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Found 521 results

  1. Anders T

    Cog

    Cog or Kogge A cog is a type of ship that first appeared in the 10th century, and was widely used from around the 12th century on. Eventually, around the 14th century, the cog reached its structural limits. This model is a somewhat generic version of this ship. However, some features narrows it down to being from around 1300, +-50 years. The ship type was a northern European brake from the sleek Viking ship. The need for spacious and relatively inexpensive ships led to the development of this trader workhorse. Fore and stern castles would be added for defense against pirates, or to enable use of these vessels as warships. It is in minifig-scale or 1:40’ish. The model will have the dimensions Length: 68 cm, Height: 75 cm (with stand), Width: 19 cm (Beam) There is approx. 4300 bricks in the model.
  2. Greetings, shipwrights. Whether a novice, an apprentice, a master, or a veteran shipwright, following the process of others, sharing your own, and giving and receiving feedback can help everyone improve. What's the point? This is just a place for all of us liberally to post WIP's for feedbacks, tips, suggestions, and questions, without otherwise littering the BoBS forum with WIP's. You can post just one step in the process, or several over a period. It's all up to you. So I am working on a vessel/ship - what do I do? Post one or more pictures, questions, ship-plans, descriptions, etc. here, and hopefully someone will step in with some wonderful advice. At least, I expect to do so. I know NOTHING about ships - can I comment, and how do I do? Everyone with something constructive to say can comment. No need to be a scholar in historic vessels, medieval carpentry or sail making. Sometimes it might just be aesthetics, a crazy idea, a suggestion for a technique, use of a specific brick, or whatever you can think of. Just keep it nice and constructive. In return, builders posting here will pwomise not to take offense! I'd suggest tagging the builder you are commenting on. But I am not an expert - the arrogant elite will laugh at my puny attempts at shipbuilding! First of all, the arrogant elite was not invited. In fact, they have been given specific instructions to go back to their fancy little elitist coffee houses to talk about how brilliant they are. Secondly, regarding puny attempts, take a look at my first attempt at a ship just two and a half years ago... Well, you really don't have to look. Move along... Nothing to see here... The rather obvious point being, we all start somewhere, and no matter where you start, or how steep your learning curve is. The only requirement is that you want to share your process, learn from others, share your ideas, and/or improve. Soooo, is this something official? What will I gain from participating? EGS bonuses? HAH! This is merely me gone rogue - and I may hang from my toes for it! No official bonuses here. However, I'd like to see a bit more focus on the process and techniques of building here, and I think ships is an interesting place to start. This is, however, quite likely to be replaced, superseded, or added to by something official at some point in the future. Who manages this and keeps the record? Manages? Keeps records? Bwahahaha - forget it! Just post your WIP's and comments. Don't overthink it! ________________________________________________________________________ Kick off! Oooohkay, here we go: I have been working on a 4th rate, circa 50 guns on two decks. I present to you: The HMS Endeavour. Started here: Went here: And have ended here: She is supposed to be the first in a series of 4th rates designed for colonial waters. A 4th rate is a small ship of the line between 46 and 60 guns, just above frigate size. This one is (IC) specifically designed to serve as flagship for colonial squadrons, sailing in consort with frigates and sloops. Looking forward to hearing your comments! And to see your WIP's!
  3. [GoC - Sloops for the RN] Class 3 Cutter From the shipyards of Quinnsville comes a ship built for greatness. A ship that is intended to serve in Her Majesty's Royal Navy and protect the shipping of Corlander businesses. To answer the call of Rear-Admiral Fletcher to build ships to protect the interests of the Crown, a cutter rigged vessel has been crafted from the fine timbers of Cocovia. Cutter 1 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr The Ship is but lightly armed with 6 four pounders, but offers plenty of maneuverability thanks to its cutter rigging. Cutter 4 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr Such a small vessel doesn't require a ships wheel, but merely a tiller to control the ships course. Cutter 3 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr Currently, she is only staffed with a bare-bones crew as she makes her way to the other side of Cocovia to join the ranks of the greatest navy in the Brick Seas. Cutter 5 by LM71Blackbird, on Flickr ------------------------------------------ My first entry towards the GoC Oaken Shield Tasks. I am quite happy how the vessel turned out, especially considering my limited real brick collection, but there is always room for improvement. C&C are welcome and apprecieated and thanks for looking! @Ayrlego @Bregir @SilentWolf @Captain Dee
  4. ZCerberus

