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  1. Hey guys, here's a project I've been working on for the past couple of weeks. It will be my second MOC to BrickFair Virginia this summer, along with my Kenworth T600 that I just finished. This MOC will be a sequel to my V6 Supercar from 2017. As you can see the V8 piston engine is already in place. It will, of course, be a mid-engine supercar, with the engine clearly visible from the rear window. It is going to be a motorized MOC, as seen by the two L motors already in place. It will also include SBrick control, although I don't plan on motorizing anything other than drive and steering as it could make things more complicated. At this point the rear of the chassis is pretty much complete, with two L motors connected to a 2-speed gearbox that will be controlled manually. The gearbox's output bypasses the engine via u-joints and connects to the rear differential, while the engine is connected directly to the drive motors via a gear train behind the rear axle. As of right now, my plans for this MOC include: Red body with black roof Red rims with low-profile tires Full independent suspension Servo steering SBrick control Obviously, with less than two months to build this MOC, the building process will go pretty fast. Also because this is a more straightforward build than the Kenworth, I might not do as many WIP updates but the updates will cover more progress. Photos:
  2. 42071: Dozer Compactor Pieces: 171 RRP: $19.99 42072: WHACK! Pieces: 135 RRP: $19.99 42073: BASH! Pieces: 139 RRP: $19.99 42074: Racing Yacht Pieces: 330 RRP: $39.99 42075: First Responder 42076: Hovercraft 42077: Rally Car 42078: Mack Anthem 42084: Hook Loader Pieces: 176 RRP: $14.99
  3. REVIEW - 42070 - 6X6 ALL TERRAIN TOW TRUCK INTRODUCTION It is that time of year again. The time when the most interesting new Technic sets will be (or already have been, in some cases) released. The flagship set is obviously builds loads of anticipation and expectancy. Interesting enough this year's flagship set isn't the biggest set, when we are merely regarding the number of parts. Even though the 42069 has more parts, this set is still considered to be the flagship. It's quite obvious when you see the size of the box or when you look at the price. At first sight the set looks as impressive as the box. Six big wheels, introduced in the Claas last year. Full RC, which means you can use a remote to drive the vehicle and to operate the crane and outriggers. There is only one remote however, so the functions need to be switched, using gears and levers. I am anxious to find out how the gear box works. Since several videos and reviews have been released, we already know that this set received a lot of criticism. One of the main complaints is the hefty price tag. It's as expensive as the Bucket Wheel Excavator, yet is has less than half the parts. There must be something in this set justifying the price tag. Why don't we start building, so we can find out what that might be. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42070 Title: 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck Theme: Technic Released: 2017 Part Count: 1862 Box Weight: 4,0 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 58,0 cm x 47,7 cm x 11,9 cm Set Price (MSRP): € 279 Price per Part: € 0,15 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX Upon looking at the box, it's clear that this set is this year's flagship. Obviously the lid/flap is a clear indication that we're dealing with the flagship, but the box itself is also pretty impressive. INSIDE FLAP The inside of the flap shows a single picture of the model, with the outriggers extended. Admittedly, it does look cool and appealing. According to the designers this is the truck that will tow the truck that was supposed to tow your car. If this bad boy doesn't get the job done, what will?! INSIDE The inside of the box shows the different functions, translated in no less than eight languages. At the bottom you can see an overview of all the Power Functions components. BACKSIDE The backside of the box also shows some of the functions, together with the B-model, a Research Explorer Vehicle. Not that I am particularly familiar with research vehicles, but it doesn't resemble anything I have ever seen CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1 Single book with stickers 6 Tires 18 Bags BOOK WITH STICKERS The way every bigger Technic (or LEGO set in general for that matter) should be packed, the sticker sheet combined with the book. BOOK The book is quite heavy and it contains almost 400 pages for 590 building steps. STICKER SHEET Since the sticker sheet is packed with the book, it's unharmed during transit. Hopefully the bear is unharmed too. The colors of the stickers are very vibrant, which perfectly match the Dark Azure look of the truck itself. TIRES One of the key elements of this set are the six big tires, introduced in the Claas in 2016. I am big fan of these tires, so I was delighted that the rumors about a 6x6 Truck with Claas tires were true. BAGS This set contains 18 unnumbered bags, containing a total of 1862 parts. The PF components are combined with the rims and are packed in two separate bags. By looking at the bags you can already see a lot of different bright colors. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This section describes the interesting parts. POWER FUNCTIONS This set contains the following Power Functions elements: Battery Box Infrared Receiver Infrared Remote Control M Motor XL Motor Compared to the Bucket Wheel Excavator this set does have the IR Receiver and Transmitter, while the BWE doesn't. And it has an M Motor, which the BWE lacks. So it has three more PF components. This is important for comparing the price. It's a nice PF Starter Pack for those of you getting (back) into the hobby. 24-16 TEETH DIFFERENTIAL Surprisingly, this set contains two old style Differentials. Upon close inspection, it seems that the mold has changed a bit, since the innards of the gear slightly protrudes, which wasn't the case with the previous versions. Admittedly, I would probably not have noticed if Sariel hadn't mentioned it. Actually it makes sense that this set contains at least one of these differentials. Since it's full RC and 6x6 we do need a center differential to prevent strain on the axles when powering all the wheels. DARK BLUE AZURE PARTS When we first saw the pictures of this set, we had to guess which color blue was used. This is because TLG has treated us with a wide range of blue elements in the Technic line. Compared to medium blue or medium azure, I definitely prefer this blue color. It would be great if TLG picked one (or two) shade(s) of blue and worked with that for a while though. They probably have heard enough complaints by now, so hopefully they will stick to dark azure as the alternate blue. Downside of getting new colors is the range of available parts. Over time the inventory will hopefully grow, but for now we have to work with this selection of dark azure. Currently there are 215 registered parts in dark azure, but they won't be very useful for building Technic. Unless you like to add Duplo to your truck 4x Liftarm 2x4 13x Liftarm 5L 13x Liftarm 11L 1x #1 and #2 Panel 1x #13 and #14 Panel 6x Curved Panel 11x3 3x Panel 11x3 9x Panel 11x5 4x Tapered Panel 11x5 CURVED PANEL 13x3 For the first time we get these panels in black, which is a very welcome addition to the parts selection. If we can get them in white too, that would be great, thanks CURVED PANEL 3x6x3 Earlier this year this transparent version of the curved 3x6x6 panel was intruced in the BMW R 1200 GS and Uwe conveniently used it as headlights in this truck. DOG BONE For the first time one of the frames (technically it's called a liftarm) is produced in a different color than light bluish grey. Six H Shaped Liftarms in red will be used in this set. One of my favorite parts and they perfectly fit the Mindstorms EV3 color palette. AXLE AND PIN CONNECTOR HUB This year the Axle and Pin Connector Hub is released in red. I already found these at the Factory Store in Legoland Germany and I wondered which set would use these in red. They are most likely not produced in red for this set, but for Baze Malbus from the Star Wars Buildable Figures. ROPE This set contains a new rope. It has kind of a metallic touch to it. It is slightly ticker than the regular rope. Thumbs up for this new version. It looks and feels a lot better. RED #3 CONNECTOR Last but not least, the rerelease of the red #3 connector, last seen in 2011. Lots of MOC-ers will be very happy to be able to use these parts for an affordable price again. I almost forgot that these parts were pretty rare, so I shot this picture afterwards. Four parts is exactly the number I have (or had before now) in my collection. So basically I doubled up! Whoop whoop. INVENTORY This set contains 1862 parts, which is not that many for a flagship these days. THE BUILD Let's build ourselves a 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck, now shall we! As with most trucks we start by building the center section, where the gearbox will be positioned. We immediately get cracking with quite a few gears, including the white safety gear (a.k.a. Clutch Gear). Early on the M Motor is attached to the gear box. This motor will be used to drive several functions, switched manually by two levers. This picture clearly shows that there are four switches to be operated. Eventually there are only two levers (one on each side of the vehicle), so let's wait and see how this will end up. So far the build is enjoyable. It's fun to add the gears and to slowly find out how they will be operated and which function(s) they will be driving. After building most of the center gearbox you will work your way forward and attach the front wheel steering linkage. As you can see the steering is operated off center and the second 12T Bevel Gear is only used to guide the rack. One of the things that also meets the eye is the different colored liftarms on the port and starboard side of the boat...uhmm truck. It seems odd at the moment, but it will prove to be useful later on...if you don't screw up anyway Talking about screw ups. I had quite a few of 'em during the build. It was late and I wasn't really sharp. An example of lack of sharpness is taking the XL Motor to the photo studio (I was building downstairs) and not thinking clearly about where the cable should be positioned. I can tell you...not this way. There is little extra length on the cable, so you will need every centimeter (or even milimeter). Connecting it this way will end up with having too little length on the