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Found 247 results

  1. Great Ball Contraption (GBC) - General Discussion and Index This is a topic used for GBC general conversation, questions, hints, tips, etc. This first post will be used to maintain an Index of GBCs here on Eurobricks or other websites. Eurobricks topics LEGO GBC 8 + Building Instructions (5 modules - 2 motors) New Akiyuki GBC Instruction Index Other sources Greatballcontraption.com
  2. BrickController2 is an Android and iOS application that allows you to control your Lego models using a compatible gamepad. It supports the following devices: - SBrick - BuWizz 1-2 - BuWizz 3 (basic support) - Lego Powered-Up devices: Boost, PUP HUB and Technic HUB (or Control+) - PF infrared (on Android devices having infrared emitter). Features: - Multiple profiles for a single creation - Multiple motor (or output) assignment to a single controller event - Different types of devices can be used at the same time - The same motor (or output) can be assigned to multiple controller events - Different joystick characteristic settings - Different button modes: normal button, simple toggle, ping-pong toggle, carousel toggle, ... - Train mode on joysticks - Normal and servo mode for the new Control+ motors - Sequences (like for flashing light) BrickController 2 on the Google Play Store: BrickController2 android BrickController 2 is also available on the Apple App Store. BrickController2 iOS Video tutorial created by @kbalage (many thanks for this): And another great video by @kbalage: Older versions: BrickController Android application. It lets you to control Lego creations via Lego infra-red, SBrick and BuWizz V1 and V2 using any Android compatible game controller: Current version: BrickController 0.6 User guide: BrickController User Guide Minimum system requirement: Android 4.4 and bluetooth low energy support on the phone (or tablet) Video on the older SBrickController application:
  3. Some might still remember this offroader I started sometime ago in 2019 and showed earlier versions in the 8081 mods thread a while ago. Well, I finally "finished" it now and created digital models for it. I call it the COMMANDO and it is "sold" by MM (Mars Motors). People that follow my Turbo Racers series and my series of 42093 scale cars with swappable engines should already know MM. To show its capabilities I made a trip to a special location and examined what it can do there. Have a look into the video to see what it possible: The configuration in this video has all axles locked and uses the drivetrain variation #2 (see below). The COMMANDO started as the glorious 8081 A model and went through lots of modifications - especially to the front and rear axles and also to the outer hull - on the way to the final result. I created three versions so far: with 1 x PF AA battery box with 2 x PF AAA battery boxes with BuWizz 2.0 ...from which the BuWizz one was used during the video and also most of the time I drove it so far. Here are a few more detailed pictures showing it in that terrain: Here are two pictures showing the chassis construction (click to magnify): ...and here are the three drivetrain variations that can be used (click to magnify) More variations are possible and the gearing can be changed with relative ease, as the motors are not an integral part of the construction: #1 is used for the PF versions and #2 is used for the BuWizz version. #3 can be used to examine the effects of open differentials in offroad situations. The COMMANDO can use various tyres and clearance should be good enough for all of them: 45982 81.6 x 38 R Balloon tyres 18450 81.6 x 44 R (Tumbler) tyres 69912 81 x 35 Tractor (Zetros) tyres I have also already designed a few addons that will be released at a later time - need to create the digital models first - and I have even more ideas for it. So far I have available: front winch rear PTO exploration gear tracks So stay tuned for additions. I hope you like the COMMANDO and I hope it is a worthy successor to the 8081 A model. If you're interested, the - free of charge - digital models (Studio files with detailed steps and submodels) and more pictures are available on Rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-111591/johnnym/mm-commando/
  4. ColletArrow

    7760-inspired PF Shunter

    I've always enjoyed the off-centre-cab shape of the classic 7760, so no sooner had I bodged my own PF-9V battery connector then I started to build one. There ended up being very little in common with the original set other than the overall body/cab shape, but anyway. The colour scheme was dictated by A: my existing parts collection, because I'm a student and don't like buying things, and B: an attempt at what this loco would look like if the British Rail Civil Engineers had used one. I quite like using this grey-yellow-black livery on locomotives, because the black around the windows and doors make them stand out against the bodywork. The handrails either side of the cab don't really make sense, but the only LBG 1x1s I had available are either horizontal clips or headlight bricks, so I put them there anyway. The cab is actually fairly open inside, but there isn't really an interior unless you count lots of wires... The front bonnet ended up held in place by gravity and friction rather than stud connections; this makes it very easy to open in order to detach the battery from the connector, which is the only way to turn the model off! With the cab removed as well, we can see there really is just a big bundle of cables in there. The receiver is only half poking out into the rear bonnet, but signal reception is still fine. In building this model I stole plenty of parts from my 20T Brake Van (and yet still didn't have enough LBG 1x1 & 1x2 bricks, hence why the cab sides are so messy). This meant it needed rebuilding, and I'm actually happier with it now - it's lost the handrails, but the yellow banding is a lot more consistent around the ends. Finally, the loco with its short works train of a bogie flat, a general purpose crane and the brake van. And, as ever, the Bricksafe folder containing the photos and LDD file can be found here: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Collet22/7760-inspired-shunter. Thank you for reading; what do you think?
