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Found 82 results

  1. It has been almost if not exactly or more than a year since I created the Z-6 challenger. I originally thought I could not improve it any further, but it turns out I was wrong in more ways than one. The model you see before you is a MASSIVE upgrade compared to the one I originally made. It features new trailing truck and tender bogies which have been needed to be worked on for quite some time. Those bogies that were once on the original model were both blocky and incomplete at the same time. The trailing truck is now more gradually sloped and the tender bogies now look like they were off the prototype. I also was able to number AND letter the locomotive where it represents an MTH version of the model (The MTH version of the locomotive was the source of my inspiration to constructing this behemoth and how I became a fan of this design). If you have noticed the display track the locomotive sits on, I bet you can guess what is going to become of it. But to leave no one on a cliffhanger, I will say that it will be going to the Lego Ideas website to become an actual product. If you wish to have this model on YOUR Lego train layout, be sure to support it. I will let you all know when it appears on the Lego Ideas website when I update this topic.
  2. Hey folks, another Motorization: all Functions of the 1989 Batmobile (LEGO 76139) RC controlled - yep the Batman again... Without sacrificing any of the nice details: Cockpit is still there, steering wheel works, just all motor driven and I motorized the guns and the roof and even made a tailored sbrick profile. Building instructions: Motorized LEGO 1989 Batmobile on rebrickable Driven by 2 LEGO Power Functions L-Motors (1:1 transmission) steered by a LEGO Power Functions Servo Motor guns engaged/disengaged by Motor roof opened/closed by Motor special Sbrick profile with programmig and grafics included a lot of space for up to 2 battery boxes/control hubs easily reachable under the trunk hatch (details on my rebrickable MOC page) Watch a Review of my motorized 1989 Batmobile on youtube: The Batmobile from Tim Burton's Batman 1989 with Michael Keaton is definitely one of the coolest, it's not as funky as the 1960s TV version and not as tank as the Nolan version but in my opinion it's simply a beaute! The 1989 Batmobile is using over 3,300 pieces, and over 60cm long. I added a few hundred bricks, mainly LEGO Technic and reused some others. So I ended up with over 3500 parts and (batteries included) almost 3.5 kg. That's heavy! So I needed a powerfull drive. I was thinking about the buggy motors but these are large and I wanted to put the batteries into the trunk. So i went for a pair of LEGO Power Functions L-Motors. These are some of the strongest LEGO motors and very small and efficient for their power and speed. The 1989 Batmobile is sleak and lies very deep on the road so it is geometrically impossible to move up any small hills (or even carpets). It will get stuck with its floor height of less then a brick. So it will only drive on a flat surface anyway. So it can be build for speed instead of torque power which the 1:1 transmission of the two L-Motors will do: It's a speed build, literally. One reason to put the batteries into the trunk was, to reach it easily for changing/recharging or simply switching on. Another reason was, to not put them into the beautifull cockpit with its nice self opening windshield - self opening? Yes, now it is motor driven ofcourse. And you hardly see the mechanics on the floor. Okay, the Batman minifigure included is way too small for the car but I found a Batman LEGO LED light, that fits into the car. Just be carefull when closing the cockpit to not get stuck. Slide-open is no problem. The car’s turbine exhaust by the way does not drive the machine guns anymore (it does in the original) because now a motor engages them. So I could make the jet exhaust it look like a real jet engine - the only exterior I changed. To make the two machine guns hidden, under the hood pop up, just press a button now. The Batmobile comes with nice little Bat emblems printed on the wheel rim - try not to lose them while driving, they are rare parts. The set of specially designed tyres for the front wheels is steered in a very specific geometry. I took care to keep that working the exact same way because it works very well for steering. The Build was complicated, took me weeks to get it right. I didnt want to change the exterior and as few as possible from the cockpit. You shouldnt see the opening mechanics. And I wanted to have all the features working, even the steering wheel (though steering is handled by a servo motor now) Every time I thought I got it, something else made problems, untill finally it all worked out. You can skip the trial and error (and breaking old LEGO gears) part: I made instructions and made them easily readable, so you can have it speed build in no time. I believe everyone should be able to build a LEGO set and try to make my instructions like that. Now it's hard to say, which one is the best batmobile motorization I ever made: The Lego 76139 1989 UCS Batmobile has more functions: motor driven MGs and a motor driven roof, the remote controlled motorized Lego 76023 UCS Tumbler I modded however has a full steerable front suspension for the independen wheels. my special Sbrick profile with some automated scripts is included I even made a cable layout for the power functions cables and extentions if you ended down here you may also be interested in or
