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Found 130 results

  1. Zerobricks

    [TMC]8081 6x6

    I decided to UP the things with my take on the 8081 modification contest. Here's what I came up with: Driven and steered front axle with homeage to the original design Tandem live rear axles working on a simillar prnicipal as the front axle Differential lock Two speed gearbox Working steering wheel You can see a sneak peek of the progress made in LDD:
  2. I'm planning on building a cargo trailer for the upcoming Land Rover Defender! Next, I might plan on building the drawbar.
  3. As a tribute to this truck this project shows some of the unlimited possibilities. It is a model of a KrAZ 255B 6x6 off-road truck which is used for extreme applications. Even though this specific truck was never produced as a civilian truck however after its retirement it has been used as such. Within a couple of minutes it can be changed into one of the four different editions which include: - Semi-truck with fifth wheel - Ballast tractor with ballast box - Trial Truck edition - Log Truck with stinger steered trailer So it is up to you what kind of job it does: just having fun as it being a Trial Truck, or will you give it a semi-trailer? Or will it be hauling logs? The truck features: solid axle suspension on all axles of which the rear axles use a tandem bogie suspension, PF powered driving on all axles 6x6 drive, reduced speed to increase power/torque, Servo powered steering, fully functional fifth wheel, modeled V8 engine, detailed cabin interior and two light units. Actually you could build this yourself. Building instructions and inventory/parts list are available. Early in the building process you will see what it is that you are building. You will be very excited from the moment you start the build of "Truck T14" KrAZ 255B 6x6 till you finish it with about 290 different parts totaling 1800 pieces. Scale: 1:17,5 Length: 477 mm (+ trailer 926 mm) Weight: 1,92kg (+ trailer 2,41kg) Parts: 1840 (+ trailer 2270) This KrAZ 255B 6x6 model is powered by a YaAZ-238A V8 4-stroke Diesel Engine which is visible with the hood opened. This power source has 8 cylinders in a V setup with a displacement of 14,87 liters. The initial YaMZ-238 delivered 215 hp with a torque of 785 at 1500 rpm. Since 1966 the YaAZ-238A engine was installed and delivered 240 hp with a torque of 883 at 1500 rpm. This detailed V8 engine is nice to build and to give it those realistic looks a total number of 80 parts is used. It is detailed with for example air filter, fan, fan belt, pulleys, hoses, by-pass oil filter and the exhaust system. Both L Motors, which are used to power the truck's drivetrain, are positioned laterally on each side of the chassis. The rotation of both L Motors is reduced using a single gear reduction one for each. The power produced by these motors individually is merged by the length differential. To increase off-road capabilities it has limited slip applied. One out going shaft is powering the front axle, but not without being geared down once more. The second out going shaft of the length differential is powering both rear axles. Both rear axles have there own gear reduction which is equal to that of the front axle. Again limited slip is applied, but to the rear axles only. The front axle has Rubber Belts installed instead of shock absorber. It's double rear axle setup is fitted with a tandem bogie suspension. The use of this setup allows easy axle and wheel travel. Both front and rear axles are fitted with "Technic Steering Wheel Hub with 2 Pin Holes". These hubs have proved to be a real improvement, less friction and the wheels do not bend under the weight of the model as it would without. Semi-truck with fifth wheel For a basic configuration a fifth wheel is mounted. Because of this a semi-trailer can be hooked up. Since this is a common application it makes the truck extremely versatile and depending on the used trailer it still suites any kind of terrain. At the rear end of the chassis has wedges installed to allow easy attaching of any semi-trailer. By adding a winch the versatility can even be increased. The battery box is simply sitting behind the cabin and the spare tire is mounted to the truck's roll bar. Ballast tractor with ballast box As used to haul extremely large and heavy loads this truck can be fitted with a ballast box. What it basically does is adding weight to the rear axles to improve traction. While fifth wheel mounted trucks have there semi-trailer to add weight to the rear axles it is now replaced with a ballast box. The truck's battery box acts as the actual weight. A spare tire is mounted that fits the truck as well as four spare tires that would fit for example a drawbar lowboy trailer. Trial Truck edition To be used as just an off-road truck to fool around with a trail truck body can be installed. To distribute the weight of the truck equally over all axles the battery box placed on top of the rear axles. Even though spare tires are not common for trail trucks two are installed to improve the looks of this truck. It is always impressive to see a truck with these large wheels having some spares. Mounted to the roll bar and easy to access when needed. Log Truck with stinger steered trailer Using this truck to transport logs requires to additions. The first one is a bolster mounted to the truck's chassis. It is sitting directly on top of both rear axles which enable good weight distribution. Second is the stinger steered trailer. Basically this trailer is a large tube with a tow ball at one end and a partial chassis with a bolster and two sets of wheels attached to it. The two sets of wheels are attached to solid axles which uses the same hubs as the truck does. Essentially the axle setup is equal to that of the truck without the drivetrain. Again it uses a tandem bogie suspension setup which allows easy axle and wheel travel. To hook it up to the truck it has a tow ball which connect to the truck's tow ball socket. The trailer's bolster is exactly the same of that of the truck and both are foldable. Finally the partial chassis with the axles and bolster attached is slidable. Allowing the full log combination to haul different lengths of logs.
  4. It was a big challange to build adjustable suspension for this tank/destroyer. My first idea was to use only one PF M motor for suspension tilting but it was not posibble (for me ) to make needed gear reductions in such a small place. So I used two PF M motors (one for first four wheels, one for second four wheels). Only one gear reduction for each motor was needed in this case. This solution brings nice advantages - you can also adjust tank height. For suspension I used torsion bars. It is the easiest way to make it. For more details look at the video. (time: 1:10) If you like this MOC you can look on outdoor video.
