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Found 983 results

  1. [WIP] Monster Van

    Hey everyone. Sorry I haven't posted in a while, I made something big but it didn't turn out as the best I could do. I didn't want to release a MOC with half effort. Anyway, I started this Monster Truck Van a few weeks ago. I have the chassis basically done and the body is around 60%. It won't have too many functions (just drive and steering), but I want it to look cool and be detailed (roll cage, seats.) Here's what I have so far. NOTHING IS FINAL. The body will be black and will have red accents. I will put the Ferrari rim covers on all 4 wheels. Chassis: Tell me what you think!
  2. Hello, I just finished assembling the set. However, when lowering / raising the outriggers, I notice that they are not deploying at the same speed. The rear one moving faster than the lateral ones. Consequently, it reaches its low and high positions quicker and stops while the two others are still moving. I can then hear a distinctive "clicking sound" of the rear gear set since the axis is still rotating to fully deploy the lateral pieces. It does sound that it is forcing on the gear teeth and make them "skip". Is this normal? If not, any clue on possible assembly mistake or workaround? Thank you for the feedback!
  3. Here's a little something I've been working on for a while now, mainly because I just didn't have time to edit the video. Instructions should come out late 2017 to early 2018. The video link is below, and some pictures after that!! Before anyone else asks, I fixed the steering, it was something purely wrong with my configured profiles settings for the Sbrick, but no one could have known that ;) Enjoy!
  4. Make more animals! So I made a six legged walking dragon. It is based on "basic walking frame" by JK Brickworks ( http://jkbrickworks.com/motorized-mic... ). Very primitive, however kids like when the veeery slow dragon tries to catch them :) Video:
  5. The Cossack is an off-highway bed truck, designed for heavy transportation in very hard environment. It’s the truck It was designed and ordered by ATK, specialized in heavy transportation for oilfield operation, and built by Option Industries, a Canadian manufacturer. Some information and images here (in French) . And video here on youtube and here on facebook. Like the real machine, the MOC is a 6x6 suspended motorized articulated tracked truck. There is 4 power functions piloted through a SBricks Controller: 1 PF-XL motor for the propulsion, no central differential, no reduction 1 PF-M motor for the steering through two mini linear actuators 1 PF-M motor for the main winch (worm gear + 24t) 1 PF-M motor for the secondary winch (worm gear + 8t) Some details: The front axle is suspended thanks to 3 Steering Arm 57515 and the front axle suspension are mounted horizontally. The pivot as composed of a steering ball joint and steering arm. The movement is done through two mini linear actuators powered by a PF-M installed on the main body. The main structure (dark bluish grey) is the spine of the truck. It’s this part that supports the entire load in the truck. The design is not very sophisticated but it is very stiff. All the motors are integrated to this structure. The dual suspended axle is inspired from the Arocs one. Both axle are linked by a mini-turntable allowing free move. There is two winches, the main one at the front of the platform, the secondary winch can be found at the tail. Thank you for reading, A video to finish, and if you want more information about this MOC you can jump here to my website. Best regards,
  6. This is my custom body for the fun tracked RC racer set. It's based (loosely) on the 41999 Limited Edition Crawler. I've added lights and swapped the motors to L motors. The body is attached at the same points as the regular version and flips up the same for access.