  3. Ahoy, seamates! I have started my LEGO-Ideas Project 2-3 months ago and now I want to present it to the specific lego pirates community! Would be nice to get your suppport but even more I am looking for some advice what I can improve on it. SUPPORT NOW Please take a look on the ideas website or at my flickr https://flic.kr/s/aHsmMnLn6a for more fotos! Here is the text from ideas: Welcome on board of The Rolling Dutchman! Since I have been a child I always wanted to control my LEGO Red Beard Runner without pushing it around and now my dream has come true. I have build a motorized Version of the famous Flying Dutchman which is my favorite pirate ship, too. I have seen the original swedish Vasa which has given the idea for the Dutchman with its marvelous bow and stern. So I managed to combine them with my own creative ideas into this "rolling" Dutchman! Please have a look at the features in the video and the pictures! Video: Update 2: Thanks for your 1k supports so far! I have worked on the main picture a bit and now added a picture of the crew and one showing the functions as well. Update 1: New rotten Sails! (Picture 7+8+Video still with the first sails) Motorized Features: Rolling movement caused by waves (1. M-Motor) Two motorized triple-barrelled chasers in the bow (1. M-Motor) Motorized steering with simoultaneously rotating ship´s wheel, rudder and steering mechanism (S-Motor) Motorized movement for- and backward (L-Motor) Motorized sail trim with turning capstan and changing sail position of all square sails (M-Motor) All features can be controlled by rc-control via 4 channels and two receivers All features use the Power-Function System but could easily be adapted to the new Control+ System which can lead to advanced handling of the functions The battery box can slide out easily to switch on/off and change batteries General Features: Minifigures: Davy Jones, Jack Sparrow, Elizabeth, Bill Turner, Barbossa and more. (I am not familiar with the movies in english so I would like to ask you to tell me the names in the comments section!) Two decks with cannons (one side the lower deck is closed to store the motors) The two tripple-barreld chasers can manually slide backwards and then the gun ports can be closed Removable deck at the stern to take out the steering wheel Removable lower balcony´s on both sides Handmade sails Two functional anchors Upper cabin minifigure size with Jack stealing the heart (illuminated) Lower cabin with Davy Jones organ (illuminated) Two torches at the stern (illuminated) The capstan can be removed The ship is based on the sturdy hull parts, the complete 2 lower rows of bricks can be removed with the steering and driving wheels to use it as "normal" push forward ship or display model The main mast and the mizzen are both slightly tilted backwards Correct rigging and sails due to the movies The ropes between the masts can be removed easily to take them apart for transport It would be an honor to receive your support. Aye! I have to thank my friend J-H to help me with some motorization problems and a special thanks to my girlfriend for not freaking out! Thanks, yours Störtebricker from Hamburg, Germany SUPPORT NOW
  4. Hi everyone, Today I want to introduce to you my latest MOC : a Poclain excavator, the HC 300. Poclain is a French company (bought in 2000s by CASE) leader in 60-70s in hydraulics excavators and engines. The HC 300 was the bigger excavator in the world in 1968 ! Specifications : I wanted to control the model with a smartphone so I used Control+/Power up applications. The excavator has also manual features. I used electrical linear actuators instead of pneumatics to enhance playability. The excavator must be able to rise one track from the ground by using the bucket and his motorized arm. Inventory is mainly based on #42082. The main design is based on 8043 set. The drive train is powered by 2 L motors and a dual differential drive : more informations on @Sariel video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5_OQooBxdY. This kind of transmission allows control by only one joystick one smartphone screen instead of two sliders. Configuration : 6 motors : 5 L motors (https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=bb0959c01#T=C) and 1 XL motor (https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=bb0960c01#T=C&C=85) 2 electrical hubs 2 000 parts Features : - Toggling cabin with mechanical locking system - 360° turret rotation : One battery box is placed in drive train and the other one is placed on turret. No cables through the turntable, only a shaft to transmits rotation from drive train to the V12. - Technical compartments : a lot of openable elements very useful to store tools and tracks components. The grid at the back can be opened to reveal V12 engine. - The entire bodywork is removable. It is only set on the turret by gravity. The entire of the excavator is modular in order to make disassembly easier. - V12 engine works when the excavator move. I add a maximum of details to make it more realistic. - The dual differential drive : Each motor drives one kind of motion, straight-line motion or rotation. Get more information here : http://groups.csail.mit.edu/drl/courses ... ldiff.html. You can also combine motions to get curved directions. Tension on tracks is maintained by springs. Originally made by @Anto : https://www.techlug.fr/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=11548 Inspirations : https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-1312/yannmar/motorized-hydraulic-excavator/#detailshttp://www.techlug.fr/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=11548http://www.techlug.fr/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=11878&p=192932&hilit=excavatrice#p192932https://www.techlug.fr/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=11343&p=185867&hilit=excavatrice#p185867https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-19850/Mowlwurf/42006-full-rc-mod-undercarriage-with-transverse-subtractor/#comments Conclusion : The video will come soon ! Building instructions too ! I hope you liked this creation, I tried to mix up realistic details and common excavator's features. Only displacement is slow because of a total weight of 2kg. HD pictures here : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVM6rX2
  5. This is an alternate build of the Lego Set 42100, Liebherr 9800. Parts list used in the MOC is listed so you can opt to just buy the required parts instead of buying set 42100.Motorized features include: Tank drive for both tracks Arms upward/downward movements Head turn Head tilt Body tilt Manual play features include: Upper and lower eye flaps can be moved to show facial expressions. Finger movements. Limited manual arm movements Here's a link to the YouTube video to showcase its movements: RJ's Johnny 5 YouTube Video If anybody is interested, building instructions are available at Rebrickable.