cable. Lucky for me I was able to turn the motor around without taking too much of the model apart. I had a friend over who is interested in LEGO Technic as well. Obviously, he didn't want to be in spectactor mode during the entire build, so we alternated building every now and then. Since I misplaced the XL Motor, you can see what happened in the picture below. The dark azure liftarms were placed over the wire, which got us into trouble half an hour later or so. Let's talk a bit more about the different colors on the different sides of the truck. Since people tend to frequently make the mistake of misplacing the differentials in a 4x4 model, TLG provided a fool proof way of connecting the differentials. This way you almost cannot make this mistake. So, you would think. Unless you are building with a team mate and you incorrectly correct a mistake. That is exactly what happened during this phase of the build. My buddy had built both live axles. He had built them correctly, but he reversed the second one, resulting in the red liftarms being on the wrong side of the vehicle. I noticed the mistake, but instead of simply turning the second live axle around, I started rebuilding the second live axle. This resulted in both differentials being on the same side. Needless to say, that didn't improve driving performance. This was the moment that we called it a night. As you can see the wire is still incorrectly attached and the rear live axle has an incorrectly placed differential. Little did we know that we *cough* my buddy *cough* also missed a 20T bevel gear right smack in the middle of gearbox. As you can see in the picture below, there is no extra length on the cable of the XL Motor. This is not the most elegant solution, but after you finish the cabin, you won't see the cable anymore. At this point we still had the rear differential the other way around, so when I hooked up the battery box to test all the functions, we noticed the two rear axles turning in different ways...a clear indication you screwed up. I immediately realised that my buddy didn't screw up the build, but simple attached the rear axle incorrectly (or is this also considered a screw up hehe). We both had a laugh and fixed the mistake. Here you can see that the red connector is a tight fit. Not much margin to work with. The finished cabin looks cool. Although, I wonder why TLG keeps using blue panels as seats. I mean, this blue doesn't really match the rest of the truck. I'd say that any other color would have worked better than blue. Yellow would have been okay, or simply dark or light bluish grey, since the set is already very colorful. Come on guys, you can do better than that. The engine powering this behemoth is a powerful 4 cylinder engine. Wait a minute?! That can't be right. A 4 cylinder engine....hmmmph. I reckon its real life counterpart wouldn't use a 4 cylinder engine, but Uwe probably prefered a non-V engine over the correct number of cylinders. I would rather see a big 8 cylinder engine, even if that meant a V8. Even Dokludi used a V8 in his replica, so there is space enough. Other than that; the engine with the two black panels looks cool. The rear outriggers use more or less the same mechanism as the side ones, using an axle instead of gears to operate the stamps. Cool aspect about this technique is that it's quite rare for the outriggers to be operated by a motor. Usually you have to manually extend the stamps, which is rather cumbersome. Or be very patient when you have to wait for the 42009 outriggers to be extended. These outriggers are deployed in no time! Here's the attachment of the gearbox to the mini LA. The axle still needs to be pushed through the bracket. When you are done with the rear outriggers you move onto the crane. The crane looks rather flimsy for a truck this robust. Some panels could be added to make it look more sturdy and robust. It feels unfinished this way. At this point the model looks like you will be adding quite some stuff. On the contrary, you are almost done at this point. I remember my girlfriend looking at the parts I had left, looking at the model and saying "but you still need to build a lot". This is how your 98% complete truck looks like. The fenders and the side panels cover up the chassis and after that you are done. As you can see, the rear of the truck lacks a proper bed, which leaves you with an unfinished feeling, again. The rear and (the looks of the) crane are definitely not the strong suit of this model. The front of the model does look cool though. Unlike the cute bear, the front says "don't mess with me, I will ... you up". At the bottom you can see the 40 year anniversary brick (3L Liftarm), which is present in all of the 2017 sets. Several "Tow 067" stickers need to be applied, but what they mean still remains a mystery. Since set 42067 is missing from the line-up many of us figured the 42067 would be introduced as a new supercar (or something similar) being towed by this truck. The designers were actually quite surprised with this theory (or they acted surprised) and they said it wasn't related at all. It is supposed to have a meaning though, which we will find out later. FINISHED MODEL Without further ado, I hereby present this year's flagship.....the 42070 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck! Some basic observations when looking at the model. I didn't like the color at all when it was first presented. During the build I actually started liking Dark Azure. It works really well with red and the yellow details. There is quite a gap underneath the doors. It's a plus that TLG included the bigger panels, but I can't help but think that the gap could have been avoided. The yellow rims with the black dishes work really well. The overall look of the truck is rather impressive. When you start building and you see the six big tires, it's a sign that it's gonna be "yuge". And that the Mexicans are going to pay for it...oh wait now, that's something totally different. It is huge though. I am well aware that bigger doesn't always mean better, but I am a sucker for big models. The front of the truck with the bull bar definitely matches my expectations for this kind of truck. The chains and the Teddy Bear add nice touches to the exterior. The center of the chassis seems to be bending a bit, which isn't really surprising, given the size of the model. When I go on a cruise, the ship is bending all the time and that's not even a bad thing. I don't really mind this model bending a bit, although one could claim that it needs some reinforcement. Is it even road legal to have the tires sticking out of the vehicle?! I wonder how it looks if you position the panels 1L farther to the outside. This is how the vehicle looks from the back (sorry for the mirrors). As you can see I have attached both chains to the rear end of the vehicle, instead of one to the side. From the rear you can easily see the chassis underneath. The bottom shot of the chassis shows the old style center differential and the pendular axles. A couple of soft springs on each side would have been nice. Some extra pictures for your enjoyment. FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS Now that we have built the model and we know what it looks like. Let's talk about the functions. This model packs six functions powered by two motors. Steering Driving Rotate crane boom Raise/lower crane boom Raise/lower the hook Raise/lower the outriggers Unfortunately you can't switch functions with the IR remote, so you need to change the functions manually, using two levers. Each lever is mounted on one side of the model. The left lever (the one on the driver's side) switches between the Driving Functions and Operator Functions. When you switch this lever to driving mode, the position of the second lever doesn't matter. STEERING Instead of using a servo motor for steering, this truck is using the M Motor, which is also used for some other functions. Steering is very smooth and operates nicely. There is no return to center, but you hardly miss it. I really like the way this is implemented. Downside however is the turning radius. As with many Technic models, this model has a very wide turning radius. You need to go back and forth quite a few times to make a 180-degree turn in a somewhat confined space. Here are two video's demonstrating the steering mechanism. DRIVING Because of the weight of the vehicle, it's geared down using a 8T on a 24T gear in the portal hub. So, don't expect spectacular performance when it comes to top speed. It does have proper torque and it drives smoothly. Using an XL Motor instead of an L motor results in the model coasting when you release the "throttle", instead of abrubtly coming to a halt. All in all I am quite happy with the ability to drive (and steer) this model. Here's a short video of driving the truck: Since I am not really interested in Truck Trial and/or outdoor operation, I won't go into much detail about how suitable this model is for that. If you are interested in that, I can highly recommend watching the video review of our top video reviewer Sariel. What I do like to address is the inability of the IR system to be operated outside. I have never done truck trial or other outdoor PF IR related activities, but it just not possible to operate the model outside of your home. I never really realised that this was a big issue, but when you buy a € 279 RC set you probably expect it to work in your garden as well. Makes me wonder how many calls have been answered by TLG's customer service regarding this matter. It's time for TLG to step up their game and come up with a better solution. OPERATING THE CRANE AND OUTRIGGERS When you switch the lever on the driver's side to upper position you are engaging the non-driving functions of the model. That is operating the crane functions and the outriggers. When you are using this mode you are depending on the second lever to select the functions you want to operate. It's either the outriggers combined with lowering/raising the boom or rotating the crane and raising/lowering the hook. This takes a bit of getting used to, but I found this model easier to operate than the Arocs, which uses a similar approach. The following video demonstrates the operator functions: One thing that kind of bugged me during operating the outriggers is the fact that a 7L axle has been used and it has been stopped by two full bushes. This resulted in the outrigger getting stuck near the panel on the right side. I was surprised by this, since TLG usually makes sure that there is ample space for moving parts. I will be modding this by using an 6L axle and half bushes. MANUAL FUNCTIONS Besides the motorised functions, this model has some manual functions like opening the doors and the bonnet. And according to TLG's website, it has moveable lights. They have yet to be found though. B-MODEL The B-model of this set is what TLG calls an Research Explorer Vehicle. A polar vehicle comes to mind, but the big tires are more suitable for other types of environment. I am not sure what TLG is aiming at. Usually I don't really care for B-models and that's no different for this set. I would be happy to see someone build this vehicle and show us what it's all about. I will take a rain check. PRICE Now that we are almost at the end of this review you have probably noticed that I am rather enthusiastic about this set. Although we haven't found a clear explanation why this set has an MSRP of 279 euro. I was hoping we would find out during the review, but we haven't. Therefore, I am afraid we need to do some math to be able solve the mystery. The most logical way to determine the price of a set is to compare it with similar sets. Other than the usual Technic elements, this set contains PF components and six big tires. Let's look at the Claas because of the tires, the Volvo L350F for the Power Functions and the Bucket Wheel Excavator because it has the same price. Claas has 1977 pieces and has an MSRP of € 149. Four big tires, PF Battery Box and M Motor.. Volvo has 1636 pieces and has an MSRP of € 219. Lots of PF including 2 PF IR Receivers and 2 Transmitters, big tires and a big bucket. BWE has 3929 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. PF Battery Box and XL Motor. 