    [MOC] LL509- Ark IV

    Anvil Class Carrier- LL 505 “Ark IV” Length: 180 meters Armament: Heavy laser turrets (2) Medium laser turrets (2) Centurion LOS medium anti-cruiser Magnetic Acceleration Rail Cannon, 1-“barrell” (2) Quad link anti-fighter laser turrets (12) Complement: Up to 24 Warden Class Interceptors Crew: 160 With the limited fighter capacity of the Forge Battle Cruiser, the Coalition commissioned a complimentary second ship, the Anvil Class Fighter Carrier. The Fighter Carrier had a much lower combat rating than the Forge Battle Cruiser receiving only a class 6 battle-rating (excluding the weapons capabilities of the fighters) due to the weapons configuration which consisted of 2 heavy laser batteries, 2 medium laser batteries, and 2 medium duty anti-cruiser single barrel MARCs (but no missile pods or peace keeper orbital weaponry) with the additional weapons mounts all dedicated to anti-fighter turrets. Despite the lower combat rating, the Anvil Fighter Carrier, is outfitted with an armor and design configuration which made the ship more durable than most other ships with carrier or support roles. Additionally, the hanger bay entry points in the middle of the ship allowed for better protection of the bays than traditional carrier designs with the hanger bay entrances located on the outer hull of the ship. The durability combined with the firepower of the Warden Class interceptors meant the combined battle-rating of the Anvil Fighter Carrier and a full complement of fighters was much closer to a class 8. This meant the carrier could be used on solo missions when battleships or long-range missile frigates were not anticipated to be in heavy use. The main drawback of the Anvil Class Fighter Carrier was its size. The carrier was nearly double the width of primary attack craft like the Forge Class Battle Cruiser of the Hammer Class Missile Corvette. This issue was often overcome by keeping the carrier in a support position behind heavy assault ships, or if the carrier was in closer proximity to the battle, using a unique design feature to separate the carrier in two. Separating the carrier in two provides for more flexibility in use and much smaller targeting areas, though it does lose some of its more appealing features such as the center mounted hanger bays and the ability to operate with two distinct shield generators for additional toughness. The separation feature also meant each half was required to contain a full range of critical ship’s systems. While this made the carriers more expensive to manufacture and crew, it also made them more reliable and durable. Eurobrick's exclusive- ship separated and showing one component half:
  5. Location: Rogian Sea Type: Class 5 Junk The WTC had been the first trading company to set up shop in the south, and had a small outpost on Kemblarsi as well. Today, a new ship was heading in to dock. Captained by Madam Dogtooth, the WTC Rising Sun was a Junk originally from the Gerlo Empire. The Junk was mostly unarmed, prefering to defend itself with speed and maneuverability. As port appeared on the horizon, it's precious cargo would soon be unloaded. What was on board could soon change the course of history in the Brick Seas... FIN Thanks for viewing my build. I'm happy with how this one turned out. (It's a substantial improvement over my last Junk for sure! ) This was an interesting build, for sure. I used Mixel joints to make the stern and bow rise above the rest of the hull, and than used some different techniques for the rest of the hull. The sails are from destiny's bounty, of course, and they look nice, especially with the colour scheme. I'm not sure if this is a class 5 or 4, and I'll be happy to downgrade it if the court so requests. C&C appreciated!
  6. __________________________________________________ EDIT: Ready MOC In Post "Update III" __________________________________________________ Hello guys! Since christmas 2017 I am working on my first LEGO ship MOC. In the first process I will create a 3D model of the ship and after that build it in real life. New albums with new pictures of updates are being addet to my album feed: https://robiniv.imgur.com/ I'll update the album as soon I make developement. You can give me advices so I can improve my work. End of project is earliest in summer 2018. (Edit: Don't know when it ends :D) _____________________________________________ Specs about the ship: Name: HMS Providence Type: Frigate Rate: 5th Cannons: round about 30 Gun deck: 11 cannons each side Quarter deck: 04 cannons each side 2 carronades Measure hull: Length: ~100cm Height: ~50cm Others: Minifig fit in decks (i hope -.-) Rudder will be operative ____________________________________________ Robin_IV
  7. ZCerberus

    [MOC] Destroyer- 619 "Dominion"

    Forge Class Destroyer- LL619 “Dominion” Length: 262 meters Armament: Anti-cruiser dual link Crusader Magnetic Acceleration Rail Cannon (4) Cruiser Buster missile tube (6) Peacekeeper long range orbital bombardment cannon (2) Rocket turret (1) Ion burst cannons (2) Heavy laser turrets (5) Quad link anti-fighter laser turrets (15) Complement: 9 Warden Class Interceptors (upper hangar) 6 Governor Class Heavy Bombers, 2 Transports shuttles or- 1 Kiltrip Defender Corvette (lower hangar) Crew: 235 Following the successful deployment of the Forge Class Battle Cruisers, the New Coalition found itself well position as peacekeepers. Peace, however, is often fleeting. A dissenting faction opposed to all forms of centralized government sprung up in the outer system of Conteruim. The Teriums as they become known retrofitted a number of older vessels with thick armor and multi directional weaponry. While the Battle Cruiser's Centurian weaponry was able to penetrate the armor plating, its line-of-sight design made engaging multiple Terium vessels difficult. To combat the Terium tactics, the New Coalition developed a new ship, the Forge Class Destroyer, equipped with direction port and starboard Crusader MARC cannons capable of eviscerating the armored Turium turtles with greater efficiency. The Destroyer also carried a larger complement than the Forge Class Battle Cruiser including heavy bombers or the ability to house a Kiltrip defender inside the Destroyer if bombers were not required on mission. The Destroyer also modified the hangar configuration as compared to the Anvil Class Carriers and the Battle cruiser to allow for hot take-offs and landings from a forward facing hangar opening. See the build log of the SHIP here:
  8. Hello everybody! Allow me to introduce my new series of MOC. To begin - Russian frigates pr.1135 (NATO designation - "Krivak"). Built in LDD. Scale 1: 350. Frigates pr.1135 - a unique series of warships, held at the Navy of the USSR and then Russia, Ukraine and India since the early 1970's to the present. In total 49 ships were built, and the construction of a serious improvement is still ongoing. "Krivak I" ASW-frigate "Krivak III" coast guard patrol ship more photos and information
  9. supertechnicman