  6. I continue my mission to motorize the Creator Expert fleet, have already done a bunch other of them. I always try to make the motorization as inivisible as possible, you should not be able to see any electronics without looking very carefully. As the Porsche is pretty big and heavy I used ad Buwizz and a Large motor geared up 20/12 to give it the power that a Porsche deserves. If you do not need Turbo Power it could also be powered with a cheaper CaDa system. Since the PF servo is so big and bulky, i have used an M motor with a rubberband return to center function instead. Also added 2 pairs of Power Function lights, altough I am not totally happy with the front lights, but this was the best I could come up with. Because I am creating instructions for other to build this, I have not used any rare/expensive bricks and tried to reuse as many bricks as possible in new locations. It only requires about 150 extra bricks and electric parts. If there are interest, I might create Power Functions and/or Powered Up versions later. I have some ideas to hide the IR reciever and there is still space for a slightly larger battery and motor. Youtube video Rebrickable Instructions
  7. Hi everyone and welcome to my newest MOC. This time around, it's a motorized alternative model for the 8048 set "Nitro Buggy". I have that set and i know it's kinda old now (around 12 years), being released back in 2009, but i liked it when it came out and still do, i find the original model quite good, but don't understand why Lego went from a Buggy to a tractor as a B-Model, when this set as so much more potential. Some months ago i made another motorized C-Model from that set, the "Nitro Hot Rod" an old looking vehicle to differentiate it from the original model, but now i wanted to do the reverse and build something modern-looking, because... i dunno, why not :D even older sets deserve some love. Now, about the vehicle itself: aside from the 5 power functions elements used to motorize and control it, all parts are from the 8048 set, and very few will remain unused. Even if you don't have that set, the parts are very common and present on many other sets, so you probably can easily build this one. It's a pickup truck kind of vehicle. It has independent front suspension; return-to-center steering using one servo motor; one l-motor powers the two rear wheels; features some details like a front and rear bumpers, headlights, side mirrors, driver cabin, and a cargo bed (non-functional, as i didn't have enough parts left). It's longer than the original model and has great ground clearance. Overall, i'm happy with the final result. One thing i want to mention, as i did it on purpose, is the fact that i made it very easy to change the gears that connect the l-motor to the rear wheels, you just need to take out the rear left wheel and a bush, and you can easily swap gears and change the gear ratio if you want. I did this because a 1:1 ratio is better to play inside home, but if you go outside, maybe you want to decrease top speed and get more torque, so a 1.667:1 ratio using gears available on the set is recommended. See the picture below for reference. The video at the end of the page also has segments with the two gear combinations. For anyone interested, building instructions are available at rebrickable. Have fun!
  8. Hello everyone and welcome to my newest C-Model. I'm keeping my current momentum of doing conventional vehicles from a tracked set and it's amazing how versatile the 42095 set can be. I call this MOC "Dirt Devil" because it was meant to run on dirt roads and has an agressive look. Now let's talk about the vehicle itself. It is 25 studs wide, 35 studs long and 14 studs tall. One of the l-motors available on the set is dedicated to steering, which has return to center functionality by using a common rubber band. There is no need to specify a size for the rubber band because it can be twisted as needed, it just needs to have enough strength to push the steering mechansim back to its center position, you can test this as you build it. Another l-motor is directly powering one of the rear wheels, so this is a 1RWD vehicle. I usually go with this approach because this set lacks parts to build a decent transmission mechanism, so, to power the two rear wheels, i would need to spend too many parts and would have enough left to model the car. Another issue with this set is that it is a tracked vehicle, so there are no rubber tires, which means the wheels on this car are useless on smooth surfaces, but if you've built my other MOCs, this shouldn't be a surprise. It runs fine on rough terrain though. Anyway, there are several fixes for this issue. Since you're getting a rubber band for the steering, you might as well get some more and hack them into the tracked wheels like i did in this video of my other MOC here; or you can add rubber studs on the wheels if you have them; or simply swap the tracked wheels for any other rubber tires if you have some spare ones, this is hands down the best and quickest solution. For anyone interested, building instructions are available at rebrickable.
