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Found 68 results

  1. Zerobricks

    [WIP] Ute supercar

    I decided to start a new supercar project and after lots of thinkign decided to make an ute just because nobody else made one yet AFAIK. For those who don't know what an ute is, it's when a pickup and a normal or sports car really like each other and end up having a child like this: For this project I set myself the following goals: Unibody construction - The model will have no chassis per-se, the body will be load carrying, something @nicjasno is really good at. Convertible - If you have a sports pickup, why not make it a convertible? This will also force me to make the unibody extremely solid, since there wont be any roof support. Motorized with gearbox - I am using a new high efficiency gearbox idea. Power will be delivered by 4 PF trains motors Realistic suspension - High-gearing solid axle in the back and McPherson suspnsnion in the front Here's the current progress: The gearbox has a total of 4 gears. Wave pieces are used to switch between them. Here's a more detailed view of the setup. As you can see, I used a tilted axle for the overdrive gear: Since the wave selector pieces can't cope with high torque, the gearbox is designed to work with high speed and low torque. That is why it will be powered by the fastest currently available motors - 4 PF train motors spinning at over 2000 RPM generating around 10Ncm of torque. The rear axle is an inverted portal design. It' made to be low as possible so that the bed can be placed nice and low. The axle has a total of 1:12 gear ratio in order to get useful torque from the fast spinning gearbox. Double 24 tooth gears are used in final drive because I expect the car to be quite heavy. So that's the basic idea for now. I will update the topic as I build.
  2. Here is my take on the motorization of the 42110. Basically the whole model was lifted to accomodate the bigger wheel, motors and BuWizzes. Model is powered by a total of 8 motors, 4L motors for RWD, 2L motors for FWD, one servo and one M motor. Total gear ratio is 1:3. It uses custom portal hubs in the front which have a pivot even closer than normal ones thanks to the new rims. Rear uses normal hubs and wheels, since they are sturdier. Axles use the original suspension's upper arms as mounting points along with a pair of 9L links for each axle. The original gearbox is connected to the rear drive, so it works normally. Steering is also connected to the original links, so steerign wheel and HOG also turn when steering Winch is motorized using an M motor. Video coming soon.
  3. From my young age I wanted to built some contraption that would allow me to run down cars, marbles etc. Along the way I get familiar with Lego 7 mm ribbed hoses, however they slow down the cart quite a lot and were not useful for the purpose. Then a few years later I've seen Zerobricks with his idea for the track (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SydmBuTPnKo). A few years later guys from Brickride (http://www.brickride.com/) created their fully functional Roller Coaster so I gave it a try. I started about two year ago and in a couple of months I had some ideas: https://www.bricksafe.com/files/teflon/roller-coaster/Roller Coaster 01.mp4 ... and the majority of track ready to go: The idea was to have a gigantic tower on one side so track would go up on one side, then do slow 180°turn an fall into the abyss with complete loop at the bottom. However the tower was not very stable so I had to change to an A configuration The new tower was about 170 cm high and reasonable stable. After some testing I had a fully functional track with one looping, a 270° + 180° horizontal turns and even track going tough the opening of the looping (sorry for lousy picture, I have no other:-/) Then I started with motorized lift. I used Brickride's idea - chain in a ditch: The propulsion at the curve at the bottom was served with side wheels with synchronized drive (matching the curve of the track with the curve of the drive was a hard task): Here is the detail, where side wheels are pushing the cart to the chain: Ant the top part also needed some clever chain tricks: At least two L motors were needed to power the thing due to its size and some friction. However, all this effort just produced very good lift but managed to mess-up my track. Like Heisenberg principle - either track was working or the lift but not both at the same time. At the time a lot of my pins started to brake and replacing them cause almost a chain reaction, since some force is needed to dismantle the track. Due to that, I even shorten the track to have as little problem with pins as possible. After months of more or less serious attacks on the issue, I realized it's just to big to work properly (with a motor). I guess my support is just not up to the task and I just have to admire Brickride's. In the mean time, we have seen the Lego answer and it's nice enough. Some more pictures of my failed project: Looping: Through the support: And panoramic view: Please note massive girder to support the track. That was my last idea out of desperation to make this track stabilized. I have failed miserably. Well, the lessons learned: Bricks are stubborn, technic ones even more so. More engineering is usually not a solution Building with bricks is not all fun and games There is no such thing as too much pins More pictures here: https://www.bricksafe.com/pages/teflon/roller-coaster