  5. There are no many creations with the blades, so here's mine: Bell 206 Helicopter Features: - Main rotor collective pitch control - Rear rotor pitch control - Opening doors - Rotating propellers - PF: M-Motor, LiPo battery. Video: More photos: Building instruction: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-98383/paave/bell-206-helicopter/#details
  6. I already planned to open this topic back in March or April, but I got caught up in work and stuff. Recent discussions in the 42129 thread makes me feel that inow is the good time to start it. My vision for this thread is that it will be a directory that contains the PF conversion mods for all of the Control+ sets so far. I have created a few mods myself as well. And I'll try to keep the information organized by updating this first post. If you have any mods, feel free to contribute. This thread can also be the directory for Studio models for the C+ sets, so that anyone with a mod idea can give it a try. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42099 Available PF mods on Rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-28766/olivierz/4x4-x-treme-off-roader-42099-power-functions-base/#details ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42100 There is currently no PF conversion mod available on Rebrickable. I've designed two PF mods for this set in Studio, but I haven't published yet because I haven't made the mod instruction. They will be published later this year. The mods are: - Full RC PF conversion: This mod replaces two hubs with two PF battery boxes, replaces all motors with 7 L motors, and adds 4 RC receivers. - Motorized PF conversion: Because a big empty box with 7 motors engaged in direct transmission is boring, I want to add something more Technic-ish, more mechanically interesting. This mod removes all hubs and motors for the base, which makes slewing and driving manual, and add 1 PF battery box, 1 L-motor, and a gearbox with 4 multi-directional switches for the functions of the super structure. Thanks efferman for sharing the base 42100 Studio file. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42109 My free mods: - L-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-84883/nguyengiangoc/42109-pf-conversion-l-motor-steer/ - Servo-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-84884/nguyengiangoc/42109-pf-conversion-servo-motor-steer/ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42114 My free mod: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-85933/nguyengiangoc/42114-pf-conversion-servo-motor-steer/ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42124 My free mods: - L-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-84954/nguyengiangoc/42124-pf-conversion-l-motor-steer/ - Servo-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-84955/nguyengiangoc/42124-pf-conversion-servo-motor-steer/ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42129 My free mods: - L-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-84984/nguyengiangoc/42129-pf-conversion-l-motor-steer/ - Servo-motor steer: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-85004/nguyengiangoc/42129-pf-conversion-servo-motor-steer/#details ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 42131 My free mods: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-92919/nguyengiangoc/42131-pf-conversion/
  7. Skid steer off road vehicle. The PF elements are fully protected from snow, and it actually works on harder snow. Driven by two PF L-motors, one motor per side. As a power source can be used BuWizz or any other 4-port battery box (not in the parts list). Building instructions+parts list: https://reb.li/m/95837
  8. I know there is a lot of buzz about Chineese clones nowadays, but this is not a clonning brand and the product is very different from BuWizz, only sharing its form factor with it. I have discussed it with @Jim and he gave me permission to make this topic. Please refrain from meaningless post that you hate anything from China and that you wouldn't buy this. Thank you I have stumbled across a very interesting piece of hardware recenty - rechargable battery with four motor outputs AND remote controller - CADA remote control. The most interesting feature is indeed dedicated controller, unlike buwizz/sbrick there is no need for smart phone. I guess video (taken by František Hajdekr) is better than words: I can only say FINALLY, the need for smart phone is what makes buwizz/sbrick unusable for me, I just want plain controller, ready in 1 second and recharchable battery. The biggest question is of course what kind of hardware is inside the BB. The only info is that the battery inside is Li-ion, no info about capacity. I'm also very interested in motor controlling chip. I don't expect it will be comparable in power with BuWizz, I expect it to be better verision of LEGO Li-pol battery. So if there is anyone here who already purchased it and is willing to open it to give us some details, I would appreciate it.
  9. Hello all around here! I'd like to present you one of my latest MOCs - "The fireplace". More photos: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmxKvMeC PF: 1 x 88000 batbox 2 x pair of LEDs 1 x M-motor Features: - "burning flame" effect; - easy access to batbox; - easy changeable back-walls; - base's module structure. You can find BI here: rebrickable Thanks for watching!)