  7. This is my creation base on a Mobile Suit (Gundam Barbatos) in the Gundam series named : "Mobile Suit Gundam IRON-BLOODED ORPHANS". Lupus is the 7th form of this Gundam, first appeared in 2nd season of the series. Type : lego gundam Name : Gundam Barbatos Form : Lupus Code name : ASW-G-08 Pilot : Mikazuki August Series : Mobile Suit Gundam IRON-BLOODED ORPHANS / (機動戦士ガンダム 鉄血のオルフェンズ Kidō Senshi Gandamu Tekketsu no Orufenzu?) Youtube : Frame Building Instruction : Overview: LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr The backpack can attach the Sword Mace. LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Holding weapon. LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr High Grade 1/144 box art: LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Both hand can attach 20mm guns: LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Attach both Sword Mace and 20mm Guns LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Full Mechanic 1/100 box art: LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Some more pose with action base: LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Barbatos Lupus ASW-G-08 1/60 by demon demon demon, trên Flickr My order creation from series Gundam IRON BLOODED ORPHANS:
  8. type : lego gundam name : Gundam Flauros - Base on the first from 72 demons of Solomon code : ASW-G-64 Pilot : Norba Shino series : Mobile Suit Gundam IRON-BLOODED ORPHANS / (機動戦士ガンダム 鉄血のオルフェンズ Kidō Senshi Gandamu Tekketsu no Orufenzu?) Youtube link : LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Mobile Armor mode: LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr Mobile Suit mode: LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr LEGO Gundam Flauros ASW-G-64 (Ryusei-Go IV) by demon demon demon, trên Flickr My other moc in series Iron Blooded Orphans:
  9. Hello, this I'm my GBC zig zag module inspired by Akiyuki. This is my first time using eurobricks and I am not quite sure how to use it properly, is this the correct way to post? Any help would be great :-) The module is here.
  10. Hello everyone Today I will show you my new creation, security camera. This is a little different creation. It is build from 99% Lego bricks. Only non Lego part are phone (Sony Xperia S), camera (Sony HDR AZ-1) and batteries. Camera is powered by 2 M motor, one for rotation and one for tilt. Phone and camera are connected via Wi-Fi. VIDEO:
  11. Hi everyone, This is my next project. Its a replica of the brand new Agusta-Westland - AW196 Air ambulance. This model is a lightweight transport helicopter designed to be able to achieve missions in about every possible environment. This is also one LEGO project, and I have tried to take lessons from my previous helicopter MOCs. At this point I have achieved the most difficult part of the MOC. The complete control center of the rotor's head is done and perfectly functional. But before, have a look at the global model in it's WIP state: The global shape is coming out of the bricks actually :) On this picture you can see one joystick standing lateraly in behind the pilot seats: And you have the same on the other side of the aircraft. Other point of view: So, what's the goal? I already build previously helicopters with onboard command, even realistic commands. It was pleasant but not always really practical. So this time I decided to make use of a pair of joysticks, one on every lateral side. The left joystick controls the cyclic movement of the rotor. When pushing it to the front/back the swashplate incline to the front and back (forwards and backwards translation of the aircraft). Pushing the joystick up and down makes the swashplate incline left or right (lateral movement of the aircraft) The right joystick controls: the collective mouvement of the rotor when pushing it up and down The pitch of the tail rotor (command is operational, tail rotor still to build) Actually, the main rotor is perfectly functional with large amplitude movement of the blade. This amplitude was a real goal of this MOC, because I found lots of beautiful build on the net, but not really one with real large movements of the blades. Other view of the rotor head, i'll explain you all of this later ;) On the other function point of view, the BB already is placed in front of the rotor in order to assure a good wheight repartition on the 3 points landing gear. I will place now a gear box with to reversible commands on it : one for the landing gear in/out command and one other for the winch, that actually does not exist. There will also be one main clutch gearbox for the rotors, in order to be able to use of the other function without rotor rotation. So, that's it for now guys, this is the first take of it. Building time: about 20 hours actually. Any comment or idea will be appreciate.
