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Found 4836 results

  1. zephyr1934

    My recent Amtrak MOCs

    When I think of passenger trains my thoughts usually drift to American streamliners of the 1930's-1960's. As such, Amfleet never really caught my fancy, the egg shaped profile borrowed from the Metroliner (PRR/PC/Amtrak) didn't really match the prototypical passenger train in my mind. Then a few years ago one of my friends sketched up a Amfleet car in LDD. That got the gears working in my mind, culminating a little more than a year ago with my setting out to take my stab at them. I found this website of roster shots invaluable for my studies (all reference photos in this post are from that site). I settled on the Amfleet II. From the outside the main distinction between I & II is that Amfleet I has vestibules on both ends and Amfleet II on only one, but Amfleet II also has larger windows. While I was at it, I wanted to make a "modern" train that can still be seen running today. So I went with the current Amtrak paint scheme (Phase VI). The most challenging aspect was to get the right shape to the sides of the cars. Not only are they rounded, but they are widest just below the windows. That took a bit of engineering to get the right shape. Meanwhile, Amtrak's blue is somewhere between regular Lego blue and dark blue, so I went with dark blue. While I could have built clear windows, they would disappear in the dark blue, so I backed the windows with tan to keep them visible in most lighting conditions. I built two coaches and one cafe. The final cars are a little wider than 6 at the widest point and they are 52 studs long. At this point I was in deep, I needed a locomotive to pull the cars. That lead to the P42DC. With my old school bias of streamlined F-7's and E-9's I can't help but think these poor locomotives had their nose cut off. Whatever the history might be, these engines have some difficult angles. There's a bit of clip snot and a lot of black magic behind that nose. Well okay, why stop now? I went on to update my Superliner I design to Superliner II's. The biggest distinction being that Superliner I's did not have transition cars (they relied on the Hi-Level transition cars). Like the Amfleet, they are 6 wide and 52 studs long. All of these cars were designed to handle R40 curves, which require roller bearings to operate satisfactorily at this length. That was easy for the Amfleet design, since the trucks on the prototype cars had an internal frame, the naturally exposed wheels of the roller bearing wheel sets worked well. But for the Superliners, that was a different story. At 6 wide there isn't space to do a brick built solution. So I made up custom truck sides for the Superliners. I rounded out the set with a heritage baggage car visible in several of the shots. Full gallery once moderated
  2. Welcome to another alternative model of the LEGO set 42095. It's surprising the flexibility this set has, which allows the creation of very different models. This is a three-wheeled beach race buggy, powered by the two l-motors available on the set, each one drives one of the front wheels, allowing the vehicle to go forward, backwards, turn left or right, and do 360º spins; talented drivers can also do drifts. The design is simple and aerodynamic, it has adjustable windshield and rear spoiler; side doors that can be opened as well as the small trunk behing the driver's seat. Other small features include a non-functional steering wheel, side mirrors, engine exhaust and small headlights. The cockpit serves as cable management for a clean look and the battery pack is very accessible if you need to quickly change batteries; the IR receiver is disguised as the driver's seat. The fun factor of this buggy is high and obviously tied to its uncommon three wheels configuration which will require some level of skill to drive. Building instructions available on rebrickable.
  3. Poor ship. I have to say, I am not a huge fan of its looks. It is like an UPS truck, or a beat-down cab in poorer part of the city. Gets the job done and offers just minimal creature comforts. On top of that this particular ship had no easy life either. If I had to write all the accidents it had I'd basically describe half or more of the story of the Mandalorian show, so to avoid spoilers - go watch it yourself. For now just believe me: Millennium Falcon had really easy and nice life compared to the Razor Crest. I did not plan to build it initially, but Brickvault guys asked me one time if I would and I agreed. After all this is quite a small ship, right? And boxy, easy shape, right? So I'll just do a month or maybe month-and-half detour from my plan, riiight? Oh boy. This aged like milk. We talked in May and, uh, I am not done yet, but more on that later :D This one-and-half month detour took half of the year, almost 5k pieces and was far harder than I expected it would be. Once again, an angular thing proves to be far more difficult in LEGO than a curved one. Got a tiny angle wrong and everything falls apart. And the size? Just about 70 studs. Yeah. There goes "quite a small ship". Btw, would you consider it an UCS or minifig scale, considering it is... kinda... both? So what do we have here? 5k pieces, a bit over 3 kilos of mass, plenty of features, internal frame strong enough to do this: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipP6ZbI-UJ09F5vPPMEbTkF1L9q2EZkMnegT8EbEC4fFMUba0WqZii3KR3Pcg_Waag/photo/AF1QipOPONHBr-6ATUGQnvs1n3uJr-Gy7C0HCNvY79DY?key=MmRXMFNjTFVIU3Rmekg3UTZqOUhvTEY1MzB3TUxB I had some fun at, uh, "temporary local beach" (on quite a high floor!) ...and on the Levitating Plate: All the hatches open: there are also additional hatches to access interior details. Truth to be told, access is not great. This is not really a play model because it is so heavy, but you can adjust stuff inside. The cockpit seats three, front seat folds for easy access to the back row: ...and of course there's plenty of space for Mando's quarries: So, why is it not done yet? I probably got the roof angle wrong. Actually, I definitely got it wrong. But is it a big deal? What do you think? Should I just proceed with instructions "as-is" or would like to see this updated? Or maybe you actually like this slightly slanted roof section? Instructions will be available on brickvault when complete, and there's a nice preorder for reduced price for now: https://www.brickvault.toys/products/razorcrest ------------------------------------------------------------ Razor Crest Update #1! I believe that's final design. Roof is now properly flattened, while still retaining minscule but noticeable wing angle, section behind the cockpit has been changed for better shape, and engines were updated thanks to ScottishDave's input on Eurobricks. Now I need to update the studio model (not too hard, should be few hours at worst) and I can get to making instructions. In the meantime, Brickvault will commence their internal review to ensure there are no flaws in the model, parts lists or instructions. I'd like to thank everyone who preordered, commented and liked - fantastic support from you all! Stay tuned for future updates! Thanks for viewing! EDIT: The instructions are released - to be found on brickvault.toys !