  10. Book Review (Review by Thorsten Benter) Almost a year has passed since initial publication of this book. There are a number of on-line reviews available – this one on EB seems to come in a bit late. Well, I don’t think so, in contrast. This book is a comprehensive how-to-build-a-train resource rather than a compilation of what is out there. And this sets the book aside from so many others. It will be up-to-date as long as The LEGO Company produces bricks and sets. Plus, with the arrival of the Powered Up system, more space becomes available inside the train body as compared to comparable PF functionality: The dedicated receiver becomes obsolete and no line of sight is required for communication creating some additional space – space for sophisticated building techniques! This books tells you everything you need to know about the historical LEGO train theme development at TLG, about scales and widths, about pivot points, microstriping, SNOTing and offsetting, and so much more with relevance to train building! (Note: A PDF copy of this review with higher resolution pictures will be shortly available at Holger’s website) Summary: A must-have for every LEGO train fan, for people entertaining the idea of getting into LEGO trains, and for people who still don’t know that they will become train fans after reading the book Superb photography of LEGO models, outstanding renders of CAD models In-depth analysis and assessment of the different LEGO train eras Demonstration and teaching of advanced building and design skills My personal LEGO book score: 10/10 About the book: Author: Holger Matthes Published: Oct. 2017 by No Starch Press Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA. Hardcover, 135 pages + 90(+) pages reserved for 4 full building instructions (ICE train, gondola car, Swiss Crocodile, and a vintage passenger coach), 150+ most relevant and educational figures (excluding the beautiful chapter openers or page breakers as well as the set building instructions), 20+ tables including bulleted lists. ISBN: 1-59327-819-5 Price: € 14 (Kindle edition, Amazon); € 23 (Print edition, Amazon) both as of 9-2018. $ 19 (ebook only), $ 25 (ebook and print edition, nostarch.com) both as of 9-2018. The present English edition published by No Starch Press is based on the initial German edition “LEGO Eisenbahn – Konzepte und Techniken für realistische Modelle”, which was originally published by dpunkt Verlag Heidelberg, ISBN: 978-3-86490-355-7. The initial German edition of the book based on Holger’s manuscript composed in 2015/16 caught the attention of foreign publishers: It began with the present English edition in 2017. It then took a bit longer until the Chinese publisher “Posts & Telecom Press” (who has already published a bunch of LEGO books written by fans) very recently released the Chinese version: http://www.ptpress.com.cn/shopping/buy?bookId=0ed0cd68-ca59-41fc-9bf9-193b06089996 (ISBN: 978-7-115-48419-2): After publication in 2017, No Starch Press’ English version became the reference for further translations. In summer 2018, the Spanish (“LEGO TRENES”; LEGO TRENES https://www.amazon.es/TRENES-Libros-Singulares-Holger-Matthes/dp/8441540179) and the Italian (“TRENI LEGO”; https://www.amazon.it/Treni-Lego-colori-Holger-Matthes/dp/8868956411) editions became available. And the Russian version is on its way (sorry, Holger couldn’t tell me any further information about its availability): (Note that the Russian cover on the right is purely made up by me – Google translator says the Cyrillic headline reads “in preparation” – but who knows …) About the author Holger Matthes is a hobbyist who has been building with LEGO since 2000. He was involved in the creation of various official LEGO projects such as the Hobby Train set #10183 and frequently presents his models and gives workshops at LEGO exhibitions worldwide [copied from Amazon website]. Table of content of the book (short version) Part 1: Overview and history Introduction A history of LEGO trains Part 2: Building your own train models (My own creations – MOCs) Basic principles Designing your own models Case studies in design Part 3: Building instructions A note on the included building instructions Appended to the body of the book, you’ll find four high quality and carefully composed instructions in addition to two free online instructions: Inter-City Express (ICE; driving and trailer cars, PF motorization, windshield designs) Gondola car Swiss electric Be 6/6 “Crocodile” Vintage passenger car Steam Engine BR 10 (as bonus online available at http://holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/br10.php) Steam Engine BR 80 (as bonus online available at http://holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/br80.php) There is further information available online. Holger directs you to https://www.nostarch.com/legotrains; but most of the very valuable stuff is actually hosted on his website. I highly recommend to visit his site: http://www.holgermatthes.de/bricks/en/index.php. You will find a wealth of background information, tips&tricks, how-to, and much more. The Book Let’s face it: Almost one year after initial publication, Holger still sets the stage with this book for LEGO train fans. It will be tough to get it much further; not on 135 pages (not counting the instructions pages), not with regard to the topics covered, not with regard to the width of the audience addressed. This book provides diverse perspectives on the art of building LEGO trains, coaches, and rolling stock – and is at the same time always determined, focused, and addresses most relevant “issues”. Train builders repeatedly face tough challenges: A train is not a building, which simply resides in all its beauty; rather trains are work horses – either hauling heavy cargo loads or endless passenger coaches, or switching rolling stock for hours and hours in a train show – or on your personal layout. At the same time, a LEGO train is “beautiful” and “esthetic” in the recognition of a train fan - as a building is for City fans. However, to be able to render real trains into LEGO models, regardless on the scale used, requires some serious knowledge about the myriads of LEGO bricks available, about advanced building techniques, and even electrical wiring skills. There simply isn’t much space in a LEGO train. Space as in “Space … is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.” [Douglas Adams, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, 1979]. It is usually >extremely< packed inside a LEGO train model, particularly when electrifying it. Shaping the outer appearance with advanced building methods such as SNOT or angled and carefully secured pieces usually eats up all the space inside the hull. And lastly: Trains need to be sturdy. They not only haul heavy loads – they also have to run endless distances on track – in the best case on long stretches of straight track and smooth curves, here and there a bit bumpy – in the worst case negotiating endless and sharply bent curves and switch points in complex rail yards. This is exactly what Holger addresses in his book: How to achieve a sturdy, reliable, and at the same time esthetic and beautiful train. And we should just get it straight from the very beginning: Stickers are frequently recognized as the “icing on the cake”. And this is certainly true. BUT: Believe it or not, you can also legally “build” tiny lines, sloped coloring, narrowly split windows and much more when using advanced building techniques! And that sets aside this book from so many postings, building instructions, and other resources: Holger shows us how to accomplish “brick-built stickering” by using the endless