  5. Zerobricks

    Tiger 4 x 4 x 4

    After completion and playing with the Leopard for a few months, I noticed the model had a few shortcomings which I wanted to eliminate with this version. These include: Suspension oscilations at high torque High center of gravity Instability on rough terrain at high speeds Most of these issues were due to the usage of the torque tube suspension which is simply too heavy and unresponsive at high speeds. What I needed was to replace the live axle suspension with independent suspension while keeping the articulation needed for offroading. Here's what I came up with: Let's break down the suspension to it's basic components to better understand how it works: Colored green are the main shock absorbers. These caryy most of the wight and provide a high suspension travel Colored orange are the gearbox transfer arms which fix each perpendicular gearbox firmly to the suspension, thereby reducing friction and fixing the U joints to keep them from popping out. Colored black are the side beams which help guide the transfer arms and hold the suspension together Colored in red and gray are the two independent drivelines powering the wheels. Finally in transparent, the suspension arms are made as long as possible for maximum suspension travel. I built the first version with this setup, but soon discovred a flaw. The torque from the drivelines would push the suspension arms down, causing the suspension to stop responding (indicated with red and grey arrows in photo above). In order to solve this problem I added the suspension bridge above, colored in pruple. The suspension bridge performs the following functions: Compensation of the driveline torque Supports 20% of the model's weight Improves articulation when going over rough terrain With the suspension solved, I turned my attention to the chassis. I wanted a model with high torque and high speed. To achieve that I installed a two speed gearbox for each independent driveline powered by a total of 4 RC motors: Finally a very sturdy chassis based on frames was built to support the model. Each axle was given it's own independent steering with servo motor and each driveline has an M motor for switching gears. This redundacy means that even if half of the model breaks down, it can still drive back home. Next step was building the model in real life. Thanks to ForwART's custom stickers the exterrior really came to life: The doors can be opened, revelaing two seats and the steering wheel: Each wheel has over 6 cm of wheel travel, allowing the Tiger extreme articulation rivaling live axle setups: And let's not forget the most important photo of them all: Finally, since there is only so much I can tell in words, enjoy the video experience: As usual the LDD file of the model is available by clicking the photo or link below: https://www.bricksafe.com/files/Zblj/tiger-4x4x4/Tiger 4x4x4.lxf To summarize, compared to the previous Leopard, the Tiger has the following improvements: Improved stability due to the independent suspension and low chassis Higher top speed due to the gearboxes Eliminated suspension oscilation Improved performance at high speed thanks to lighter and more responsive independent suspension Improved maneuverability thanks to all wheel steering Sadly there are also a few drawbacks which I plan to fix in the future version: When pushing the model hard in Ludicrous mode and in low gear the 12 tooth bewel gears can get damaged and need to be replaced Low steering angle (18 degrees) Because only one servo motor is used per axle, steering is more prone to be bumped out of center.
  6. I am working on a trophy truck. I am having problems with the rear live-axles articulation. It only turns about 20 degrees. Is this because the links are located far away from the ball joint or is it something else?
  7. I present my latest MOC, a 6x4 Dump Truck: Click pictures for highres, or visit the BrickSafe folder if you want to It is based off of the chassis I made for my 8x4 Recovery Truck last year, but obviously has lost an axle, and been adopted for remote control with Power Functions. It features: -Drive with two XL-motors -Steering with Servo-motor -Independent suspension on front axle -Live axle suspension on rear axles -Dumpable bed with one M-motor and two LAs -Openable cabin -Openable doors -V6 engine driven from both rear axles, via a lockavle central differential -PF LEDs up front -PF LED reversing lights I found a sloution to steer the rear axle, using a turntable and a linkage to the servo motor, combined with pendular suspension, but it had too much slack, and wobbled all over the place, so I ditched it. I also made a mechanism to lift and lock the rearmost axle, but that to turned out less than satisfactory, so I ditched that as well Pictures! There you can see the red lever above the XL-motor, that engages the central diff The bed is quite spacious I was unsure if the M-motor would be sufficient to tip the bed, but it turned out very well, and it has no problem, even with some load! Close up of the tipping LAs. The driving rinf you can see above the rearmost axle is from the locking mechanism I tried to make, that didn't work. I then forgot to take it out Here the cabin is tilted forward. The battery box is held in a solid structure behind the cabin, as you can see. The servo for steering is placed vertically just below the battery box. Close-up of the V6 engine, including "twin turbochargers" The side panels taken off the battery box compartment, shows the wiring and placement of the servo At the front of the bed, we have a spare wheel, and some tools ...for when you need to change a tyre (obviously) The rear axles with left wheels removed for better view. You can also see where the tipping LAs are attached And of course, the under belly shot An LDD representation of the drive line. Green is where the power from the two XLs come from, purple is the axle to the engine, cyan and orange are axles 2 and 3 respectively. All in all I am pretty pleased with the result, as I've been wanting to build this for a long time! Hope to make a video of it in the not too distant future! I will also perfect the LDD model, make it available for those who want it, and post it on rebrickable. I might even make instructions for it, if I fin the time, and can get LDraw to work again
  8. I started this project because I wanted to share my experiences building various offroad models over the last decade. This topic is meant to guide the builders with comparisments, suggestion and best building practices, It is however not a place to find already finished and perfected designs - that's up to you. Various aspects of the design of the vehicles will be split into several subgroups and explained in details. 1. Number of wheels First thing we need to know is how many wheels our design will have. Most common setups are as following: 4x4 Setup Advantages: 1. The simplest and most widely setup 2. Having only 4 wheels means lower weight and higher performance 3. Higher manoeuverability 4. Simple suspension and driveline design Disadvantages: 1. With only 4 wheels the suspension has to be designed to be as flexible as possible to get the most out of the wheels 2. In a case of a mechanical failure of a single wheel, the whole model's performance is greatly affected 6x6 Setup with double rear axles Advantages: 1. Two rear axle provide more traction area, especially when going uphill 2. Usually 6x6 vehicles are longer than 4x4 and therefore less likely to tip over 3. Since the front and second axle are usually closer than in 4x4 setup, there is less ground clearance needed between them 4. Greater redundancy in a case of a mechanical failure Disadvantages: 1. Lower manoeuverability due to a longer wheelbase even with rear wheel steering 2. More complex driveline and suspension design is required 8x8 or more wheels setup Advantages: 1. Having 8 or more allows for much greater traction area 2. Ability to drive over ditches 3. Because wheels are usually much closer there is much less chances of getting stuck on top of an obstacle 4. Excellent redundancy in a case of a mechanical failure 5. Better weight distribution 6. Less suspension travel required per each wheel as with 4x4 or 6x6 and hence better stability Disadvantages: 1. Lower manoeuverability even with rear wheel steering 2. Powering 8 or more requires a very complex driveline 3. Depending on a driveline, combined torque required for powering all 8 wheels can destroy gears if a single wheel gets stuck 2. Type of wheels and tyres Now that we decided on how many wheels we want for our offroad beast, we have to look into what type of tyres and wheels we want to use. I will hereby cover only the bigger types of tyres and wheels. 