    1:200 QM2

    I’m designing a 1:200 scale model of the Queen Mary 2 with full interior (except the hotel rooms, 1300 identical rooms would get redundant). I’m using LDD to design it and hope to buy the 19,228 pieces and build it over the next 2-5 years. It will have working elevators, cargo doors, passenger doors, and all 17 decks with machinery and public spaces. Let me know what you think.
  10. Anders T

    Skuldelev Ships

    Still not pirate ships, as such, but some of them could be handy for a bit of raiding. The models resemble five ships from just after 1000 A. D. Viking-age in Scandinavia. They are minifig-scale or 1:40’ish. The largest model, Skuldelev 2, will have the dimensions Length: 80 cm, Height: 40 cm (with stand), Width: 10,5 cm The smallest model, Skuldelev 6, will have the dimensions Length: 29 cm, Height: 21,5 cm (with stand), Width: 7 cm There is approx. 4900 bricks in the models combined. With 2100 going to Skuldelev 2, 1100 to skuldelev 1 and 450-700 bricks for each of the other ships. The main source of reference is the The viking Ship Museum: Vikingeskibsmuseet i Roskilde The focus of the museum is a permanent exhibition of the five original Viking ships excavated nearby in 1962. The line drawings and data found at the museum is the basis for the models and the replicas Ottar, The Sea Stallion from Glendalough, Roar Ege, Helge Ask and Kraka Fyr are invaluable source material for the colors and final look. Information about the ships can be found here and at the links found above https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skuldelev_ships Skuldelev 1 A “large”cargo vessel (Knarr), 1030 A. D. Skuldelev 2 (and 4, see information) A Warship (Skeid), 1042 A. D. Skuldelev 3 A cargo vessel (Byrding), 1040 A. D. Skuldelev 5 A small warship (Snekkja), 1030 A. D. Skuldelev 6 A fishing boat or small cargo vessel (Ferje), 1030 A. D.
  11. This vessel, (called Project Upsilon) was Classic Space forces secret weapon against any potential uprisings of any alien, robot, or human race outside of the Galactic Space Congress. I say WAS because it's death-star level super laser was never used due to a planted Blacktron bomb sending the station and it's crew hurtling through hyperspace toward a black-hole in early 1988 during the early hours of the attempted Blacktron coup. The station was never recovered and almost all of the crew was presumed killed by the black hole except for blue astronaut Benny, who fell off the station before it reached full light speed while doing regular maintenance to the solar arrays. (Benny survived a day floating out of conciseness in orbit off Jupiter II before being found by retreating Congressional forces. He still wears the broken helmet and smudged suit from that day as a reminder of the eternal sacrifice of his fellow two crew members that were lost. He was, for a time, secretly considered with suspicion regarding the loss of the ship by rouge operatives of the Galactic Space Congress' black ops division.) Thirty-one years later in 2019, the station is found floating in the very far-off Delta quadrant of our galaxy, completely iced over. The crew are flash-frozen from that horrible day in 1988, and the main computer is barely running on emergency battery power. The clock on the computer is checked by Benny himself: over 200,000 years have gone by! (The ship went inside the black hole which deposited the ship in the very distant past via a time vortex.) The fusion reactors are restarted, and the barely-functional computer begins to wake up the two crew. Then it is discovered that a third frozen astronaut is on board in Benny's bunk, a pink one, who was not on board when the ship was blasted off towards the puncture in space / time. Who is she? Why is she there? The answers may lie inside the thawing mainframe core of the 1980's computer... Here is what I've been working on for a year or so on my computer, and more recently in real life. Overall this 101 studs long beast in real life is quite light, although it's not to easy to hold while taking a photo... I had to have another person help me with this picture as the 14 top and bottom stands that keep it level on the table don't make very good holding points for flight! The eight yellow triangular things are movable solar panels, while the cockpit seats two Classic Space mini-figures. The large super-laser emitter on the front is a Death Star-like cannon, used only in times of last resort against unfathomable enemies to the normally peaceful Classic Space fleet. (this would mean potential Blacktron, Robotron or Spyruis incursions, if it hadn't been sent into a Black Hole and time traveled back 200,000 years within minutes of first coming online in 1988.) The ship featured both a dual fusion reactor system and solar panels in eight moving segments as a backup in case of emergency as well as powering the super laser. This would prove vital in keeping trajectory equipment's backup batteries charged and cryogenic crew storage frozen solid for several hundred-thousand years.... you never know how long this station would have lasted otherwise on just fusion alone! The brand-new cockpit should seat two figures, ideally the yellow and white astronaut's from the Benny's Space Squad set. (70841) The solar panel's intense energy from even remotely nearby stars powers the super-laser. (In case you were wondering what those black-and-white pods were on the solar panel wing struts, they are small maneuvering rockets.) The rear of the ship. I was inspired to create the engine pods on the space station after seeing a older post by Flickr user Karf Oohlu as seen here. The access hatch to the inside of the station is visible at the extreme rear near the two engines. I plan on using the white, yellow, and pink astronauts for the lost classic space crew of Classic Space station Upsilon. Benny was also part of this 1988-vintage crew, but managed to loosen himself from the Blacktron-sabotaged space station before it reached the black hole whereupon it vanished, presumed destroyed, with it's crew (minus Benny, who was badly damaged but ok) assumed dead. NOTES: I would have put this SHIP (which stands for "Serious Huge Investment in Parts", in case you didn't know!) in with my other Classic Space stuff, but I think it's best to keep mini-figure scale base and this major space ship separate, as it's not meant to land on planets' surface's. Anyway, this is my first SHIP, and most likely my last one as well. EDIT: main post edited and pictures revised 9/03/19. Real life pictures added! Comments, questions, suggestions, complaints and such are always welcome.