6x6 Truck has 1862 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. More PF than BWE, but way less PF than Volvo. So the BWE has over twice the number of parts, no PF Receiver or Transmitter and a single motor, but it still has the same price. You can argue that the BWE was actually cheap compared to other sets. Okay, let's call the BWE cheap and ignore it. Leaves us with the Volvo to compare to, since that set has a lot of PF components. The volvo has the entire range of PF components, including 2 PF IR Transmitters and Receivers. So it has a lot more PF components than the 6x6 Truck. The Volvo has approximately 200 parts less than the 6x6 Truck. At around 10 cents a piece, this would make up for a maximum of € 20. The Volvo is € 60 cheaper and it has almost double the number of PF components. The Claas isn't overly expensive, so the price of the tires probably don't add extreme costs to producing the set. When looking at the price of other sets, I simply cannot explain why the 6x6 Truck should cost 279 euro. Therefore, I can only jump to the conclusion that this set is overpriced. I'd say the price should be somewhere between the Claas (€ 149) and the Volvo (€ 219). € 149 + 2 tires and more PF components makes me feel like € 199, but no more than that, and definitely no € 279. SUMMARY When I first saw this set, I wasn't very thrilled about it. Even seeing it in Billund didn't change my mind. It's just a big truck which can drive and has yet another shade of blue. I do like big models and I do like the Claas tires, but it just didn't do it for me. Bright colors for a truck like this?! BUILDING EXPERIENCE During the first stages of the build it was clear that this set packs and interesting gearbox to operate some cool features. The set contains over 100 gears, so there obviously is interesting stuff going on. During the build we (I had some help during some of the building stages) made some serious mistakes. This wasn't because of the instructions. This was because it was late and we weren't paying enough attention. The funny thing is that this actually added some fun to the build. We had to take some stuff apart, and investigate where the problem originated. This was somewhat reminiscent of the good old days, where you sometimes had to puzzle your way through the build. So yeah, I really had fun during the build, even though I (we) made some very stupid mistakes. DESIGN Dark azure is a very nice shade of blue. It's way better than medium azure or medium blue. Now let's hope that TLG makes a pick when it comes to blue and add some connectors to the mix. Some parts of the truck look very cool and some look unfinished. Especially the rear of the vehicle and the crane look unfinished. It feels that some modding needs to be done to complete this model. I have very much come to terms with the bright colors though and I have started to appreciate them. What I don't get is the use of bright orange parts in the chassis. Why not throw in some dark azure if you need to use another color than grey. I can totally understand that TLG want to make the build process as understandable as possible, especially with the target audience in mind, but in some aspects they are overdoing it. PLAYABILITY Sometimes when I build a Technic model, the functions just don't seem to work properly. They look like a Proof of Concept, instead of actual working mechanisms. The good thing about this model is that the functions work properly. Steering, driving, operating the crane and the outriggers, everything works fine (except maybe the minor issue with the outriggers). Outdoor playability is virtually non-existent though. Don't expect your kids to have fun in the garden with this thing. They will get frustrated. FEATURES The main functions of the model are all operated by a remote control. Upside is that these functions work really well. Downside is that you still need to manually switch the functions, and you need to be inside. The outriggers are a blast to operate, they are so cool. PARTS In term of special parts this set isn't exactly special. You get six big tires, which you might already own four of, when you own the Claas. For existing PF users, it's mostly parts in new colors. If you are new to Technic or new to PF, this set is a pretty decent starter pack. VALUE FOR MONEY This is where things get ugly. The hefty price tag of € 279 is way too much. Around € 199 would have been reasonable, but € 279 is nowhere near reasonable. VERDICT After building the set and spending some time playing with it I can only come to the conclusion that I really like it. I am even thinking about modding this set and that is something I seldomly do. This set reminds me of the 42039, where I felt like the president of a fan club with very few members. Sometimes a set just works for me and this is such a set. And that's not because it's the best set right out of the box, but it has potential to have a lot of fun with it. Some sets are perfect, but you will hardly touch them after building. The real question is whether people will be forking out such an amount of money for a non-licensed set. 6,8 Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  4. If you remember those little clockwork robots, which used to be toys and are now prized collection articles, than you will surely recognize my representation! I've been working on this for some time now and I'm proud to say that this robot walks as well as the real thing! It uses two pullback motors, a couple cogs (gears) and 623 LEGO elements to achieve (I only hope you agree ) both good looks and great functionality. The mechanism with the incorporated motors is made to fit exactly into the case and the case comes off all in one piece (I like my modularity). The mechanism for the legs is the most simple thing ever but making it was as complicated as any of my larger MOCs, because balance played such a vital role in all of it. You can still see it wobble as it walks (I find the wobble quite indearing though ) and a lot of work went into keeping it from falling when it does. I like to think this is my best work yet, so I hope you like it just as much enjoy!!! My Flickr gallery
  5. Hi all, Here is an attempt at building a new forklift. My previous one used the TLG design for the boom. This time i decided to build my own. Why? Just because the TLG boom had a big inner central mecha that makes impossible for the driver to look in front of him... I solved this by using a string based mechanics to lift the first stage of the mast. The second stage is also indirectly lift by the first one's movement. The whole arm has a tilting mechanism: The model has a propulsion base on one medium size motor, a tilting mechanism based on the same one. The direction is made with a servoand the main lifting use also a medium size motor. At all stage, the power is enough. Some other pictures: Front view. the driver just can look in front of him. Good idea no? Maximun size of the full open mast The model has drive and steering. Led light are also at party. The steering Wheel is custom made using technic disk and a Polly tire I hope you'll like it. Steph
  6. drakmin

    [MOC] 1400mm X-wing

    Today I started a new model. I'll build it mainly using light bluish grey Technic parts. Here's a first sketch to plan Bricklink order:
  7. What with a certain company ripping off my Koenigsegg One:1 and making a pretty bad job of it at that if you have seen some of their marketing photo's where the flex axles bend into strange shapes. Also due to the fact that my own Lego version started to look a bit shabby when parked next to the more recent Ultimatum GTR V10, i decided to do a major upgrade, basically start over, but this time without trying so hard to replicate the real Koenigsegg, but rather with the aim of making a Koenigsegg based car that is designed more with the aim of making it look good in Lego Technic (we will see how that turns out!) I will be aiming to replicate the Koenigsegg suspension, slight tweaks to my previous rear suspension and a major improvement to the previous front suspension to make it stiffer. I am looking at a combination of my previous 3+R (fake) paddle shift gear box from the Koenigsegg, and the Ultimatum's improved 5+N+R. I have already designed a compromise 4+N+R to fit under the 8 cylinder engine. I just have to work out the shifter mechanism. The engine will be 1 stud lower than the previous Koenigsegg The doors MUST use the same mechanism as the previous Koenigsegg, but I am looking to change the method to actuate them. The roof needs to be at least 1 stud lower than previous (that was my main issue with the bodywork of the previous Koenigsegg when standing it next to the Ultimatum) and here I may move slightly away from the real Koengsegg design, I will see where it all takes me. Again it will be 1:10 scale or thereabouts as I am not yet that inspired to work at 1:8 as I like the challenge of less space to work with. The back end is in progress, and while it looks similar to the previous Koenigsegg, virtually every part has been re-designed and I think significantly improved, so far, I am having fun.