1. 94.8x44R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Good thread design 3. Low rolling resistance Disadvantages: 1. Low traction, these tyres are prone to slip on the rim at high loads 2. Due to its rounded shape the tyres tend to slide off obstacles when crawling over them 2. 94.3x38R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Medium traction 3. Low rolling resistance 4. Realistic design and proportions Disadvantages: 1. Shallow thread pattern 2. These tyres are very hard and don't adjust to the terrain 3. 107x44R Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. Medium traction 3. Very deep thread 4. Currently largest tyres by diameter Disadvantages: 1. High rolling restistance and vibrations due to the thread pattern 2. These tyres are a bit hard and don't adjust to the terrain 4. Power Puller tyres Advantages: 1. High traction 2. Good thread 3. Largest Lego tyres ever produced 4. Deep wheel offset Disadvantages: 1. High weight 2. Hard to use, they require complex hub assemblies 3. Very rare and expensive 5. Outdoor challenger wheels Advantages: 1. Very high traction 2. Very good thread pattern 3. Deep wheel offset 4. Over 7 studs of space inside the wheel Disadvantages: 1. High weight 2. Hard to attach to the standard axles 3. They require a lot of torque to use them at their full potential. 6. Tumbler wheels Advantages: 1. Low weight 2. High traction 3. Very flexible Disadvantages: 1. Low thread pattern 2. Small size 3. Expensive For the 94.8x44R. 94.3x38R and 107x44R tyres we have a choice of two wheels: 1. Racing wheel large Advantages: 1. Good mounting option with axlehole and pinhole 2. Available in multiple colours 3. Cheap Disadvantages: 1. No inside wheel offset means steering pivot point can't be placed inside the wheel. 1. Futuristic wheel Advantages: 1. Deep wheel offset allows us to place steering pivot point inside or closer to the wheel than racing wheel large 2. Slightly larger wheel size stops the 94.8x44R tyre from slipping on the rim Disadvantages: 1. Limited mounting options, with only one axlehole 2. Hard to find 3. Hubs Now that we have our wheels and tyres we need a way to mount and power them. Here are the most common currently available options: 1. New standard ungeared CV hubs These hubs are usually driven by the CV joint counterpart which pops inside Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre: 2. Firm wheel mounting 3. Readily available, easy to use and to build on. Disadvantages: 1. Low operating angle - the CV joint can operate to a maximum of about 30 degrees, which limits steering angle. 2. Very low torque transfer - the CV joints are prone to deforming and popping out even with low torque applies to them 3. Low ground clearance 2. Old ungeared CV hubs Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre 2. Firm wheel mounting 3. Better ground clearance than newer hubs Disadvantages: 1. Very low operating angle - the CV joint can operate to a maximum of about 25 degrees, which limits steering angle. 2. Very low torque transfer - the CV joints are prone to deforming and popping out even with low torque applies to them 3. Hard to find and expensive 4. No other mounting points than 4 ball joints 3. Built cardan ungeared hubs Example of a hub using a cardan joint to directly transfer the power to the wheel Advantages: 1. Low steering pivot offset - usually at the edge of the tyre 2. Easy to build 3. Can transfer higher torque than a CV joint 4. Higher steering angle Disadvantages: 1. Mounting relies only on the axle and is not as firm as standard hubs 2. Not capable of transferring high torque to the wheels 3. Low ground clearance 4. Standard portal hubs Advantages: 1. Easy to use and to build on. 2. Can transfer very high torque to the wheels when using 8z and 24Z gear combination 3. High steering angle 4. High ground clearance 5. Firm wheel mounting Disadvantages: 1. Very high steering pivot offset - requires stronger steering mechanisms and more fender space for wheel to swing 5. Built portal hubs Advantages: 1. Easy to build. 2. Can transfer very high torque to the wheels when using 8z and 24Z gear combination 3. High steering angle 4. Higher ground clearance than standard portal hubs 5. Low steering pivot offset when using futuristic wheels Disadvantages: 1. Wheels are mounted and held only by one axle, not as firm as standard hubs 2. Hub relies on friction of the components to keep it together, which can slide apart after prolonged use 6. Built planetary hub Advantages: 1. Highest gear ratio of all other hubs, 1:4 2. Firm wheel mounting when using futuristic of power puller wheels 3. High steering angle 4. Lower steering offset than standard portal hubs Disadvantages: 1. Requires old turntable, futuristic or power puller wheels for best results - all are hard to find 2. High number of moving gears 3. Least efficient due to the high friction caused by the large surface contact area and number of moving gears 4. Suspension Suspension is the mechanism that will keep our model's wheels in contact to the ground and will be supporting most of its weight. Most of the designs cover 4x4's Following factors determine the type of suspension system we will use: 1. Weight of the model - The heavier the model, the stronger the suspension components have to be 2. Speed - Faster models require more responsive suspension systems with low unsprung weight 3. Flexibility - The higher the obstacles you want to climb over the more flex and/or wheel travel suspension has to provide 1. No suspension I have yet to see and offroad vehicle without any type of suspension (except for maybe 42070, 42081 and 42082), but I will list my opinion regardless: Advantages: 1. Simple design - having no suspension simplifies our design...and that's about it Disadvantages: 1. No flex over terrain means, there are only 3 wheels at once touching the ground 2. Low stability 3. Poor weight distribution 4. No shock absorption at high speeds 2. Pendular suspension This is the simplest suspension you can put on your vehicle. It basically means one or more of your axles are free to swing about. When using this suspension I suggest using the small turntable where drive axle enters the axle. This will keep the drive axle from carrying the weight of the model, which causes unnecessary friction. 42030 is a typical example of this suspension system. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Using this suspension on both axles can give the model very high flexibility 3. If there are no springs used, the model can have perfect weight distribution on left and right wheel Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. No shock absorption means this suspension is not suitable for high speeds 2. When using on one axle, the stability of the whole model relies on the unsuspended axle. 3. When using pendular suspension on both axles springs or a transfer mechanism are required to keep the model upright 3. Single torque tube suspension This suspension became available with the release of the 8110 Unimog. Best examples of this suspension are 8110, 9398 and 41999. It is the simplest suspension which also allows for vertical suspension movement. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Universal joints can be placed inside the ball joint, allowing power to be transferred to the axle 3. Easy to implement Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. Axle requires a some kind of a linkage system to keep it cenetred (panhard or parallel links as seen above). 3. Using this suspension on the front axle usually results in negative caster angle which causes higher rolling resistance 4. When used on rear drive axle, the suspension has the tendency to cause oscillate, especially with soft suspension and high power 4. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 4. Double torque tube suspension This is an evolution of the single torque tube suspension, which uses two ball joints to drive each wheel side respectively. It is my own original idea. Advantages: 1. Simple, robust design 2. Universal joints can be placed inside the ball joint, allowing power to be transferred to the axle 3. Easy to implement 4. Self-cenetring, since axles are connected in the center there is no need for linkages to center it 5. Can carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Drive torque compensation Disadvantages: 1. Large unsprung weight, poor responsivness at high speeds 2. Using this suspension on the front axle usually results in negative caster angle which causes higher rolling resistance 3. When used on rear drive axle, the suspension has the tendency to cause oscillate, especially with soft suspension and high power 4. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 5. Parallel floating axle This suspension uses linkages which keep the axle parallel to the chassis of the model. For best functionality and reliability the lengths of all links and that of the double cardan joint should be equal. Also all the linkages and drive axles should be parallel. Advantages: 1. Keeping the axle parallel to the chassis reduces the oscillations effect 2. Better responsivness compared to the torque tubes 3. Neutral caster angle when used on front axles. 4. Self cenetring when using A arm as upper link or 4 link setup 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. If configured to carry power to each wheel side independently the drive torque can be compensated. 7. Easy to connect spring to the chassis Disadvantages: 1. High unsprung weight, less responsive at high speeds 2. Increased mechanical complexity, double cardan joints required to carry the power to the axle 6. Half axle independent suspension This is the simplest independent suspension you can build. Best example of such suspension are Tatra and Pinzgauer trucks. Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Robust design with low number of moving parts 3. Easy to connect spring to the chassis Disadvantages: 1. Changes of the caster angle as the wheels travel up and down 2. Hard to implement a drive system that does not carry the weight of the vehicle 3. Hard to implement steering system 4. Wheels tend to drag sideways on the ground when suspension travels up and down, reducing efficiency 7. Trailing arm parallel independent suspension Personally I have not used this suspension yet, but I did use a normal trailing arm suspension which does not keep the hubs parallel. Normal trailing arm suspension which does not keep the hubs parallel acts similarly to torque tube suspension. For the prallel version of the trailing suspension I imagine the following: Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Robust design with low number of moving parts 3. Long links allow for high suspension travel 4. Very easy to connect spring to the chassis 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently Disadvantages: 1. Hard to keep the wheels from sagging under the weight of the model. 2. Difficult to transfer power to the wheels 8. Double wishbone suspension This suspension uses two A-shaped arms to keep the wheel hubs in place. As of late it's my favourite suspension system due to: Advantages: 1. Independent suspension with low unspring weight, suitable for high speed 2. Very customizable design with lots of adjustable characteristics (suspension arm lengths, caster angle, camber angle, steering geometries) 3. When build correctly it is far more robust than live axle suspension 4. Increased ground clearance compared to live axle suspension, especially when used with portal hubs 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Extremely easy mounting of springs 7. Very stable compared to live axles 8. Frame holding the suspension can be part of the chassis, therebye lowering the center of gravity Disadvantages: 1. More moving parts as live axle suspension, increased mechanical complexity 2. Limited wheel travel - Lego wishbones allow a max. of around 25 degrees of suspension angle 9. Multi-link suspension To be updated when I build my first multi-link offroad suspension. I can assume the following characteristics: 1. Independent suspension with low unspuing weight, suitable for high speed 2. Extremely customizable design with lots of adjustable charactersitics (suspension arm lengths, caster angle, camber angle, steering geometries, virtual pivot point) 3. Large steering pivot point compensation 4. Increased ground clearance compared to live axle suspension, especially when used with portal hubs 5. Can be configured to carry power to each wheel side independently 6. Very stable compared to live axles 7. Frame holding the suspension can be part of the chassis, thereby lowering the center of gravity Disadvantages: 1. Very high amount of moving parts, increased mechanical complexity 2. Limited wheel travel - Lego wishbones allow a max. of around 25 degrees of suspension angle 3. Hard to connect springs to the chassis 10. Spring types Listed below are the most common types of springs available: 6.5L Soft shock absorber Advantages: 1. Small, easy to implement Disadvantages: 1. One stud of suspension travel 2. Low spring rate, can't support heavy models 6.5L Hard shock absorber 1. Small, easy to implement 2. High spring rate, can support heavy models Disadvantages: 1. One stud of suspension travel 9L soft shock absorber When using 9L shock absorbers I suggest you do not use the default offset upper attachment point, but use an in-line attachment point instead. This will reduce the friction and allow for better high speed performance Example: Advantages: 1. Two studs of suspension travel 2. More attachment possibilities than 6.5 L shock absorber Disadvantages: 1. Default attachment points create friction 2. Low spring rate, can't support heavy models 9L hard shock absorber Advantages: 1. Two studs of suspension travel 2. More attachment possibilities than 6.5 L shock absorber 3. High spring rate, can support heavy models Disadvantages: 1. Default attachment points create friction 2. Rare and expensive 11. Attaching springs to live axles If we start with basics, the first things we have to check is how position of springs affects suspension of live axles. The closer you place the springs together, the more flex the suspension will have, but it will also be less stable: I suggest you to keep springs at a distance of around 1/2 of the total model width. When placing springs you should keep them in-line with the wheel bearing in order to reduce friction. First example of bad spring placements: And example of good spring placement: When using multiple springs make sure to place them symmetrically centrred to the wheel hub: When attaching springs to torque tube suspension, you have to allow springs to tilt in two planes: You can also attach the springs to the suspension links to increase suspension travel. This technique is especially common on Trophy Trucks: 12. Attaching springs to independent suspension Independent suspension allows for much more flexible spring placement. Generally the closer you attach the spring to the main suspension arm pivot, the higher spring travel you get, but lower suspension force. Examples going from the hardest suspension with low travel to the softest with high travel: You can also attach springs inside the suspension arms: Or horizontally: As with the live axles make sure springs are in the center of the wishbones. Example of good placements: And an example of bad spring placement, which causes excessive friction and suspension binding: 5. Steering Steering is the system which allows our model to change direction. Generally there are two types of steering system used: 1. Skid steering Advantages: 1. Very simple to implement and control with two separate motors for left and right sided wheels. 2. Does not require a dedicated steering motor Disadvantages: 1. Not efficient, since wheels have to skid to steer 2. Power had to be reduced or even reversed in order to steer. 3. Not very accurate 4. Not very effective offroad 2. Classical steering with steerable wheels Advantages: 1. Efficient, with minimum loss of speed 2. Accurate 3. Does not reduce the power of the drive motors 4. Can be used in front, rear or all axles for tight steering radius or crab steering 5. Effective offroad Disadvantages: 1. Requires more complex hub assemblies 2. For best steering accuracy you need a dedicated servo motor. Examples of a simple classical steering system for live axles 1. Parallel steering system for live axles Here both hubs are always parallel. Position of the steering in the front or rear rack has no affect on the steering. Advantages: 1. Very simple and robust 2. Easy to build Disadvantages: 1. No Ackermann steering geometry 2. Steering rack moves inwards as it steers, requiring more space. 