her holding her favorite bird, the hummingbird. To tell the truth, he was sad to let her go… But he knew she would serve the Queen well, just like she had him. And to a man who bled the colors of Corrington, nothing meant more. He contacted an old friend of his from the Noble Parliament, whom he intrusted to find a suitable captain for the ship. With her Majesty's Navy having no shortage of experienced naval officers, the ship was immediatly assigned to an up-and-coming captain Foster. A mere 3 days later, Samuel Scarver stood at the docks of Belson, as he watched HMS Alexandra sail into the sunset. (There are actually 9 figures barely visible / invisible from the angle I took the image ) ----------- A new Cruiser for the Navy! She is a class 6 Corvette built for the Oaken Shield task, you are free to decide her stats, otherwise she is ready to be licenced. This ship is heavily inspired by one of "boeing_787_8_dreamliner" ships on instagram, he makes som very nice ships and was nice enough to send me the file for his ship "La Therese". I learned a lot of new technics from his ship and I borrowed 90% of his fantastic rigging as well as some other parts. (Samuel Scarver is Edward's father and was referred to in my character's introduction)
  16. The other day I started working on my very first Ship Of The Line! After seeing all of those fantastic ship's I could no longer resist the urge to try it out myself. So here I'am. As you all know this will be a project that will take a couple of months to finish so I figured I should let you see the building process and give some helpful advice if you feel like it One of the things that I just want to tell you all is that she will be built on Pre-fab Hulls, so don't even try. I have already done some progress that I will show you in the following pictures: Her is how she looks like right now. I didn't really have a choice when it came to the colors. I have way to many brown parts to just let them lay around, the black is well, standard and the dk brown was very cheap. This isn't of course the final design so your inputs are more than welcome! This will be her total length, 8 mid-sections in total. Just like any proper ship of the line she can be split up in parts to reveal her soon to come interior. I hope you all will enjoy the ride! P.S she have no connections to the real Vanguard, I just had to quickly find a name.
  17. Thomas Waagenaar

    [MOC] L'Aurelié, 44-gun heavy frigate.

    I would like to present my first ship, out of what will hopefully end up as a fleet of many more! Her name is L'Aurelié, she's a 44-gun heavy frigate. On her lower-deck she carries 28x 24 pounder long guns. On her upper deck she carries 16x 18 pounder long guns, interchangable for carronades! (Not yet designed). Of these cannons, 2 of them are in bow chase and another 2 in aft chase configuration. Overall she is about 110 centimeters long with bowsprit included. On the waterline she is about 80 centimeters long. At her tallest point she is 72 centimeters tall. Thematically I went with the flags and ensign of the Russian navy in the 18th century, as I just thought these flags looked cool and fit the colours of the ship quite well! The printed flags on top of the masts I got from Brickprint in the Netherlands, the large flag at the rear is just a small table flag I took apart with only the flag part remaining. Sadly, she has no sails and will not get them either, as due to the place she is displayed is right below my AC-unit, meaning that whenever it's blowing air it would essentially mess up or even rip off the sails in the worst case scenario... As such, I have decided to not do sails on her. (Which fits my "agenda" anyways as I don't have proper sewing capabilities to make actually nice looking sails anyways) I hope you guys enjoy her! She'll be sailing around the Brick Seas too over at the BoBS page, for her story, please click this link! L'Aurelié L'Aurelié L'Aurelié L'Aurelié For some more pictures, please see the album below, if anyone wants more close-ups or anything, let me know and I'll happily take some more! I'm aware some pictures are quite dark, the lighting is sadly never really good here in my apartment... :( It's either full sun so the glare is way too extreme, or too little sun, resulting in some darker images... https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVP4s9L
  18. (I was unsure again which forum to use; feel free to move it to a more appropriate spot if need be). Grin, who said history never changes? This ship’s known history changed between 1978 (Lego’s first edition of this set) and the 2003 reissue of this set. Back in 1978 it was thought the now still preserved museum ship was the original 1797 build ship, that underwent a thorough rebuild in 1854. But by the time the 2003 set came out, it was decided the 1854 rebuild was actually a completely new ship, with perhaps a few timbers used from the first ship. (photo by James in Balto, via Wikicommons) Anyway, we do not use timbers. Onto the bricks Mr Baines! (Yep, no box, no instructions, no original set. Just two bags with lots of bricks…) I wanted to build this ship for several reasons. I never knew this Lego set