  8. Hi everyone! I'm glad to present you the third version of my trial truck with a long prehistory and a slightly unusual design Lego Indominus Mk3 by Alexey Tikhvinsky, on Flickr Some history now: In the far-distant 2015 @Lucio Switch has built a titanic airfield firetruck that made a strong impression on me. The stunning set of functions, motorization, scale and appearance of this monster inspired me to build a modification. Searching for parts and construction took about a year. I wanted to not just change the color scheme or somehow improve already perfect truck - I wanted a total rework of the entire transmission, body and concept in general As a result, we got a truck with a loud name "Indominus Rex" and a claim to conquer the off-road. The 4 most powerful motors (5292) produced by Lego ever, differentials with limited slip (thanks @efferman for idea), planetary gear reduction in each of the eight wheels - all this allowed to overcome quite serious obstacles, even with weight of the model (6 kilograms) and dimensions (92x25x25 centimeters). Modification, judging by the opinions of AFOLs and the victory at the MOCs exhibition in Moscow Megabricks museum, turned out quite good. The flatbed body, a thin (3 pins) frame, a relief roof with air intakes and off-road rubber did their work - the truck moved away from the original as much as possible with the help of some solutions and design features. In the same 2016, in a New Year eve, I made another modification of the ACT truck. Indominus-2 was created specifically to participate in the winter truck trail competition in Moscow. No differentials, reduced weight (3.5 kilograms) with the same dimensions. Design was primitive, while preserving the common features of the original "front end". No serious ambition in the construction of this truck, it was initially clear that with its dimensions, it will not pass the road for off-road trucks. As a result, of course, the distance was overcome, but at the cost of one repair and loss of drive on three wheels out of eight (actually twelve, the two rear axles were with twin wheels) But a large number of positive emotions and feedback pushed me to an idea that this truck has not been exhausted yet. There were several attempts to build modifications of the same airfield truck in different versions, which ended, however, at the stage of creating the chassis (I wanted to do something fundamentally more light and durable). Later, I was distracted by building the truck with a crane from, again, @Lucio Switch This truck, being assembled completely in the original version, absorbed almost all my electrics, the technic frames and, in general, almost all the parts (17 motors, three battery packs, 13 meters of pneumohoses, 16 pneumatic cylinders and 131 technic panels). The idea of building another truck on the same scale from the remaining assortment of parts seemed simply insane. And at the beginning of 2018 I found a solution to two problems at once. I figured out how to build both an original and not too expensive in parts truck, which at the same time would inherit design and performance from its two predecessors. Why build the next four-axle monster, when the 4x4 format for trucks is still looks pretty? In addition, there was an opportunity to test my strength in terms of creating a MOC, and not modification. Lego Indominus Mk3 by Alexey Tikhvinsky, on Flickr I left only some recognizable elements from the original truck, which allowed to identify it as Indominus-3: сontours of the cabin, individual elements of the body kit, doors. The functional was done with an eye to the fact that this truck will participate in the February truck trial in Moscow (by the way, riding at -15C degrees turned out to be very "fun", even filming was not possible, everything was frozen, including phones and cameras). But, despite the "competitive" orientation, the equipment turned out to be more like the first version of Indominus: limited slip differentials (three pieces: front, rear and center), chains on wheels (homemade, from the jewelry chain), complex exterior and interior (with Duplo penguins!) Lego Indominus Mk3 by Alexey Tikhvinsky, on Flickr In additional: old pneumatic shock absorbers (very soft and long-stroke), anti-roll bar on both axles, portal gear reduction in pair to wheel planetary gear reduction. I used: 2х Buwizz v2, 4x RC buggy motor (5292), 1x Servo motor, 4x extension wire and Android app made by @imurvai to control this truck with gamepad (works very well and smooth, by the way) Lego Indominus Mk3 by Alexey Tikhvinsky, on Flickr In the end, in my opinion, this truck turned out quite bright and sturdy, and even with 4.5 kilograms weight can handle some offroad in the conditions of russian winter Lego Indominus Mk3 by Alexey Tikhvinsky, on Flickr I hope you liked this orange buddy as much as I do If someone is interested, I'll try to make a detailed review of technical features (with schematics and colorful pictures, yes ), video and some photos of the "nude" chassis. In conclusion, I want to thank @Shurik for great photos and @Limga for his endless patience and support throughout my entire AFOL path! Thank you all for attention! Update: I found a photo from the competition. One of the participants struggled to help me with a loose climb up the hill Update #2: Just filmed a little adventure in snow https://youtu.be/oVwOIyrj6wQ Update #3: Added a video with summer offroad https://youtu.be/CXFRc0i4dWg
  9. If you have not posted in this topic before, please read the instructions carefully before posting. We are trying something new. The purpose of this topic is to allow people to easily keep track of new sets releases and significant sales at S@H. It is not for announcing new sets that will be released in the future, not for discussion of the sets, and not for any other purpose. ANYTHING YOU POST HERE IS FOR SOMETHING JUST RELEASED, OR SOMETHING PUT ON SALE at S@H that YOU THINK LOTS OF PEOPLE WILL CARE ABOUT (for example the recent 50% sale on Arkham and on the "Classic castle' (yeah, right, classic my a$$). If a Bionicle sword or Makuta costume or Belville dress go on sale for 90% off, that's NOT of general interest. Use your judgment people.... Whenever a set has been released on S@H, or is newly available in the stores, and you wish to inform other EB members about it, post it in this topic. Please make sure that the information has not been entered by someone already. Product releases that are more than a week or two old are probably already �old news� � don�t bother entering them. It is probably useful to say where the product is released if you know. For example, many sets are released in Europe or North America first, and in the other region weeks or months later. Saying that a set is released in North America is one entry, and its release in Europe 2 months later would be another entry. The easiest way to know if something is available in a country is to load it into your shopping cart at S@H, and then try to transfer to that country on the main page. If the product is not available in that country you will get a message telling you so. A reasonable way to enter data would be as follows: Date of entry (redundant, but helpful) Set name Link to the set picture if available Where the set can be obtained (S@H, or Lego Stores, TRU, or whatever) Geographic area of release. Use your best judgment as to what you think other people will be interested in. Try not to turn this into a spamfest of useless stuff no one cares about. The idea is that when people do a search for �new posts�, every time they see a new post in this topic, they will jump to it and see info about a new product release. This is an experiment. If it turns out to be a waste of time or a spamfest, it will disappear. I have entered the first one below as an example. If you have any questions, feel free to post them. I assume there will be a few posts to ask questions, I will try to clarify, and hopefully after that nothing other than "for sale" information. Let's try to make it work. June 22 / 07 Creator sets: Ferris Wheel http://shop.lego.com/Product/?p=4957 Monster Dino http://shop.lego.com/ByTheme/Product.aspx?p=4958&cn=348 Model Townhouse http://shop.lego.com/ByTheme/Product.aspx?p=4954&cn=348 Available at S@H North America. So far not available in Europe.
  10. Hello everyone! Today I'd like to show you the model that I've been working on for more than two years, it's my first MOC in this scale that is actually close to being finished. It was rebuild from scratch dozen times and still requires bodywork. The MOC is LaFerrari in 1:8 scale: Origially I had a lot of ideas and great ambitions, but over time I realized that I just don't have enough skill to make everything I wanted. So current version has following features: independent suspension; 2 L motors for driving; Servo motor for steering; working steering wheel; 8 speed sequential gearbox driven by M motor; spacious interior with low seats positioning; powering with standard LEGO PF. Proportions: width - 29 studs; height - 15-16 studs; length - about 70 studs, don't know yet. Originally I wanted to use bigger wheels but then I stopped on 68.8. The thing is that front section of the car are too low so there won't be any place for arches with bigger wheels. Battery box is located in front of the car because everything behind seats is one huge gearbox. It just lays on its own weight and will be covered on the top with something black. This way you won't see most of gray and light gray parts through the bonnet. Distance between seats is only 3 studs and every seat is 7 studs wide. There's no free space between them - only a few hidden cables there. This is how it looks without seats: Top and bottom views: The whole core of the car is basically done. It's pretty sturdy and doesn't bend when you hold it. In current state it has about 1600 pieces. The most challenging part of the build at this point is a gearbox. It had to be very compact because car is so low. In this LDD file you can investigate all gears: https://bricksafe.com/files/ibessonov/wip-moc-laferrari-technic-2018---1/8 speed gearbox.lxf Here are some renders of gearbox without stepper. Green axles are input from motors. There are 3 clutches here and they give 8 unique combinations of their engagement. L motors are slowed down significantly. This is because they are not powerful enough to make this car fast. Here's a stepper mechanism that I used to move all 3 clutches: Green things should be connected with white rubber bands, they hold axles in fixed 90-degrees positions. There's a strong resemblance with 42056 Porshe's gearbox here, I know it. That model helped a lot with the inspiration. My plan is to finish bodywork but it's the hardest thing for me. This is the exact reason why I'm creating this topic - to get help/critique while I'm finishing the model. LaFerrari has quite complex shape and I should have chosen something more simple for my first MOC. But I already spent way too much time so I have to finally finish it. Leave your thoughts here, I'm very curious of what you might say. Thank you!
  11. Hi, Does anybody know if the parts from the technic 42083 bugatti chiron are in the ldraw parts libary yet (as official or unnofficial parts). I wanna make a gearbox and need the parts to do so. Replicating them in LDD is too confusing. I have the 42083 set x2. one is half built, so no dismantaling it, and the other is getting returned to lego. there are none of the new parts for sale locally on bricklink yet. regards, SNIPE.
  12. A music video for Daft Punk's Harder Better Faster Stronger, with Technic letters, filmed using a GoPro on a custom Mindstorms controlled rig. Made by this guy:https://www.youtube.com/user/fastythefastcat
  13. Hello everyone, let’s me introduce my latest MOC: All terrain with 12 WD Liebherr LTM 1350 6.1. Mobile Crane informations: Weight: only mobile crane: 9480g + 1550g Speed:11cm/s Width:18cm / 23 studs Length:92cm heigh:28cm Tire:81.6mm (LEGO Wheels with Third party Tires) Crane MAX Heigh:195cm Crane MAX Capacity: from 300g to 2000g (Macbook Pro retina 15”) Crane MAX Extend: 125 studs Driving:4 X XL Motor::960N.cm Steering:2 L Motor ::972N.cm XXL Linear Actuator:1XL Motor::960N.cm (MAX Extend 27 studs) Turntable:1 L Motor :1152N.cm Extend Boom: 1 X XL Motor::960N.cm Lifting:2X XL Motor::400N.cm Which part is difficult do? the one of big problem how to create a strong power Linear Actuator for my super heavy 3KG boom? before I start my crane project, I had wanna to use third party company’s pneumatic, although it has extend 19 studs but it failed, it cannot made crane up. When I want to give up then chat with my friend, and he inspired a new idea how to create a LEGO XXL Actuator only using 1 XL motor. I really happy I can done a big big crane. let’s see the movie… … https://www.facebook.com/shineYucorner/videos or
  14. This lego great ball contraption module uses two "minecarts" and a conveyor belt to lift the marbles. The module is quite reliable even though it has so many gears and moving parts. The carts have extra plates on the bottom to make them heavy enough to pull the strings down, as these strings are quite stiff. The Instructions and part list is on rebrickable here. ↑↑↑ This mechanism with the two 2L technic beams is what makes the carts stop at the top to let the marbles in. The PF switch is attached to the servo motor witch flips the gearbox direction, this way the main XL motor always runs in the same direction.
  15. Hello to everyone. I'd like to present a new project. I'm building an Underground Mining Loader. The idea came to me two years ago when Lego released the set Mine Loader (42049). By the time, I was expecting this to be the flagship model (1H) of that year, but it turned out to be a medium-size model. So I built my own. I took parts mainly from my Volvo Loader (42030) and built a version with a much lower profile. The result was ugly but functional. It's being on a corner getting dust. A couple of weeks ago I took this Moc apart and I'm rebuilding it from scratch. I'm not showing the "original" because it's really ugly. I hope I can make a decent model, something between good-looking and functional. Although most of the ideas come from the previous Moc, the "improved version" it's proving to be a difficult job. I think it would take a couple of weeks to finish the improved version. Here're some pictures from the first part. I'm happy with the results. I think 1/5 of the job is done. Disclaimer: I'm not trying to replicate a specific machine, but I have taken inspiration from the Caterpillar portfolio Thank you for your time. ****Pictures of the final model**** Lateral access to motor. For maintenance purposes, I guess. Hardly noticeable IR receivers ;) Easy access to motor. Cabin with chair and control panel. No floor. Easy access to battery and cables. You can also accommodate the rechargeable battery.