  12. Ahoy my fellow captains, kind of a strange feeling to start this post, since I have been browsing this forum for more than a year now, admiring these countless pieces of art posted here. Actually, it's been my six-year-old son who constantly asked me to post our progress here - his father was a little shy and reluctant to do so, since he is never truly satisfied with his construction and still in awe regarding your astonishing models. But, you know, "Arrrrghh", what the heck, no need to hide anymore, I've been utterly in love with LEGO since I got my first bricks and can still vividly remember sitting on my child room's floor next to my brother, listening to "ALF" cassettes and (re-)build our barracuda for the 100th time.. The first pictures show the results of my sons' and my christmas-constructing period of 2016. Ever since, we weren't really happy with its form and as we were blown away by the exellency of ships like the "Le Fleuron" or the "Sang Royale" (and especially, of course, Cpt. Greenhair's unbelievably helpful ideas - THANK YOU, CAPTAIN!!), we wanted to do it differently this time. The pictures after the "Barracuda" show the process of our current project with the (according to my most patient, wonderful and tolerant wife...) fitting title "HMS Effortless". I think you know this feeling of always finding something to improve... lately, it's the positioning of the masts - the distance between the fore-mast and the mainmast seems to be too far. Please let us know what you think and where you see room for further improvement - my son and I are happy about every feedback! First the "old" Barracuda: And this is supposed to be legendary HMS Victory's "secret" sister ship, the HMS Effortless: (The balcony was my son's wish ) It's planned to give her full rigging, sails and of course the many missing details she deserves. it's always a question of time and money Here are more pics from her construction so far as well as more of the Barracuda.
  13. (I was unsure again which forum to use; feel free to move it to a more appropriate spot if need be). Grin, who said history never changes? This ship’s known history changed between 1978 (Lego’s first edition of this set) and the 2003 reissue of this set. Back in 1978 it was thought the now still preserved museum ship was the original 1797 build ship, that underwent a thorough rebuild in 1854. But by the time the 2003 set came out, it was decided the 1854 rebuild was actually a completely new ship, with perhaps a few timbers used from the first ship. (photo by James in Balto, via Wikicommons) Anyway, we do not use timbers. Onto the bricks Mr Baines! (Yep, no box, no instructions, no original set. Just two bags with lots of bricks…) I wanted to build this ship for several reasons. I never knew this Lego set way back when. By the time this one appeared (1978), I was well into my dark ages. So getting this set was not exactly fulfilling a childhood dream. Hence I had no need for originals. A bricklinked set of stones would be fine. Luckily, some vendors offered just that already! No childhood-dream set. But building big sail ships was one of the things I did a lot when I was a kid. Those were all Rainbow Worriers, so to speak, where I would use all colours I had to reach size. Big as possible. And from what I remember, the intricate rigging was what I spend most time on. The rigging was actually needed to keep my masts and spars up and in position. I used little cards with darning wool from mom to make that rigging. I remember the start always being an exercise in patience and frustration-management, with masts and spars collapsing at every touch until I would have the basic rigging up. So building a large sailing ship might be a nice sentimental journey anyway. A chance to finally get it right; all in one colour. And with enough bricks to end what I began. Another reason for getting this set was that, like most Hobby sets from the seventies, it uses very few ‘weird’ or specialized bricks. It is mostly constructed from 2x8 and some smaller standard bricks, 2x8 and 1x8 plates (and quite a lot of smaller plates). Many black bricks and plates, and quite a few yellow plates (both so far rather sparse in my stash). The set would be a nice addition to my basic set of bricks and plates. And finally, I got to check tricks and techniques of the Lego Masterbuilders of those days. The hobby sets are often praised as pretty much the ultimate builds in the old Lego style, and I tend to agree (the cars from that series are fantastic as well). The masts for example are set into the hull by technic axels, one of the few more modern elements in this build. They more or less promise masts that might stand on their own, without the rigging I really needed. The original 398 set was from 1978, the in 2003 reissued set was number 10021. I did not know what I was getting, luckily it turned out to be the 1978 set. The first round was what is now known as knolling; sorting the bricks type by type, in neat stacks, well laid out on a surface. The ideal way to check if you got everything, and it makes for a pretty easy way to handle, find and store bricks. I usually stack bricks with one or two studs free left or right, for easy counting and separating them. It took me 2 afternoons, mixed with reading online, checking the Bricklink inventory lists for this set, and with reading up on the real ship. 978 parts. I was missing a few 1x1 yellow plates, but I had enough in my stash to get that sorted out. (for those in the want: these are all the bricks for the original build, I tend to use pictures like this as sort of bricklists for my own builds) The yellow 1x1 windows mark this as a 398 set, the 10021 set used yellow 1x1 'headlight' bricks because the windows had gone uhm, out the window (perhaps nautical terms are more clear: The yellow windows had gone over the wall? Or is that just Dutch briney?). Building. Round one... I had managed to gather instructions for the set from the internet (taking care to get the right ones for this particular set), and it was time to start building. Reading the (not to big and slightly unsharp) scanned instructions was sometimes hard. This is old fashioned building; counting studs with several steps added per drawing. It took me a few restarts to get it right. As ‘Questforbricks’ once noticed in his blog, the joy of building with Lego is also a matter of timing. Don’t push it, we are doing this for fun. So stopping at the right moment is important. It is nice if something has progressed far enough to show progress, and it is even better to end a session with a product that invites you to work some more on it. So I made a pause at what I hoped would be the right moment. (wreck of the Bayard, South Georgia) Right now, the hull resembles a shipwreck. A ship, run aground by accident or on purpose, and left to fall apart where it stranded because it is not in anybody’s way. In a cold climate, such a ship takes a very long time to fall apart. Yep, things are going swell... No decks and superstructures, but already a recognisable hull, with just a few stumps where the masts used to be (or are going to be), beams and girders bare. That is pretty much how the ship looks now. The keel is laid, from here it is all upward and outward. A good time to leave it for the next round. Second round Although I had to go back and forth a few times on the bow, all-in all things progressed nicely. Most problems I had were with the slightly fuzzy instruction prints I had made; especially with the red and yellow plates, it was not always clear which plates were used. And these are old style instructions, no step by step exploded view. You get a drawing, and in the next drawing, a lot of bricks and plates have been added. It is a matter of counting studs and searching to spot all the differences. Regularly I would concentrate on one part of the ship, and miss steps on the other end of the ship. Back up two or three steps, to see what I missed there, and add those too. All in