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Found 46 results

  1. I was watching some of the E-races on youtube ad thought to myself, why not have competitions like that too. Just like the trial trucks, but with the focus on being speed and handling. Here are the basic rules I'd propose use either 2XL, 3L or 4M motors for drive, no RC motors allowed use any Lego battery box, the Li-Po is lighter, but has lower voltage, while the new AA battery boxes have no current limit use of Sbrick is allowed since it only controls the model the model can use a third function like a gearbox, or even a spring-powered boost mechanis, as long as it does not power the car directly use of pre-2005 bricks is not allowed to keep things modern and fair What do you guys think? Anyone wanna try it? Few more ideas: size limit - all cars should be approximately at the same size paneling - cars should be properly covered with panels, bare chassis is not allowed
  2. Roberto7g

    Ferrari SF90

    My special rendition of Ferrari SF90 Mission Winnow. https://forum.brickset.com/discussion/24340/f1-custom-stickers-collection-2016-1990-2006#latest More to come..
  3. RoscoPC

    Tyrrell P34 1:5

    The six wheeled Tyrrell P34 was the first F1 model I built back in 2006, using a mix of Technic and System LEGO parts. Since then, I have made several F1 cars covering about three decades, from late 60s to early 90s, all in 1:8 scale. Due to the small front wheels of the P34, the compact front suspension of the first model was working, but was not as accurate as I would have liked. That’s why last year I decided to evaluate the possibility of building a detailed and fully working front suspension for this iconic car, taking advantage of all newest parts introduced by LEGO, as well as old and discontinued ones to reproduce this state of the art model in a bigger scale. In fact, the 22969 rims and 32296 big tires that I’ve always used as rear wheels in all previous models, in this case are acting as the “small” front wheels, in a fully independent double front suspension. There is a single central anti-roll bar that reacts to the displacement of the two front axles. At the same time, the steering rack is directly acting on the front axis, while the movement is then transferred to the second axis through a pivot and levers. As a result, the overall model scale went up to 1:5, and this lead to a completely brick built rear wheel concept, with an internal rigid frame to keep the cylindrical shape and support the model weight without distortion, and an outer layer of rubber elements. In such a large model, I decided to also include some RC features: XL-motor for driving, servo-motor for shifting, M-motor for steering. All of them are controlled with a powerful BuWizz unit. The compact 4 speed gearbox is a reinforced mod of Paul J Boratko III’s solution with the new rotary selector, while the shift drum is based on the concept MK II of P-LEGO, adapted to stay within the side prismatic fuel reservoir. Obviously, inside the cockpit, the steering wheel rotates while steering, and the shift lever moves as well while shifting. Other features are the various brake cooling systems (through NACA intakes and hoses for the front axis, and dedicated ducts for intermediate and rear wheels), a 90 degree V8 fake engine with 0.5 stud pitch between banks, air intake cones, two side water cooling radiators, three oil cooling radiators (two paired with water ones, one on the rear wing support), rear suspension with big 11.5L shock absorbers and stabilizing bar, side windows in the cockpit, and more. Dimensions: 798x389x188 mm Weight: 5.3 kg Parts: about 6’000
  4. This is my first try at making a tread and posting pictures, so I hope I do it right. It all started with me making a very oldschool 2015 Sauber car out of ancient lego I found in a tray in the basement. 20190310_161317 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Later lego started making real versions of F1 cars and I remade my 2015 Sauber. 20190310_161340 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_161434 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Then during the 2018 season I started making all of the teams cars and I finally finished the project, right in time for the 2019 season to begin next week The cars were made with parts available to me and might not be the perfect match, but they are good enough for me. All 10 cars 20190310_161801 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Mecedes. I made some changes mainly removing some green, which I feel are not "of the right shade" url=https://flic.kr/p/24vFQut][/url]20190310_161821 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_161842 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Ferrari. Is the official one, I think. 20190310_161900 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_161913 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Red bull 20190310_161944 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_161957 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Renault 20190310_162054 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162104 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Haas 20190310_162117 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162126 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Mclaren 20190310_162525 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162536 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Force India 20190310_162756 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162810 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Sauber 20190310_162819 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162831 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Toro rosso 20190310_162851 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162910 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Williams 20190310_162920 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162928 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr On the grid. 20190310_162039 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_162617 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr 20190310_163022 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr All of them 20190310_163203 by Martin Hansen, on Flickr Some cars are a bit dusty, it was a long season and some was done way before others. I hope you will enjoy them.
  5. I think I have enough F1 models designed by RoscoPC or not? In the living room, LED lighting for lower models from LEGO: I know the wheels are hanging, inherent to the design and display solution. Otherwise not possible to have 12 in the living room. I will find a solution some day. I don't like the 3 missing models much, so that's why I did not build them. May be I will add Luca's next model but it has to be spectacular :)
  6. When I was cleaning up my working place today I rediscovered one of my very early mocs, a Ferrari F2002. The scale is about 1/12 and by today's standards you have to describe its look as very vintage: looks of studs exposed, countless illegal building techniques and some parts in wrong colours because I could not just order them on bricklink. But there is one part of the build I am still proud of today: the (not working) rigid suspensions. It is very funny how things can change in about a decade. I hope you like it. http://Ferrari F2002-3 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-2 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-1 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-5 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr
  7. austindave