  16. This MOC started out as an inspiration from the 42078 Mack Anthem: I wanted to build a truck of similar scale but with better functionality and power functions. Seeing how the 42078’s trailer had no PF or gearbox whatsoever, I saw this as a point for some development. I actually started the building process with the trailer as it was to be the more functions-dense part of the MOC, so the actual Kenworth component didn’t come in until halfway through the build. The trailer includes a central distribution gearbox where one switch controls between the motorized functions and the pneumatic compressor and the other selects 1 of the 2 motorized functions, which are lowering the front stabilizers and rotating the crane. The boom and jib are pneumatic, and both the extension and the winch are controlled manually. There are also manually deployed rear stabilizers that keep the trailer stable while the crane is in use, and the entire rear bed can be removed by pulling out several bushes (not seen in the video). As for the actual Kenworth T600 part of the build, its scale is nearly identical to the 42078 Mack truck. The truck’s functions include steering via a knob behind the cab and a 6-cylinder mini piston engine, which I made in yellow to represent a Caterpillar engine. Inside the cab there’s a steering wheel and 2 seats, and there is a bed with a TV above it in the sleeper. The part I’m most happy about with this part of the build was the hood - nearly half of it was built with System pieces to capture the shaping of it. Overall I felt that, despite its simplicity compared to the trailer, the truck portion managed to capture the design of the real Kenworth T600 very well. This MOC was a breakthrough in that this was essentially a MOC composed of two independent MOCs: a truck and a trailer. The building process was one of the most interesting I’ve had among the MOCs I’ve made, and it was very interesting looking at the two independent parts come together. All the functions worked as intended, and the pneumatics operated with pretty good speed. I’m definitely looking forward to exhibiting it at BrickFair Virginia this August. Video: Photos:
  17. While the Metallic Silver parts still don't exist outside of the official 41999 set, the new 42083 Bugatti makes it possible to source and build the main body from Dark Blue parts. Those that missed out on 41999 at least now have the option to build it from parts if they wanted to.
  18. I never imagined I would say this, but as of today I am the proud owner of a Porsche 911 GT3 RS. How cool is that?! Waiting for this set to arrive seemed to take ages, so I was definitely on cloud nine when the set finally arrived. The 911 is one of the oldest sports cars on the market. It's lineage dates back to 1963, which is quite impressive! Since the production of the 911 there have been lots of different versions, like the Carrera, Carrera S, Targa, Turbo, R, GT1, GT2, GT2 RS, GT3 and GT3 RS. The GT3 RS can be easily recognized by the race-inspired inlets in the front wheel arches. Due to legislation there's a grill in the inlets. It can be removed during track days, which will improve the downforce. The LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS is a 1:8 scale model and is 17 cm high, 57 cm long, and 25 cm wide. It has been designed by Andrew Woodman and Uwe Wabra. When TLG started the initial drafts in 2013, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS project remained top secret. Therefore TLG had to build the first LEGO version using photos of the camouflaged prototype of the original from the internet. The first LEGO prototype was ready in a matter of weeks. Like every sports car with the Porsche emblem on the hood, the LEGO version of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS also combines design, performance, and functionality. Still concealed in black-and-white foil as a mystery model at the Nuremberg toy fair late January, the color of the characteristic bodywork has now been revealed and shines in bright orange. Thus, it corresponds to the special coating of the original sports car in lava orange authentically. With the right skills you can get the GT3 RS around the Nürburgring in 7 minutes and 20 seconds. Factory driver Brendon Hartley took it for a spin on the Nardo circuit in Italy. The video can be found here. When you talk about a genuine sports car, you immediately talk about performance, which is pretty impressive, to say the least. Let's take a look at the specs: Horsepower: 368 kW or 500 pk (at 8.250 rpm) 0 - 100 km/h: 3,3 sec 0 - 200 km/h: 10,9 sec Top Track Speed: 310 km/h or 193 mph Price: around 250.000 euro (no extras, Dutch price) If you are interested in buying (or configuring) your own 911 GT3 RS, you can click here and indulge yourself. Instead of buying or configuring we will be building a Porsche 911 GT3 RS today. That's something not a lot of people could say, until now! Although I must admit that even though this version is a fraction of the price of the real car, it still has a pretty heavy price tag. Forking out 300 euros for a collection of ABS isn't something everyone will understand. Before we start I like to point out some of the questions which have arisen. For example; why is this set rated 16+ while the Mercedes is 12-16 year? Is the price tag of 300 euros justified? Does this model replicate some of the real world mechanics? Does the luxury packaging add any value to this set? These are just some of the questions I will be answering in this review. This review will have a different setup than my regular reviews. Since this sets focuses on the entire experience instead of the model alone, I will try to share this experience in my review. Instead of opening the box, discussing the parts and taking you through the build, like I usually do, I like to focus on the different aspects of the set and model. When it comes to the model, I will try to compare it with it's real life counterpart. TLG made a teaser for this set using the word Ultimate. There will be little discussion about the real Porsche's association with this word. But will it's LEGO counterpart live up to the expectations?! I think it's time to move onto the interesting part and find out whether this LEGO Technic set also deserves the predicate Ultimate. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefor, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. Number: 42056 Title: Porsche 911 GT3 RS Theme: Technic Released: 2016 Part Count: 2704 Box Weight: 4,8 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 47,1 cm x 37,3 cm x 14,7 Set Price (MSRP): € 300 Price per Part: € 0,111 Links: Brickset, Bricklink Will this be a Limited Edition set? No, it will be as limited as other Technic sets. Which is also stated in the press release: The exclusive LEGO set of the exceptional sports car, which has been developed in close conjunction with Porsche AG, will initially be available at shop.LEGO.com from June 1st, 2016, as well as in the 13 LEGO stores throughout Germany and Austria. It will be available in other stores from August 1st, 2016. This means that when you are reading this review, the set is already available, which is usually not the case with other Technic sets. The box is a key feature of this set. Instead of a regular Technic box, this set is packaged like the 41999 - Crawler Exclusive Edition. The term Exclusive indicates that we are dealing with a special set, which is obviously the case for the Porsche as well. The following question (asked by JGW3000) is more than justified: Since the box presentation is a key feature of this set, perhaps Jim can comment on packaging and outer packing used to protect the box, so we can determine if we should go to a LEGO store or risk mail order in order to purchase this. In my Review of the 42043 - Mercedes Arocs I explained that my box was severely damaged. Obviously that's something you don't want to happen when you are buying a 300 euro Ultimate LEGO Technic set, with exclusive packaging. Lo and behold; the box arrived in pristine condition. The set box snugly fits inside the outer box, which avoids taking damage too easily. I am very pleased with the condition my set arrived in. I don't think getting the set in a physical store will guarantee a better condition. Thumbs up for shipping it this way. I hereby present, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS...in a box! It's way more luxurious than a regular LEGO box. Black and orange obviously work very well together. The bright color, combined with some post-crop vignetting really makes the Porsche stand out. I can honestly say that the box makes you anxious to open it. A LEGO box has seldomly made me feel more exhilarated before opening it. This is definitely a plus. This box is pretty big and feels massive. Since it's filled with additional boxes it feels very sturdy and doesn't dent easily. Since it's filled to the brim, the box isn't much larger than the box of the 41999. The width and height are the same. It's a bit deeper though, which can be seen in the image below. FRONT SIDE The front side of the box shows the model itself, along with the Porsche emblem and the set information. In case you are wondering what the 18 means in the upper right corner; that's not 18, but 1:8, the approximate scale of the model. It also states that this set is 16+, which is rather unusual. Hopefully we can answer Allanp's question at the end of this review: What makes this set carry the 16+ symbol? It isn't the largest or the most complex set to date, so why the 16+ age thing? BACK SIDE The backside of the box shows a top down view picture of the Porsche, along with four key features (interior, suspension, engine, upholstery). INSIDE The reason the box feels so sturdy is that it is literally filled to the brim. I can't think of any other Technic set which was filled like this. In the old days TLG used an inlay, but they never entirely filled a box like they did now. Showing the rims instead of packing them inside the box is a nice touch. The way the book and rims are being presented, is an indication that you are in for a treat. Another bonus is visible on the inside of the cover. It shows the history of the 911 from the original 911 (911) to the 2011 911 (991). The box contains: 1 x Book 1 x Sticker sheet 4 x Box with parts 1 x Box with rims and tires Each of the smaller boxes depicts what you will be building during that phase. I sure hope we will be building more than just an engine, seats, hood and a spoiler After discussing the box, the book definitely needs our attention. It's presented as the center piece of the contents and it's an absolute eye-catcher. The book packs a whopping 580 pages (including the front and back cover), which is unprecedented (not having seen the 2016 2H BWE instruction manual). Being designed as a coffee table book, it doesn't simply provide the building instructions. It also contains an abundance of historic information about the Porsche 911 and of it's LEGO counterpart's design process. Comments have been made that this book makes the set more expensive, which is debatable. Around 40 pages have been devoted to this additional information, which boils down to around 7% of the book. Maybe I'm simplifying the calculation, but this means this book can't be more than 7% more expensive than regular instructions would have cost. While we are on the subject of a coffee table book, TLG could have gone the extra mile and provide a hardcover book. This surely would have increased the costs, but you would get something in return. I'm not saying they should have, I'm saying they