variety of bricks and plates to build streamlined and nicely accentuated and smooth surfaces – rather than using the bulky, essentially non-LEGO-philosophy-but-by-TLG-released ICE #55768 nose with stickers attached all over it … There is so much more in the book. This is what I am trying to highlight in the following. Holger’s book is a must for us all: Beginners, advanced builders, as well as Train Tech gurus! And those who believe that they already are. One more thing to add: Photography and CAD image rendering. Or: A picture is worth a thousand words. Holger says: “The biggest thank you goes out to my old friend and master photographer Andy Bahler, without whose pictures this book would have been useless. His commitment, night after night, was above and beyond expectation …” The pictures are spectacular – you will notice right away. Organization of the book There are three parts in this book, although there is no such explicit assignment in the table of contents. Holger tells us on page 2 though: “The first part of the book gives an overview of LEGO trains over the different eras, covers some history, and answers questions about how to combine old LEGO trains from the attic with today’s kits. The second part of the book is about building your own LEGO train models, also known as My Own Creations (MOCs). Using my many years of experience building LEGO models, I’ll show you how to create proper train models, covering both the possibilities and the limitations. Finally, the book ends with step-by-step building instructions for several models.” Usually, the table of content is a good starting point for the organization analysis. However, this book is extremely focused and self-contained in each of the chapters of the three parts. This is very helpful (and also very different from other books), as the LEGO universe, including train worlds, is as diverse as it possibly gets. The number of pieces alone currently available through TLC’s official channels such as LEGO sets, PaB, and LEGO stores – or even more so – through the uncountable BrickLink stores around the globe is truly mind-boggling. Well, it is not only the sheer number, but more so the endless combinations possible – and what you achieve with such. Chances are: One gets rapidly lost and a little frustrated. Exactly this is NOT happening when “reading” this book. OK. We do it differently – as it seems appropriate for a “different” book: We walk through, as the very nice and focused organization of the book simply allows that. Part 1 “INTRODUCTION Decades ago, the toy designers at LEGO likely never imagined how durable their work would be. Today, parents can dust off their childhood LEGO trains and play together with their children who have just received their first brand-new LEGO train set. And fans of all ages can revive older sets and parts to create entirely new models.” In order to prevent such an almost natural “disorientation” or lost in parts and ways to connect them, in part one the book begins with a review of on-line resources. Information-, instruction-, and brick-availability-wise. Holger lists only the most relevant internet locations. Start here and progress further on your own. It makes your building life so much easier. As with every printed book, online references may become outdated at some point in time. Holger names thus only most reliable web portals, which will most probably exist for a long time. “A HISTORY OF LEGO TRAINS Let’s explore the evolution of the LEGO train systems from the earliest set to the present.” Next, there is a historical review of which type of train system was available at what time defining an era. This is rather significant. First of all, this approach results in a theme classification rather than a temporal evolution of sets: The blue, grey, 9V, RC, and PF era. As the pieces from different areas are naturally largely interchangeable (otherwise it would not be LEGO!), you may mix them as you see fit. Nevertheless, each era has a certain typical appearance – if you want to capture that, you need to know what was going on during that particular era. As an example, people in love with the grey (12 V) era often capture the look and feel of that time – for example studs everywhere, not many curved bricks/diverse slopes (as they were not available at that time) – rather limited colors schemes, black, red, and yellow ... The reader learns what has been produced when and in what color scheme. There is also ample of information on the technical features of each era – it appears as if the author is deeply involved and well connected in the LEGO train community – all the way up to participate in the design of selected sets. Holger shares his knowledge with the reader – always in a concise and focused way. It is pointed out that Holger is not even attempting to compile a complete list of sets available within the different eras – in contrast, he is summarizing the unique era characteristics and features. He focuses on power sources, tracks (including switches and crossings), and other elements (wheels, baseplates, in addition to unique features, such as trucks, couplings and buffers). The grey (12 V) era sections stands out of course, as this was the most diverse and most creative train theme ever (IMHO, of course!). Here you will find an – again unique – compilation of “remote-controlled accessories”, “windows and doors”, “light bricks”, “weighted bricks” … What I personally find extremely useful – and it must have been a considerable effort – is i) a summary table, listing the most important features of each era, and ii) Holger’s evaluation of these features he headlines as “Seen from today’s perspective”. Even long-time and experienced train enthusiasts will surely find valuable information in this chapter! Part 2 “BASIC PRINCIPLES Let’s dive into the world of LEGO elements and explore the endless ways to connect them.” Now that one knows the individual features of the different eras, Holger opens part two of the book with a compilation of relevant LEGO pieces for train building. It is really surprising how many there are! I have built trains myself – seeing all the various elements nicely grouped and organized makes it so much easier to get an overview of individual pieces, select the ones you may want to try out – and compare them to other options. This section is extremely helpful when you start off with a new model – or when you want to overhaul an already existing train. In the following section, Holger introduces typical train specific building techniques (although you can use many of them throughout the entire LEGO universe!). And is not surprising that there are eleven dedicated pages on SNOTing and fractional-plate offsetting in all three dimensions. These are the most crucial techniques when shaping the look of a train. SNOT (studs not on top) is a powerful technique and has become very popular among train fans. Originally rather restricted to a few elements, which allowed to “reverse” the building order, the LEGO Company has released a broad variety of SNOT elements over time. These are of course also shown in the preceding chapter on relevant LEGO train pieces. I’d say that this chapter is extremely important for beginners and of great interest to experts as there are various approaches shown side-by-side. At least for me this chapter is highly inspiring. The same is true for plate offsetting, i.e., building with only one half stud or even less displacement off the stud grid. First, the look of a train becomes much smoother even when not using curved bricks; secondly, this technique allows you to literally “build” colored surfaces with fine structures and even thin stripes (called microstriping). Without using stickers that is … Ever used minifig guns to create pantographs? Or ice skates as door handles? No? Well – Holger shows you! “DESIGNING YOUR OWN MODELS You might be wondering if you’re ready to begin making your own models. Which train should you build? Maybe you should start with the commuter train that takes you to work every day, or a freight train? And who hasn’t dreamed of a beautiful steam engine in LEGO?” Now we are getting down to business. The following two chapters of part 2 are not about “building a train” – they are about “how to do it right”. We are talking about scaling and modeling rather than “pushing along”. Before Holger goes into details though, he points out the importance of thoroughly choosing a scale. This is an extremely important decision to be made when attempting to model a real-world train. How much detailing is required? How much abstraction is allowed? Citing Holger again (page 73): “Building a recognizable model isn’t about scaling every part exactly, although proportion matters. Intentionally omitting some details or exaggerating others is usually necessary. Scale modeling with LEGO is a bit like drawing a caricature: the end result may not be an exact likeness, but it is recognizable and undeniable.” We learn about model scales (1, L, O, HO …), alternative approaches (scaling by wheel size) as well as choosing a model width (6-, 7-, 8-stud-wide). Don’t mix these up – almost any scale may be used for any track width! There are so many diverse examples here on EB. Holger narrows the scope of widths covered in his book to 6 - 8 stud wide (see cover page of the book), as these are the widths most builders choose – in addition to the official 6-wide LEGO models. He discusses the advantages and downsides of each of these widths in detail. A very important aspect when designing and building a LEGO train – regardless of the model scale – is the official LEGO track geometry. Maximum distances of fixed axles, alleviation of this rather restricted distance using articulated single trucks (a theme repeatedly discussed here on EB), sliding middle axles in three axle trucks – you will find all the answers in this book. When it comes to attaching cars to each other – even more design aspects have to be considered, which are all discussed: Pivot points vs car distance, additional pivot points to reduce car distance, the effect of pivot points on design issues, to name a few. And then: Steam engine design: 7 full pages! As far as I am concerned, steam engines are the most challenging models to render in LEGO. To say it with Anthony Sava’s words: “I'd buy a set with a steam engine in it, but I have little interest in buying a box on wheels.” (EB Forum, April 2nd 2018). Holger shows us all the challenges and caveats. The remaining sections in this chapter are: Power and Control, discussing mostly the implementation of PF elements, Modeling Details, and Track Design and Layout. Again, extremely valuable information and guides are given. One comment on third party suppliers: At the time of writing this book, both SBrick controllers (as a replacement for PF receivers, featuring wireless Bluetooth connectivity) as well as ME Models (as a supplier of wider radii curves) were actively present on the market. As of now (i.e., August 2018) though, the new LEGO Powered Up system introduced lately makes SBricks for trains almost obsolete – and Me Models have gone out of business some time ago. There are a good number of very good 3rd party alternatives for additional track pieces – large curve radii, complex switch point geometries to name only a few. They come as superb injection molded pieces which are almost indistinguishable from original LEGO track, as well as 3D printed varieties. I believe that a book of the format Holger has chosen simply does have to deal in-depth with such developments as they are much more volatile than almost any LEGO product. Taking aside the LEGO RC interim solution of course. But again, Holger gives a full account of why RC happened at all and why its lifetime was even shorter than that of many 3rd party small businesses. I really enjoyed this section very much. Regarding very recent developments by TLG naturally not covered in the book (the original German manuscript was written in 2015/16): The introduction of the Powered Up system leaves much more space within a train engine so that all the building tips and tricks provided in Holger’s book become even more intriguing! It appears as we can even more freely combine advanced power/remote control options with the present advanced building instructions. Which makes this book even more valuable! “CASE STUDIES IN DESIGN Armed with the tools and knowledge about LEGO modeling covered in the previous chapters, we’ll now take a closer look at the actual design process using some of my own builds as a guide.” This chapter needs to be explored – interpreted – by yourself. This is – as far as I am concerned – the heart of the book. Here you will learn how to begin designing a model. I find this part the most difficult: How to begin – looking at the all the bricks, plates, slopes, clips, there are so many of them … so we should take this to our heart: “Designing a model is a creative and personal process: there’s no right or wrong way to build a successful model. The guidelines in this section are meant to get you started. You’ll certainly develop your own strategies along the way.” Along with: Decide on a scale and choose the width: 6-, 7-, or 8-wide? Decide how the train will be powered and what type of track it’ll run on. Choose a target audience: should it be a realistic, recognizable model, or are play functions more important? You will notice: This is about >you<! Nevertheless, you will also learn a lot in this chapter. Holger has chosen a regional express train (Bombardier double deck train), a powerful electric locomotive (Siemens Vectron engine), and a (well, Holger is German after all …) steam engine (BR 10) as case studies. This is a very clever selection – as the techniques he shows apply to almost every engine I am aware of – including American diesels as well as American steamers … or all the various European trains, Emanuele (EB member LT12V) is currently presenting here on EB … And finally … Part 3 “BUILDING INSTRUCTIONS! Get inspired with these step-by-step instructions for building an Inter-City Express, a simple gondola, a Swiss Electric Locomotive Be 6/8 “Crocodile,” a vintage passenger car, and a steam engine.” From page 136 to 227 you will find first class, high(est)-quality building instructions for the above referenced models. There is nothing more to add. As said: This book is a must … Play Well! @Jim Thank you very much Jim for giving me the opportunity of writing this review for EB - it was a great pleasure. And for sending me this wonderful book! @HoMa Thank you Holger for writing this book. And for all the additional information you gave me when writing this review and for your comments! Thanks for reading, Thorsten
  11. Do you think it is a good idea to buy fake chinese pf motors. I bought two fake buggy motors and large motors. If you want the link, send me a private message. Thanks
  12. This is my MOD chassis for the LEGO Technic Land Rover Defender 42110 with motorization using PF motors. Features: - fully RC for driving, steering and gear selection - working V8 fake engine - driving by 2 PF L-motors - steering by PF servo motor - 2-speed gearbox (LO/HI), controlled by PF M-motor - AWD with a centre differential, including differential lock - the centre differential lock is auto engaged by the LO gear I hope you enjoy the video :-.)