2. Ackermann steering system for live axles This system allows the hubs to steer at different rates. The steering arms are offset inside so they form a virtual steering point where at the point where lines meet. Advantages: 1. Better steering performance Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly 2. Steering rack moves inwards as it steers, requiring more space. 3. Steering system with diagonal linkages This system acts similar as Ackermann steering system by using diagonal steering links. Advantages: 1. Better steering performance 2. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements 3. Can be configured to be used in front or the rear of the axle. Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly 4. Simple steering system for independent suspension 1. Very simple and robust 2. Easy to build 3. Can be even more robust when using double steering racks and links 4. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements Disadvantages: 1. No Ackermann steering geometry 5. Ackermann steering system for independent suspension Advantages: 1. Better steering performance 2. Steering rack only has to move in one direction without sideways movements Disadvantages: 1. More complex assembly, less robust. 3. General steering tips 1. When using independent suspension always make sure your links are paralel to the suspension arms, otherwise you may end up with wheels which are not parallel and are causing excessive friction: 2. When using standard portal hubs make sure your steering system is robust enough to deal with the forces generated by wheel driving into obstacles. 3. If possible use servo motors which allow for high steering precision and return to center. They are especially useful at high speed models. 4. Most efficient way to steer the wheels is using the steering racks. 5. Build axles in such way they have positive caster angle, example for direction of travel from right to left. This will self-center your wheels and reduce rolling resistance. 6. Drivelines Drivelines are the responsible for transferring the power from the motors to the wheels. There are various drivelines you can build, here I listed few with their characteristics: Driveline types 1. Permanent 4x4 Advantages: 1. Simple, centralized, low mechanical complexity 2. Wheels are always powered, great offroad performance 3. Light weight Disadvantages: 1. Poor steering radius 2. Tyres have to skid when steering, lowering efficiency of the model 2. 4x4 with open differentials Typical example of this driveline is 42070 Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering Disadvantages: 1. If one wheel loses traction, all the power is transfereed to it, poor offroad performance 3. 4x4 with lockable differentials Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering 3. All differentials can be locked, so wheels are powered for great offroad performance Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Dedicated motor is required to actuate differential locks, higher weight 4. Axle mounted motors Typical example of this driveline are 9398 and 41999. Advantages: 1. Differentials allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering 3. If one wheel gets off the ground the second axle can still pull/push the model. Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Usually the rear axle motor is more loaded than the front, especially when climbing uphill, the motors can't "help" each other. 3. Worse offroad performance than permanent 4x4 5. H drive: This is my favourite driveline due to the following reasons: Advantages: 1. Motors allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Model can skid steer 3. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering normally 4. Having 2 drivelines allows you to carry more torque to the wheels 5. Redundancy, even if one drive fails the model can still move 6. Wheels are always powered, great offroad performance Disadvantages: 1. Higher mechanical complexity 2. Slightly higher weight 6. Wheel motor drive Each motor powers a wheel independently. Advantages: 1. Motors allow the wheels to so spin at different rates when steering 2. Model can skid steer 3. Very efficient since wheels don't have to skid when steering normally 4. Redundancy, even if one or more motors fails the model can still move 6. Lower mechanical complexity Disadvantages: 1. Motors can't "help" each other 2. Higher weight due to a higher motor count Transferring power axially When transferring power via axles, you can reduce the flex by using connectors instead of simple "bare" axle: Use axles with stops to prevent them from sliding out of gears: Where possible always brace tooth gears from both sides: Transferring power at an angle Where pairs of U joints are used, make sure to align them to eliminate vibrations: Brick built CV joint which can transfer high torque at over 30 degrees angle Brick built cardan joint which can transfer extremely high torque up to 15 degrees angle Brick built flexible drive which can transfer medium high torque, extract and retract, suitable for low angles Transferring power perpendicularly The following perpendicular gearboxes are the best suitable for transferring high torque Avoid knob and worm gears, because they waste energy Gearboxes In my models I generally use the following gearboxes: 1:3 differential gearbox Advantages: 1. Very high gear ratio between low and high gear, 1:3 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time Disadvantages: 1. Takes a lot of space 2. This gearbox requires a good housing to brace the gears properly Compact two speed gearbox Advantages: 1. High gear ratio between low and high gear, 1:2,77 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time 4. Very compact design Disadvantages: 1. Requires two of the rare 20 tooth clutch gears 2. More complex shifter assembly. Diagonal gearbox Advantages: 1. High number of gears 2. High gear ratio possible, over 4:1 2. Capable of transferring high torque 3. Very efficient since only 2 gears are used at any time Disadvantages: 1. Takes a lot of space 2. Input and output axles are not parallel. 3. A complex shifting assembly is required for sequential operation. Driveline effect on suspension Transferring torque on the wheels can affect the suspension, especially when live axles are used. The following photo shows how the torque causes one side of the axle to push down and the other to lift up: In order to minimize this effect I suggest the following: 1. Make sure to have most if not all the downgearing inside the axles, so you do not need high torque going to the axles. 2. Make sure your models have a low center of gravity 3. You can eliminate this effect by using two counte rotating axles which cancel each other's torque, example below: 7. Motors and control Following are the most common types of motors used for Lego models. You can find more info here: http://www.philohome.com/motors/motorcomp.htm My personal favourites are L and RC motors due to the balanced output speed to torque ration and great mounting options. 1. PF-M Advantages: 1. High speed output 2. Smallest available motor 3. Cheap and available Disadvantages: 1. Low torque 2. Poor mounting options 2. PF-L Advantages: 1. High speed output 2. High torque 3. Cheap and available 4. Great mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Odd shape 3. PF-XL Advantages: 1. Very high torque 3. Cheap and available 4. Good mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Slow speed output 2. Large form factor 4. PF-Servo Advantages: 1. Very high torque 2. Very precise output with 15 positions 3. Good mounting options Disadvantages: 1. Slow speed output 2. Output axle can move a max of 180 degrees 3. Large form factor 4. Hard to find 5. 9V-RC motor Advantages: 1. Most oowerful Lego motor 2. Very high speed output 3. Good mounting options 4. Two output axles with different gearing ratios 5. Drive axles can pass through the motor Disadvantages: 1. Low output torque 2. Low efficiency 3. Power hungry 4. Odd form factor 5. Hard to find and expensive Power options 1. PF - AA battery box Advantages: 1. High capacity 2. Good mounting options 3. Works with rechargeable batteries, but with lower performance 4. Cheap and easy to find Disadvantages: 1. 