could have. Personally I think this book is fine, since it only contains about 7% additional information (concentrated at the beginning). It would have been a different case, if it contained more information throughout the book. Riffling through some pages of the book, we even see the previously mentioned Brendon Hartley making an appearance (top right image). The first step in the construction of your 911 GT3 RS is to build the drivetrain, complete with dual clutch gearbox (PDK), paddle shifters, suspension and the heart of the 911 GT3 RS, the 4.0 flat 6 engine. When you have completed all the steps in box 1 you will be able to test out all the functions and see how they work. Reading this means we are working on the fun part of the vehicle. Which immediately raises the question; is all the functionality of the car built during this phase? The first box contains 11 numbered bags. It even contains the new fender pieces, two printed and four unprinted. Will we be using these already in the first phase? Below are two images showing the new (and orange) parts contained in the first box. New pieces are the orange fender pieces, flex axles, the 3L axle with stop (color coded brown), new wheel hubs, changeover catches, suspension with red finish, panels and a tile with a unique code (supposedly to unlock online content). Instead of taking you through the build, I will discuss the different technical aspects of the real vehicle and compare them to it's LEGO counterpart. The single most interesting part about this set is the gearbox, which you start building early on. The picture below shows where the lever, to change the selected gear mode (Drive, Neutral or Reverse), will be placed (between the two blue 3L pins). As you can see, selecting Reverse simply changes the direction of the gears. Does this mean we have the same number of gears in Reverse as we have in Drive? Yes, it does! It’s the year 1983. In the new 956 Group C racing car, Porsche is putting a double-clutch transmission – Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) – through the rigors of motorsport for the first time. PDK offers a crucial advantage: the driver can keep the accelerator pedal depressed and change gear easily by using buttons on the steering wheel, even in the corners. This is how it works. PDK is essentially two gearboxes in one and thus requires two clutches. This double-clutch arrangement provides an alternating, non-positive connection between the two half gearboxes and the engine by means of two separate input shafts. During a gear change, therefore, one clutch simply opens and the other closes at the same time, enabling gear changes to take place within milliseconds. Highly responsive and particularly sporty. More information can be found here In the picture below we can see how TLG implemented the double clutch mechanism. There's a clutch at the top and one at the bottom. This is obviously a simplified interpretation of the real PDK. How about making your own four wheel drive Porsche? Does the transmission have an output that could be sent to the front easily, like 8448's (asked by Lego Nerd)? The red changeover catch is probably placed for stability (you will connect a liftarm to it later on), but it also provides a possibility to turn this into a 4WD car. Of course, you would need two additional differentials, one between the front wheels, and one in the gearbox between the front and rear axles. What's the point of having clutch gear inside all this? (asked by Allanp) Unlike in a real car, there's no stop after the highest or lowest gear, meaning that you can switch the car from 4th to 1st gear and from 1st back to 4th. That's one of the reasons the clutch gear is used, since the axles/gearbox will generate a lot of resistance/strain at some point. Another reason is that it's there to prevent possible damage to the gears if two speeds get temporarily engaged at the same time while rolling it. Or possibly if rolling in neutral and engaging drive while in first gear. Here's a video of the gear changing sequence. I have temporarily attached an axle to demonstrate the gearbox. Obviously you will not be shifting gears by turning a gear. You will be shifting this car, using the flappy paddle gearbox! How cool is that! The paddles are integrated in the steering assembly, which is shown below. The right paddle shifts the car into a higher gear, while the left one switches down. Here you can see the steering and shifting assembly attached to the chassis. The video below demonstrates shifting with the flappy paddles. Bear in mind that the subassembly is not yet properly secured, so there's some movement, which will be gone when the chassis has been finished. How am I supposed to shift gears by the way? As you can see there's no convenient position to operate the paddles. You need to grab the bushes and elastic bands to operate the gearbox. I can hardly imagine there's no better solution for this. Extending the axle by 1L would probably have done the trick. This feels somewhat cumbersome. The best solution would have been to design custom flappy paddles, but I understand this decision can't be taken lightly. What I don't understand is that TLG didn't provide an extra set of elastic bands. The bands will wear out after a few years on the shelf, rendering them useless. Providing a spare set would have been a nice gesture. Onto a more delicate matter. Some of you might have heard or read the rumors about this set being potentially flawed. Before jumping to conclusions, let's take look at the supposed flaws of the gearbox. First of all, the gear sequence is incorrect. Instead of switching from 1st to 2nd to 3rd to 4th, it's shifting from 1st to 3rd to 2nd to 4th. Say what?! I talked to Paul (Boratko, Crowkillers) about this possible issue, and without seeing any picture he immediately figured out that some of the gears must have been switched. As it turns out, there's indeed a mistake in the building instructions, or in the design, but I reckon it's not the latter. The video below demonstrates the incorrect sequence: I can (more or less) understand why this mistake has been made. What I can't understand is that this has not been caught before production. Quality control guys most likely aren't petrol heads, like some of the AFOLs. Let's take a look at what's wrong. On the left you will see the assembly when you follow the building instructions. On the right you see how it needs to be built. The grey 16T Gear and the black 12T Double Bevel Gear need to switch sides. the center gears are placed correctly. Here's a short video of how to apply the fix. The mistake has been made on page 267, 268 and 269 of the manual. So make sure to apply this fix when you reach that stage. After this fix, the sequence of the gearbox has been corrected. The gearbox is now shifting in the proper sequence, which can be seen in the following video: So it's all good now?! Well, not exactly. There's an even more pressing matter which we need to discuss. Occasionally the gearbox seems to stall completely. Take a look at the video and see what happens: Since you are not supposed to hook up a motor near the fake engine, the white clutch gear can't do it's job to prevent stalling. However, the main question is; why does the gearbox stall completely? And why does it stall so often? One of the reasons can be that the fins on the new red driving rings are slightly too thick. This will increase the change of the gears getting stuck. However, it happens quite often so I am not sure whether this is the case. The majority of the people building this set will probably never notice this flaw, since the clutch gear will hide the gearbox issues. But this set being The Ultimate, you'd expect the gearbox to function properly. The gearbox being the single most important technical function in the car, I am baffled by the fact that the mistake in the building instruction has not been caught, and that the actual gearbox itself seems to be flawed. Next time TLG better contact Paul before releasing another supercar This issue has been communicated to TLG, so let's wait for them to come with an official statement. Comparing the Porsche to the 42039 - 24 Hours Race Car we can see that the width from the end of the wishbones (where the ball joints connect) is 23L versus 19L. The Porsche itself is actually 4 studs wider than the 42039, two on each side. Compared to the steering assembly of the 42039. You notice the gear rack is much smaller, yet the turning radius is better. Two of half pins are limiting the turning radius of the Porsche. Removing them will slightly improve the radius, but the wheels might slightly touch the inside of the chassis, especially when the suspension is compressed. Here you can see the steering linkage, a pretty straightforward mechanism. Fitted as standard, the new rear axle steering with sport tuning combines performance and everyday driveability. An electromechanical adjustment system at each rear wheel enables the steering angle to be adapted based on the current driving situation, steering input and vehicle speed. The advantage for day-to-day driving: during low-speed maneuvers, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction to that of the front wheels. This has the virtual effect of shortening the wheelbase. The turning circle is reduced to make it easier to park. The advantage for sporty driving: during high-speed maneuvers, the system steers the rear wheels in the same direction as that of the front wheels. Driving stability is increased by the virtual extension of the wheelbase and agility is enhanced by the simultaneous steering of the front and rear axles, especially during overtaking maneuvers on the racetrack. One of the coolest feature about the real 911 GT3 RS is the fact that it has rear axle steering. It even alternates between steering modes! At low speed it counter steers (to improve the turning radius) and at high speed it steers in the same direction (to increase driving stability). That's so incredibly cool. And it's definitely something we expect to see in The Ultimate supercar TLG is releasing. Unfortunately they haven't. I am very disappointed to conclude that there's no real axle steering at all. Not even counter steering rear wheels, which would have sufficed. Obviously having both modes would be super duper awesome, but at least give us the counter steering mode. Not sure why TLG hasn't implemented this feature. They might have felt the need to do both of them. But omitting rear axle steering altogether is a huge letdown for me. RECTIFICATION I need to rectify something. According to this interview on the Top Gear site, Porsche vetoed the inclusion of the rearsteer. Obviously Uwe was able to recreate this mechanism. Makes you wonder why it wasn't included. This electronic active damping system offers continuous adjustment of the damping force on each wheel based on the current driving situation and your driving style. At the press of a button, you can select between two different modes. ‘Normal’ mode is designed for sporty driving on public roads and on wet racetracks. ‘Sport’ mode is specially tuned for maximum lateral acceleration and offers the best possible traction on the track. To continue with cool features, or letdowns, the 911 GT3 RS has, what's called PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). This basically boils down to ride hight adjustment, which is another potential cool feature to incorporate into the model. Unfortunately, like the rear axle steering, this feature has been omitted too. The engine of the new 911 GT3 RS sits just above the tarmac. At