  9. This is yet another C-Model for the LEGO Set 42095 "Remote-Controlled Stunt Racer". This time around, i challenged myself to use the available parts to build a war tank as closest as possible to the real, generic vehicle. I used the smaller sprocket wheels on purpose to make this model run slower to better resemble the real thing, as the original set doesn't have gears to adjust the velocity. It is powered by the 2 L-Motors, it can go forward and backwards, turn left and right as needed. The front is clear to easily overcome obstacles; on the rear there is a space dedicated for cable management. I tried to keep this build as compact as i could. It may not seem like it, but this was quite the challenge, it went through various revisions and parts optimization until i became happy enough with the result. It can be further improved and modded with additional parts, but i wanted to keep it as a C-Model, so i was restricted by the set's available components. Building instructions available at https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-65285/davejsp/rc-cyber-tank/
  10. This is basically a C-Model for the RC Stunt Racer, but instead of using the 2 original L-motors, i used 2 fake, chinese, buggy motors, which are more than enough for this build (they are also pretty cheap for the performance they pack and you can easily get them). Aside from the motors, all the parts used were taken from the set 42095 "Remote-Controlled Stunt Racer". The design is very compact and sturdy, cables are very well protected inside, the battery button is easily accessible on the back, the IR sensor is well disguised and positioned. It was made with the objective of being very fast and able to easily drift and spin, which i find to be more fun than doing wheelies, it's also very cool to do races with it and will require mastery to control due to its high speed. Building Instructions available on rebrickable.
  11. Proud to present my latest moc. A motorized ATTE. Instructions can be found here it can walk, steer by articulation and control the main gun rotation and elevation.
  12. Hello everyone. I just want to share a MOC i've made recently, it is a c-model of the set 42095 "Remote-Controlled Stunt Racer", so it was designed using only available parts on that set. It is quite a departure from the original, no one would think it was possible to build such a racer with this set. It uses a single l-motor to power one of the rear wheels and the other l-motor is dedicated to steering, which returns to center automatically by using a rubber band. I released free instructions for the steering system i developed for this MOC, check them here. The only limitation are the "tracked wheels", since there is no rubber, they don't have traction on smooth surfaces, this vehicle can only run on rough terrain like dirt, sand and snow, so it is basically an off-road racer. I tried to add as many details as possible given the available parts. The battery pack button is easily accessible, the IR receiver is on top to get the cleanest signal possible and the cabin is used for cable management, giving it a cleaner look. Building instructions are available at rebrickable, i also have a mechanical steering version here if you prefer. It is somewhat big, but lightweight and sturdy, so the l-motors can do their job easily and it runs quite fast. A quick video showcasing it is available here. For anyone who decide to build it, the most obvious modifications you can do is to replace the "tracked wheels" by normal off-road tires; or to apply rubber studs. Everyone feel free to share your opinions.
  13. Hi! I'm glad to present my motorized modification of 42094 set. It has six remote controlled functions with two S-bricks. Here is exemplary part list: And here is short review and functions demonstration: Photos in high resolution: https://www.flickr.com/photos/141718063@N06/albums/72157705982003774 Thanks for watching!
  14. Hi everyone, I would like to present my latest creation to you: A lego technic helicopter inspired by the Eurocopter EC135, in particular the police version. The eurocopter is an iconic helicopter which is widely used by police, fire and ambulance services and for executive transport worldwide. In fact I see these fly over my city almost every day The model presented here is not a very identical copy of the real machine, because I always like to be a bit free with the styling. As a matter of fact this model is in the end more of a display model than something to play with. When I started this project I aimed for a relatively small and compact package with some PF comonents inside and A goodlooking bodywork. I think I found the right ballance between panels flex axles and connectors. - Dimensions: 47x13x22 Studs -Weight: 750 g -Rotor span: 47 studs -White and Dark Azure collor scheme -easy accessible PF AAA battery box -Motorized main rotor and tail rotor powered by a PF M motor -Clutch gears for safety -Tiltable rotor blades powered by a PF M motor -Controlled using a standard PF remote controller Designing the tail (rotor) was probaly the biggest nightmare of this model. All the curved shapes and angles made it very hard to put it together. On top of that, a driven axle had to be placed inside as well. The solotion regarding the tail rotor I came up with was to use a rubber band. I tried using gears as well but it turned out too bulky and very ugly. Another challenge was the Dark Azure collor scheme. Not many parts are available in this collor so that was a huge limitation as well, but in the end it looks much better then most other collors would on this model. And at last a shot together with my Audi RS1 which, despite being built in different scales, look very nice on the shelf next to each other. Also special thanks to everyone here on the forum who helped me with the design on my WIP topic. I won't make instructions for this model, but for my current WIP I will. Comments, feedback and questions are as usual highly appreciated!