  4. Vladimir Vysotsky Lego Mosaic Free Building Instructions: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-67939/makushima/vladimir-vysotsky-mosaic/#details Lego Art MOC - Vladimir Vysotsky Mosaic (Free Building Instructions) by makushima Lego Art MOC - Vladimir Vysotsky Mosaic (Free Building Instructions) by makushima
  5. badgerboy

    [MOC] Mr Moon

    Here is Mr Moon: Wind the handle, Mr Moon will roll his eyes as another spaceship orbits him looking for a place to land… "Hooray, we’ve planted our flag!" Oh, looks like Mr Moon blew the flag down again! I'll be upfront, I did this for the ongoing LEGO IDEAS 'Out of this World Space Builds' contest. But, It wasn't always mechanised though, I agonised about my initial idea which was just going to be 'The man in the moon'. I thought I could do a simple Brick Sketches in homage to Chris McVeigh. I just felt that it lacked pizzazz! So I noodled about adding Classic Spacemen, and microfigures and flags, but it just felt like a perfunctory attempt. After talking with an artist mate of mine [a muggle or Noffler (Not A Fan oF LEGO) as I like to call them] I decided to try to add some form of movement. Here is a little video of the mechanism I eventually got to work in action: If the video doesn't play properly, it can be found here too (turn off sound though - my kids are doing homeschooling in the background!). I'm kicking myself a little because there was a prototype mechanism using the yellow racks I had and some more dbg and brown technic pieces that I appear not to have documented photographically :-( Someone on IDEAS has suggested adding the option of a cow to replace the spaceship with if you wanted and I love that idea. I'm close to the 250 part limit. Some trimming is possible in the part count of the mechanism I think owing to a lack of parts in my collection. I actually spent about £15 on a couple of Bricklink orders that included the black curved gear racks and a couple of bigger black plates. I'm going to have a play to see if I can figure something out... guess I'll be buying a cow sometime this week! I feel like I need a disclaimer, I realise I don't post much on Eurobricks, I'm more of a lurker here in the last few years (this was after I realised I was saying the same things in a few places!). I do feel bad for asking for support, but I really would appreciate the extra exposure sharing this here hopefully gives my submission. Please accept my apologies if you feel I'm being mercenary by posting this. For anyone who is willing to make a comment or lend support to my submission, my entry can be found here. I appreciate any thoughts or criticism and thank you for taking the time to read my post.
  6. Ahoy my fellow captains, kind of a strange feeling to start this post, since I have been browsing this forum for more than a year now, admiring these countless pieces of art posted here. Actually, it's been my six-year-old son who constantly asked me to post our progress here - his father was a little shy and reluctant to do so, since he is never truly satisfied with his construction and still in awe regarding your astonishing models. But, you know, "Arrrrghh", what the heck, no need to hide anymore, I've been utterly in love with LEGO since I got my first bricks and can still vividly remember sitting on my child room's floor next to my brother, listening to "ALF" cassettes and (re-)build our barracuda for the 100th time.. The first pictures show the results of my sons' and my christmas-constructing period of 2016. Ever since, we weren't really happy with its form and as we were blown away by the exellency of ships like the "Le Fleuron" or the "Sang Royale" (and especially, of course, Cpt. Greenhair's unbelievably helpful ideas - THANK YOU, CAPTAIN!!), we wanted to do it differently this time. The pictures after the "Barracuda" show the process of our current project with the (according to my most patient, wonderful and tolerant wife...) fitting title "HMS Effortless". I think you know this feeling of always finding something to improve... lately, it's the positioning of the masts - the distance between the fore-mast and the mainmast seems to be too far. Please let us know what you think and where you see room for further improvement - my son and I are happy about every feedback! First the "old" Barracuda: And this is supposed to be legendary HMS Victory's "secret" sister ship, the HMS Effortless: (The balcony was my son's wish ) It's planned to give her full rigging, sails and of course the many missing details she deserves. it's always a question of time and money Here are more pics from her construction so far as well as more of the Barracuda.