the rear end, of course. With its low center of gravity, it was predestined for motorsport. Indeed, this water-cooled six-cylinder unit with four valves per cylinder, VarioCam and dry-sump lubrication with a separate engine oil tank could not be more ideally equipped for its role. The engine draws its power from a capacity of 4.0 liters. This equates to a power output per liter of 92 kW (125 hp), and acceleration that simply knows no limits: the sprint from 0 to 60 mph is completed in a mere 3.1 seconds. The real Porsche has been fitted with a 4.0 liter 6-cylinder boxer engine, while its LEGO counterpart is fitted with a flat 6 engine. The difference between a boxer and a flat engine, is the movement of the pistons. The boxer engine has horizontally opposed pistons (when one piston moves in, the opposite piston moves out), while the flat engine has pistons on each side moving in and out simultaneously. More information about flat engines can be found here. Edit: Techniccrack pointed out that it's exactly the other way around. So the boxer engine has pistons moving in and out simultaneously. Thanks for pointing this out. While the engine in the LEGO version isn't realistically correct, I certainly don't mind TLG choosing this solution. It would have been cool to see new engine parts, but it's perfectly understandable that TLG used the currently available parts. After 323 steps (of 856) you have finished 38% of the model, resulting in the chassis. If there's no additional technical functionality (which seems that way) this means that 62% of the build consists of adding body and interior parts. Constructing the gearbox is interesting, but the overall build of the chassis is a bit underwhelming. The engine has been completely covered by panels and other parts, which is true to the original Porsche. But it does prevent you from seeing the pistons move at different speeds when shifting gears. The calipers are looking rather rectangular. Makes you wonder if it would have been better to use black parts combined with a rounded sticker. This would have reflected the actual shape better. Another option would be to create a custom part, but we obviously TLG can't keep designing new parts. It's cool that they included the calipers in the first place. The rear side has double shock absorbers, while the front uses a single absorber (per side). The back of the car is very heavy compared to the front, so this is good decision. Another aspect which has been discussed is the color vomit in the interior. I don't really mind using colors in the interior (like UCS Star Wars sets), as long as the different colors aren't clearly visible. Clearly visible are the blue pins (especially two of them in the gear box (D/N/R selector). Shouldn't these pins be black? More on this later. During production of the real 911 GT3 RS there is a stage called 'the marriage', where the drivetrain is connected to the body of the car. In this box you build the floor plan of the 911 GT3 RS, complete with seats and roll cage, before placing it over the drivetrain in a similar way to the production of the real 911 GT3 RS. The second box contains 9 numbered bags. The orange parts, including a 11L liftarm and axle connectors, which I already spotted in the Maze set. For me this was an indication that the Porsche would be released in Orange. The floor plan of the car is built separately from the car, in a modular fashion. Note that the body can't be easily detached from the chassis after completing the model, so it's not a real modular build. Here's a video demonstrating the marriage: After the marriage, and adding the seats, the car looks like this. At this stage you have completed 531 steps (of 856) or 62%. I really enjoyed building the second box. Placing the floor plan over the drivetrain is gives you a sense of building a real car. Clearly visible is the roll cage behind the seats. In box 3 you start to assemble the body of your 911 GT3 RS. Starting with the rear of the car and then onto the build of the iconic hood, now with distinctive shaping. Then it's the roof, again with distinctive shaping indicating the lightweight magnesium design only found on the newest 911 GT3 RS. The third box contains 4 numbered bags. Since you will be building the body, this box mainly contains an abundance of orange parts, including lots of panels. This set contains the full range of available panels in orange, except the 5x11 Panel. If I counted correctly this set contains 31 black, 59 orange and 2 grey panels, resulting in a grand total of 92 panels! It also includes 18 frames, which is quite a lot. At the end of box 3 you have finished 79% of the car (679 of 856). It is starting to look like a real Porsche! I absolutely love the new-ish 13x3 Curved Panels. They work really well on this model. Thumbs up for the part designer who designed this part! Now you build the front before adding the distinctive wheel arches with air outlets only found on the 911 GT3 RS. Next you add the massive, motorsport inspired, adjustable rear wing before finishing off your 911 GT3 RS by adding the doors and the exclusive wheels. Like box 3, this box also contains 4 numbered bags. Also containing mostly orange parts and panels. This leaves us with a finished car...okay, almost finished. Next stop, wheels & tires. 20 inches at the front axle, 21 inches at the rear axle. For a wheel size combination, that’s a first in the 911 model range. The larger footprint makes another improvement to dynamic performance. The wheels are made from a forged alloy and feature a platinum-colored paint finish. The central locking device bearing the ‘RS’ logo is derived from motorsport. Compared with the conventional five-bolt wheel connection, it offers enhanced performance thanks to the reduction in rotating masses. And, of course, it ensures a faster wheel change, which is vital when you’re in the pit and the clock is ticking. The tire sizes on the new 911 GT3 RS are nothing short of impressive: 265/35 ZR 20 on 9.5 J x 20 at the front, 325/30 ZR 21 on 12.5 J x 21 at the rear. The last box contains the rims and tires (stored inside the box). As you can see the LEGO wheels have the same size for both the front and the rear wheels. I think this is a perfectly understandable choice. Different sizes would have been hardly noticeable, but it would have added significant costs. Great thing about these rims is, that they are custom designed rims for the GT3 RS. Another great technical specification is that the offset inside the rims reflects the real rims, resulting in a better steering geometry. The printed RS emblems on the 1x1 tile add a nice touch. What size of construction can fit inside the new wheels for when making custom steering and suspension geometries? 5x3? 7x3? 7x5? How deep are they? (asked by Allanp) Can you tell me if they fit on the portal hubs? (asked by Zblj) Hopefully the following images will answer both questions. The portal hub is touching the rims, so it's not possible to fit them without spacers. The image below shows how far the frame is protruding from the rim. Let's talk rims and tires! From left to right (links to Bricklink for easy reference): 42039 - 24 Hours Race Car (and 10 others) 42000 - Grand Prix Racer or 8146 - Nitro Muscle 42056 - Porsche 911 GT3 RS 8674 - Ferrari F1 Racer 1:8 42030 - Volvo L350F or 8110 - Unimog or 76023 - Tumbler 8466 - 4x4 Off Roader or 5659 - Power Puller This picture shows which wheels will fit nicely under the new wheel arch panels. Front view of all the rims. As you can see the Ferrari F1 tires are slightly wider and almost the same height. The Ferrari tires have a slightly higher profile than the Porsche tires. Hopefully this image will give you some reference as to how the different rims compare to each other. This clearly shows the depth of the different rims. After adding the wheels, you have finished your very own Porsche 911 GT3 RS! Let me start by saying that I absolutely love the looks of this car. It sure is a 911 GT3 RS, no doubt about it. I have read some criticism that the car doesn't look good from certain angles. I beg to differ. Taking in account that we are still talking about a LEGO model, I think this car looks magnificent. There's a gap between the headlights and bumper, which people have complained about. Admittedly, it would have looked better when the transparent dishes would be positioned half a stud deeper and half a stud lower, but I'm not too bothered with it. Here are several pictures showing how the model will look after approximately 10 hours of building time. I love the front view of the car, with the black gear racks in the front bumper/spoiler. And I love how the hood worked out, but that's because I love them curved panels Back of the car looks pretty decent too, although I am not really sure about the rear lights. On the other hand; these kind of shapes are hard to capture in a Technic model. EXTRA FEATURES We have spoken about the technical functions of this model, but obviously there are some extra features as well. These are depicted in the picture below: Open hood/bonnet Open trunk/boot Open doors Adjusting the spoiler (regulate downforce) A bag for storing your racing gear COLORS Take a look at the image below to see some of the color choices TLG has made. What's catching our eye, is that the decision has been made to use a Black 2L axle in the door handle, instead of the usual red one. Kudos for TLG! However, in the rear wheel arch they used a tan frictionless pin and a blue friction pin. Maybe I am missing something, but why did TLG use the tan frictionless pin?! There are no rotating parts in that assembly? Furthermore; wouldn't it have been a great opportunity to use black 3L friction pins throughout the model. This would acknowledge the fact that it's a 16+ set and it would have made bodywork look way better. This would also solve the blue gearbox pins issue. And while we're at it, throw in black axle pins, as the icing on the cake. I understand the regular color policy, but this set being a 16+ set, and the Ultimate, and blabla, well....you catch my drift. 16+ AGE INDICATION This is the right moment to continue the discussion about the 16+ age indication. Asked by Allanp: What makes this set carry the 16+ symbol? It isn't the largest or the most complex set to date, so why the 16+ age thing? To be honest; I am not entirely sure. The build isn't that complex to justify the 16+ indication. My best guess it has something to do with the set being more of a display set than a play set. If it were a real 16+ set, all axles and pins would have been black and the instructions would have had a lot less steps. There's probably a good reason for it, but at the moment I can't explain why this set it 16+. COMPARISON WITH 42039 The picture below shows a comparison with the 42039 - 24 Hours Race car. While it's only 4L wider, you can see it's much longer. The next two pictures show the entire bill of material. A lot of discussion has been going on about the price. It is pretty steep, there's no denying that. But does this set justify spending 300 euros? I have tried to come up with a fair calculation, without any prejudice. Basically it's the same car as the 42039 (24 Hours Race Car), only bigger. Meaning it doesn't have Power Functions, Electronics or Pneumatics. Nor does it have an abundance of very special parts (some new molds and colors, which I will account for later). Both cars use lots of panels to make them look nice (don't get me wrong, I love panels). In my opinion a comparison with the 42039 is justified. I can even add the 42000 Grand Prix Racer to the equation. Also a car, more or less same scale as the Porsche, no Power Functions, Pneumatics, whatsoever. So let's do the math. The 24 Hours Race Car has an MSRP (Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price) of 100 euro (same goes for the 42000). The Porsche has an MSRP of 300 euro, which makes it three times more expensive. The 42039 has 1219 parts (1141 for the Grand Prix Racer), so the Porsche should have around 3657 (or 3423 parts). Let's take the average, round it down and make it 3500 parts. 