  15. Here is my take on the motorization of the 42110. Basically the whole model was lifted to accomodate the bigger wheel, motors and BuWizzes. Model is powered by a total of 8 motors, 4L motors for RWD, 2L motors for FWD, one servo and one M motor. Total gear ratio is 1:3. It uses custom portal hubs in the front which have a pivot even closer than normal ones thanks to the new rims. Rear uses normal hubs and wheels, since they are sturdier. Axles use the original suspension's upper arms as mounting points along with a pair of 9L links for each axle. The original gearbox is connected to the rear drive, so it works normally. Steering is also connected to the original links, so steerign wheel and HOG also turn when steering Winch is motorized using an M motor. Video coming soon.
  16. Dear all, With the arrival of the new Volvo set, I felt like rebuilding my old 42030 front loader. The problem was that I still had a MOC built, standing in the cupboard since 2016 :s So I finally built some instructions for it (available at Rebrickable), and made a short video. Here is a presentation. The C-Model is a Jeep-like car (with Volvo colors ;) ) As the A model, it is fully motorized. The L and XL motors are connected to the transmission, and the servomotor ensures the steering (with Ackermann geometry, and working steering wheel): The two driving motors are connected by a differential, which allows combining their rotations. If we note x = 220 rpm the speed of the XL motor and y = 390 rpm the speed of the L motor), we can emulate 4 gears: L forward, XL backward: V = y - x = 390 - 220 = 170 rpm, XL forward, L off: V = y = 220 rpm, L forward, XL off: V = 390 rpm, XL forward, L forward: V = 390 + 220 = 610 rpm. The differential is also connected to a V6 fake engine, and the rear axle is pendular: Finally, the M motor is used to power a crane: Here is a small video to show it in action: Hope you like it!
  17. From my young age I wanted to built some contraption that would allow me to run down cars, marbles etc. Along the way I get familiar with Lego 7 mm ribbed hoses, however they slow down the cart quite a lot and were not useful for the purpose. Then a few years later I've seen Zerobricks with his idea for the track (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SydmBuTPnKo). A few years later guys from Brickride (http://www.brickride.com/) created their fully functional Roller Coaster so I gave it a try. I started about two year ago and in a couple of months I had some ideas: https://www.bricksafe.com/files/teflon/roller-coaster/Roller Coaster 01.mp4 ... and the majority of track ready to go: The idea was to have a gigantic tower on one side so track would go up on one side, then do slow 180°turn an fall into the abyss with complete loop at the bottom. However the tower was not very stable so I had to change to an A configuration The new tower was about 170 cm high and reasonable stable. After some testing I had a fully functional track with one looping, a 270° + 180° horizontal turns and even track going tough the opening of the looping (sorry for lousy picture, I have no other:-/) Then I started with motorized lift. I used Brickride's idea - chain in a ditch: The propulsion at the curve at the bottom was served with side wheels with synchronized drive (matching the curve of the track with the curve of the drive was a hard task): Here is the detail, where side wheels are pushing the cart to the chain: Ant the top part also needed some clever chain tricks: At least two L motors were needed to power the thing due to its size and some friction. However, all this effort just produced very good lift but managed to mess-up my track. Like Heisenberg principle - either track was working or the lift but not both at the same time. At the time a lot of my pins started to brake and replacing them cause almost a chain reaction, since some force is needed to dismantle the track. Due to that, I even shorten the track to have as little problem with pins as possible. After months of more or less serious attacks on the issue, I realized it's just to big to work properly (with a motor). I guess my support is just not up to the task and I just have to admire Brickride's. In the mean time, we have seen the Lego answer and it's nice enough. Some more pictures of my failed project: Looping: Through the support: And panoramic view: Please note massive girder to support the track. That was my last idea out of desperation to make this track stabilized. I have failed miserably. Well, the lessons learned: Bricks are stubborn, technic ones even more so. More engineering is usually not a solution Building with bricks is not all fun and games There is no such thing as too much pins More pictures here: https://www.bricksafe.com/pages/teflon/roller-coaster