750mA current limit - not enough to fully power RC motor 2. Heavy 3. Has to be removed and opened to replace batteries 4. Wasteful 5. Odd form factor 2. PF - LiPo battery box Advantages: 1. Small form factor 2. Light weight 3. Easy to recharge Disadvantages: 1. 750mA current limit - not enough to fully power RC motor 2. Low capacity 3. Studded design 4. Expensive and hard to find 3. RC control unit Advantages: 1. No current limit - can power 2RC motors at once 2. 3 Power levels 3. Has integrated steering output with 7 positions 4. Good mounting options 5. Easy battery replacement 6. Radio based control Disadvantages: 1. Poor quality, prone to breaking 2. Limited angle (45 degrees) and torque from the steering output 3. Has to be removed and opened to replace batteries 4. Very large form factor 5. Expensive and hard to find 6. Heavy 7. Required dedicated antennas and remote Control options 1. PF receiver and controller Advantages: 1. Receiver is easy to integrate into the model 2. Controllers have physical feedback 3. Cheap and easy to find Disadvantages: 1. IR based, low range, useless outside 2. Lack of PWM motor control, unless using train controller which is awkward to use 3. Odd form factor for use with steering 2. RC control unit See above 3. Third party options such as BuWizz and Sbrick Advantages: 1. Smaller form factors, easy to integrate into model 2. More outputs than PF system 3. Smooth control of motors 4. High range thanks to Bluetooth control 5. Higher power available with BuWizz 6. Customizable profiles Disadvantages: 1. Smart device is required 2. No physical feedback 3. Sbrick is limited by PF battery box 4. Price 8. Chassis Chasis is the backbone of your model which olds everything together. For chassis I suggest you to use the following components in order to make it strong and robust enough to deal with the stresses involved when crawling or driving at high speed: Some flex in the chassis might be a good thing to improve offroad capability, but only if id does not affect the driveline and cause friction on the drive axles. Remeember to use diagonal support, since triangles are the strongest shapes. You can also use panels and motors as structural support. Interlocking your chassis will keep it from slipping apart. For good examples of chassis designs I suggest you check the instructions for 9398 and 42083.
  9. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] Logging Truck

    Hello everybody, I present to you another "ancient" MOC of mine - built in May 2016 and only now I finally managed to make a presentation of it - The Logging Truck: At first it was supposed to be a Trial Truck, but as it grew to heavy, especially due to "model team-ish" cabin, I decided to make it more easy going. It doesn't represent any particular model, nor is it scaled or anything... It's driven by a PF XL motor and steered by a PF M motor. It has full suspension, detailed cabin interior and engine compartment. Oh, and I have to admit it is heavilly inspired by Ingmar Spijkhoven's work (2LegoOrNot2Lego). I'll let the photos do the talking... The position of the trailer trolley can be adjusted between the two yellow stops - the main beam slides through the trolley and is held in place by springs and rubber 2L connectors. While the truck is fully suspended, the trailer uses a kind of pendular linkage between both axles. The cabin has detailed interior... ...and so does the engine bay - totaly imaginatory - without any knowledge or research of the real truck engines . I guess under skirt shot is in order... I really like how the front axle turned out, the ackermann is almost to much. Here's another pair of photos to finish it off and a short video of course... I hope you like it and thanks for comment. Please find bigger photos here. Best regards, Miha
  10. Zerobricks

    Leopard 4x4

    After a few month break it's time to get back to Lego and Eurobricks, and why not do it in style I give you the leopard 4x4: The model is a combination of the following ideas and concepts: Quite some time ago I came up with double torque tube suspension idea and now it was time to use it in a real model Claas tyres were an obvious choice due to their agressive profile and massive size. With the release of the 42069 set, I was finally able to build a model with a unique and striking color combination The final model took me some 12 hours to build and the features are as following: - Powered by 4 RC motors and 2 Buwizz - Double torque tube suspension - Independent dual drivelines - Dual servo steering gemoetry - Working winch - Working lights - Openable doors - Openable hood - Openable and removable rear cover Specs: - Width: 24 cm - Height: 24 cm - Weight: 1600 grams - Final gear ratio: 1:5 from outermost RC motor output - Total power: ~60 watts Now onto the photos: The rear trunk can be opened: There is barely enough room left for seats in the interior. Notice the different springs used to potimise suspension. The before mentioned springs give the model excellent flex: There are two servo motors used in order to keep the steering system as stiff and strong as possible: Under the hood there is a hidden winch, which is strong enough to lift the car: And the final, most important photo. Notice how the left and right side wheel drive axles use different colored joiners and bushes: And finally there is a video of the model in action: Safe to say the combiantion of the four RC motors and two Buwizzes with a low gear combiantion of 1:5 results in a model with impressive performance. As seen in the video Leopard can wheelspin all 4 wheels when accelerating on flat surface, which is a first for any of my Lego offroaders. Dual servo motors provide massive steering power and rigidity and allow the wheels to be steered into obstacles with ease. Only downside to the model is it's slightly high center of gravity cause by all the added panels and detailing. P.S. It feels good to be back
  11. Yes, there are dozens upon dozens of LEGO models of the Sherp ATV. I’ve only decided to build my own because I had this idea about how a suspension could be added to it (yes, the real Sherp has suspension according to the manufacturer) and I just had to try it out. The result is a dead simple vehicle that can go 7 KPH on flat terrain and literally rips through snow: Photos & reading: http://sariel.pl/2019/01/sherp-atv/
  12. The C-Model of notorious 42039 24 Hour Race Car. Just like Bootleg Belle, the idea here was to build an oversized desert truck. While Belle goes with hot rod styling, Dream is a pickup truck that someone carved up to extreme extent, installed an oversized and boosted V8 in the back, topped it with preposterous wing and thus fashioned a beast to dominate any desert. It looks angry and ridiculous, because that's how I felt while building it - my girlfriend was reading a particularly bad - yet published by a renowned publishing house! - novel aloud while I was building Features: ► V8 engine with moving pistons and twin "procharger" pulleys, ribbed hose headers and two exhausts, connected to rigid transmission with differential ► radiator with cap & hood intercooler intake ► individual front wishbone suspension & rear live Hotchkiss drive (dragged axle) with integrated bumper ► steering connected to HOG ► opening doors ► cockpit with a (non-functioning) steering wheel, dashboard and seats ► oversized rear wing, rear view mirrors, front lights, reverse lights and stop lights, two side fuel tanks with caps
  13. I think anyone who ever used the portal hubs came to this issue. The hubs simply have the steering pivot point so far from the center of the wheel, that you need to either reduce the steering angle, or have a model with large fenders. Today I came up with this simple mechanism to compensate for that by simply turning the whole front axle in the opposite direction. The two tilted 6L links are usually used to keep the axle from moving forwards/backwards. In my case they are attached to the steering rack at a high angle. Moving the steering rack will cause the geometry of the axle to change - rotating it to (mostly) compensate for the large pivot point: Of course this is just an idea for now, but it should be easy to implement on a real model. The wider the axle, the better the compensation. Of course the axle has to be designed in such way, that suspension, drive and steering system will be able to work with this degree of movement.