  4. I have always wanted the original 4757 Hogwarts Castle because it had a clock and a pendulum! I found its clock works to be a GREAT mystery until I could look into its instruction manual! Lego was so gracious to create the new Clock Tower and release it! I loved it very much. However, a great feature was missing: the pendulum! I decided to make minimal modifications for adding a pendulum and even motorizing it! My Clock Tower's clock work would not be a GREAT mystery because I made a video which showed how I built it!
  5. Hi! I'm glad to present my motorized modification of 42094 set. It has six remote controlled functions with two S-bricks. Here is exemplary part list: And here is short review and functions demonstration: Photos in high resolution: https://www.flickr.com/photos/141718063@N06/albums/72157705982003774 Thanks for watching!
  6. Hi everyone, I would like to present my latest creation to you: A lego technic helicopter inspired by the Eurocopter EC135, in particular the police version. The eurocopter is an iconic helicopter which is widely used by police, fire and ambulance services and for executive transport worldwide. In fact I see these fly over my city almost every day The model presented here is not a very identical copy of the real machine, because I always like to be a bit free with the styling. As a matter of fact this model is in the end more of a display model than something to play with. When I started this project I aimed for a relatively small and compact package with some PF comonents inside and A goodlooking bodywork. I think I found the right ballance between panels flex axles and connectors. - Dimensions: 47x13x22 Studs -Weight: 750 g -Rotor span: 47 studs -White and Dark Azure collor scheme -easy accessible PF AAA battery box -Motorized main rotor and tail rotor powered by a PF M motor -Clutch gears for safety -Tiltable rotor blades powered by a PF M motor -Controlled using a standard PF remote controller Designing the tail (rotor) was probaly the biggest nightmare of this model. All the curved shapes and angles made it very hard to put it together. On top of that, a driven axle had to be placed inside as well. The solotion regarding the tail rotor I came up with was to use a rubber band. I tried using gears as well but it turned out too bulky and very ugly. Another challenge was the Dark Azure collor scheme. Not many parts are available in this collor so that was a huge limitation as well, but in the end it looks much better then most other collors would on this model. And at last a shot together with my Audi RS1 which, despite being built in different scales, look very nice on the shelf next to each other. Also special thanks to everyone here on the forum who helped me with the design on my WIP topic. I won't make instructions for this model, but for my current WIP I will. Comments, feedback and questions are as usual highly appreciated!
  7. The origins of the idea: The core of this model consists of three rings which can independently rotate around three perpendicular axes. These pivoted rings are called gimbals. Gimbals have been used in a wide variety of engineering applications since ancient times till modern days. Gimbal suspension is used to provide stability to objects inside unstable environment, e.g. compasses on ships and gyroscopes on planes. Furthermore, the simplicity and effectiveness of gimbals often attracted artists' attention. In science fiction and fantasy, gimbals have been used to represent complex contraptions capable of creating new physical effects and even manipulating the very fabric of reality. Some of the examples include the machine from the 1997 movie Contact, the gravity drive from the movie Event Horizon, mass relays from the video game series Mass Effect and even the Time-Turner from the movie Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. LEGO implementation: The idea of this model is to set gimbals in motion. Complex transmission allows each of the three motors to independently operate one of the three rings. Therefore the contraption is very easy to control. The rings and the frame are perfectly rigid and secure. The design of the model is intentionally minimalistic so that it could be used as a part of larger models. Video demonstration: Simple version: There is also a simplified version of the model with only two rotating rings and one motor. It may be also actuated by hand. Video demonstration and speed test of this version: Afterword: If you like this idea, please support my project on LEGO Ideas and share it with your friends! Thank you for your attention!
  8. The classic 1967 Ford Eleanor GT500 was a fearsome beast in its day, with a 428 cubic inch big block rippling the pavement courtesy of an astounding 355 horsepower. It's also the car made famous as "Eleanor," Steve McQueen's awesome ride in the original 1974 movie Gone In Sixty Seconds. With so much heritage to this classic car, I knew this build had to reflect that hardcore stance and styling everyone grew to love. 1967 Eleanor Mustang- let’s drive by lachlan cameron, on Flickr In an attempt to stay true to the mechanics and design, I began with the classic live axle rear suspension and an inboard suspension style in the front with Ackerman steering and torsion bar. 1967 Eleanor Mustang- Chrome engine block, gold pistons, red chrome wheels - by lachlan cameron, on Flickr I threw my new red chrome rims on the car just for a quick photo with lots of bling :) 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr The car also sports front and rear headlights, motorized hood and trunk, 2 XL motors for drive, 1 servo motor for steering, 2 Buwizz batteries in the trunk, a chrome V8 engine block with gold pistons, working fan and blower, snap back doors. 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr I did try to follow the shape of the car closely, as you can see in the overlay below: 1967 Eleanor Mustang by lachlan cameron, on Flickr After so many new challenges on this car I'm fairly satisfied with the outcome. So sit back, grab a cuppa and check the video! And as always - a huge thanks to my brother @DugaldIC , @KD123 & @technic_addict for their support throughout this build.