  18. I finally have good pictures of the demonstrator model for my take on a cheap no-modification-required switch track motor. Have a look! The key that makes this work is that the servo acts on a slider, which pushes on the little spring-loaded switch point piece, rather than forcing the lever mechanism back and forth. As such, it takes very little force to change the switch from open to closed and vice versa. I'm using two of the 1x1x1 corner panels to trap the servo horn so that it pushes the slider back and forth, while a 2x2 corner tile pushes the point piece backwards and forwards. The actual switch lever needs to be in the 'open' position to allow the point piece to move back and forth properly; otherwise, the switch will stay closed even when the servo releases the point piece. I'm using an Arduino Uno, but you could use any Arduino or compatible clone as long as you get the pins hooked up right. It's a lucky coincidence that the servo is the size it is; two of the 1x2x3 panels form a nice enclosure that keeps it from moving about too much. It's important to get the older style that don't have the reinforcing ridges on the edges, as otherwise it won't fit. I used a small piece of paper folded on itself a couple of times to keep the servo wedged in tightly. I imagine you could use some of those 1x2 bricks with the vertical groove in them to help hide the servo cabling, but I didn't bother since this is only a demonstrator. Here's a better view of the setup without the track in the way. My servos came with a pack of three differently-shaped horns to put on them - I'm using the shortest one available to me (mine was 19.5mm long with six small holes in it and was the only one with one 'arm' on it). I also have not permanently attached it with the screws that also came in the package, mainly for the purposes of testing. Lastly, here's a picture of the support structure I built up to keep everything in place. I also made an LDD file of the structure as well as the slider mechanism and servo holder so that you can build your own! http://bricksafe.com/files/Phoxtane/digital-model-files/servoswitchtrack.lxf The hard part of this built is not the mechanism, but setting up the servo as well as the Arduino controller. If anyone is interested, I can do a more in-depth post on how these servos work and how to use them, but the basics go something like this: Attach the servo to the Arduino using the diagram on this page: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Sweep Test your servo to make sure it's working using the example code on that page (the servo should slowly move back and forth between its endpoints) Center the servo at 90 degrees - http://www.allbot.eu/build/allbot-arduino/centering-a-servo/ - this puts the servo at a known position for use in our mechanism Place the small one-arm servo horn onto the servo spline so that it's pointing across the servo body, not away from it. This allows the servo to reach the little pocket we've built and actuate the slider. This is the tricky part; you have to play around with the Arduino code to calibrate your servo for its switch track. These servos are mass-produced as cheaply as possible, so the actual physical position of the horn at the 0 and 180 degree endpoints will vary somewhat from unit to unit. For my servo, the two positions the servo should move to for a closed and an open switch are about 83 degrees and 113 degrees, respectively. The corner tile should barely touch the point piece when open, and should keep the point piece tight against the outside track piece without the servo struggling or forcing itself out of position. I made some minor improvements to this code for my demonstrator - the servo doesn't sweep between positions, but jumps between them, so it's faster to actuate. I also have the Arduino disconnecting the servo in between movements so it doesn't 'hum' while waiting to move to the next position. General improvements to this model would include building the mechanism out of DBG and black for the servo holder, as well as tidying up the wiring to the servo. The servo horns stand out quite a bit color-wise, but since they're nylon, they could easily be dyed black to match the servo housing, and the silver-colored screws that come with the servo horns could be touched up with some paint or nail polish to turn them black as well. The only downside to this mechanism is that you can't run a train backwards through the straight part of the switch when it's closed, since the point piece can't move out of the way. Since this is already being controlled by a microcontroller, it wouldn't be difficult at all to add some sort of sensor that would open the switch when a train is approaching it from the wrong side. As for overall cost, beyond the price for the pieces needed to build this barebones mechanism (I had all of the pieces in my collection): I bought a ten-pack of these servos for $2 apiece, and if you don't already have one, a small Arduino starter kit can be found online for $25. The Arduino Uno has six analog pins, so it can potentially control up to six servos at once. If you're starting out from scratch, the total cost for six motorized switches would end up being around $37 - which is much cheaper than the ~$125 it would take to build this out of genuine Lego parts (one battery box, six M-motors, three IR receivers, three IR remotes), and it doesn't take any PF channels.
  19. Zerobricks

    [WIP] Ute supercar

    I decided to start a new supercar project and after lots of thinkign decided to make an ute just because nobody else made one yet AFAIK. For those who don't know what an ute is, it's when a pickup and a normal or sports car really like each other and end up having a child like this: For this project I set myself the following goals: Unibody construction - The model will have no chassis per-se, the body will be load carrying, something @nicjasno is really good at. Convertible - If you have a sports pickup, why not make it a convertible? This will also force me to make the unibody extremely solid, since there wont be any roof support. Motorized with gearbox - I am using a new high efficiency gearbox idea. Power will be delivered by 4 PF trains motors Realistic suspension - High-gearing solid axle in the back and McPherson suspnsnion in the front Here's the current progress: The gearbox has a total of 4 gears. Wave pieces are used to switch between them. Here's a more detailed view of the setup. As you can see, I used a tilted axle for the overdrive gear: Since the wave selector pieces can't cope with high torque, the gearbox is designed to work with high speed and low torque. That is why it will be powered by the fastest currently available motors - 4 PF train motors spinning at over 2000 RPM generating around 10Ncm of torque. The rear axle is an inverted portal design. It' made to be low as possible so that the bed can be placed nice and low. The axle has a total of 1:12 gear ratio in order to get useful torque from the fast spinning gearbox. Double 24 tooth gears are used in final drive because I expect the car to be quite heavy. So that's the basic idea for now. I will update the topic as I build.
  20. Hey Guys Jeep Wrangler custom Pickup „Bandit“ 1:10. The model is full motorized and radio controlled. More pics: instagram.com/brickzone_52 1 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 2 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 3x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 4 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 5 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 6x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 7 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 8 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 9 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 10 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 11 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 12 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 13 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 14 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 15x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 16 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 17 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr
  21. Jan-'17 Now, building instruction file (PDF) is available at Rebrickable linked below http://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/Modoro/motorized-42056-porsche-911-gt3-rs-version-11 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hi.. everyone! This my 2nd posting here, introducing my own renovation(or remodeling) of TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS. Among the newly released 2016 Lego models, "TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS" received the best attention before release. In addition to its nice and detailed appearance, now I attempt to review the process of blowing features including RC driving and 4-speed gearbox shifting, and LED lights as well. The video above shows the process of remodeling TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS and a driving test in the following order. The process of remodeling each part of PORSCHE chassis Driving and steering test of the remodeled PORSCHE chassis The process of binding the renovated chassis to the PORSCHE body Field driving test The main target of this RC remodeling is just a chassis (or power-train) that is composed of front/rear axis, power transmission and steering units. The following figure compares the before and after appearance of the renovated PORSCHE chassis. <Before> <After> The changes and features of the renovated PORSCHE chassis are as follows Mounted drive motors (L-motor x 4) Mounted a steering motor (S-motor x 1) Modified gear shifting method not using the paddle shift remodeling of the 4-speed sequential gearbox for enhanced durability and power transmission efficiency Mounted PF battery (optionally, two batteries) Mounted two SBRICKs for the remote control capability While including all of the above modifications, it maintains the design and major features of the original 42056 model. (rear fake engine room, Hand of God, glove box, toolbox under the hood etc.) This review is divided into a total of 9 sections, and the following videos illustrate the building progress of each section, respectively. part 1: chassis frame remodeling In this section, the main contents of RC motorizing 42056 PORSCHE chassis is largely divided into three sub-parts and will be described as follows . 1) reinforcement of chassis regidity A dictionary meaning of chassis frame is defined as "the frame plus the "running gear" like engine, transmission, drive shaft, differential, and suspension" In the original 42056 model implementing the real PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS in LEGO model, a chassis is composed to support the body, transmissions, front and rear axis, engine etc. By the way, LEGO designers did not consider the RC driving from the stage of planning the TECHNIC 42056 model. Thus the chassis regidity, weakened by adding driving & steering motors, gear-shifting motors and battery boxes, cannot maintain the body shape of its own secure and inhibits the stable driving performance. In order to reinforce the chassis regidity that is more weakened by removing liftarms to mount 4 driving L-motors under the gear-box, 42056 chassis core is newly configured using a total of thress TECHNIC 5x11 liftarms. 2) provision of driving motor mounting space 4 driving L-motors are mounted under the gear box between the driver and front passenger. 3) provision of gear-shifting axle mounting space In the original 42056 model, The transmission and drive shaft axis are designed in the form perpendicular to each other. According to this design, gear shifting can be done accurately, smoothly and sequentially from 1st speed to 4th speed. However in the driving test progress, it turned out that thress 24-toothed bevel gears in driving pathways can not deliver high torque & power to the rear axle and differential gears. Thus, to remove three bevel gears in the pathway of the remodeled 42056 chassis, gear shifting axle is heightened by 3L and driving shaft is connected right to the 4-speed transmissions. part 2: 4-speed sequential gearbox remodeling part 3: control units for the RC gear shifting part 4: driving motors mounting part 5: dashboard remodeling part 6: front/rear axis remodeling part 7: rear engine room remodeling part 8: assembly process of the renovated PORSCHE chassis part 9: binding the renovated chassis to the body of PORSCHE These are all I prepared for the review of the motorized 42056 PORSCHE model. Thanks for reading & watching (-;
  22. I have always wanted the original 4757 Hogwarts Castle because it had a clock and a pendulum! I found its clock works to be a GREAT mystery until I could look into its instruction manual! Lego was so gracious to create the new Clock Tower and release it! I loved it very much. However, a great feature was missing: the pendulum! I decided to make minimal modifications for adding a pendulum and even motorizing it! My Clock Tower's clock work would not be a GREAT mystery because I made a video which showed how I built it!
  23. The origins of the idea: The core of this model consists of three rings which can independently rotate around three perpendicular axes. These pivoted rings are called gimbals. Gimbals have been used in a wide variety of engineering applications since ancient times till modern days. Gimbal suspension is used to provide stability to objects inside unstable environment, e.g. compasses on ships and gyroscopes on planes. Furthermore, the simplicity and effectiveness of gimbals often attracted artists' attention. In science fiction and fantasy, gimbals have been used to represent complex contraptions capable of creating new physical effects and even manipulating the very fabric of reality. Some of the examples include the machine from the 1997 movie Contact, the gravity drive from the movie Event Horizon, mass relays from the video game series Mass Effect and even the Time-Turner from the movie Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. LEGO implementation: The idea of this model is to set gimbals in motion. Complex transmission allows each of the three motors to independently operate one of the three rings. Therefore the contraption is very easy to control. The rings and the frame are perfectly rigid and secure. The design of the model is intentionally minimalistic so that it could be used as a part of larger models. Video demonstration: Simple version: There is also a simplified version of the model with only two rotating rings and one motor. It may be also actuated by hand. Video demonstration and speed test of this version: Afterword: If you like this idea, please support my project on LEGO Ideas and share it with your friends! Thank you for your attention!
  24. The classic 1967 Ford Eleanor GT500 was a fearsome beast in its day, with a 428 cubic inch big block rippling the pavement courtesy of an astounding 355 horsepower. It's also the car made famous as "Eleanor," Steve McQueen's awesome ride in the original 1974 movie Gone In Sixty Seconds. With so much heritage to this classic car, I knew this build had to reflect that hardcore stance and styling everyone grew to love. 1967 Eleanor Mustang- let’s drive by lachlan cameron, on Flickr In an attempt to stay true to the mechanics and design, I began with the classic live axle rear suspension and an inboard suspension style in the front with Ackerman steering and torsion bar. 1967 Eleanor Mustang- Chrome engine block, gold pistons, red chrome wheels - by lachlan cameron, on Flickr I threw my new red chrome rims on the car just for a quick photo with lots of bling :) 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr The car also sports front and rear headlights, motorized hood and trunk, 2 XL motors for drive, 1 servo motor for steering, 2 Buwizz batteries in the trunk, a chrome V8 engine block with gold pistons, working fan and blower, snap back doors. 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr I did try to follow the shape of the car closely, as you can see in the overlay below: 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr After so many new challenges on this car I'm fairly satisfied with the outcome. So sit back, grab a cuppa and check the video! And as always - a huge thanks to my brother @DugaldIC , @KD123 & @technic_addict for their support throughout this build.
  25. Hello everyone, I made this pick-up almost two months ago (before I joined Eurobricks) and I would really like to hear your thoughts about it. It is 50 studs long, 28 studs wide, 15 studs high and weighs 1285g. Motorized and remotely controlled - 2L motors (driving), stereo motor (steering), 8878 battery, V2 IR receiver. Front tires from 8070 supercar, rear from 42000 Grand Prix Racer. Working V8 fake engine with some details to make it resemble real V8 engine, connected directly to the driving motors - works at the same speed no matter what gear you choose (in neutral also). Suicide doors with working door handles, Rear doors and roof window can be opened. Fake fuel tank and chrome stripes in the cargo area. Power is transmitted to the rear wheels through 4 gears manual gearbox. Leaf spring suspension with height-adjustable rear (manual with levers in the cargo area). Working turn signals (front and rear) - connected to a servo motor via coupled PF switches. Working steering wheel. Other details and functions that I would like to point out: Retractable license plate (simple manual mechanism). Lights (front and rear) manually controlled with a lever behind steering wheel - connected to a speed dial of 8878 battery (on/off and low/high beam). Working radiator fan, connected directly to a V8 engine. Video of functions: Video of driving outdoors (added 14 August 2014): More photos can be found at: MOCpages - http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/391803 Flickr - https://www.flickr.c...57645075634267/ I hope you`ll like it…