  14. Thirdwigg

    [WIP] Sports Car

    I loved the building process for the 3T Sports Sedan so much that I started another car. The 3T car needed a friend, and like every car maker who creates a competent sedan and follows it up with a CUV, I will too. Nope. I'm making a sports car. Again, this will be a mid-scale manual sports car with following features in order of priority: Suspension Rear wheel drive HOG steering Steering wheel Sequential 4 speed transmission (currently this one, thanks @Didumos69) Mid engined Flat 4 Discrete gear-change function Design language similar to the 3T Here is the first draft with a Porsche Cayman in the back of my mind, and you'll note a couple of problems already. The suspension is set, and will not change much. The hardpoints are also set, so the wheel base will not change, the rear overhang, height, and width will not change, and the seat and steering wheel placement will not change. Everything else may require some shifting, such as the length and front overhang, and internal placement of components. I do not like the HOG placement, and connecting the steering wheel is going to cause some problems at this point. So I could move the transmission back to the center of the car, and connect the steering wheel and place the HOD on the dash. I could also move the engine behind the rear axle which could lower it by one stud, and bring 6 pistons. But then there is no way this does not finish as a 911. What do you think. Move the engine to the back? Or keep the cabin of the car cluttered with steering and drivetrain parts? I do not have a solution for the changeover yet, so will be coming once I know where everything is placed.
  15. Dear folks, Don't know if this forum is in need of 'yet another AWD front steering', but decided to post it anyway since it may have some interesting features to share: - Compact 5 stud high modular design - Strong, double suspension per arm - Embedded cross block, to prevent bending axles - Adjustable steering arms to enable toe-in and toe-out (and as a side effect, prevents damage when crashing) - Ready for (2.4 GHz RC) servo steering ;) I needed a flat front module to fit my chassis, but didn't want to use the 'old' 3 stud high Wheel Hub (50301). It simply has too much friction in the turns and breaks too easily. Furthermore I wanted to use the universal joint (61903) in stead of the cardan cup (92906). Since I'm putting significant torque on these joints, and it turns out the universal joint is much stronger. However, this does requires the wheel arms to pivot 1 stud wider than using the standard config. Using the 5 stud high 11949 front wheel bearing and bound to a maximum height, I needed a way to fit suspension within this height. Very happy with the result. Anyway, have a look if you're interested. Happy to hear if anything can be improved. https://www.flickr.com/photos/153697698@N03/sets/72157695812709340
  16. Over the past couple of months, I have very much enjoyed many of the build threads that have taken place on Eurobricks. Of note was the excellent Hammerhead thread by @Didumos69 where the build kept improving in no small part because of the feedback given by so many. In this same vein, I wanted to embark on a less ambitious project. I'll try to update as often as I can. The project is a manual sports sedan in mid-scale. Features (at this point, in order of priority): Four wheel independent suspension Rear Wheel Drive Steering (Steering Wheel, HOG) Four Doors Flat 6 Opening Bonnet Opening Trunk Toddler Safe Transmission Current Progress Basically, the dimensions are set, and the suspension will not change much. Now I'm working on a transmission, which I have not decided if it will include. A manual gearbox puts the shifter a little too high for the scale, and this sequential will fit, but the changeover location is not great, either forward or rear. I'll update this again tonight, and see what I can figure out.
  17. Thirdwigg

    [MOC] Unimog 437

    I guess you could say I couldn't make up my mind about the kind of Unimog I wanted to make next. So I decided to make a platform that would support multiple versions. Features: Interchangeable platform Long and short wheelbase options Standard and Doka cabs, removable Manual control PF control (drop in) Front and rear suspension Steering 4x4 with I-4 fake motor Opening doors and hood Tipper bed options Feel free to check out thirdwigg.com to learn more about the build. Manual SWB with tipper bed. Manual LWB Doka with tipper bed. Power Functions (XL drive, Servo steering) LWB with cover. Manual LWB with canvas bed showing the suspension travel. You can find more pictures on my flickr. I have been adding instructions for the various versions here, and more will be added over the coming weeks. Someday I'll make a camper, because, everyone needs a camper. This was a fun project, and I loved the way it turned out. I have the LWB on my desk right now, and I keep getting distracted from work. I hope to add additional options for the system at some point, and will take other suggestions for versions to add. Hope you enjoy.
  18. I mainly build Technic C-Models, but I also enjoy Creator alternatives, so here's what I built out of set 5763. In the photo, hot-rodder sigfig is added for scale and reference). Features: ► minifig scale (with adjustable steering wheel) ► openable and adjustable canopy-cage with roll bar ► rear suspension (individual for each wheel) ► details such as engine with radiator and twin turbo, lights, steering wheel, twin exhaust and rear view mirrors Browsing through OLX (online marketplace fo classified ads) I found old (2011), used 5763 for a price of a new small, ~50 piece set. I liked how the set contained big wheels and offered possibility to build suspension, so I bought it right away. Only one super-cheap plate was missing, so it was a nice deal. The MOC Alternative uses almost every part from the set. As you can see, the build came out quite clean:
  19. For the "Fast car competition" organized by BuWizz, I have done that: For this contest, you have to make a vehicle with suspensions, and do a video showing it doing at least one jump. Of course, the MOC must be powered by a BuWizz! For the steering, there is a servomotor. The driving is done by two L motors, with a 1:1.8 ratio. So the buggy has a correct speed, and enough torque to be driven on dirt, sand... It is fully suspended. The front is an ordinary system. But for the rear, I couldn't do independant suspensions (not enough compact) or a suspended axle (because as the motors are in the chassis, when you accelerate the axle tilts). So I done an "amost suspended axle". The liftarms thin 5L have an effect of anti roll-bar. I have tried to do a light design. Thus, the MOC weighs 460 grams.