  12. Hi everyone In the past I used LEGO pneumatic tanks as water container for my models. Like this it is possible to build working LEGO fire trucks with 100% LEGO parts. However, there may grow fungus in the wet pneumatic tanks since there is always residual water in the tanks after draining them. Therefore, I decided to create custom water tanks with my 3D-Printer. It worked quite well, and I was able to build a 100ml tank with the dimensions 9x9x5 studs and pin holes: And it looks like this in action: Cheers FT
  13. While working on another fire department truck, which I will present you soon, the idea for a neat small vehicle came to my mind. So I interrupted the other building process for ten minutes and created this fire department turntable ladder. http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?f=572608 I consists of 24 parts (26 parts with nozzle and "water" as shown on Picture above). Maybe we can renounce the mandatory video this time... The picture with the bottom view will reveal all the intricate mechanisms ;-)
  14. Hi to all ABS-addicted

    Hi everyone As a new member of the eurobricks-forum I'd like to introduce myself here. I'm living in Switzerland and recovered my passion to build LEGO after my Dark ages around 3 year ago. Specially, I like to build LEGO Technic while using also basic bricks. The main topics of my MOCs are trucks and other functional vehicles. The main ambition of my building is to create models based on real vehicles with the same working functions as in real life. Furthermore, most of my models are remotely controlled. Normally, I control my models with Sbrick but I also built some models with PF IR control or with the Buwizz. From time to time I also take a LEGO set and make some modification to improve the functionality and make it remote controlled. In real life I'm working as research assistant at a University of applied science and love sports. Here an overview about some of my MOCs: Unimog 406: Functions: Drive, Steering, Diff-lock, winch, 2 speed gearbox, lights Airport Rescue Vehicle MOC Functions: Drive, Steering, Boom Control 1, boom control 2, water monitor 1, water monitor 2, Direction water monitor Unimog 4023 Functions: Driving, Steering, central and rear diff-lock, snow blower on/off, snow blower shoot direction and snow blower height Further models you can find on my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/functionaltechnic and on my webpage: http://www.functionaltechnic.com/ Cheers
  15. Some month ago, I found a random image of what looks like an exploration truck. As i did not have enough info on the real machine it was impossible to use it as reference, so, some choice have been made: Mini size : not enough part to build something big when I started (other stuff in progress and cancelled since, that's why) A classical front wheel steering would have been possible, but very fragile due to the size of the vehicle. And I will need a pivot + linear actuator system for a future project, so it was a good opportunity to use it. No differential, because size matters. Suspension if possible Tracks, of course. The full album is available on FlickR. Power function part used : 1x PF-M for Steering trough mini Linear Actuator 1x PF-M for AWD propulsion without differential IR receptor Rechargeable battery Cabin is reaaaaaly ugly. One day I will be able to make cool design. Unfortunately/fortunately, after I had finished this little boi, I found a new picture of the real vehicle. But not searching with "arctic/exploration truck", I had all wrong since the beginning. This thing is actually an Oilfield flatbed truck: the Cossack from ATK: Guess what ? It will soon be a real thing. Bigger, with some function. Best regards
  16. LEGO train bridges

    Dear All, my train layout is built “into/around” my home office, which is located in the attic. With the pitched roof area beginning at a height of about 60 cm (2,0 feet), there are not that many options for placing longer runs of LEGO track, as close to the walls in about 40 cm (1,3 feet) height. The floor area is 4,2 x 6,3 m2 (26,5 m2 = 285 square feet), whereas at 2 m height (6,6 feet) there is only a 40 cm (1,3 feet) width section … so beware of your head! Figure 1: Schematic views of my home office. Top: Room cross section. Bottom: Floor plan. All numbers in meters. [The most important question of course is: 2,3 feet? I simply used an online tool for the conversion – I am wondering, is the “,3” bit in the decimal system? Which would mean: 1 foot and 3 tens of a foot. That does not make much sense as there are 12 inches in one foot … and 2,54 cm in an inch. There are 30,5 cm in one foot (rounded) – so we have 3/10*30,5 + 30,5 cm = 39,7 cm which is close enough to 40 cm.] OK, I am just kidding – I lived for 4 years in the US – changed/added a good deal of things around and to the house and - it is