  9. Hello everyone, I made this pick-up almost two months ago (before I joined Eurobricks) and I would really like to hear your thoughts about it. It is 50 studs long, 28 studs wide, 15 studs high and weighs 1285g. Motorized and remotely controlled - 2L motors (driving), stereo motor (steering), 8878 battery, V2 IR receiver. Front tires from 8070 supercar, rear from 42000 Grand Prix Racer. Working V8 fake engine with some details to make it resemble real V8 engine, connected directly to the driving motors - works at the same speed no matter what gear you choose (in neutral also). Suicide doors with working door handles, Rear doors and roof window can be opened. Fake fuel tank and chrome stripes in the cargo area. Power is transmitted to the rear wheels through 4 gears manual gearbox. Leaf spring suspension with height-adjustable rear (manual with levers in the cargo area). Working turn signals (front and rear) - connected to a servo motor via coupled PF switches. Working steering wheel. Other details and functions that I would like to point out: Retractable license plate (simple manual mechanism). Lights (front and rear) manually controlled with a lever behind steering wheel - connected to a speed dial of 8878 battery (on/off and low/high beam). Working radiator fan, connected directly to a V8 engine. Video of functions: Video of driving outdoors (added 14 August 2014): More photos can be found at: MOCpages - http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/391803 Flickr - https://www.flickr.c...57645075634267/ I hope you`ll like it…
  10. Hi everyone, Here's my modification of 8416, fully motorized and remote controlled. An additional function is the working & tilting steering wheel. The PF elements used are: - 1 M-motor for driving - 1 Servo motor for steering - 1 M-motor for lifting - 1 M-motor for tilting the lifting assembly. - 2 IR receivers - 1 Rechargeable battery box Rebrickable: http://rebrickable.com/mocs/Chilekesh/8416-fork-lift-motorized-rc Bricksafe: http://bricksafe.com/pages/Chilekesh/8416-motorized (*.lxf file can be downloaded here). Any suggestions on improvements are very welcome. Happy building!
  11. Jan-'17 Now, building instruction file (PDF) is available at Rebrickable linked below http://www.rebrickable.com/mocs/Modoro/motorized-42056-porsche-911-gt3-rs-version-11 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hi.. everyone! This my 2nd posting here, introducing my own renovation(or remodeling) of TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS. Among the newly released 2016 Lego models, "TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS" received the best attention before release. In addition to its nice and detailed appearance, now I attempt to review the process of blowing features including RC driving and 4-speed gearbox shifting, and LED lights as well. The video above shows the process of remodeling TECHNIC 42056 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS and a driving test in the following order. The process of remodeling each part of PORSCHE chassis Driving and steering test of the remodeled PORSCHE chassis The process of binding the renovated chassis to the PORSCHE body Field driving test The main target of this RC remodeling is just a chassis (or power-train) that is composed of front/rear axis, power transmission and steering units. The following figure compares the before and after appearance of the renovated PORSCHE chassis. <Before> <After> The changes and features of the renovated PORSCHE chassis are as follows Mounted drive motors (L-motor x 4) Mounted a steering motor (S-motor x 1) Modified gear shifting method not using the paddle shift remodeling of the 4-speed sequential gearbox for enhanced durability and power transmission efficiency Mounted PF battery (optionally, two batteries) Mounted two SBRICKs for the remote control capability While including all of the above modifications, it maintains the design and major features of the original 42056 model. (rear fake engine room, Hand of God, glove box, toolbox under the hood etc.) This review is divided into a total of 9 sections, and the following videos illustrate the building progress of each section, respectively. part 1: chassis frame remodeling In this section, the main contents of RC motorizing 42056 PORSCHE chassis is largely divided into three sub-parts and will be described as follows . 1) reinforcement of chassis regidity A dictionary meaning of chassis frame is defined as "the frame plus the "running gear" like engine, transmission, drive shaft, differential, and suspension" In the original 42056 model implementing the real PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS in LEGO model, a chassis is composed to support the body, transmissions, front and rear axis, engine etc. By the way, LEGO designers did not consider the RC driving from the stage of planning the TECHNIC 42056 model. Thus the chassis regidity, weakened by adding driving & steering motors, gear-shifting motors and battery boxes, cannot maintain the body shape of its own secure and inhibits the stable driving performance. In order to reinforce the chassis regidity that is more weakened by removing liftarms to mount 4 driving L-motors under the gear-box, 42056 chassis core is newly configured using a total of thress TECHNIC 5x11 liftarms. 