3500 versus 2704 parts. Something doesn't add up. Why am I missing around 800 parts?! Based on the 42039 and 42000, a Technic set like this should end up with a price per part around 8,5 cents (the average of 8,2 and 8,8 cents). Meaning the Porsche should have cost around 230 euro, but it doesn't. So, the conclusion of this little calculation is that you are paying 70 euro for added value. What can be considered added value? A nice book, special box (and packaging), new rims, and an official Porsche license. I don't think that counting the book as added value is fair, since any set of around 3000 parts will have a pretty thick book. The book actually contains around 40 pages without instructions. So around 7% percent of the book is added value. This seems negligible when it comes to printing costs. This leaves you with the box (including extra packaging) and the license. We've probably all seen the video where you see the packaging process, which is mostly done manually. Let's say the box and extra packaging adds another 10 euro. Still 60 euro to allot. For those of you who haven't seen the video; LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS Sneak Peek from LEGO Factory in Kladno: Some new molds have been created (rims, fenders, panels) and a lot of parts in orange for the first time. Imagine this this eats up another 10 euro per set. This leaves you with 50 euros for the Porsche license. Maybe I underestimate the new rims/molds, booklet or packaging. That could very well be the case. But it's a fact that this model is relatively more expensive than the 42039 or 42000. Simple mathematics, no more, no less. I'll let you decide whether the added value is worth paying the extra bucks Almost at the end of my review, it's time to summarize how I feel about this set. Usually I am not overly critical. I acknowledge the fact that at the end of the day, LEGO is a toy. However, this is a different ball game. Being a 16+ set and TLG calling it The Ultimate made it clear that this set means serious business. UCS TECHNIC First of all I am really pleased to see TLG venturing into the Technic realms of what's commonly referred to as Ultimate Collector Series in the Star Wars theme. We've seen hints about this being the first in a new series, so I surely hope to see more models like the Porsche. UNBOXING EXPERIENCE When the set arrived I was on cloud nine. This is more than your run of the mill Technic set, so I was really excited to get building. This excitement continued during the unboxing phase. The box has a deluxe appearance and it's filled with nicely packed goodies. All in black and orange, which absolutely looks stunning. THE BOOK The books which has been included contains some cool additional information about the Porsche. Mainly before the start of the build though. The vast majority contains building instructions. Being a coffee table book, a hardcover would have been cool. It's no biggie that it's not though. THE BUILD The technical part of the build is concentrated in the first box, meaning that after 38% of the build you are done with the functional parts, leaving 62% of the build adding cosmetics. This is somewhat underwhelming. I really enjoyed 'the marriage' phase though, which gives you the feeling that you are actually building a car. TECHNICAL FEATURES Unfortunately, when it comes to technical accuracy there's a lot left to be desired. No active suspension management or rear axle steering. So two of the most interesting potential features have been omitted. Being the Ultimate it would have been cool to see both, or at least one of, these functions implemented in the model. GEARBOX The flappy paddle gearbox is supposed to be the star of the show. It's absolutely cool that TLG has implemented this feature. However, the mistake in the building instructions leaves you with an incorrect shifting sequence. This issue will most likely be corrected in a later version and/or an errata will be provided. I am not sure whether TLG will address the gearbox locking issue. This being a display model, I don't think this issue will be noticeable for the majority of the builders. The fact that Reverse has the same number of gears as the Drive mode is not accurate, but for me this is an acceptable choice. The flappy paddles could have been implemented in a way that you can actually operate the paddles, without touching the rubber bands constantly. PRINTED PARTS The RS 1x1 round tiles on the rims have been printed, which is nice! Makes you wonder why the 1x1 tile on the steering wheel (with Porsche emblem) hasn't been printed. It's plus that the wheel arches have been printed. This ensures the model still looking good after a decade on the shelf. At that time the rubber bands will be petrified and will most likely break when operating the gearbox. Therefor, it would have been great if TLG provided an extra set of elastic bands, for future use. PIN COLORS TLG has used a black 2L axle in the door handle, which definitely looks better than red ones. However, they haven't included 3L black pins. Instead they still used the blue ones. If you decide to use black 2L axles, why not use 3L black pins in several places. WOW FACTOR I showed it to some friends (non AFOLs) and the only interesting thing to show is the gearbox. Which actually doesn't really present well, since you don't see what's happening. You don't even see the pistons moving faster. Basically there's not much to demonstrate, other than it's an impressively big model. A very good looking, yet slightly boring, model. PRICE I have devoted an entire chapter on the price of this model, of which the conclusion was that you pay around 70 euros for added value. It depends on the type of LEGO buyer or builder you are (and the size of your wallet) whether this is justified. The price tag of 300 euro seems a bit steep for what you get in return, so I can imagine some of you will wait for a nice deal to emerge. CONCLUSION TLG definitely brings a unique experience, and I really like the looks of the model. However, the feeling that this "could have been" a better set predominates. That being said, I still think it's a must have for every LEGO Technic car enthusiast. It looks cool when you put it on display. And it offers lots of possibilities to modify. Or like brunojj1 phrased it: Seems to me like the Porsche delivers a perfect base for MODing and MOCing variations such as B-models or PF upgrades to make it a real ULTIMATE. If you are looking for the perfect set, you better look further. If you are looking for a unique Technic set with great potential, this is the set for you! ...and with this bombshell it's time to end Leaves us with the scores. 9 DESIGN This definitely is a 911 GT3 RS! 8 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Build itself is okay, the total experience adds a point. 5 FEATURES It lacks two functions and the major function is flawed. 6 PLAYABILITY This being a display model, it's virtually non-playable. 9 PARTS New rims, entire range of orange panels and new orange parts. 7 VALUE FOR MONEY Depends on your budget, purpose to buy it and other motives. 7,3 COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER I really wish TLG would have been more clear about the embargo rules. Pictures and videos were popping up everywhere on the Internet, while the review embargo stated the 1st of June. Additionally, the set already seemed to be available at some locations. Other than that, I still enjoyed the ride and I'd like to thank TLG for providing me this set! Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found in my album.
  19. This is my new 1969 Dodge Charger Monster Truck. It’s a hybrid, a chimera. It’s an all-wheel drive, all-wheel steer monster. I built it in sections. It is very easy to build and assemble. I had to sacrifice passenger seat to make room for IR receivers. Quick reference of the features: - 2 XL motors for drive, one for each axle, - Tatra suspension, - Loads of suspension travel, - 2 L motors for steering, one for each axle, - Tatra steering system (via small LA) with Ackerman geometry, - Independent steering of front and rear axles, - Normal steering mode, - All wheel steering mode, - Crab steering mode - 2 L motors for winches, one for each winch, - Openable doors, - Hidden/flip-up headlights, - Working steering wheel, - Hemi V8 engine with carburetors and blower. BOSS Here you can see door opening mechanism. UNDERDOG SINISTER VICE And here is the chassis. So, which combo do you like the most?
  20. Hey guys, sorry I haven't posted in a while. I've had the clips to make this video for 2 months now, but not enough time to edit. Anyhow, with that said, here's what I have done. I have rebuilt both of the rear axles so they can be driven by 2 L-Motors, and rebuilt the front axle so that it can be steered by a servo, and still be able to fit an engine and have room in the cab for other motors. I also rebuilt the front of the truck since it seemed too sparse to me, but I've left the rest of the truck (besides some of the internals) original. I decided I only wanted to use a single Sbrick, and I had only one port left, since there was already an M-Motor in the model to drive the functions connected to the distribution gearbox, so I built a custom sequential shifter that I could fit in the cab, and access the axles of the changeover catches in the gearbox, and thus shift through the functions sequentially. This is done with one M-Motor. All of the internal mechanics of the gearbox were left stock, besides the elimination of any white 24 tooth clutch gears. I did not change the rest of the model that much, though I did think having an inline-4 seemed kind of lame, so I put in a V8 instead. i will not release any instructions due to the extense of the modifications. Please enjoy the video and photos below, and feel free to leave a reply!
  21. Hi! Here is a small model for Bricks by the bay convention: (yes, I know, the back is bent in this photo) Features: -Steering (that's it ) Hope you like it! -TechnicRCRacer
  22. I'm thinking of getting a Lego device that will give my models more power and allow me to control them outside and from long distance using my smartphone. As far as I am aware the best two options are BuWizz and SBrick, however I am not sure which option is best, as comparisons I have seen have never determined a clear winner. SBrick is way more affordable, more compact and seems to be popular in the Lego Technic community. I only learnt about BuWizz recently, it seems to generate an insane amount of power but it costs over twice as much as an SBrick and is bulkier, plus I already have 6 Battery Boxes and it would be a complete waste not using them. Of course they are both clearly better than the Official Lego PF IR Sensors I am currently using, which are god awful past a 2m range and are useless outside, however I would like to know people's thoughts, opinions and experiences to help me decide which is best value for money before I blow loads of cash on a toy. Currently I am leaning towards SBrick, but from what I've seen online, BuWizz looks like a viable option also. Cheers