absolutely no problem to adjust to the yard – feet – inch world. None what so ever. Because you have to; there are simply no “cm” or “m” in the US … Uhmmm – what did I want to show … sorry: Yes, bridges. When you live in an attic, there may be holes in the floor to get there via stairs. And maybe doors opening to another room. And furniture; certainly not only 60 cm high (I leave it in the metric world) … so you need to mount your track to the walls behind or even “through” furniture, under desks, and you need bridges – many. Essentially it is one large bridge - this post is about the brick- or semi-brick built sections on my train layout. Figure 2: Floorplan and track layout. Left: “Principal” track arrangement: Two main outer loops, two smaller independent loops around the chimney on the left and on the right. Right: Actual BlueBrick track layout. Note that there are two track levels. Red rectangles indicate bridges as referenced below. With respect to Figure 2, left: This was the principal idea: Two parallel main track sections going around the entire room (outer two red lines). Then one circle on the right and one around the chimney on the left. There are possible track levels, as indicated by the two stacked red lines in Figure 2, top left. Problem #1: The stairs (shown in green, top) to get up to my office; here only one section of track fits in between outer wall and hole in the floor. Solution #1: A long incline eventually allowing the two track sections to run “stacked”. Problem #2: The door (also in green, bottom) giving way to the next room stuffed with stuff that we regularly look for. Solution #2: A draw bridge, which is always in the “up” position when I am not playing. On the same image on the right, a BlueBrick generated track layout is overlaid. It actually consist of two “layers” – there is a good section of elevated track under my desk on the left and also behind some book shelves on the right. This is why the layout looks pretty congested in some areas. Most of the track running close to the walls is not visible (or is behind furniture) and is mounted on wooden supports which in turn are mounted to the wall. Some of these areas are rather complex modular constructions, as I need to get there from time to time. Then there are some regions covered with low-level “table” type areas (IKEA is your friend) – as well as supports mounted to furniture. The same is true for “tunnels” – they are all over the place as I have to run some track sections “through furniture”. Coming back to bridges: The red rectangles in Figure 2 on the right indicate the LEGO built bridge sections. I used all sorts of LEGO bricks: DUPLOs from my daughters (now 20 and 22 years old; asked for permission of course!) to swiftly gain elevation, combined with System bricks and plates to adjust to required heights/widths. And Technic stuff to secure things. Oh well and Monorail track … I guess Monorail enthusiast will not like that … BUT: This stuff is fantastic to structurally support bridges!!! Bridge 1 This one is lame – uses the Monorail straight tracks as main structural support – and DUPLO bricks mixed with System bricks and plates for the end-sections. Figure 3a: Bridge 1, location on layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 3b: Bridge 1. Bridge 2 This one is a little more complex. It is a fully automated draw bridge integrated into my PBrick control scheme (and here). The PBrick operating that thing is a Scout. It has its own ID address and understands 4 commands: “Up”, “Down”, “Stop”, and “Status”. Manual control is also possible; the switch to toggle the mode from “remote” to “manual” control is the light brick in combination with the built-in light sensor of the Scout. Further, there are two touch sensors to ensure that the Scout knows the status of the bridge. One detects the fully “up” and the other the fully “down” position. When both sensors are open, the bridge is somewhere in between. To make things a little more appealing, a slightly modified/extended #42042 crane is used as power source. I needed to extend and fix the boom to the ceiling as the load is fairly heavy. Furthermore, I used a pulley system apparently called “threefold purchase” (according to Fig. 6-21 on page 64 in Sariel’s extremely helpful “The unofficial technic builder’s guide” book (http://sariel.pl/2016/10/guide2/) to get a mechanical pulling power advantage of 6. This way the PF M motor used in #42042 manages to draw the bridge up from the fully down position, which requires the biggest drawing momentum, without hassle. Figure 4a: Bridge 2, location on layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 4b: Bridge 2, entire structure, “down” position. Top: Top view showing the track. Bottom: Side view with a “track lift” on the left, LEGO storage shelves on the right, and a door to the storage room, which remains clear in the “up” position. Figure 4c: Bridge 2, details of the sensor mounts (“up” sensor mounted to the book shelf, “down” sensor mounted to the underside of the bridge) and the pair of guide rollers. Figure 4d: Bridge 2, details of the Scout PBrick, the #42042 crane, and the pulley mechanism providing a mechanical advantage of 6 when drawing/releasing the bridge. This video shows a little more … Bridge 3 This bridge is fully LEGO brick-built and spans my entire “City” area. It also connects to the next bridge via a curved elevated segment, which was quite challenging (for me …) to give the supporting structure a “solid” appearance. Figure 5a: Bridge 3, location on the layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 5b: Bridge 3. Top: From the wooden shelf track support on the left an elevated two track segment travels behind the City buildings. Bottom: The two elevated tracks merge into a curved one-track segment. Figure 5c: Bridge 3. Bottom left: The curved one-track segment. Bottom right: There is a small pedestrian bridge providing access to the light house. Top: The curved segment continues with a longer straight stretch. A largely modified #10027 train shed (with an additional structure on top) serves (also) as track support. There is a small grating type secured elevated path, which allows the City train personnel to survey the City traffic situation and act properly … Bridge 4 This bridge is a semi-brick-built structure; however, as it spans the opening for the stairs to the story below my office, I wanted to be sure. There is a wall mounted main support which is “decorated” with a supporting structure consisting of Monorail curved track segments; on top though the long incline in the back as well as the elevated track segment connecting to Bridge 3 is entirely brick-built and self-supporting. Again with System and DUPLO bricks – there is even some DUPLO SNOT. With the addition of Technic beams, the pylons have become quite sturdy, so I may even replace the wooden “floor” sections with actual LEGO bricks and plates but that has to wait for a longer time, I guess … Figure 6a: Bridge 4, location on the layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 6b: Bridge 4. Bottom: Entire view of the bridge structure; on the right, the City bridge structure merges with the level 2 section of the outer loop (cf. Figure 2). Top left: In the front (barely noticeable) the inner main loop at level 1; in the back the long incline (sloped at 2 plates/ 9V track piece) of the outer loop main loop. The arrow points to the incline on both pictures. Top right: Last bridge section leading to a long stretch of track behind book shelves. Figure 6c: Bridge 4. View from the stairs giving access to the attic (cf. Figure 2), showing the curved Monorail tracks as supports along with the Technic cross bars. Figure 6d: Bridge 4. Some details of the Duplo-, Technic-, and System-bricks used for the support structure. Figure 6e: Bridge 4. Details of the last bridge section leading behind some book shelves using straight mono rail tracks and bridge support parts (#55767) as main structural elements. The pylons are made from Duplo and System bricks. Bottom right: Some Duplo SNOT on the main pylon. There are some more images on BrickShelf (http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=ThorstenB), just navigate to the “bridges” folder. These are pretty large in size though. Best regards, Thorsten
  17. Lexus GX EV3

    (For original post) Hey guys. I just got done posting the video for my Lexus GX EV3 on YouTube. Check it out! The entire video was made about a month ago and I just posted it now. Now it's time to take this apart and head to my next build, which is finally putting together the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set I got for my birthday (I used some of its pieces in this). Be well, StudRobotics
  18. My latest MOC, the 4x4 crawler! This was modeled off some 1960/70 pickups, hence it’s boxy look. The goal was to have a powerful drive and a winch, with a release like in 42069 so it can be pulled by hand then engaged. I am happy to say that these goals have been achieved. In the video, the crawler has no trouble driving on ice and frozen grass, and I also made a course out of books to test the crawler indoors. When driving outside, the temperature was -2C. The crawler is powered by 2 L motors, steering by a servo motor as well as engine and winch controlled by M motors. Video: Pictures: Thank you so much for watching and reading! Looking forward to your comments! BbBT