2) provision of driving motor mounting space 4 driving L-motors are mounted under the gear box between the driver and front passenger. 3) provision of gear-shifting axle mounting space In the original 42056 model, The transmission and drive shaft axis are designed in the form perpendicular to each other. According to this design, gear shifting can be done accurately, smoothly and sequentially from 1st speed to 4th speed. However in the driving test progress, it turned out that thress 24-toothed bevel gears in driving pathways can not deliver high torque & power to the rear axle and differential gears. Thus, to remove three bevel gears in the pathway of the remodeled 42056 chassis, gear shifting axle is heightened by 3L and driving shaft is connected right to the 4-speed transmissions. part 2: 4-speed sequential gearbox remodeling part 3: control units for the RC gear shifting part 4: driving motors mounting part 5: dashboard remodeling part 6: front/rear axis remodeling part 7: rear engine room remodeling part 8: assembly process of the renovated PORSCHE chassis part 9: binding the renovated chassis to the body of PORSCHE These are all I prepared for the review of the motorized 42056 PORSCHE model. Thanks for reading & watching (-;
  12. Hello all! There's a thread called "parts wear" which deals with such things as discoloration of bricks over time and tire deformation, but that's not quite what I was looking for. This one, as the title suggests, is geared towards motorized technic creations... Many people who build complex technic things and love their motors know that ABS plastic on plastic doesn't make for the best bearing in the world, often resulting in extensive deformation and/or failure of parts, or the creation of "dust" from a once-useful axle under load. Fast mechanisms, even under little to no load, also like to disintegrate very quickly... What building techniques (or even slightly non-vanilla tricks) do others use to keep their models going, or at least keep the parts usable once the model comes apart? Happy Building! I got some wheel hubs (left) a few weeks ago because they look like they can handle heavy vehicles much better than standard axle-in-pinhole hub designs (right). I don't know if there's any real advantage to using them, but it seems like the greater surface area plus a drop of oil or something would make them far better at holding up in the long run versus just an axle in a hole
  13. If you remember those little clockwork robots, which used to be toys and are now prized collection articles, than you will surely recognize my representation! I've been working on this for some time now and I'm proud to say that this robot walks as well as the real thing! It uses two pullback motors, a couple cogs (gears) and 623 LEGO elements to achieve (I only hope you agree ) both good looks and great functionality. The mechanism with the incorporated motors is made to fit exactly into the case and the case comes off all in one piece (I like my modularity). The mechanism for the legs is the most simple thing ever but making it was as complicated as any of my larger MOCs, because balance played such a vital role in all of it. You can still see it wobble as it walks (I find the wobble quite indearing though ) and a lot of work went into keeping it from falling when it does. I like to think this is my best work yet, so I hope you like it just as much enjoy!!! My Flickr gallery
  14. Hello everyone! we want to share with you our new weekly video on the channel! It is a fully motorized steampunk inspired moc. To build it, it took about 70,000 pieces. The builder is the friend of Dario Tiezzi. Hope you like it!! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB2Ks_69diJsB1LcMlqONvA?sub_confirmation=1
  15. Hello to everyone. I'd like to present a new project. I'm building an Underground Mining Loader. The idea came to me two years ago when Lego released the set Mine Loader (42049). By the time, I was expecting this to be the flagship model (1H) of that year, but it turned out to be a medium-size model. So I built my own. I took parts mainly from my Volvo Loader (42030) and built a version with a much lower profile. The result was ugly but functional. It's being on a corner getting dust. A couple of weeks ago I took this Moc apart and I'm rebuilding it from scratch. I'm not showing the "original" because it's really ugly. I hope I can make a decent model, something between good-looking and functional. Although most of the ideas come from the previous Moc, the "improved version" it's proving to be a difficult job. I think it would take a couple of weeks to finish the improved version. Here're some pictures from the first part. I'm happy with the results. I think 1/5 of the job is done. Disclaimer: I'm not trying to replicate a specific machine, but I have taken inspiration from the Caterpillar portfolio Thank you for your time. ****Pictures of the final model**** Lateral access to motor. For maintenance purposes, I guess. Hardly noticeable IR receivers ;) Easy access to motor. Cabin with chair and control panel. No floor. Easy access to battery and cables. You can also accommodate the rechargeable battery.
  16. Count Sepulchure