all I enjoyed this a lot, it is more fun than just brick by brick doing as you are told. An evening of building, and an hour the next day finished the hull. I must say, I am not a fan of canon bristling ships, and not the biggest fan of sailing ships from this period (beginning 19th century), but this is turning out rather nice! The thin white line seems to be the waterline, a bit higher up than I expected, but yes, it seems about right. The overall shape is very good, and the silhouette of the hull works remarkably well. With the black bricks, the blocky appearance of what should be smooth ship curves (the basic Lego problem in building ships) is hidden rather well. It is only in the lighter details, like the gilded bow, that the ships shows its Legoness. The interrupted white band of the gun deck does add a lot of character to the ship. The black brinks also resemble the planks of a wooden hull nicely. And there are a lot of small details that I do love. There are little roof bricks used in slits in the deck, that depict stairs going down to the lower deck. The ships bell is represented by an unprinted minifigure head (back when knolling, I expected it to be part of the figure head of the ship). There is a capstan and a steering wheel, although the capstan is placed a bit awkward between two openings in the deck (a scale problem I expect, a capstan is massive). The one thing I am not too sure about are the glass plates covering part of the gun deck. I expect on the real ship this would have been a grated hatch, and I am thinking about replacing them with black plates. But first I want to build the ship according to instructions… The small yellow windows (one of the things that show this to be a 398 set) add a lot of life to the stern of the ship. And this was a nice point to stop until I had more time... Third round lucky? The masts, spars and sails were a lot less work than expected, and flew on. The masts are a bit massive from the front, but a lot stronger and better connected than anything I did in my youth (rails and plates...). And the stowed sails add quite a bit of life to the masts. The minimal rigging was just that; minimal. And a bit of an embarrassment to be honest This is the ship as intended. Hmmm, the end result is slightly less appealing than I expected. I finished the ship as per instructions, including the very minimal rigging. And all in all it certainly is an impressive build, large and not bad at all… But several parts are screaming at the boat-nerd in me to get corrected. The bulwarks (the sides of the ship above the deck) are too high in some places (technically correct, but it throws off the lines of the hull due to scale effects). I am not a fan of all guns out (there might have been a different opinion had I been 10 year old me). I also discovered it will not be possible to rig the ship properly until I do some serious rebuilding in the hull itself. At the sides of the ships are rests, boards sticking out for the shrouds and stays of the masts, and they are too far forward to set up a realistic rigging. I need to move them back until they are behind the centre of the masts. And when I do that, I might as well close all the canon ports, at least at one side, to make for a smoother hull. (rolls up sleeves, spits in hands, time to get some modding done...) Modding Most urgent; correcting the rests for shrouds and stays on the sides... On the left side the build as instructed, on the right the uhm, right way for shroud and stay boards ( I know I should have stuck to nautical terms)… I closed the gun ports and enlarged the fighting tops in the masts (those are the plateaus at about 1/3 from the bottom of the mast that look a bit like low crows nests). I also lowered the boom on the mizzen mast, so it came closer to the deck. As an addition, I decided to try and make a little more difference between the stowed sails. A few not yet fully stowed, like a ship entering Harbour? I also added some stowed stay sails to the bow sprit. I was a bit unsure whether the half stowed sail looks too blocky or not, but they do add a certain liveliness to the whole. I also experimented with more realistic guns on the deck. But the ones I liked best were too big for the rest of the deck, so I decided to leave them off entirely. The most interesting design would be 3 studs wide, and 4 studs deep (on a deck that is 8 studs wide). Too bad, too big… Rigging Back in the old days when I build Lego sailing ships, rigging it was pretty much the main event. It was not much different this time. All in all, I build the ship in 4 sessions, a few hours each, perhaps 7 or 8 hours in total. Between the instruction-finished model and my own version I had 11 sessions, some just an hour, but several 3 or 4 hour long sessions. Yep, that was the main event alright. I would pester Mom until she would give me a card with darning wool to rig my ships, and spend days at trying to get it right or at least slightly logical. I intended to do the same thing now, using that very same darning wool. Which turned out to be easier said than done. For starters, I could not find anything like that stuff in my town. Don’t people darn their socks any-more? Uhm, well truth be told, I don’t. I wear thin cotton socks these days, and any repairs feel like pebbles in my shoe. Right. Who still darns socks? I tried some some strings, like cotton or knitting wool, but they all turned out too thick to clamp between bricks easily. I really needed that darning wool! Luckily and much to my surprise, those old cards with wool were still readily available in Germany, just across the border. Ha! It took me a while to figure out how to do the rigging best. The big difference between real rigging and a model is the lack of pulley’s, deadeye’s and other bits and bobs that allow to tighten ropes one by one. In Lego, you do one rope right, tighten the next rope, and the earlier rope suddenly show slack… Especially the shrouds (those web like side ropes up into the masts, that sailors climb) took some experimenting to get right. And as always in a model, there are decision points on what to show, and what to leave out. Once I had figured out a way to do it, I removed all the ropes done so far, cleared the masts of all the spars and started anew. It takes some planning to make sure I could reach all the points. Once certain ropes were in place, you could not get everywhere anymore. Basically I had to work from back to front, and from the centreline of the ship to the sides. The ‘running' ropes (moving ropes, used to hoist and lower sails, or trim sails to the wind) are ‘new’, signalled by a light tan (for new or less worn ropes) or a dark brown colour (for older ropes). The stays, shrouds and other ‘fixed’ lines would be tarred, so those are black. All in all this looks a lot more like I hoped for. The ship has proudly resided on my display shelf for over a year, until dust threatened to take over (the ‘hairy’ wool is a great dust-collector, and all the lines and ropes make it virtually impossible to dust the decks and bricks). All in all it has been a pleasure to build, and was quite a sight on my shelf. I plan on building something older in future, but strongly based on these building principles... Might be a while though, for right now I am lost in space...
  14. Faladrin