  19. Ever since set 42039 hit the shelves, I feel attracted to building Le Mans prototype cars, due to their characteristic shape and almost futuristic looks. So I think you can imagine the delight I felt when during my random stroll on the interwebs a few months back, I stumbled upon the following concept car. Back then, I tried building a Lego version of it and got quite far. But due to lack of pieces I had to abandon early. I have since bricklinked a thing or two and want to redo the model from scratch. I think the actual car doesn't even exist in reality yet, and I think this is actually a rendered image. If I remember correctly, it is a concept that they want to try to build in reality in 2020. Personally I think it's the least car-like looking car there is (if you only count serious car models). If you forget the wheels and decals, it could be modern architecture as well. What's also cool is how the black wheel arches are actually almost shaped like Technic panels. I will be using the wheels of 8070, 42039 et al. These are slightly less than 9 studs in diameter, which justifies the following side view: The planned functions are: front steering rear drive, driving a fake engine suspension doors (powered by the damped springs also used in 8448) There's little space, so I don't count on having a gearbox. With a bit of luck, I can find room for a 2-speed, which at least gives the idea of a gearbox. But it probably won't be a proper "supercar" in the Lego sense of the word. We'll see, and I might need some help from you guys with this later on. OK, let's start. All I have so far is the two suspension modules. Here's the front suspension: First thing you might notice is, I'm using the long wishbone arms. Personally this is what makes the suspension much more interesting to myself, because it's more challenging to make it work and looks much more like F1-type suspension. Also you see I'm using only 1 small spring per wheel. The suspension travel is very little (about 1 stud) so I hope having 1 spring per axle is enough. It'll have to be though, because the mechanism isn't very strong, so a stronger spring will result in parts coming loose. The black axle on the left is the steering input, to that's where the rest of the car will come. Thanks to the pins with pin hole, the 5x7 frame is pretty rigidly attached to the whole thing. The chassis will be connected to that 5x7 frame. The rear suspension is unsteered, and therefore less spectacular. But it holds the differential: Those two modules is where I am right now. I do want to have said beforehand that I'm really not good at recreating existing car bodies, so it will be difficult and I will take some slack here and there. But how fortunate is it, that Lego has the perfect color for this car. Older Technic fans know these panels from the great Offroader 8466 and its smaller brother 8465. I'm actually not even a fan of the old panels, but this car is really the perfect opportunity to put them to use (and indeed, I bricklinked some, so I have a nice collection of them). Unfortunately though, these four pairs of panels are the only pieces in this color (except a very rare ribbed hose I don't have). So the body will necessarily be a bit crude. A body with modern pieces would probably be better, but I want to see how far I can come using these good old panels. When we get there, your feedback will be very welcome. The gaps will be filled up with black, I think. But a word of warning: I will probably add some details in a second color, simply because I find black a bit boring to work with. OK, that's it for the opening post. I hope you don't mind all the rambling I do between the pics. Next up will be a basic chassis connecting the two modules together at the right distance.
  20. Hi! I'd like to build Avtoros Shaman 8x8 and I do not have enough technic steering portals. Is it possible to replace this part with technic steering wheel hub holder in conjunction with two technic axle towballs without modifying original construction? It is easier to buy the hub holders than portals for me.
  21. Copied from Facebook User Noman Iqbal from Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. I can split this into a separate topic.
  22. Hi, Does anybody have any ideas on how to vertically support rings which are made up of 4 curved gear strips, putting gears inside of them would not be smooth enough. I have tried putting different types of pulleys and Lego system 2x2 tile round with centre hole in the channel on each side of the gear strips but the spacing is imperfect and there is no bricks thin and small enough to fill this spacing. and it would also offset a big proportion of the whole model. If not, I could always just use NXT/EV3 motors as they have a strong output hub which is supported by the motor enclosure anyhow, but this will be expensive and noisy. I need something that will allow for the curved gear racks to spin smoothly because they are used as wheels. here are the pictures of what I have tried: https://imgur.com/a/H5Wfq https://imgur.com/CpFwpwO https://imgur.com/2q4308j
  23. Hi this is my first forum so I don’t really know how to make one but can someone give me a link where I can get the instructions for free??