  7. Hello all, With the possible release of lego technic mercedes Zetros, I decided to rebuild my Technic unimog U400 into an unimog U4023. I could do this thanks to the recently aquired Claas Tractor Tyres and the abundant parts of the Liebherr - I find the Liebherr a fantastic set for parts - I modified the cab and I will integrate 2 control+ L motors and 1 XL control+ motor for drive. First I started with the cab, the chassis I'll do next The cab is build on the same base of the U400 cab The cab is not 100% true to the original, lack of various grilles, the front wheel arches are not integrated in the cabin, the air intake etc, but I find it a great start if i can say so myself. The cab features lockable doors Here is a foto of the cab on the original U400 unimog chassis with Claas Tyres. So the next project is to rebuild the chassis with the control+ motors and I also plan to rebuild the front bumper to match the U4023 bumper. Hope you liked it so far
  8. Lego Technic Rolls-Royce Phantom by Isaac Yaw Instructions: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-67767/Isaacyaw/rolls-royce-phantom-110-by-isaac-yaw/#details Full video: functions: -Fully independent suspension system-Adjustable height suspension-V12 engine with gearbox-6-speed manual transmission-working steering wheel and 'hand of God' steering system-full black and yellow theme interior-fully openable doors, hood, and trunk replicated from the original model-hidden 'umbrella' in the door dimensions: length- 57.5 cmwidth- 20.5 cmheight- 15.5 cm
  9. These two trains comprise my space-train fleet for the Nexus Force, one streamlined passenger train, and one generic freight train. You can see more the Nexus Force stuff in this thread here in the Space sub-forum. It features the modular base, trucks, crawlers, and several spaceships, along with the mini-figures. (human or otherwise!) The Moonlighter train is owned by the Nexus Force, and is a retro-futuristic stream-liner mix of old-school steam technology, but with hyper-modern safety features designed specifically for use by Nexus Force personnel as a very high-speed, high-security ground transport between the northern-most city of St. Nicklaus and north-pole-hugging outpost of Ice Station Odyssey, around 500 miles away. (this all takes places on the ice-bound planet of Beta Polaris, which orbits what we here call the North Star, far away from Earth.) Thus this makes it a space train! Unlike the slower Earth trains, the Moonlighter type of space-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 110 MPH (135 is the loco's top possible speed) on it's special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's over hundreds of miles, all while using Positive Train Control (PTC) on the the mostly double-track mainline, where all vehicle crossings are flyovers and switches virtually non-existent once out of St. Nicklaus city limits. This train runs along with nine other identical versions of this train (10 total trains in all) on the route with up to seven in running order on the route and at least two in the maintenance shed / in emergency backup storage at any one time. They are numbered 2000 through 2010. The Moonlighter engines themselves are based off the 4-8-4 GS-6 "Daylight" of the Southern Pacific Railroad of Earth (known on Earth for the lone GS-6 class survivor, 4460), but with only two leading wheels instead of four, turning it from a "Northern" type 4-8-4, into a "Berkshire" 2-8-4 type steam locomotive. The loco is equipped with ditch lights and a large headlight. The Nexus Force logo goes onto the nose of the streamlined pilot and the rear of the observation car, while the engine's number goes under the cab windows. The two forward tanks are for oil, and the rear tank is for water. The engine is equipped with a water scoop (like on the old New York Central steam locomotives) for refilling the water tank on the fly. There is a ladder from the tender-top deck to the coupler level behind the engine for access to the trailing passenger cars, and two ladders on either side of the steam loco for entry into the enclosed control cab. Three of these passenger cars go on the Moonlighter, with two before the dome car and one immediately after it. The recessed panels are the platform doors. One of these vista-dome cars goes in the middle of the train. (You may have noticed there are no exterior platform doors on this car. I decided not to add them because they didn't look good with the dome.) The rear observation car is currently missing it's rear curved windows, but it will have them when built IRL. The Nexus Force logo goes on the rear of this car, as previously mentioned above. After another locomotive has arranged a freight train in the Nexus force spaceport's yard, a RS-1 road switcher loco has arrived on scene to pull it's train to the some 500+ miles distant city of St. Nicklaus. This larger diesel is numbered 99, and is running with a mobile armored cannon unit for the journey ahead, as it runs through some areas that could be ripe for an ambush by enemy forces, as you never know where the Maelstrom might have agents in deep cover or have planted ambushes alongside the line. A train was derailed and attacked last month in Avalanche Canyon by pirates, which is why the railroad is taking no more chances while it's position is being currently fortified all along the route. The Nexus Force owns several ALCO RS-1 class locomotives for use in heavy-duty switching jobs involving mobile rail-based artillery (in case of enemy invasion, this loco type can be quickly armored with bolt-on sloped plates), and as a road vehicle for general freight duty. The Neo Nexus Force logo goes on the ends of both hoods, and the number 99 (in printed 1 x 1 tiles) on the short hood sides. In reality, this loco was inspired by an early-2000's MOC I and my father made of a generic diesel loco. I later destroyed