  13. Hi, I am building next MOC based on model which can be found in the game Snowrunner. I picked KHAN 39 Marshall - it is based on real world vehicle - UAZ 3151. I would like to ask for your advice with one of my biggest problem in mocing - creating a decent looking body. When you see the photos and think "It doesn't look like UAZ..." then YES - you are right and: I wish to focus on body and look (I don't want to discuss functions here, they are there and they are fine). As you can see, the main color is picked (some parts in proper colors are missing, but is not a problem when bricklink is around, the same goes for some missing obvious parts), but any smaller recolors are possible. The biggest problem I have is the front grill. It looks almost ok, but as the grill for Jeep or Land Rover, not the UAZ. I tried to recreate UAZ grill, but I failed miserably. As you can see, there is no much space for it and I am also very pleased with perfect connection of the front and the hood and I definitely will keep that. Important factor is also the fact, that body needs to be as one piece, which can be easily removed, so the body demands some rigidity. Also I plan to add front and rear lights, but at first I need to be sure that the body is right. So, could you help me a little to improve the look so it would be closer to UAZ body look? :)
  14. Hello, This is my first post. I built Wing Body Truck seven months ago. Then I knew that many people wants building instructions. Now it is available. Sorry for late, because I've worked alone! Total 4126 pcs. The weight of Truck is 4600g (with 6x Eneloop batteries).
  15. Hi everyone, I have been running all my models with standard AA-battery boxes (running with 2800 mA AA batteries). Now i am wondering if that, besides space saving AAA-boxes are able to deliver higher output or are better than AA-Boxes. And, in such case, any significant difference between rechargeable 8878 battery box and AAA-battery box? Many thanks!
  16. Hello everyone, I was trying to figure the below down on my own browsing forums, searching for answers, reading a lot of articles from last 2 years however I did not find strict answers to my questions. I am sorry if some answers were already posted here and I did not find them. As I am about to spend some serious money (for me personally as I am not rich) on Lego Technic and I want to be able to create custom machines later I feel like I HAVE TO decide between Power Functions and Powered Up. 1. Is (or will) Powered Up system be customizable using Lego official App or 3rd party app? Will I be able to use Power Up motors and customize them into different than original machine so it works? 2. Should I even be coinsidering Powered Up systems for future and creating custom machines? 3. Is Power Functions a better choice for now and for future for creating custom machines? Is it easier to customize controls? 4. Are there any news or leaks that Lego will allow to customize controls of new Powered Up motors? 5. Is Power Functions better for building custom machines than Powered Up? 6. Does BuWizz or Bricks going to support and customize Powered Up? I am sorry, it all feels so overwhelming as for a beginning person that has limited budget and needs to pick carefully and plan everything ahead.
  17. Hi everyone, I would like to present my latest creation to you: A lego technic helicopter inspired by the Eurocopter EC135, in particular the police version. The eurocopter is an iconic helicopter which is widely used by police, fire and ambulance services and for executive transport worldwide. In fact I see these fly over my city almost every day The model presented here is not a very identical copy of the real machine, because I always like to be a bit free with the styling. As a matter of fact this model is in the end more of a display model than something to play with. When I started this project I aimed for a relatively small and compact package with some PF comonents inside and A goodlooking bodywork. I think I found the right ballance between panels flex axles and connectors. - Dimensions: 47x13x22 Studs -Weight: 750 g -Rotor span: 47 studs -White and Dark Azure collor scheme -easy accessible PF AAA battery box -Motorized main rotor and tail rotor powered by a PF M motor -Clutch gears for safety -Tiltable rotor blades powered by a PF M motor -Controlled using a standard PF remote controller Designing the tail (rotor) was probaly the biggest nightmare of this model. All the curved shapes and angles made it very hard to put it together. On top of that, a driven axle had to be placed inside as well. The solotion regarding the tail rotor I came up with was to use a rubber band. I tried using gears as well but it turned out too bulky and very ugly. Another challenge was the Dark Azure collor scheme. Not many parts are available in this collor so that was a huge limitation as well, but in the end it looks much better then most other collors would on this model. And at last a shot together with my Audi RS1 which, despite being built in different scales, look very nice on the shelf next to each other. Also special thanks to everyone here on the forum who helped me with the design on my WIP topic. I won't make instructions for this model, but for my current WIP I will. Comments, feedback and questions are as usual highly appreciated!
  18. Can someone clarify small question about PF L motors and V1 reciver? I know, that 2 PF L motors on one channel of V1 reciver are underperfoming. So here is the question. if i put 2 recivers in model, one purely for servo and second for motors, where each L motor use its own channel, does they would reach their proper speed, and would such combination safe for hard-coupled motors? I'm trying to make rc 42077, and have only V1 recivers and regular AA battery box. Thus question above. Or what is better for model of such scale and weight - 2 L motors, 1 XL or 2 XL motors?