    1990 Ferrari F1 moc

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1990 ish Ferrari. Image of car type I have a Stud.io files if any one would like to make them. I have 2 front ends could not make up my mind which I liked the most.
  8. BrickMonkeyMOCs

    [MOC] City-Scale Ferrari SF71H (2018 F1 Car)

    A while ago I posted a 2017 Ferrari F1 car with an optional mod to add the halo device for a 2018 version. Now that the real 2018 car has been officially launched - and also won its first race, albeit thanks to a rather lucky pit stop under virtual safety car conditions - I've reworked the design to better match the shaping and livery of the actual 2018 SF71H F1 car. The model now has red front and rear wings, a more compact halo, extended bargeboards, a new engine cover, and a lower and wider rear wing. As before, the design fits a minifig driver, and features removable front and rear wings, and an engine under the detachable engine cover. In the process of updating the 2018 model, I've also upgraded my 2017 car and substantially improved my older 2016 model. Free instructions for all three cars, from 2016 to 2018, are available from my website (click the image below or my signature banner at the bottom of this post).
  9. McLaren97

    Favourite Speedchampions Set?

    Whats your favourite Speedchampions set?
  10. Mirco Hussmann

    Ferrari SF71H 2018 F1

    Hello everybody, I'd like to share my latest project, an ~ 1:8 scale model of Ferrari's new Formula 1 car, the SF71H piloted by Räikkönen and Vettel. Features include: - PF-driven remote controlled driving and steering - custom stickers and tyre decals - functional crash structures (Halo, airbox, front and rear) - damperless suspension (more on that below) - realistic rake - bricks with Technic holes as "skeleton" The car is designed in the same manner as the Racers 2008 Ferrari (8157), though I completely started over with this MOC, I just use the same basic idea to get the whole car structurally stable and nearly flex-free. The Halo is the only non-Lego part I had to use because I don't have red flex axles, so instead I used part of a firetruck hose I found somewhere between old toys and stuck them onto 53451 mounted in holes next to the headrest section. The suspension is quite unconventional. I don't own the Technic F1 suspension bricks and I didn't feel like buying them, so I tried to build kind of an F1 style suspension without them. The front one is nearly the same as 8157's, only with a few adjustions, mainly in width. The rear unit is a standard double wishbone suspension with 9L liftarms, the driveshafts only have CV joints at the differential, not at the wheel carriers. This way, I was able to mount the Porsche wheels to the axle using truck rims to connect them. At first, I had the suspension fixed with all sorts of L-shaped technic bricks, but neither worked in holding the suspension high enough for the car to be tilted forwards or even even (^^). I didn't want to use shock absorbers because a) there is no space for them and b) if I would've mounted them directly, without pushrods, they would've stuck out, and I didn't want them to spoil the otherwise pretty clean look of the rear. The alternative I went for was mounting two 32140 Technic L-bricks to the upper wishbones with two black mounting pins, with the outer as a regular pin, while the inner pins are ones that are borken on one side so the whole thing could flex quite a bit. I then asymmetrically mounted a 13L liftarm between the tops of them to push them apart, and the flex made possible by the broken pins allows the whole thing to absorb pretty decent bumps. I also crashtested the Halo which can be seen at the end of this video. The official FIA Test used a 20kg tyre fired at the cockpit with 225 kph, so considering the scale of the model, my tyre should be about 7 m/s fast when hitting Halo. My highly scientific approach of making sure that is roughly case was to throw the tyre across the room, making it travel about 7 metres in less than a second. Scienced. Stickers were made by printing on photo paper, putting transparent duct tape on it and double-sided tape on the rear, no muscles strained there. For the tyre decals, I used my mother's Silhouette Cameo 3, a basic plotter, with yellow Oracal vinyl material that is usually used for car stickers. It's a bit of a pain in the brick to put them on the tyres and keep them there, but if they are really clean and dry and the glue on the vinyl is fresh and new, it can be done. I also used the rest of that material for decals on my little brother's -removed- Porsche for a livery he "designed" himself, here's a picture to show what else can be done with this method. Image removed. Finally, I'd like to give some impressions of the car, which can also be seen in the video, but the original pictures are higher res, so here they are. I know it's not perfect and I still improve it day by day, but I just had to share it now, so let me know what you think! Edit: recalculated scale due to new information available.
  11. I started making a regular Renault Twizy... Twizy 3 by James Tillson, on Flickr ...but with the buwizz and a buggy motor I switched to Twizy F1, Twizy F1 4 by James Tillson, on Flickr Shame its not yellow but the yellow #4 connectors are more expensive than white ones.
  12. austindave