  24. Hi all! I'm back with a new car: Lil' Speedster! This was all built because of the trans-clear angle connectors. I thought they would look good as headlights, and I quite like the appearance. It was also partly built just to hone my abilities into becoming a better builder. I believe that this looks at least better than my Supercar. It has a small inline two engine, front and rear suspension, and compact steering. I will probably not make a video of this car. More photos: I have tried out Blueprint for instructions, tell me what you think! Also in folder is the LDD file: https://bricksafe.com/pages/TechnicRCRacer/lil-speedster Thanks for reading! -TechnicRCRacer P.S. The LDD is slightly different that the car in the photos.
  25. Hello Eurobricks AFOLs, I am Engine and this is my first post here on EB forum. My friend HorcikDesigns told me, some of you here want to know more about my last MOC. My pleassure! Original Vehicle: As some of you noticed, my MOC should be scale model of Ghe-o Rescue. It is a Romanian rescue vehicle designed for extreme terrain, with a capacity of up to 11 people. Dimensions are: 5.2 m length; 2.7 m width (even wider version exists); 2.4 m higth (without rooftop carrier). The weight is 3.2 tons. Under the bonnet, more engine types can be monted, with the most powerful one with 500 hp. Live axles are used for suspension, both equipted by lockable differentials. There are also built-in water tanks for 620 liters for fire extinguishing. Another specialty is the possibility to mount tracks to rear wheels or pneumatic "pillows" on wheels for floating on water. Tires are also special. It is Arctictrans 1300x700-24 (diameter 1300 mm and width 700 mm). The manufacturer shows off an independent test in which they won over Avtoros and Trecol manufacturers. Here you can see several cars built on them. And because the tire diameter and width exactly match the 1:16 scale to the LEGO "Tumbler" tires Ø81.6x44, the scale of the model was decided. So far I do not know any other LEGO cration of Ghe-o Rescue. MOC: The MOC was designed for Kostky.org Trophy Competition, organized by our technic race event guru Peter. And the task was to build a drivable, remote-controlled, off-road vehicle that would be able to travel about 3 km. And at the same time, it should be as beautiful as possible and with design matches to original vehicles. Terrible task. The dimensions of the model are: 332 x 168 x 168 mm (41.5 x 21 x 21 studs), weight 1.2 kg. The drive is permanently 4x4 without differentials. Axles are not sprung. But thanks to the torsionally soft frame of the vehicle, decent axle crossing is achieved (some LEGO trial experience here). Inside, there is a functional winch with a length of 2.5 m. Good lighting is a necessity for the expedition special. The control is provided by sBrick. The propulsion is made by 1 x PF XL motor with a total gear ratio of 1: 1. Schizophrenic steering is provided by the PF Servo. The winch is driven by a PF M motor via a worm gear (8: 1 ratio). Five pairs of PF lights really shine in front of the car. Electrical source is a battery box with 6 AA batteries. The whole MOC is pure LEGO exept of: sBrick receiver, high strength thread as winch rope, threaded cardans and event mandatory stickers. Drive ability: Drivig speed corresponds to a pleasant walk. Off-road capabilities were adequate to the track. Tire traction did not limit offroad capabilities, but a small power of e-motor did. Then the winch becomes useful, that is able to lift the entire weight of the vehicle. And if it was still not enough, the other "competitors" were there to help. A minor issue was the steering. Thanks to the loose in steering mechanism and occasional insensivity in the mobile app, sometimes I sent it out of the way. A major issue was energy consumption. Within 1.5 km, I drained out three sets of batteries (2x alkaline GP Ultra Plus, 1x rechargeable GP 2700). And yet I do not know how to solve it. But most likely it is caused by PF Servo motor, as we disscussed after the event with other partipiciants. ----- Thank you for comments and questions. Pictures are here in my gallery. Original post on Kostky.org.