the old MOC for needed parts around 2011. This new MOC honors that loco with the old doors on the sides, and four printed vent fans on the long hood. The cab features control stands for either direction of travel, but it is mostly used short-hood forward. The doors to the cab also open for figure placement. This model was inspired by this armored train MOC, that was itself inspired by the movie "Castle in the Sky" and it's armored train therein. The road vehicle model is partially inspired by Lola the car from the TV show Agents of Shield. (although this one doesn't fly) The sports car doesn't have great off-road capabilities, so it has to be trucked in on a flatcar to the remote space base. This fuel tanker is filled with gasoline or diesel fuel for use in the space base's land vehicles. Usually two or three tanker cars are sent into the base every couple weeks for refueled the on-base supply. This bathtub gondola is filled with ice boulders that have frozen ancient lifeforms trapped inside. The Nexus Force is sending them to a specialist laboratory off-world to have the DNA decoded and the beings themselves studied. Due to height clearance issues in St. Nicklaus city, regular-height cupola caboose types are forbidden. So, the bay window type is used instead. This moon base-like space base model is where the Moonlighter travels to, and was inspired by set 60036 (Arctic Base Camp), with a rooftop shield generator partially lifted from set 75098 (Assault on Hoth) and a sensor array inspired by set 76157 (Wonder Woman VS. Cheetah) The base consists of eight separate, interchangeable, modular sections, all of which have opening roof / wall sections for ease of access. These sections include (but are not limited too): a common bunk room, a spaceship control tower, a fusion generator, communications room, break room, and several more. As you can see, I joined the base to the rail-line with a short siding for freight deliveries, and for the servicing of steam locomotives on services such as the Moonlighter.
  10. Hello! Here is the latest addition to my "Midiopolis" Midiscale City. Enjoy! This Modular features an Old Office Building, with the first story having been renovated and occupied by a Chain Beauty Supply Store, leaving the remaining upper two stories intact in their original state. Next to the Old Office Building is a Country Boutique & Candle Shop.
  11. Been working on a MOC, Robby the Robot from "Forbidden Planet" (1956) and a host of other movies and TV shows. This design inspired the Lost In Space robot that it's often mistaken for, but Robby is much cooler. All purist other than some cut stickers. I want to get one of the adult Belville blondie dolls after lockdown to better recreate the poster pose, rather than using the child one I had available. A bit fragile in places, but I'll think how to sturdy it up over the next little while no doubt. Robby the Robot MOC by jp-30, on Flickr Robby the Robot MOC by jp-30, on Flickr Robby the Robot MOC by jp-30, on Flickr
  12. Yet another LEGO TIE Fighter. How far can this classic design be pushed? How many ways are there to build an eye sandwitched by hexagonal solar panels? Is there a perfect design already? This is where beauty of LEGO as form of modelling strikes with full power, as answers to these questions are: Very far, infinite ways, and no, there is no perfect design available and never will be. In 2014 I have built this: It worked, and I think for 2014 and what was available back then, it was pretty good. It had obvious flaw though: no space for a minifigure, and it was also a little too small in scale. I was limited mostly by the fact there were no proper cockpit pieces, and my attempt with literally the only other one was... not spectacular, not to mention it needed painting with A LOT patience required. The new model takes advantage of this cockpit piece, which allowed me to push that original 2014 design further. I know, I am late to the party, years - literally - behind other designers of great TIE models, like Bricks Feeder or Rebel Builder, yet I hope I can bring something new into the T/F building scene. Originally I thought I would just stretch the build here and there but no, heheh, no way. Literally the only unchanged parts are the eight quarter (or one-eighter?) dome pieces, which are to me still the only way to have smooth and roughly spherical design without holes all around. Unfortunately when we look at a closeup of a real movie-filming model of the T/F we see how far are we from true modelling but I say we're collectively inching towards it pretty nicely. I have said this plenty of times but original designers of TIE Fighters really did all they could to make them unbuildable properly, naturally unknowingly - who would think adult guys 30 years in the future would try to recreate the design using perhaps the weirdest medium available?. The T/F is just a sphere, two struts and two flat hexes. Except: 6-diameter central cokcpit piece would require a 9-diameter ball, minifig-scaled TIE would require an 8-diameter ball and don't even get me started on sources for TIEs dimensions. If you think that Illustrated Guide To Star Wars vehicles is helpful, well, not much. I dare to say this book did awfully lot of harm to LEGO Star Wars MOCing scene. So is my TIE perfect? No, not yet. I promise though, I did all I could to make it as good as possible, with no compromises made. And this time it houses a minifig! The design is super sturdy to my standards, nicely swooshable - for a reason, but I will get to that later. Naturally having a T/F built opens a way towards the Interceptor, which for me is among the best looking spaceship designs in any sci-fi. While the core design is similar, the ball has some differences, mostly to accomodate longer struts. This is because LEGO curiously didn't develop 2x9 plates and for once I was in a situation where I can't