    1990 Williams F1 moc

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1990 ish Williams. Image of car type I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make.
  13. austindave

    Lotus 79 ish f1 MOC

    I saw this while I was looking at Vintage F1 cars to try to make. Lego Ideas Lotus 79 by Kozy . I did a model of this in Stud.io picture below. Took me ages to figure out how the front was fixed on. I like the model but I had a go at my own loosely based on his model design. Mine is 1 brick shorter and I got the side pods and rear wing 1 plate lower, which I like more as it fits better with my other vintage F1 models. I was surprised that when I finally finished my Stud.io model that I has all the bits to make it. Although not in the right colour yet. Google search for this car type. The 24307 Part the 1st plate on the side pod. As I have seen the 2018 Speed champions sets. I was thinking that the new triangle tile like on the ford fiesta rally car might be better. But they may not make it in black and I don't know it's ID number. 1st pic is the Stud.io render of the model by Kozy. 2nd n 3rd my real life as is and the finished Stud.io render. Dave
  14. austindave

    Jordan F1 car

    My MOC of a Jordan F1 car around 1998 ish. Images for car type. I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make.
  15. austindave

    1980's ish Ferrari F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1980's ish Ferrari. google search for the car type . I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. I still have to get some right parts for my real model.
  16. austindave

    1990 ish mclaren F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1990 ish Mclaren. Google search for this car type I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. This one is almost finished I just need to find 2 tiles 2 x 3 for rear wing, I got 2 x 4 on at the moment. This is one of my fav moc's I have made
  17. After taking a shot at creating a couple of 9-wide 2017 F1 cars, I though it would be fun to turn the clock back 50 years… to 1967. The cars back then were incredibly dangerous mid-engine-missiles, but I have been a fan of their classic look and simplicity for a long time. I made an effort to recreate one in 8-wide LEGO as a kid, but I was never fully satisfied with the results. Today I’ve started all over with new designs, and I’ve done my best to capture some key details that made these cars look so distinct. I present to you the Ferrari 312 vs. the Lotus 49. ^ And here they are! The yellow racing livery on the nose of the Lotus is made up of five individual custom stickers, and nothing is folded. I felt there were no attractive options for brick-built livery, plus I knew I’d have to make stickers regardless for the racing numbers, “TEAM LOTUS” logos, etc. ^ The ’67 Ferrari 312 is one of my absolute F1 favorites, producing what is perhaps my favorite engine sound of all time. It was featured prominently in that Ferrari/Shell V-power commercial showcasing a variety of Ferrari’s Grand Prix machines. ^ The iconic Lotus 49 was easily the fastest F1 car in ’67, but arguably lost the championship because it… broke a lot. Still, with the innovation of bolting the engine directly to the chassis to act as part of the car’s structure, Lotus effectively changed the sport. ^ The raised lip surrounding the cockpit is, in my opinion, an important aspect of these classic cars’ look. I tried several ideas for capturing it before settling on this one. ^ The sections of the Lotus’ low lying exhaust pipes seen beneath the rear axle are actually attached separately from the rest of the pipes seen in the rear, using minifigure “Tool Box Wrench” pieces. ^ These two models, like their real life counterparts, differ most visibly in shape towards the rear. While there was no way to capture every detail in this scale, I did my best to approximate the distinct look of each car. The Ferrari’s 3-litre V12 engine is very different from the Lotus’ famous Cosworth DFV V8. ^ Note that the rear tyres are wider than the fronts, just like the real cars. Those older LEGO tyres actually fit perfectly on the newer Speed Champions wheels, which really worked great for these MOCs. ^ These classic cars are essentially in scale with both of the 2017 F1 cars I built a little while ago. The wheelbase of this Ferrari 312 is just over 2/3rds the length of the wheelbase on the Ferrari SF70H, which is accurate! The 2017 cars are also a bit wider than the 1967 cars (9-wide vs. 8-wide), which is also just about right. ^ While full minifigures can’t fit in the cars’ narrow cockpits, it is possible to build “drivers” using minifig heads on 1x1 bricks with a round 1x1 plates underneath. They may look like bizarre board game pieces on their own, but they work well inside the cars for display. Thanks for taking a moment to look at my MOCs! I've also posted this on MOCpages (link), and larger images can be found on my Flickr page (link). Comments and feedback are always appreciated.
  18. austindave

    1979 - 80's ish Mclaren F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1979-1980's ish Mclaren. google search for the car type. I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. As you can see my real model still has 3 more bits to change.
  19. 2017 ranks as one of my favorite years for F1 in the last decade. I love the improvements to the cars’ aesthetics, and the racing got back to record-setting speeds. Beyond that, Ferrari made a strong return to form that really took the fight to Mercedes, and I could not be happier with that development. 2018’s cars are set to debut later this month (and introduce cockpit protection to the sport), but I wanted to take one last look at the 2017 season by capturing some of it in LEGO. I present to you the Ferrari SF70H vs. the Mercedes W08. ^ Here they are! I really tried to capture the proportions of the cars as well as I could in this scale while keeping the designs fairly detailed. ^ I originally built the W08 with actual green pieces, but eventually opted to just give the car it's correct colors using custom made stickers on gray parts. It just looked so much better this way. ^ The #5 driver numbers on the SF70H are the only custom stickers I had to make for it. The rest are from Speed Champions sets (I almost always save the stickers). ^ The Mercedes has a slightly longer wheelbase than the Ferrari, as seen on the real cars (example). ^ The Mercedes also has a slimmer nose than the Ferrari, again to mimic the real cars. The front wing "aero" varies between the two models as well. ^ The last major difference between the two models are the engine covers; The Ferrari has it's T-wing mounted directly to the shark fin, whereas the Mercedes has it mounted on it's own little support arm. ^ The drivers are made with the "driver body" pieces that were included in a ton of the 2002 Racers sets. These two are from "4593 Zero Hurricane & Red Blizzard", with helmets and customized minfig heads. While it would be possible to make full minfigs fit in these cars, I don't think it's possible to do so without making the cockpit area look considerably less accurate. In the last four years I've only built one other model, but alongside these two I'll be putting up a few more replica F1 cars in 2018 for sure. This is my first time posting a creation on Eurobricks, so thanks so much for taking the time to look at my MOCs! I've also posted this to MOCpages (link), and larger images can be found on my new Flickr page (link). EDIT: Bonus photo comparison of the real SF70H vs the MOC version;
  20. austindave

    1960's ish Lotus F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1960's ish Lotus.google search for the car type . I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. This model is complete. It was a carry on trying to get the Dark green 1 x 2 tiles at a good price some sellers wanted over £2 each!
  21. austindave

    1980's ish Williams F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1980's ish Williams.google search for the car type . I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. I still have to get some parts in the right colours.
  22. austindave

    1980's ish Renault F1 car

    Hi this is one of my F1 MOC cars. Its an 1980's ish Renault. google search for the car type. I have a Stud.io file if any one would like to make it. As you can see my real model still needs a few bits I have to buy but it is complete apart from the wrong colours on a few bits Dave
  23. GiantAmbushBeetle

    Classic 1990 Ferrari Formula 1

    Hello fellow Legoheads! Here is my most recent creation, a medium-scale Ferrari Formula 1 car in the style of the 1990's era. 450 parts, original LEGO stickers, steering, and all the proper aerodynamic features of that time - namely big wings, bigger wing end plates and a blown diffuser for -literally - tons of down force. If you like it or if you have an ideas for improvements please let me know via a comment. Thank you!
  24. GiantAmbushBeetle

    [MOC] 1973 Formula 1 - medium scale

    Greetings Legoheads! May I present to you, a small MOC of mine, its a medium scale 1973 Era Formula 1 car, approx. 500 parts. I think there is not much else to say, I hope you enjoy my little creation!
  25. StangMan302

    Formula Car

    Today I have created with my good friend @Aventador2004, a formula car using the parts from 9394 and 8041 limited edition sets. We each did a fair share of work on this build, but he did a little more as he knows more techniques. Features. Hand of god steering. Moving steering wheel. Operational 6 piston engine. rear differential. We put two sets of tires on the car, please leave your opinion down below. And as always feedback welcome! @Aventador2004 and I will be commenting back on this project, leave all technical stuff to him and detail work to me. Thanks for viewing now here are some pics.