    A turkey that loved turkey

    Hello, everyone! The turkey body piece. What does one use it for? I came up with a character using only 4 pieces. Mr. Reykut is pleased to meet you! He is already greasy in anticipation of what's to come! And he sure loves turkey! "Follow me, for we shall head for the kitchen!!" "Welcome to my place, do make yourselves comfortable." "The star of today's show - the turkey!!" "Man am I going to enjoy this... I added some extra grease today!" "Please don't mind me, housekeeping ain't doing itself, you know..." "I always say that the floor should be as shiny as a freshly-roasted turkey..." "About time to turn it over. I can smell the juicy meat" "Let's grill this turkey for good!!!!!" "Yeeeaaaahhh, baby!!" And now - for some proper action!! "Nothing beats a large greasy turkey! Gravy is for wimps, enjoy the meat!!" "Shall we go for some more?" Thank you for your attention! x)
  17. Count Sepulchure

    [9v MOC] CMF vig: March Harriet

    Hello everyone! What kind of ideas pop into your head when you hear of a "cmf 8x8 vignette contest"? Mind you, I eventually thought of Micromotor, 9V, Fiber Optics and a matching figure capable of delivering the goods (hint: it did). Here's what came out of that idea... Just a dance club, folks! Nothing to see here, carry on... It is fairly tall for a vig, but it certainly works give the space restrictions. The dim lights were a pain to film in my setting, although I tried my best. The show must go on, no excuses allowed! And no regrets for that matter. Welcome the Catwoman from the Batman Movie franchise! Double the fun!! Some technical shots. The old 9V system is invaluable for how smoothly it integrates into Lego System. Fitting the fiber optics element into 8x8 was one hell of a task. At times I felt like a car thief on a job... The floor, oh, the floor! Don't even ask. Some bits and pieces. The pole absolutely had to be chrome - a choice afterwards regretted... I dare you to find a sound, functional and purist solution of proper length if you don't believe me. A rubber wheel was the only option of attaching the piece as far as my knowledge of pieces goes. ...And the heat goes on... Now that's a club I wouldn't at all mind visiting... Hope you had a great time here, be sure to visit soon! And something tells me you might just do that... Thanks for your attention! Let me know if you had as much fun as I did! x)
  18. genISD

    Motorizing 7715 with 810

    Hello This is my first post here. I got 7715 from my childhood and just recently by a luck I got complete 810 motorizatioon set which can be used with 7715, according to instruction sheet. However I have no idea how to put battery box from 810. It's almost 7 studs wide (6 studs plus half a stud on every side - battery box thicker cover. I think I must build additinal train car from this battery box but grey is not so good looking. Have you ever tried using this approach?
  19. I'm happy to present to you my first modular building. I have put it on Ideas too, so if you like it, please support: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/106103. edit: It is now available on Rebrickable Some time ago my daughter got this Duplo set from her aunt: http://brickset.com/...ative-Ice-Cream That got me thinking I could use one of these cones for my own purposes, especially since my little one was very interested in throwing bricks across the room, instead of proper play (or maybe that was proper play ;) ). Anyway I borrowed four bricks from her (I honestly intend to give those back to her) and thought it would be nice to make a big advert out of this ice cream and make it rotate. Such an Ice Cream Parlor should have nice clientele drawn by this big sign of what's inside :) So power functions was a must. But since I was to integrate PF info a modular, why not go further and add some lights too? When I was young (long time ago...) I always liked things that moved and had lights :P so you can call it late compensation :P Later on I will present it module by module, but if you want to have a quick look at it in action, here's a video: Ok, so let's start with a view of all the modules separately: And now let's talk about the ground floor: As you can see, on the right there is the ice cream parlor with seating available inside and at the back of the building. You can buy ice cream, lemonade, donuts and coffee. The staff is taken from the Ice Cream Machine set :) I'm happy with the bench - it gave me some headache, but I wanted to have something distinctive. The lamp is also different to typical one, but it's nothing special. On the left there is an entrance to the owner's apartment. There is also a small storage room for bike. The top of it is removable for easier access, but you can get the bike in and out through the door (but it's tricky). Ok, now - the heart of the modular - the Power Functions module: All electronic components are here. That is: 1 Rechargeable battery 2 switches 3 sets of PF lights (so 6 sources of lights total) 1 M motor Of course apart from that there are also all the technic components to make it work. The motor is running the Duplo brick with a 1:9 reduction. The lights are provided for the ice cream parlor (4 of them), entrance to the staircase (1) and the apartment (1 for the table lamp seen above). My idea was to be able to control lights and motor separately, that's why I have 2 switches here. Look closely at the picture above. There are two holes for technic axles above. The one on the left is for access to the switch controlling the motor (advert). The hole on the right allows access to the switch controlling all the lights. Those go on/off simultaneously. You can't have just part of them on. That would require even more switches and there is simply no room for that. It's crammed inside already. Now, have a look at the bottom of this module where all the lights can be seen and the front of this module, which allows access to the rechargeable battery in case you need to recharge it (power cord access). Through the holes in the front section you can turn the battery on/off and change the voltage too. Now, the last two modules are the roof and the apartment of the owner. It's not much room inside - the advert required quite some space already, but it's cosy :P As you have seen already this apartment get light from the lamp on the table, which is actually part of the Power Functions module. Yes, I know the TV is kind of useless on that wall, but... hey, he wanted a TV so I gave him one :P So, how do you operate this thing? With a KEY :) and last, but not least - two pictures of it with lights on, and ambient lights off: Full gallery is available on my Bicksafe: http://www.bricksafe...ce_Cream_Parlor I hope you enjoyed this little presentation. Please consider support on Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/106103
  20. Hi! I was very impressed by new 42054 set so I’ve decided to motorize it. The chassis was completely replaced but the body is the same like in the official set. There are four motorized functions in my model: AWD, front and rear steering and cab rotation. Also I’ve added electric PTO for outer RC attachments. I plan to create new rig in the near future. Let’s see my MOD in action: A few photos: New transmission: BB switch as in original set: Electric PTO: Thanks for watching! I hope you like it :)
  21. jaffrry

    AT-TE

    HI, This is AT-TE With Motorized & Lights,hope you like.
  22. tkel86

    Swing Ride

    A Swing Ride, one of the most popular ride in the world. It use chains for the chairs like the real one. Inside the central support there is a xl motor that rotate and incline the top circular support. Then the centrifugal force do the rest of the movements. You can see it working here:
  23. Hi! Two years ago, I did a motorizable cherry picker for a contest on the french forum TechLUG. So, I used the comments I had, and I decided to : - Use a more little scale - Better proportions - I did a better cab. In the first MOC, it was too heavy because of the battery box inside it. - The first cherry picker was motorizable by a M motor ; this one is only motorized, more simple and efficient. To summararise : Better proportions (I hope ^^) Only motorized I use inverted gearboxes for : - Outriggers - Arm - Turn table And the manual functions : - The steering (of course) - Extension of the arm So, here's the result: The simplest function is the steering. But there is the L motor over it. So, I used three 16t gears to turn the wheels directly by their axle of rotation. And now, the gearbox. It's an inverted gearbox : the "out gears" turn in the opposite sense. So, when you invert the position of the driving ring, you invert the rotation of a function. Here are screenshots: The outriggers can up the truck: the wheels don't touch the floor. To finish, the arm. It has a triple deformable quadrilateral. I needed so much time to do it, but it's nice to see in action. And the video :
  24. Hello everyone. This is my very first motorized lego vehicle. I'm wondering if somebody could help me to improve all the mechanisms. The vehicle has front steering (this technique requires less space between wheels and mudguards). It's powered by two motors (PF L and PF Servo). I would like to know if there is a way to implement a differential gear. I'm also looking for the best steering technique. I would appreciate any ideas.
  25. Hello, I would like to motorized my set - Lego Technic 42037 vers. B PF RC or A. Which parts I need and/or which briks I need to motorized my set? Is there any video to show (step by step) how to do it? Thanks for any help