really replace 2x9 plate with anything without compromising structural integrity. Having that solved I went onto the wing design and OH GOD INTERNET WHAT HAVE YOU DONE. If anyone knows angle on the panels and can prove it, gets a free beer. With shipping. Because the wings are angled in all dimensions, good luck guessing proper values from photos. Because of the IGTSWV book, half of the models (and I don't even mean LEGO models) existing are wrong. And then because of SW animated series, the other half of the models are also wrong... ...so my source of reference was this: Then after having all that done, I experienced another unexpected problem: The ship is top-heavy and won't stand straight. I added tiny legs on the bottom edges of wings which help a bit, and because the design is quite sturdy, the T/I requires no stand. There you have it. Yet another T/F and T/I. I hope you like the designs and I hope I managed to introduce something new to the very competitive scene. Enjoy! ...but wait, there is more! I would not build these models if not a commission request from BrickVault: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrhb3SP2lZBgguLHIWWuHOQ Originally it was meant to be just a few TIE models based on the 2014 design I had, just LDD files, but over time we developed a much more interesting designs and... instructions for each of them! The instructions are paid and please understand, it took weeks to develop them, error-proof, make the experience enjoyable and builds sturdy enough to be handled easily. Normally I do not make instructions, as I prefer to build with real bricks than to do electronic designs. The instructions are designed to have dozens of simple to follow steps with just few pieces per step, have submodels where needed, parts list for each step and a total bill of parts at the beginning. Additionally, in few places, there are notes to watch out for some particular details. I can fully understand now what LEGO designers go through and I can imagine amount of effort required for making instructions for larger and more complicated designs. I am pretty sure it took more time to design instructions for the recent UCS Millennium Falcon than to design the model itself. Thanks for watching and Happy New Year!
  13. Hi all, I'm experimenting with a 6x6 chassis design (3 motors, one powering each axle independently) and I want it to have steering on two axles. Not an engineer but I've Googled a lot of 6x6 designs, but it's not clear to me which arrangement provides a tighter turn radius - front/rear or front/ middle. The front/middle seems most common in military designs (like the Stalwart). But I find my prototype turns pretty well.
  14. Nuts to the Falcon. The beautiful and graceful Lambda Shuttle has always been my favourite of all the Star Wars ships, and I'm delighted to present my LEGO minifigure-scaled version of this wonder. Didn't you already make one of these, Ru? Yes I did, and well-remembered! It was ten years ago, and a large part of the reason I joined EB in the first place. You can see it here. I revised it a coupe of years later but never publicised the update; you can see it here here (link to flickr folder). I had always intended to go back and tweak the original; however this is a totally new MOC. I started working on it back in 2016, but then we moved house and the LEGO went into storage for a couple of years. front The overall scale of this version is similar to my earlier version, and like the former is based around using the 6x3 vertical windscreen also found in 2015's System-scaled Shuttle Tydirium. The other major factor is the height of the rounded sides of the body: I've used the 4-wide cylinders to give what I think is the best approximation to the real thing. These are attached via a fairly complicated variety of SNOT techniques to a ten plate-high body. Not all the parts are (yet) available in white (the macaroni tiles now are, but not the 4x4 round plates with 2x2 hole), hence the splashes of grey at the sides (or trans-clear in one spot). Starboard The wings are a composite of Technic liftarms and plates. I chose this to keep the weight of the wings down; even built like this I had to work quite hard to prevent the wings flopping down too easily. Some more views: Rear High I've tried quite hard to make this accurate to the movies. There are actually two distinct versions in the movie canon - the sleek ILM model used in the space scenes, and the shorter droopier-nosed version which featured in the Home One hangar scene. The cause of this discrepancy is apparently due to the set designers at Elstree studios in the UK having access only to a few photos of the lambda, but not the ILM model itself thousands of miles away in California. If you are interested, and for a nostalgic reminder of what the Internet looked like in the early naughties, check out Lambda-class Shuttles: the Dimorphism Blooper. I've modelled this one on the ILM studio model. Mostly, I think it is accurate, but I have had to make a few compromises. The cockpit taper - which is only about a stud-width at this scale - is impossible to render without resorting to a solid-black windscreen, and instead is implied by the exaggerated taper of the cockpit sides. The cockpit is a little deeper than the original - required to allow minifigure seating at this scale; the original Kenner toys model did something similar. High close/detail I've take a bit of a guess at the sloping vent-thing under the vertical fin; it is difficult to tell from reference pictures what this is supposed to be. Pressing the silver grille-tile just in front of this operates a latch to allow the body to open. In some places aesthetics wins over accuracy. The bulges on the side of the fuselage should rise to about half-way up the fuselage sides, and should extend back about half-way along the body, but I was so happy with the effect of the