  20. I have finally got around to announcing my 40th Anniversary of Technic build! I am going to be making my first fully manual model in honor of the early Technic models. I am planning to build a 2017 Ariel Nomad Tactical, which is essentially a supercharged, street-legal sand-rail/Group B racer hybrid. The Real Thing: Ariel Nomad Ariel Nomad As you can see, it is a pretty awesome vehicle. It can do 0-60mph in 3.4 seconds, 0-100mph in 8.4 seconds, and it has a top speed of 125mph. It is rear-wheel drive only with a 6+R manual transmission, chain-driven by an inline 4-cylinder 2.4L K24 Honda i-VTEC engine, transversely mounted over the rear axle which produces 235bph (which can be upped with an optional supercharger) and 300lb-ft of torque. It is built for off-roading, as it has long-travel, unequal length, double-wishbone suspension, with Bilstein shocks, and approach/departure angles of 71 and 82 degrees respectively. To top all that off, it comes in whatever color you want it to. And the whole thing weighs less than 1500lb. Who wouldn't want one?! For more info, including all the options and still more specs, check out the manufacturer's page. The Model: I am planning on a manual model with a 6-speed transmission, 3+R gearbox, HoG steering, full suspension, and hopefully a fake engine. And maybe in the future... An RC version with buggy motors! Some blueprints I am using for this model. Ariel Nomad Blueprints CURRENT PROGRESS: Gearbox Revision! All the parts are here! I have exchanged all the color vomit parts for black, it looks much better now! I am streamlining the framework around the gearbox. [WIP] Ariel Nomad Chassis V2.0
  21. Czechoslovakia WW2 tank. Power functions: 1x XL motor 2x L motor 3x M motor Fuction and chassis Lego. Desing Cobi small army WW2.
  22. Hi everyone, This is my first MOC to be published here on the forum: a small/compact rally hatchback. It is not a copy of an existing car, but the front is inspired by modern Audi's. The design parameters that I want to achieve include the following: Fast drivetrain Lots of torque (the car must be able to drive on tarmac, dirt and sand) An average scale of 1:12.5 Front and rear independent suspension Front and rear PF lights Servo steering with small turning radius Buwizz 2.0 to increase performance (located under the bonnet for better weightdistribution and easy acces) A light and rigid chassis Openable doors and bonnet A realistic/clean interior (no visible moters/wires/chassis beams) A gapless body, using rather pannels than beams Drift (on sand) It contains 100% LEGO parts (excpet BuWizz) with a total of 1178 parts. I am very happy with the result. Here are some pictures The Buwizz with easy acces... Clean interior... Openable glovebox... Rear suspension... Front suspension... The underside shows the chassis, wires and motors... Annd finally a little video to demonstrate the fucntions and the oudoor performance. Building instructions/partslist: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-14441/T-Lego/technic-rc-audi-rally-car-with-buwizz-20/#comments Hope you like it, comments, criticism and questions are welcome!
  23. It's only photos, but it is a design I've been working on for quite a while now. It will work with the standard 7 long steering beam and Track Rod 6mm, it even gives you Ackerman Steering. 17.5mm, 34mm diamiter rims. So that should cover all 1:10 scale models. You can swap the large spring for a smaller and uses these parts at the top one with parts x1 "Tube with double Ø4.85", x1 "Cross Block/form 2 x 2 x 2", x1 "3 with arch with Knob & Shaft Ø3.2", x2 "Technic Lever 2m" and x2 "Axle 3mm with Stoppers". I have only shown instructions for one side, it should be self explanatory on how to make the opposite side Please find photos Here! Lego McPherson Suspension Enjoy.
  24. This is my first WIP post on EuroBricks where I will show my progress on my newest build, an EV3-powered 1:8 replica of Lexus' newest flagship coupe, the LC500. The car will most likely be a combination of both the standard and the V6 hybrid LC, but it will have a V8. The body will also be orange. Here's a photo I found of an LC that looks a lot like the one I am shooting for. Features I'm planning to add: Four or six-speed paddle-shift transmission Retractable spoiler Detailed interior Fake V8 engine (but I would like to achieve moving pistons) Full independent suspension All I built so far was the rear axle for the LC. It's exactly like the one in the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set but more reinforced. I also made the V8 engine using Lego Digital Designer. I plan to build the paddle-shifting mechanism used in Didumos' Ultimately Playable Porsche 911 GT3 RS (the one with the tilted wheel) and pair it up with a gearbox. I currently am having trouble whether to motorize his gearbox with the EV3 motors or to pick a different one with less gears and friction. I also am having a little bit of trouble finding the right front axle, though I like the one that Didumos put his Porsche because of the fact that is has two shocks for each wheel. However, I find it very difficult to fit the V8 engine in the middle since the axle is made for a rear-engine car. Here's a poorly drawn render I made of what I'm trying to achieve with the front axle. And here's the chassis in the real LC and the measurements for the LC Lego model. Overall, I'm excited about the build. I would welcome some helpful comments about the V8 engine, axles, and the gearbox I planned to use before I order pieces on BL. Once I start working on the body and aesthetics, I would appreciate some input with that as well. I can also give you the download for the .lxf file of the engine if you'd like to check it out. I look forward to replying to your comments and sharing my progress. Thank you.
  25. So this is my latest tank. It is a development of my previous tank, the Blacktron Liberator. The Liberator is very fast and fun to play with, but it also has plenty of shortcomings. With this build I tried to eliminate those shortcomings and at the same time be a little more purist: the only non-LEGO item in this build is a Buwizz brick. However this tank is not controlled by the Buwizz app. Instead I've tested @imurvai's BrickController app with this MOC (see video). And that proved to be a very positive experience. Ever since I've been playing around with Sbricks and Buwizz bricks one thing (well more than one thing to be honest) has bothered me, and that is the lack of any physical feedback. When I am playing with a MOC I am usually looking at it, not at the app on my smartphone. And so it can easily happen that my fingers lose touch with the controls without meaning to. This is totally not an issue when using a gamepad :). The MOC is powered by 2 XL motors for drive and 2 M motors for rotation, elevation and shooting. Functions: - Working torsion-bar suspension - Shooting; - Driving; - Turret rotation; - Gun elevation; Very roomy tank for minifigs :) Of course I've also made a video :) Hope you will like it!