    [MOC] The Renegade Cutter

    The Renegade Cutter A tribute to 6268 Renegade Runner Here is my last MOC. A little Pirate ship : The Renegade Cutter : I was heading to a more Pirate ship as I am more used to build for Brethren of the Brick Seas game and have mostly built a merchant fleet. I was immediately appealed by the old and simple design of the 6268 Renegade Runner, probably my first Pirate ship ever (I had it quite quickly at its release in 1993 way before I managed to get my hands on the biggest ones) So I decided to stay to a little and classical pirate ship design. Here it is from other angles : It has only the 2 hull sections the Renegade Runner has and is using a similar sail plan. The rigging is strictly LEGO official and the sails are originals too. I just added a second jib and made more rigging. I also changed the curves of the hull and made it really different from the original. Hope you'll like it ! C&C's are always welcome !
  15. Broadside is one of my favorite triple changers ever since I set my eyes on his G1 toy photo decades ago. I had a chance to acquire Chinese KO version of him many years ago (bundled together with a few KO combiner limbs) but sadly missed out on it. So I never owned / played with this toy to understand his notoriety as a brick-former in the TF fandom. Anyway... 9 years ago I attempted LEGO Broadside version 1 (below) . VERSION 1 As you can see... the ship mode looks fat and the plane mode has saggy wings. duh! VERSION 2 Few months ago I started this v2 project after I saw a photo of Macross Valkyrie in my FB feed . That's an eureka moment where I kinda got the transformation to jet mode figured out. From there , I took a few breaks in between to retreat, rethink and redo it to get the right shaping in both his alt modes. Inspired by USS Nimitz, the back of the ship mode must be symmetrical to provide more mass to form robot legs, unlike an actual ship show above . Compared to v1, the ship mode v2 here is missing armaments on the deck. This is a nod to G1 Broadside's bio about "his vulnerability in ship mode and the need to rely on his passengers to protect him." USS Titanic is a Transformer too :) One of the transformation step: fold the ship deck to form the jet mode's rear. JET MODE Jet mode was inspired by F-14 Tomcat. Since the ship mode is long, this causes the halved deck to form pretty long wings for the jet. ROBOT MODE! In the actual G1 toy of Broadside, he's equipped with an Axe and also a gun. Here, I've decided to integrate them both as a single weapon (Axe turning to gun)... and it's named Hull-Raiser. :) When not on active duty, he tend to his farm and crops. With fellow triple changers that I built recently, Rodimus Prime and Snapdragon For more photos of Broadside v2 and clearer visuals on how he transform between modes , click on my blog link below: https://alanyuppie.blogspot.com/2019/08/lego-triple-changer-broadside-v2-part-2.html don't forget to follow me below! http://instagram.com/alanyuppie78 https://www.facebook.com/alanyuppiebrick https://www.youtube.com/user/alanyuppie
  16. The Neighborhood Merchant