mudguard pieces here that I've left them as they are. Detail Front The seven-wide cockpit does not allow a complete set of grille tiles at the front. I may have to resort to a decal on the central tile. The technic skis at the sides would perhaps work better with the pointy-ends at the front but there was no way to attach them that way round (and they could do with being two studs shorter!). There are few canon reference images of the rear. Rather than the usual blanket trans-blue tiles, I have instead tried to show what the engines might look like under the exhaust glow - inspired by this superb render by Thad Clevenger. The vents end up looking a little square; it might be possible to improve this with decals. Rear detail The extremes of the rounded rear end look a bit square, but this is the best solution at this scale, at least until LEGO produces this piece in 2x2. Here's a view from beneath. You can see the taper of cockpit sides, and how the technic skis are a little easy to knock out of position . underside One of the major challenges I faced was attaching the rounded sides of the body SNOT to the studs-up frame. Mostly this is achieved with SNOT brackets, but there was no room for this on the forward sections, which are actually attached via an internal clip. Inside here are two very hard shock absorbers which are intended to encourage the wings to sit in either 'up' or 'down' positions; see here. The smooth sections in the middle are the landing gear doors. An essential feature of any Lambda is that it must be able to fold its wings in order to land. With this, the wing-mounted guns need to fold outwards. I've also included a chin-ramp, though it is hinged a little further back into the body of the ship than on the real thing. Landed front low As you can hopefully see, there is also landing gear, with folding flaps to cover the recesses. It is retractable, as shown below: Landing gear detail The shock-absorber parts act as a kind of suspension when the ship is landed, and provide a spring action when folding to keep the retracted gear in place. It works surprisingly well. Towards the front of the above picture, you can see the cockpit floor is mounted at a half-stud offset, which allows two figures to be seated side-by-side. Having experimented with several ways to allow the cockpit to open, I found that having the nose section slide off provided the best compromise between accessibility and strength. Cockpit interior detail As you can see, the white 4L bars that frame the windscreen are held on by droid arms, and the sloping cockpit sides held in place at the front by 1L bars with claws. It's a bit fiddly to put together. The 1x4 trans tile at the rear unfortunately exposes the asymmetry inherent in any odd stud-width construction; if it were available in trans-black the stud might be better hidden! Access to the inside is easy: the whole top slides off. The red Technic liftarm at the front is a latch to keep the roof in place; it is released by pressing down the metallic silver grille tile. I've also removed a side wall for the photo. Interior I had in mind that this is the shuttle Darth Vader uses to transport Luke from Endor to the Death Star II. It is kitted out for high-ranking officers, with an Imperial Coffee Machine and an Imperial Waffle maker. For a size comparison, here's my Lambda next to the latest official playset version. Comparison to system set I really liked that set, despite is obvious compromises of proportion (and I infinitely prefer it to the hideous UCS set). I like to think that mine is on the same approximate scale to this but more proportionally accurate. The Lambda is the end result of a long process of trial and error, and I'm pleased with the result. I hope you like it too! For more pictures see my Flickr album. C&C welcome! Rufus
  15. chuck_in_charge

    [MOC] 1:200 Iowa-Class Battleship

    Hello friends at eurobricks! First time poster here so please go easy on me. I would like to take this opportunity to share my Iowa-class Battleship MOC. The model is built to 1:200 scale (accurate to a stud!). The ship features separable waterline hull, fully articulating main and secondary turrets, detailed superstructure, curved bow and stern, floatplanes, and stands. Almost all AA emplacements from 40mm Bofors to 20mm Oerlikons are represented here. This model has taken me well over 300 hours, across several months, to research, design, model and test-build. I am proud to call it my best work yet. Below are studio.io renderings mixed in with some photos (I have yet to accumulate the correct colors for the full physical build and photo shoot). If you have doubts about structural integrity, scroll to the very end for a video demo. Iowa-Class Battleship Cover Photo by Chuck, on Flickr Iowa 1943 vs Missouri 1945 by Chuck, on Flickr Iowa Test Build - Waterline 1 by Chuck, on Flickr Iowa Test Build - Waterline 2 by Chuck, on Flickr Iowa Hull Test Build by Chuck, on Flickr Iowa Shake Test by Chuck, on Flickr Separately I have also built a fully refitted/modernized version of the Iowa-class (BB-63 Missouri in her 1980s to be exact) with various upgrades to her armament: Iowa & Missouri Updated Comparison by Chuck, on Flickr I have created several other ships including the CV Enterprise, battleship Texas and light cruiser Atlanta in this scale before. Below is a snap of the fleet. Feel free to take a look and say hi @: https://www.instagram.com/chucky_in_charge/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/chuckincharge/ Every Ship I've Built in 1:200 Scale by Chuck, on Flickr
  16. Welcome to Harry potter custom builds and moc's. I'm loving the new Harry Potter range of sets but there is always room for improvement. Interested to see how people have altered, added to the existing sets or just gone crazy and built something themselves. Looking forward to seeing your magical creations.