  19. Another smart brick is in the making. Jason Alleman is one of the persons behind this initiative. This time the emphasis is on sound and lights. More info on Kickstarter: PFx Brick More info on: http://fxbricks.com/
  20. Hi all! I finished this build yesterday, and am quite happy with the resulting model, so I took it out for some pictures today. Unfortunately the batteries in the model died out before I had a chance to film it, so I'll have to do that tomorrow (feel like I need to prove that all the functions actually do work on this one ) So here it is, the Tow Truck Mk II, a combination of a European truck with a typically American "rotator crane"(??) on the back (a Eurotator?) First some information regarding this MOC (of course, you don't have to read it ) As many of you might know, I built a pneumatic tow truck/recovery truck roughly two years ago, and a lot of you even seemed to like that model! When I finished that model, I wanted to make an RC PF version with the same functions and body, and I also wanted to make one powered by just one motor, with function switching gearboxes as the ones you see in most of the official non-RC PF sets released by TLG. Well, it only took about to years to get around to actually doing it! Due to the fundamentally different techniques building with pneumatics vs mechanical functions, some compromises had to be made, and some features could even be added! Firstly, this model has no suspension. The back of the model is pretty densely packed with axles and gears and functions, so fitting live axle suspension while maintaining a somewhat acceptable overall rigidity in the model was deemed impossible (for me) very early on. Also, du to the various functions going to the front, suspension there was not worth it either. Secondly, the swing-out outriggers of the original model from 2013 needed to be unnecessarily complicated, bulky, and not very strong, so I opted for an alternative solution. However, I did manage to make the fourth axle steered, something the 2013 model did not feature As you can see, it uses the genreal colour scheme and a lot of the stickered pieces from 8109. The model was initially all yellow, like the last one, but I wanted to spice things up a little, and am very happy with the resulting colours Okay, enough babbling, here are a couple of more pictures: In the above picture, everything is deployed/opened. The motorized functions are: 1. Tiltable cabin (small LA) 2. Front stabilizers/outriggers (small LAs) 3. Front winch 4. Middle outriggers (worm drives, self locking geometry) 5. Rear stabilizers/outriggers (small LAs) 6. Wheel lift elevation (small LAs) 7. Wheel lift extending (large LA) 8. Wheel lift tilting (small LA) 9. Crane rotation (worm drive) 10. Crane lifting (large LA) 11. Crane boom extending (worm drive/z8 gear/gear racks) 12. Crane winch Other features are: -Openable doors -Working V8 engine -Openable side- and rear panels (to access battery box, as well as some chains and attachments for the towing fork) -Proportional steering with Ackermann geometry on axles 1, 2 and 3. The crane superstructure has two gearboxes for the three functions up there. That means there is a constantly running single axle going through the turntable, and the cranes functions are selected up top. This allows for infinite rotation, with none of the cranes' functions being affected. Yeah, I know that bull barmight be ever so slightly overkill, but IMO it's not too bad It can even lift things directly in front of it Lastly, the underside shot: Also, for those who haven't seen them yet, here are a couple of quick renders showing the internals of the model: And with colour coding for the various functions All pictures and renders can be found in higher resolution in the appropriate Bricksafe folder. Overall I'm quite happy with the resulting model, but even though all functions work, at least one of them is not ideal (cabin tilt; I'm looking at you). Also, I feel the crane superstructure could be made more elegant. Anyway, hope to be able to make the video tomorrow! Comments, thoughts and criticism is as always appreciated!
  21. Hi there, I'd like to present a MOC I've been working on from time to time since a few months: It's a small RC buggy, something I'm missing from Lego: Pictures show the V2 model. An interactive 360° view of the V1 model (with different rear axle) is available here: http://pub.clusterd.net/lego/technic/mocs/buggy/ Steering: PF Servo motor Propulsion: PF L motor (geared up 28z => 20z => 12z which is good enough to drive on office carpet and short distances on thicker carpets with fresh batteries, it works great on smooth surfaces; 36z => 12z => 12z also works, but requires more power and works best on a smooth surface; RWD) I initially used it with a AAA battery box and V2 IR receiver (not shown in the V2 pictures above, where it will be fixed to the rear spoiler, the V1 model had it at a slightly different location), but the AA battery box also fits - though it looks not as good due to different mount points, and it will also be heavier then. I assume it will also work with the LiPo box and SBrick and I can - since a few weeks - confirm that it also works with a BuWizz, but then it's more something for outdoor areas, as it gets pretty quick in fast and ludicrous modes. I created the main chassis of the V1 model of this buggy during a long evening/night and added most of the body parts the following day or days, don't remember exactly. The stickers are from the 8048 set and IMO fit the buggy theme great. Steering is also from 8048. It's fun to drive around and it can also take some hits. I took inspiration (mainly for the rear shock mounting and general setup) and motivation (I wanted to have something about as small as this) mainly from this video on YT: ...and some other videos about small RC buggies. The creator's buggy itself is also roughly based on the MOC (video and instructions for V1 model) of someone else. Instead of (re)building this one, I created my own - also because I didn't have a Buggy motor at that time. I also created a V3 model. It's slightly bigger, has front lights (using PF LEDs) and uses bigger wheels but shows some deficiencies of the design: The rear axle tends to tear itself apart in this model on rough surfaces, making the gears slip. I assume this is due to the bigger wheels used in the V3 model. I use some additional axles with stop and bushes now to hold the rear axle together for a longer time. I assume this maybe could be fixed by using a frame around the two axle holes that shouldn't move apart. When doing tight turns the V3 also lifts one of the front wheels - the one on the same side as the gear that sits on the drive axle. If someone has a good explanation for this, I'd be grateful. I suspect the softer shocks compared to V2.
  22. Soon after I've got my 42100, I decided to use it for making something epic and funny. So, after a month of work I've made this "movie" which tells a story about the last battle between old and new. Don't take it too serious, just have fun! P.S. Moral of the story is that the winner hasn't won at all. Cos' all the fallen gained an ability to be revived into different models and live forever, but the winner will stay useless and untouched. :)
  23. Last year, korea did lego exhibition called "Brickorea 2019". And we had a race as a sub-event. Rule One car for one person Can possable use just lego set. not only moc. Any shape allowed If model can move forward. width is limited to max 30cm(circuit width is 50cm). no limit in length. If model use PF system, only 2 channel is allowed per car. Sbrick, Buwizz, and other none-lego motor or batterybox is not allowed. 9V buggy motor and other remote contol system before PF is not allowed. If model use PU or C+ as control method, driver can use brickcontroller2 for contol. Ranking method Racing(racing time) 50% design(voted by competition participant) 50% Circuit rayout. It was a round trip course. not normal racing circuit. All yellow cone is obstacle. That charactor in middle of course is not obstacle. Originally is obstacle but removed. All cone sticked use tape. Even fastiest car chash to cone with full speed it is safe. Car list 1st winner. msk6003(me!)'s 'Porterleghini Muerlcierlago' Original is Hyundai's porter truck. One picture is worth a thousand words. Type - PF Used - 2 Train motor, 1 Servo motor 2nd winner. Fried Kim(새우튀김무영 in korean)'s 'White gold' Type - Powered up Used - 2 PU M motor 3rd winner. Bluebox(파란상자 in korean)'s 'Ladybug chased by wasp' Wheel on front bumper is working as roller for following track wall. Type - Powered up Used - 2 PU M motor Design winner. Nomingi(노민기 in korean)'s 'Lizard' This model is 'walking' with 4 leg. Even can't moving properly but enough for attracting other people. Type - Control + Used - 2 C+ XL motor Crescent_cho(초월 in korean) This car is originally designed for soccer competition but it canceld. Type - Powered up Used - 2 PU M motor Byeolgom(별에서온곰돌 in korean)'s 'Slapdash' Type - Powered up Used - 2 PU M motor ParticleS's 'Two wheel' He bought 76112 batmobile but want to try something different. Type - Powered up Used - 2 PU M motor Ggureogi(꾸러기 in korean)'s 'Banggu-cha' This is 42070 which converted to old korean-style disinfection car. Smoke from car is mini humidifier. Type - PF Used - 1 XL motor, 1 M motor Rumix(루믹스 in korean) Type - PF Used - 1 L motor, 1 Servo motor. Olive(올리브 in korean)'s 'I like bath' This is pretty fast and very good-looking car. Type - PF Used - 1 L motor, 1 Servo motor Macgyver(맥가이버 in korean) Type - PF Used - 2 L motor Hyung Jun Jin(육포공장 in korean)'s 'Artist Jin's secret dietary life' He is korean lego community 'Brickinside' 's lego ambassador. Type - PF Used - 2 L motor Vant(반트 in korean) That QR coad is linked to his instagram. He is normally create lego art but doing first try to technic this time. Type - Control + Used - 1 C+ XL motor, 1 C+ L motor Car under this sentence is made by korea technic team 'DASAN'. First 3 car is body changed 42099. Onepeace(원피스 in korean) Type - Control+ Used - 2 C+ XL motor, 1 C+ L motor Kimkamza(신봉동찐감자 in korean)'s 'Kamza car' Type - Control+ Used - 2 C+ XL motor, 1 C+ L motor Love like spring rain(사랑봄비 in korean) Type - Control+ Used - 2 C+ XL motor, 1 C+ L motor Kwonsu Shin(소원희인아빠 in korean)'s 'Dumper' Type - PF Used - 1 XL motor, 1 Servo motor, 1 L motor for dump function Kwonsu Shin's junior Type - PF Used - 2 L motor ETC Picture with all participant and there own car. Top low(from left to right) Wani kim(competition host and main admin of Brickinside), Rumix, Macgyver, Olive, Vant, Crescent_cho, Onepeace, ParticleS, Love like spring rain, Kimkamza Bottom low(from left to right) Kwonsu Shin, Byeolgom, Ggureogi, Hyung Jun Jin, msk6003, Fried Kim, Bluebox, Nomingi Top 3 winner with there own car and aword. msk6003(1st), Fried Kim(2nd), Bluebox(3rd)
  24. Hello! This is my first design which modelling a real one. (to have some fun: free to guess, what was the original) Width: 7 studs and 1 plate, Length : 50 studs Drive: 2 PF m motor. (3 axle bogies, 2 driven) First step: final version (?) of the base with some details:
  25. Trekkie99

    9v battery + PF wire?

    Hi everyone. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with taking a 9v battery plug and joining it with a PF wire. Just like this MiniZip. Any suggestions, tutorials, or discussion is much appreciated. Thanks.