way back when. By the time this one appeared (1978), I was well into my dark ages. So getting this set was not exactly fulfilling a childhood dream. Hence I had no need for originals. A bricklinked set of stones would be fine. Luckily, some vendors offered just that already! No childhood-dream set. But building big sail ships was one of the things I did a lot when I was a kid. Those were all Rainbow Worriers, so to speak, where I would use all colours I had to reach size. Big as possible. And from what I remember, the intricate rigging was what I spend most time on. The rigging was actually needed to keep my masts and spars up and in position. I used little cards with darning wool from mom to make that rigging. I remember the start always being an exercise in patience and frustration-management, with masts and spars collapsing at every touch until I would have the basic rigging up. So building a large sailing ship might be a nice sentimental journey anyway. A chance to finally get it right; all in one colour. And with enough bricks to end what I began. Another reason for getting this set was that, like most Hobby sets from the seventies, it uses very few ‘weird’ or specialized bricks. It is mostly constructed from 2x8 and some smaller standard bricks, 2x8 and 1x8 plates (and quite a lot of smaller plates). Many black bricks and plates, and quite a few yellow plates (both so far rather sparse in my stash). The set would be a nice addition to my basic set of bricks and plates. And finally, I got to check tricks and techniques of the Lego Masterbuilders of those days. The hobby sets are often praised as pretty much the ultimate builds in the old Lego style, and I tend to agree (the cars from that series are fantastic as well). The masts for example are set into the hull by technic axels, one of the few more modern elements in this build. They more or less promise masts that might stand on their own, without the rigging I really needed. The original 398 set was from 1978, the in 2003 reissued set was number 10021. I did not know what I was getting, luckily it turned out to be the 1978 set. The first round was what is now known as knolling; sorting the bricks type by type, in neat stacks, well laid out on a surface. The ideal way to check if you got everything, and it makes for a pretty easy way to handle, find and store bricks. I usually stack bricks with one or two studs free left or right, for easy counting and separating them. It took me 2 afternoons, mixed with reading online, checking the Bricklink inventory lists for this set, and with reading up on the real ship. 978 parts. I was missing a few 1x1 yellow plates, but I had enough in my stash to get that sorted out. (for those in the want: these are all the bricks for the original build, I tend to use pictures like this as sort of bricklists for my own builds) The yellow 1x1 windows mark this as a 398 set, the 10021 set used yellow 1x1 'headlight' bricks because the windows had gone uhm, out the window (perhaps nautical terms are more clear: The yellow windows had gone over the wall? Or is that just Dutch briney?). Building. Round one... I had managed to gather instructions for the set from the internet (taking care to get the right ones for this particular set), and it was time to start building. Reading the (not to big and slightly unsharp) scanned instructions was sometimes hard. This is old fashioned building; counting studs with several steps added per drawing. It took me a few restarts to get it right. As ‘Questforbricks’ once noticed in his blog, the joy of building with Lego is also a matter of timing. Don’t push it, we are doing this for fun. So stopping at the right moment is important. It is nice if something has progressed far enough to show progress, and it is even better to end a session with a product that invites you to work some more on it. So I made a pause at what I hoped would be the right moment. (wreck of the Bayard, South Georgia) Right now, the hull resembles a shipwreck. A ship, run aground by accident or on purpose, and left to fall apart where it stranded because it is not in anybody’s way. In a cold climate, such a ship takes a very long time to fall apart. Yep, things are going swell... No decks and superstructures, but already a recognisable hull, with just a few stumps where the masts used to be (or are going to be), beams and girders bare. That is pretty much how the ship looks now. The keel is laid, from here it is all upward and outward. A good time to leave it for the next round. Second round Although I had to go back and forth a few times on the bow, all-in all things progressed nicely. Most problems I had were with the slightly fuzzy instruction prints I had made; especially with the red and yellow plates, it was not always clear which plates were used. And these are old style instructions, no step by step exploded view. You get a drawing, and in the next drawing, a lot of bricks and plates have been added. It is a matter of counting studs and searching to spot all the differences. Regularly I would concentrate on one part of the ship, and miss steps on the other end of the ship. Back up two or three steps, to see what I missed there, and add those too. All in all I enjoyed this a lot, it is more fun than just brick by brick doing as you are told. An evening of building, and an hour the next day finished the hull. I must say, I am not a fan of canon bristling ships, and not the biggest fan of sailing ships from this period (beginning 19th century), but this is turning out rather nice! The thin white line seems to be the waterline, a bit higher up than I expected, but yes, it seems about right. The overall shape is very good, and the silhouette of the hull works remarkably well. With the black bricks, the blocky appearance of what should be smooth ship curves (the basic Lego problem in building ships) is hidden rather well. It is only in the lighter details, like the gilded bow, that the ships shows its Legoness. The interrupted white band of the gun deck does add a lot of character to the ship. The black brinks also resemble the planks of a wooden hull nicely. And there are a lot of small details that I do love. There are little roof bricks used in slits in the deck, that depict stairs going down to the lower deck. The ships bell is represented by an unprinted minifigure head (back when knolling, I expected it to be part of the figure head of the ship). There is a capstan and a steering wheel, although the capstan is placed a bit awkward between two openings in the deck (a scale problem I expect, a capstan is massive). The one thing I am not too sure about are the glass plates covering part of the gun deck. I expect on the real ship this would have been a grated hatch, and I am thinking about replacing them with black plates. But first I want to build the ship according to instructions… The small yellow windows (one of the things that show this to be a 398 set) add a lot of life to the stern of the ship. And this was a nice point to stop until I had more time... Third round lucky? The masts, spars and sails were a lot less work than expected, and flew on. The masts are a bit massive from the front, but a lot stronger and better connected than anything I did in my youth (rails and plates...). And the stowed sails add quite a bit of life to the masts. The minimal rigging was just that; minimal. And a bit of an embarrassment to be honest This is the ship as intended. Hmmm, the end result is slightly less appealing than I expected. I finished the ship as per instructions, including the very minimal rigging. And all in all it certainly is an impressive build, large and not bad at all… But several parts are screaming at the boat-nerd in me to get corrected. The bulwarks (the sides of the ship above the deck) are too high in some places (technically correct, but it throws off the lines of the hull due to scale effects). I am not a fan of all guns out (there might have been a different opinion had I been 10 year old me). I also discovered it will not be possible to rig the ship properly until I do some serious rebuilding in the hull itself. At the sides of the ships are rests, boards sticking out for the shrouds and stays of the masts, and they are too far forward to set up a realistic rigging. I need to move them back until they are behind the centre of the masts. And when I do that, I might as well close all the canon ports, at least at one side, to make for a smoother hull. (rolls up sleeves, spits in hands, time to get some modding done...) Modding Most urgent; correcting the rests for shrouds and stays on the sides... On the left side the build as instructed, on the right the uhm, right way for shroud and stay boards ( I know I should have stuck to nautical terms)… I closed the gun ports and enlarged the fighting tops in the masts (those are the plateaus at about 1/3 from the bottom of the mast that look a bit like low crows nests). I also lowered the boom on the mizzen mast, so it came closer to the deck. As an addition, I decided to try and make a little more difference between the stowed sails. A few not yet fully stowed, like a ship entering Harbour? I also added some stowed stay sails to the bow sprit. I was a bit unsure whether the half stowed sail looks too blocky or not, but they do add a certain liveliness to the whole. I also experimented with more realistic guns on the deck. But the ones I liked best were too big for the rest of the deck, so I decided to leave them off entirely. The most interesting design would be 3 studs wide, and 4 studs deep (on a deck that is 8 studs wide). Too bad, too big… Rigging Back in the old days when I build Lego sailing ships, rigging it was pretty much the main event. It was not much different this time. All in all, I build the ship in 4 sessions, a few hours each, perhaps 7 or 8 hours in total. Between the instruction-finished model and my own version I had 11 sessions, some just an hour, but several 3 or 4 hour long sessions. Yep, that was the main event alright. I would pester Mom until she would give me a card with darning wool to rig my ships, and spend days at trying to get it right or at least slightly logical. I intended to do the same thing now, using that very same darning wool. Which turned out to be easier said than done. For starters, I could not find anything like that stuff in my town. Don’t people darn their socks any-more? Uhm, well truth be told, I don’t. I wear thin cotton socks these days, and any repairs feel like pebbles in my shoe. Right. Who still darns socks? I tried some some strings, like cotton or knitting wool, but they all turned out too thick to clamp between bricks easily. I really needed that darning wool! Luckily and much to my surprise, those old cards with wool were still readily available in Germany, just across the border. Ha! It took me a while to figure out how to do the rigging best. The big difference between real rigging and a model is the lack of pulley’s, deadeye’s and other bits and bobs that allow to tighten ropes one by one. In Lego, you do one rope right, tighten the next rope, and the earlier rope suddenly show slack… Especially the shrouds (those web like side ropes up into the masts, that sailors climb) took some experimenting to get right. And as always in a model, there are decision points on what to show, and what to leave out. Once I had figured out a way to do it, I removed all the ropes done so far, cleared the masts of all the spars and started anew. It takes some planning to make sure I could reach all the points. Once certain ropes were in place, you could not get everywhere anymore. Basically I had to work from back to front, and from the centreline of the ship to the sides. The ‘running' ropes (moving ropes, used to hoist and lower sails, or trim sails to the wind) are ‘new’, signalled by a light tan (for new or less worn ropes) or a dark brown colour (for older ropes). The stays, shrouds and other ‘fixed’ lines would be tarred, so those are black. All in all this looks a lot more like I hoped for. The ship has proudly resided on my display shelf for over a year, until dust threatened to take over (the ‘hairy’ wool is a great dust-collector, and all the lines and ropes make it virtually impossible to dust the decks and bricks). All in all it has been a pleasure to build, and was quite a sight on my shelf. I plan on building something older in future, but strongly based on these building principles... Might be a while though, for right now I am lost in space...
  19. Gabor

    [MOC] RC Balaton Ferry

    I´m happy to present you my newest model, a not exact copy of the ferries on lake Balaton in Hungary. Hope you like it! As I was a small kid we often spent our summer near Balaton. If someone is younger than 6 and lives normally in a small village, it is really impressive to see cars which drive onto a ship and after that they come down on the other side. That´s why it was always a highlight for me to visit and sometimes travel by this ferry. Still nowadays if I´m there I wait the ferry once coming and going away. It´s still the same ferry as 25 years ago, I still find it really cool and it brings back the old memories. It took 9 months from the idea to the final MOC. The building process included some really cool challenges and was one of the most exciting developing projects in my entire MOC-life. The idea was to build a remote controlled ferry which can swim and drive on real water, can catch the coast reliably and my older tiny RC models (Milka truck and Flixbus) have to be able to drive up and down. The last requirement was to make it possible to show the whole setup on exhibitions. At first I searched on the internet for the biggest one-piece plastic box and ordered one of them. It was difficult because most of the big boxes has small bottom wholes to let water out. I needed exactly the opposite of it. Keeping water in the box. The measures of the box decided the measures of the model. On the beginning I tried to experiment with some LEGO boat hulls. The facts that these hulls are not completely closed and the ship is without vehicles already very heavy brought me to the solution to use empty bottles. They are the most reliable things to keep air in and protect the electric parts, like Sbrick from the water. Of course you can say I could put everything to a higher position, not integrated into the deck. But no, if everything would be in the building, everything would be on one side and the ferry would be completely unbalanced. On this side everything would be under water. What I could do was to integrate the motors on the other side into the deck. It was also not enough. I needed counterweights. At first some LEGO keels, but they were not heavy enough (they contain air, too :/). So at the end I used simply some pieces of steel. The real ferry has Voith Schneider propellers. We know that it´s possible to recreate it with LEGO bricks, but not at this small size. And he depth of the box is only 15 cm. That level of reality was also not the goal of the project. The draught of the loaded ferry had to be less than 15 cm, so I decided to use 4 propellers. Of course the available propellers of LEGO are like disasters, if we examine their functionality. If they are not, they are too big. So I built my own version out of Technic pieces. The propulsion uses two channels of the Sbrick, one for each side. You can turn with the ferry that way. I thought you don’t need this feature in this thin box, which is only 10 cm wider, than the ferry. But I was not right. You really need to do turning maneuvers to keep the ferry parallel with the walls. And yes, I hope I will have the chance to drive the ferry in a bigger pool in the future! Next challenge was to catch the coast stable enough for the buses and trucks. Maybe I said earlier that the ferry is everything else than horizontal. The counterweights are good, but not good enough. The proportion of the weights of the vehicles and the real ferry are also different than at the LEGO word. So the LEGO ferry has extremely strong reactions, if the vehicles come. The real ferry has also water tanks to balance itself. The LEGO ferry doesn´t have such a help. So I decided to build the ramp so that it can take part in bringing the ferry into a better position at least near the coast. There is a hook on the ramp (see in the video). It catches the panels of the coast and don´t let the ferry go away. After that it goes down a bit more and forces the whole ferry to raise itself a bit. The coast is horizontal, so this force brings the ferry also closer to the right horizontal position. That is nice, but as the vehicles arrive, it changes. That´s why I had to develop a correct order, position and driving path for the vehicles, too. These small vehicles are not off-roaders. If you can´t follow the instructions, the vehicles stuck on the ramp. But if you do everything well, it works smooth! The most difficult one of the nonfunctional problems was to create the meeting of the deck and the curved walls without gaps. I used for it 1x2x2 panels. The deck goes actually into the wall (under the top of the panels). But the upper end of these panels is not equal high with a whole number of plates, so I had to sink the wall on the sides with a half plate. I did it by using different wholes on the Technic frame, as for the deck. 1 Technic whole is 2,5 plates, so using neighboring wholes gives us the 0,5 plate difference. The ferry had its first appearance on Bricks4Family 2021. It worked surprisingly well during the weekend. After the box was completely horizontal and the exact level of the water was also found. By catching the coast the visitors often thought, it´s enough to turn off the propellers and open the ramp. What they (and I on the beginning) didn´t realise was the fact that if the ferry drives, the water goes in the other direction under it. If the propellers stop, the water brings the ferry slowly back. One method is the perfect timing with opening the ramp. Other method is to keep the propellers on and opening the ramp at the same time. After Bricks4Family I made a few very small changes on the ferry, so on the second exhibition (Ilmbricks 2021) worked everything even better. I put for example a door on the side, so it was possible to switch on and off the battery box, without removing the captain´s deck, the life boat and the whole roof. The deck has also 4 invisible, but removable panels. If they are removed, I can hold the ferry by holding the really strong Technic frame. Now there are small Technic bricks in them. It became much easier to remove the panels with the help of a small bar or an axle. If you really read all of these, a huge thank you for it! Hope you liked the ferry! You can find the pictures in high res in my Photostream! PS.: The next exhibition where I plan to show the ferry is Bricks am Meer 2022 in Bad Zwischenahn, Germany. Hope we can meet there!
  20. Class 5 - HMS Queen After much deliberations at the Pine Island Monastery , it was finally time for Sir Major Brickford to depart from Terraversa and make haste to Brickford Landing. After tidying up some loose ends in Westface, the newly arrived ship from the Quinnsville shipyards had just arrived, the HMS Queen. Ship2 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr After narrowly escaping a battle with Oleon, who could have predicted that Corrington forces would now be heading to the New Haven Sea in a joint effort. Either way, the sea air felt good. Ship3 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr ---------------------------------------- Thanks for looking! I've had this ship built for months, and I figured it was high time that I posted it and got the Major to the New Haven sea before I miss the fighting! Extra pics in the spoiler.
  21. Marooned Marin

    [MOC] Ferry boat

    BACKSTORY Somewhere in the heart of the Mediterranean lies one of the most beautiful cities in Europe which goes by the name of the Dubrovnik. Those familiar with the Game of Thrones will know Dubrovnik better as King’s Landing since it served greatly for principal photography of the series. Nearby lies (conveniently) the most beautiful island in Europe, the evergreen and very much cursed island of Lokrum, but we won’t go into that now. Built over a half a century ago, unique in design and specially made to dock shallow waters of the island port, twins Skala and Zrinski have transported more than several million visitors, both residents and tourists, on and off the beloved cursed island. Today, after 50 years of loyal service, two wooden ferries are more than means of transportation as they grew out to be a hidden bond between the residents’ heart and soul, one being the city and other the island. ABOUT the MOC To maximize play and ensure an easy access to passenger area, bridge deck is (almost) easily detachable from the main deck. Small annoyance comes from detaching and reattaching the white rail guard. With or without bridge deck, the construction of the main deck is exceptionally sturdy. Roof of the bridge cabin is also detachable. MOC was first designed in Stud.io and later built, and re-built, using the real 100% legal build techniques and original LEGO pieces. RARE AND CUSTOM PARTS The use of RARE parts is minimal and only few represent a challenge: 1x 64645 Boat, Hull Brick 16 x 10 x 3 in WHITE 3x 30340 Minifigure, Utensil Flotation Ring (Life Preserver) in RED Several Hose, rigid, 3mm in longer dimensions There are few UNIQUE parts used in this MOC, mainly decorative stickers for the flag of Saint Blasé (city patron saint); Dubrovnik coat of Arms; last ship poster; and one for the name of the ship on stern. QUICK INFORMATION Parts: 1328 parts (without minifigs) Dimensions: W: 15.6cm L: 39.7cm H: 21.3cm Weight: 1,227 grams Difficulty: Moderate/hard Build (tested on two +8 years old) Type of set: For Display & Light Play Estimated Cost of Parts: 190-230€ (on BrickLink in 2021) IMPORTANT: Model does not float Detailed instructions AVAILABLE at Rebrickable on this LINK
  22. As said in the title, something has to be done about my accounts, after having realized that I own only 7 dbs. Luckily, there are 3 ships readily available, I built them many months ago, now it's time to put them into good use. I hope they'll sail safely and swiftly and earn me a bunch of doubloons this turn. Here's another one, la Blonde It's a upgraded version of the new BBS, I've added one extra hull section and some other mods. Class:5 Cost:420 Range: 4 Maneuvre: 2 Firepower: 2 Crew: 4 Cargo: 6 Hull: 3 Total: 21
  23. Brethren of the Brick Seas: Class 7 Rating system of the Royal Navy: 6th rate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rating_system_of_the_Royal_Navy TOB 11 by Philippe, auf Flickr The hull leans slightly outwards on the side, then inwards. I don't like Tetris on the ship's deck and railing. That's why I built it mostly flat and with few height differences. I want to see curves and as few corners as possible. TOB 07 by Philippe, auf Flickr The captain's cabin is a little wider. Here the hull is built towards the outside at the bottom and towards the inside at the top. TOB 08 by Philippe, auf Flickr Light cannons have been added on the upper deck. Because the ship is wider, the cannons can also be operated. There is enough space in width. These must of course be smaller than the cannons on the cannon deck. TOB 09 by Philippe, auf Flickr Swivel guns are always useful. I moved the main mast further back. A longer row boat was built. TOB 05 by Philippe, auf Flickr I improved the shape of the ship. I like the view from above. I can even see that the hull is getting narrower towards the top. TOB 06 by Philippe, auf Flickr My ships are similar but not the same "learning by doing". Correcting and changing is too time-consuming, changes to the ship's hull have consequences for the entire ship, building a new one is easier. Every ship is a new build with improvements. TOB 10 by Philippe, auf Flickr I'm not entirely happy with the bow of this ship. Maybe I can build the bow differently and better. I don't know, at the moment I have no idea. I like the rest, maybe just small improvements. TOB 04 by Philippe, auf Flickr I like that I can build the ship wider and more realistic with the Custom Hull. The widest point on the main deck 24 studs (included railing). The main deck is from the aft to the forward railing 87 studs (included railing), at the feet of figurehead 96 studs. The waterline is 87 studs. Total length 117 studs. http://www.suave.net/~dave/cgi/scale.cgi TOB 01 by Philippe, auf Flickr It's good that I building digitally. So, I don't have to spend any money for bricks to build a ship that I don't like when it's finished. Sails are just decoration, with real bricks I use cotton sails. Masts and rigging are adapted to the existing sails. A digital build should also look good and realistic. That also includes minifigures. TOB 02 by Philippe, auf Flickr
  24. spaceship with lots but lots of hidden missile ramps ! As Macross Manga :D Airstrip with Blacktron logo BT2 - Guided Missile Corvette FSG-1 by Horlack, on Flickr BT2 - Guided Missile Corvette FSG-1 by Horlack, on Flickr BT2 - Guided Missile Corvette FSG-1 by Horlack, on Flickr
  25. *Your entry has earned 14 XP* The VFS Sustainer, an MC-190A Battleship, protects Kinyen sovereignty by patrolling the system for encroaching hostile vessels. The agriworld of Kinyen—homeworld of the Gran—suffered greatly under Imperial rule for their rebellion. The planetary government has turned out to be a staunch ally of the Freedom Fighters and Followers of the Force, who share their ideals of peace, kinship, and community living. The blockade at Kinyen secures neutrality by blocking invasions from either the Empire or Republic into the other's space on the Great Gran Run. The Followers of the Force have established a Blockade at Kinyen. (More photos to come! Happy New Year!)