  17. Here it is! Refinished and redone, with a couple of added bits and bobs, the Mountain Oracle! Ascend the steps of her mountain sanctuary, and just maybe she'll speak to you of the future. This is a MOC I created a while back, I've made some upgrades since the first version. The fountain down in front, as one, as well as that waterfall coming out of the mountain. And a second partial tools up on the hillside to the right. And yes, that staircase is a lot more sturdy than you'd think. It's supported from underneath the platform landing as well as by several clear supports that are hidden behind the staircase itself. This is the original MOC, that's been improved. This MOC (the resubmission) is now gathering support with blazing speed on LEGO Ideas! If you like it and wish to support it, please consider doing so! Thank you! :) https://ideas.lego.com/projects/f31174e5-f828-4ea8-858b-9014d457cbfc You can check out more pictures here on the Flickr page!
  18. I have added a new model to my collection of MOCs from The Legend of Zelda video game series. After the Temple of Time from Ocarina of Time (left) and the Clock Tower from Majora's Mask (middle) I have now built the Tower of the Gods from The Wind Waker (right): I started designing this model about two years ago (using Studio), but never got around to finishing it. So I decided to make some good use of all the free time I had during lockdowns and over the Christmas holidays to finally get this project done. I am pretty happy with how it turned out and it's nice to finally be able to put it into my shelf. Here are some more pictures: The top of the tower houses the boss room where Link has to defeat Gohdan: Another look at the interior: The tower splits into three sections and one of the floors can be taken out in order to access the room below: If you are interested in my next projects, here is my Flickr account. If you have any feedback or suggestions, I would be glad to hear your thoughts!
  19. Hello, all! Today I bring you my latest creation, a 4-8-2 mountain type based off of Frisco's 1500 class. I have been able to fall more in love with Frisco locomotives as I've been helping take part in cosmetically restore the Frisco 1501 located in Rolla, Missouri. Not only that, but my great grandfather was one of the engineers of the 1501 before it was retired. Some history of the locomotive: “Steam locomotive 1501 was once part of a proud stable of thirty such engines on the Frisco Railway system. Built in 1923, the handsome modern machine was the pride of the fleet until dieselization of the system in the late 1940s. The 1501 was part of an initial order for fifteen locomotives placed with the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Eddystone, Pennsylvania in 1923. The order was the Frisco's response to delays in passenger service due to the tortuous Ozark territory west of St. Louis. The oil-buring locomotives were a type nicknamed "Mountain", which has a wheel arrangement of four lead or pilot wheels, eight driving wheels, and two trailing wheels under the cab (4-8-2).” Down below you can see the progress of the locomotive from the very beginning. I decided to update this as to help show the final product.
  20. dimka_ya

    [MOC] 5pin trucks

    Hello! I want ot share my car models. Previously designed trucks and cars 4pin wide, I thought that the truck should be wider than the car - whitch means 5pin, since 6pin - its too much :) 4pin trucks can be seen here p.s. If I made a mistake in the section - please forgive me and move the topic to the ride one. Thank you for the attention! Next trucks ( Which is betten - add new models in the first (main) post or in the following comments? ) My topics: micro city + micro village
  21. Good evening community, Today i want to present our latest realized model. The XII H2 was especially designed for the hilly terrain of saxony. It has been built in Chemnitz between 1910 and 1927. The model consists of approx 1121 parts and it´s about 58 studs long. The model is a customer-wish and it´s designed for a motorization with power-functions as well as powered-up and for sure with the old 9V train-motor. All the electronics like motor, battery-box and IR-reciever take place in the large coal-tender. All the wheels are from Big Ben Bricks. The main wheels are XL-drivers, the wheels on the front-bogie are medium and at the tender are small train wheels. To make this locomotive with the low hanging cylinders suitable for curves, i separated the cylinders horizontally. The upper part is fixed to the main frame and the lower part is connected to the bogie and could swivel left and right. Special attention was paid to the boiler with the golden rings and the golden accents like in the example. The technic to create the boiler rings was taken over from the DR BR 01 of Simon Jakobi (Dr.Snotson). The instruction of the DR BR 38.2-3 is no available on our website. As a speciality i also want to use this opportunity to present our latest news. Since November the 1st we offer different 3D-printed components in our shop too. We offer different rod-designs in various dimensions, as well as rod sets or special components like blind-wheels or customer solutions. This offer is probably most interresting for customers in europe because we´re located in Germany but we ship worldwide too. And here with custom 3D printed parts.