    [MOC] Snow-Rigged Merchant Brig "Boreas's Haul"

    Boreas's Haul Hi everyone! Long time viewer, but I just joined recently. Thought I'd share one of my first ships I've made with you guys and get some input from the masters ! I've always felt bad to know that poor little merchant guy (he deserves a name) was on his same tiny little merchant ship for a whole 27 years, so I decided to build him his own regal trading fleet. Even though his little plastic face still shows the same expression, I know deep down his smile is a little wider now. Anyhow, here are some some pictures of the ship: IMG_2779 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2799 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2805 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2807 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2787 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2813 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2816 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr He probably should think of investing in to cannons, but lets just say he was too greedy to get any (truth is that I forgot to build them). Also, I've always been a huge fan of modular sets so I also included a full interior: IMG_2817 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2820 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr For the hammocks, I used the ones used in set 60153-1, and I highly recommend them for pirate builds. When at the proper width, they fit minifigures in so well that you can move the entire ship several times and they wont fall off. COMBINED by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr I have an obsession with the old 2 x 3 printed books and old castle shields (anyone else?) so I tried to incorporate them in to my Captain's Quarters. Do you guys think they fit or should I remove them? IMG_2829 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr The line for the top of the ship is connected to the bow and stern and held up on the top with two clips, so even though it looks like a pain to get inside it only takes a few seconds by just lifting the line off the two clips. Here's the crew and the rest of the "fleet": IMG_2832 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr IMG_2836 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr If anyone wants to know, I designed the sails using photoshop and I made the sails using printable A4 pre-treated canvas paper, and then just doubled them. Anyhow, thank you so much for stopping by, and have a wonderful day! Also, to all of you are wondering, don't worry about the old merchant ship! I put Fraunces in charge of it and it seems that he is enjoying his time on it . IMG_2837 by Neighborhood Merchant, on Flickr
  17. ZedKay

    The Flying Dutchman

    Hello fellow builders, I present you the Flying Dutchman, the infamous ghost ship from the Pirates of the Caribbean film series, in LEGO! The idea came to me a year ago, while I was sitting at my desk when I cast me eyes upon the 3 official LEGO POTC ships on the top of my shelf: The Black Pearl, The Queen Anne's Revenge, and The Silent Mary. For years I had been waiting for LEGO to release a Flying Dutchman, but to no avail it never came out. Determined to build the ship myself, I embarked on an exciting, challenging but rewarding journey to produce a MOC which would take up its rightful place among my fleet and make it complete. More information can be found here at LEGO IDEAS. If you like it, feel free to support! Here are some renders below (more can be found on my Flickr page): LEGO Flying Dutchman - 1 by Scarvia LEGO Flying Dutchman - 2 by Scarvia LEGO Flying Dutchman - 4 by Scarvia And with the crew: LEGO Flying Dutchman - 6 by Scarvia The infamous triple-barrelled chasers in the bow: Triple-barrelled chasers (Out) by Scarvia Triple-barrelled chasers (In) by Scarvia Thank you for your time.
  18. Ymarilego

    Chemicals terminal

    This is render of a commissioned model I am working on. 90% of the bricks are already ordered so building can soon start. The model has about 50k bricks and is 2m75 x 1 m in size
  19. The Golden Bugle Freshly out of the MAESTRO Shipyards, The Golden Bugle is doing its Maiden course. The light fast vessel has proven to be very well seaworthing and can achieve fast travels through the Colonies in order to bring cargo and of course news ! It was clear its first purpose was to deliver official mail towards the colonies like Lady Condora wanted initially. This ship will be added to my fleet and I intend to license it as a class 3 vessel. I wanted it ready for the last contest but I didn't managed to finish it at time, so I'm keeping it for my fleet. C&C's are always welcome.
  20. Captain_Brickbeard

    Brig o war moc

    RecentlyI am a new member of Eurobricks and I have decided to share the building process of my brig, this is one of my first serious ship builds and I would really appreciate feedback and tips. The inspiration was taken from the ships Anders T build and from https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YLyN_fnj41E. Curently I am struggling with the bow(haven’t really started on it) and making the captains cabin look right. Her are some pics E
  21. Hi, folks. During last SHIPtember, Ryan Olsen created a SHIP based on Babylon 5 - the EAS Agamemnon. I stumbled across it at the time thanks to some Lego blogs, and at the end of the year decided to build one for myself. Credit for the original Lego design goes to Ryan, of course! I took his WIP pics (here) and final pics (here - awesome photography & Photoshopping!) and reverse-engineered it in LDD to understand how it all held together and what parts were required. Then I used Rebrickable to figure out what parts I needed. To build it, I used the "hide" tool in LDD - hide bricks in reverse order, then undo to play back the build as you follow along. Much more helpful than the absurd LDD-generated instructions... Here's the end result (Flickr album here) - my pics & lighting are not studio-quality, unlike Ryan's! The middle section rotates (manually) and stays put at any angle, so it's well balanced and the turntables provide enough friction to keep it stable. Stats-wise, it's about 95cm (~117 studs) long, 35cm tall and 15cm wide, using ~4700 bricks, weighing-in at just over 3.7kg (8.2lb). I made some guesses as to internal structure (e.g. the turntable connections in the rotating section) and the greebles on top & bottom are my own, but it's very close to Ryan's original design and some reference images of the original. Ryan was kind enough to share the image files he used for the stickers, so I was able to complete the model. I couldn't connect the front & rear side plating in LDD - as I learned here, the connections are just illegal as there's not enough clearance between the side plates and overhanging top & bottom plates in software - however, it obviously works in the brick. I converted the LDD to an LDraw file (using SylvainLS's updated parts mapper here) and used LDCad (which can ignore collisions) to place the plates in order to use POV-Ray to make the renders you can see in my album. I learned a lot doing that! Note that I made some tweaks in-the-brick but haven't re-done the LDraw file or any renders to reconcile the minor differences. It was a fun, frustrating at times, but very rewarding journey, and I'm really happy how it turned out. The SHIP looks awesome on display in my living room. Thanks for the inspiration, Ryan, and thanks to those on this site who helped with the digital stuff! Here's a 360 degree render: https://photos.app.goo.gl/caouE0BlHzarD6C42
  22. Dear friends, I got a new commission and is a tug again for the tug owner Iskes Towage & Salvage and is a EDDY design tug. The scale will be around the 1 to 40, with lighting and an open visible engineroom. This is again a strange tug with two bow's and two enginerooms, also the trusters on this ship stands on the front and end of her. I started on the superstructure and hope you will like again the WIP stages. Kind regards, Edwin telstar-27 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7488 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7486 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7485 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7489 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7490 by VFracingteam, on Flickr
  23. As the title suggest, Titanicus transforms into RMS Titanic ,the tragic ship that sank more than 100 years ago. The length:width ratio of the ship is about 10:1 ... so I've decided to use a LEGO scale of 38 :4 studs to build this. Actually I really enjoyed "sculpting" the front and rear hull of the ship. They took me many iterations before I am finally satisfied. One man's (lego) flower is another man's propeller I'd say! One of the final additions to the ship were the masts at the front and back. This required me to redesign the robot arms to accomodate these masts. STORY TIME! How's the Ice-breaker mode? Looks pretty cool eh despite being an "after-thought". Since the ship is only 4-studs wide... and 2 studs were allocated to form the hull/side panels... I'm left with 2-studs thickness to work with when it comes to designing the inner core /structure of the robot mode. Reinforcing the core requires me to slide a Technic axle inside the core as a backbone (think Kebab). *Ship funnels played important roles in padding up the hollowness of the shoulder. 2 of them helps to hold the back kibble in place ,preventing it from drooping. *funny though . Earlier in this project, I started building the funnels short and stumpy coz they kept getting in the way during transformation. After I redesign the transformation method, those funnels become helpful. Ok guys, hit my blog for more photos and visuals on the transformation: http://alanyuppie.blogspot.com/2019/04/lego-transformer-uss-titanic-ship-aka.html Don't forget to subscribe my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/alanyuppie And follow me in IG too! https://www.instagram.com/alanyuppie78/
  24. yorkc1215

    [MOC] Medieval Trade Cog

    Hello everyone. This is my first MOC shared on Eurobricks. Hope you enjoy it .
  25. UPDATE: Instruction avaiable - at BrickVault UCS First Order Resurgent-class Star Destroyer by Kommander, auf Flickr Size: 109cm x 52cm x 25cm Parts: 7855 LEGO STAR WARS UCS FO Resurgent-class Star Destroyer Render by Kommander, auf Flickr UCS First Order Resurgent-class Star Destroyer by Kommander, auf Flickr UCS First Order Resurgent-class Star Destroyer by Kommander, auf Flickr And some instruction pages. Instruction by Kommander, auf Flickr You can find more pictures HERE Original post: Hey Eurobricks I wanna share with you my new project - a First Order Resurgent-class Star Destroyer in UCS-scale. To avoid another long time MOC in WIP Nirvana I started this time with little help from LDD. Dimensions, main frame, angles... took me about a year to set these parts. Because of the LDD file I generated instructions and and part lists for me. On the picture you can see an early version of the ship and one of the latest with much more details. For the moment only one digital render of the ship. There will be some adjustments/tweaks in the "real" version but most of it works fine for me. I already finished the main frame with the instructions... and its good! More pictures will be on flickr Greetings Kommander