  22. Presenting another of my Danish State Railways’ (DSB) locomotives - redesigned from 7-wide to 8-wide and digitally rendered but already built and tested DSB Litra MK The Danish State Railways (DSB) first radio control shunter Litra MK was built by Siemens/Vossloh in Germany as type VSFT G322. 25 were built from 1996 to 1998. All but one shunter were transferred to DSB subsidiary Railion in 2001 and DB Schenker Rail in 2007. My model: The DSB Gods version. Scale: 1:45 Length: 27 studs from buffer to buffer Width: 8 studs Bricks: 578 Powered: 1 x 9v battery, 1 x PF custom adapter, 1 x M-motor & 1 x SBrick. Gear ratio: 1:1 Designed: 2020 (third version - the first (6-wide) in 2012 and the second (7-wide) in 2014) All renders are done on the very high setting in Stud.io with all of my own custom decals added in the PartDesigner tool. Rear with the hidden SBrick inside: Removable hood for easy placement of the 9v battery inside - probably a 800 mAh rechargeable Li-Po one: The mechanical power transmission technique with 1:1 gearing: My earlier 7-wide version was rather fragile (and prone to implosions when handled the wrong way) but this time around the construction is pretty solid and the mechanical power transmission much better with surprising pulling capability. Long live 8-wide
  23. Hi,I'm making a topic to combine my WIP stuff, any questions and worries while building stuff. I've been making B-C-models since I was 6th /now 31/, playing with ATCO bricks, as in Bulgaria LEGO was stupidly expensive. 20 years later I was given 42046 as a gift and here we are... I've got 21 MOCs on rebrickable now - you can see them HERE My Bricksafe hoarding place for renders and real-life shots is HERE Some of you may have already seen some of my work posted on the forum here /42106 Big Rig/. C models followed - a truck trailer from 42103 visible above, revised 42039's B model /below, both manual and RC/ and a whole bunch of stuff from 42101 and 42102 /also below/. 42101 alt-builds - up left - a mini-cyber-truck-thing, up-right - trial truck from mini-Claas and Buggy - two steered axles, some interior, lots of color barf. Down left - touring bike - front suspension, steering. Bottom right again Claas and Buggy Combo - Soviet Big Rig - opening doors, HoG steering, fifth wheel that accepts big trailers. Up left - plane out of 42101 - propeller spins, VERY SOLID and hard to take apart. Up right - a bit ugly ATV, has steering and rear solid axle, that's suspended. Does wheelies. Down left - helicopter - has inverted HoG to spin the propeller, rear one is manual too. Down right - Rat Rod - has Beam of God steering and a low stance. If you push it hard it'll even scrape the floor :D 42106 VW Camper - build log is below in the topic. It has pullback, wheelie bar, wheelie stand and a cute face. Same parts can build the 42098B funny car. It has a V6, by-passable pullback, /un/lockable steering and HoG on the roof. Modified it quite a bit as you can see. Corvette's Hot rod also made from 42106's parts - featuring V8, linked steering wheel, lockable steering, HoG in the back, by-passable pullback motor, removable roof, exhausts and supercharger. ================================ GTS is my old forum name and my nickname in Bulgarian is Kostq /pronounced Kost-ya/. So you don't get confused by the profiles.
  24. KMPMOCS

    [MOC] KMP's Vehicle MOCS

    Decided to take inspiration from fellow builders and put all my past & future builds into one thread, so I wouldn't feel bad about having to create new threads everytime I had something new to upload. The first pictures are the builds that got me started back in 2017, and ones at the bottom are the more recent mocs that I've made. Jaguar XJR-12 Completed in January 2021 McLaren Senna Completed in January 2021 Lexus LFA Modification of an earlier version that I built back in 2019 Bentley Mulliner Bacalar Completed in February 2021 Koenigsegg Jesko Absolut Completed in February 2021
  25. I built another narrow gauge train - prototype is the "Borkumer Kleinbahn" connecting the harbour and the town on the island Borkum in the North Sea. It's driven with a Power Functions M-motor: This kind of drive was designed by 1000Steine users Lok24 and Flogo. I also made instructions on rebrickable . It runs pretty well on a custom built layout - using the old LEGO tracks: