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Found 170 results

  1. Remember: Little engines CAN do big things! Run Lady! He's right behind you! Builders note on the following models: These two engines were my most beloved thing to watch in childhood up until the Polar Express movie came out to displace it in 2004. I loved to play with my wooden railway models, and would have thought I'd have died and gone to heaven if I'd had the Lego models described below when I was little, around the time the movie came out when I was 6 or 7 in 2000 / 2001. So, in short, look on, younger Murdoch17 and gasp at what you've been able to accomplish with the help of many others and quite a few years of knowledge and learning. I still am a passive Thomas fan, BTW, (my collection of books is still around somewhere!) but everything after the switch from the models to CGI turns me off., so I haven't watched the show in 10 years, just in case anyone is wondering. Oh, and the Polar Express models by @SavaTheAggie were what inspired me to get this serious into LEGO trains in 2011 or so, so I've come full circle - from Thomas to Polar Express from the movies, then from Polar Express and back to Thomas the long way round via LEGO. Here is Lady the steam loco and her train consisting of two (custom) coaches Victoria and Elton, driven by Burnett Stone and Mrs Conductor. They travel between the worlds of Sodor, our world (circa the year 2000), and many other rail-gateways, to bring the vital magic gold-dust, paying passengers and small amounts of cargo to their respective destinations in the multiverse. It's a difficult and dangerous job (especially with Diesel 10 on the prowl) , but somebody's gotta do it. This model was originally Hunter Dobbs steam locomotive and is based off of "Lady" from Thomas And the Magic Railroad (you know, the 2000 Thomas And Friends film that sadly, flopped horribly.) I redid the boiler using @ScotNick design from the BR Class 9F 2-10-0. Here is a link to Hunterdobbs' original engine. Fictional background (from Thomas and friends wiki) for this engine, as seen in the Magic Railroad movie. (Also, the figure in the cab of the engine is a representation of Burnett Stone, caretaker and driver of Lady, as played by Peter Fonda in the 2000 movie.) Lady once came to the Island of Sodor a long time ago, when she was found by Diesel 10, an evil diesel engine who wanted to destroy her. Lady and Burnett Stone both ran away from Diesel 10, but during the chase, Burnett used up all her coal and made her go too fast, causing Diesel 10 to catch up and crash her. Lady was taken back to Muffle Mountain and stored inside Burnett's workshop, where he spent years desperately trying to restore her to working order, but he did not have the right coal to make her steam. Years later, Lady was still out of service, and without her, the Magic Railroad began to lose its magic. That all changed when Lily, Burnett's granddaughter, and Thomas brought a truck of coal from Sodor to Muffle Mountain, which proved to be the correct coal necessary to make her steam. Lady came back to life and returned to Sodor, where she was once again chased by Diesel 10. Lady, Burnett and Thomas successfully managed to escape Diesel 10, and she gave the Conductor Family the Gold Dust they needed. As a side note, while watching Thomas and the Magic Railroad as a kid back in the early 2000's, I always wondered how it was supposed to be a technical railroad if Lady (the magic steam engine who powered and ran the warp-gate railway) had no coaches for people to sit in. She had a station on Sodor, and one on in the real world in the form of her owner's workshop, (as explained in the movie) but where were the coaches she most likely used to deposit people at these points? Well, now there are two brand-new coaches ready for service! The rear of the loco, with the red headlamp. These cars have been named Victoria and Elton. These names were chosen for several reasons, but mostly for these facts: Victoria was because of when Lady was supposedly built (in the 1890's) in "Thomas and Friends" canon and that is who was Queen at that time. Elton because I was listening to a good Elton John song ("This train don't stop here anymore") and decided then and there he was going to model the second car. So, we have a stuffy, quiet-loving type coach of the late 1800's, and a flamboyant, lovable, with a passion for singing out load coach from the 1890's, but with the heart and soul of Elton John. Oh, and they are both painted bright magenta to match Lady, who is still driven by Burnett Stone, but conducted by a female version of the Mr. Conductor character from the Magic Railroad film. Burnett Stone (Played by Peter Fonda in the 2000 movie) and Mrs Conductor (played by a actress as yet unknown... fill in your favorite one!) This 6 wide BR "Warship"class with hydraulic claw (AKA Diesel 10) model has been heavily modified by me from a old Class 37 file by LazarusBricks to have new removable roof sections for the cabs with seats for figures and cab controls. As you can see, I chose to leave off the face to keep the engine more in line with the rest of my locomotives. The rear of the locomotive. This in-universe background info is from the Thomas and friends wiki and concerns the events of The Magic Railroad movie (though he is still in the TV show to date, unlike his opposite number, Lady the magic steam engine): Diesel 10 once visited the Island of Sodor a long time ago, and caused trouble for the steam engines while he was there. During his visit, he found Lady, the engine responsible for keeping Sodor alive, and chased her, making her crash. Following the accident, Lady's caretaker, Burnett Stone, hid Lady in his workshop and tried to restore her, but failed to bring her back up to steam. Several years later, Diesel 10 came back to Sodor when the Fat Controller was on holiday, intending to destroy Lady forever. He was first seen by Thomas and Gordon when he raced past them at Killaban Station, and brought his two lapdogs, Splatter and Dodge, to the railway, who were present when he was scheming. He caused several problems for the steam engines, such as dumping sneezing powder around Tidmouth Sheds and later destroying the scaffolding that had been placed beside the shed. When Mr. Conductor travelled across Sodor to find the windmill, Diesel 10 found him and held him over the Big Dipper, intending to drop him. However, Mr. Conductor managed to escape by cutting one of the hydraulics hoses to his claw with a pair of wire cutters, causing him to fling Mr. Conductor across the island and to the windmill. Diesel 10 was later present at the Coaling Plant, where he was covered in coal when he was teaching Splatter and Dodge “how to stop being stupid”. After Junior flew in the air after riding the windmill's sails, he landed on Diesel 10's cab, who raced across the island and to the smelter's yard, where he tried to push James and Junior into the melting pit. Fortunately, Junior and James managed to escape by using the last of the former's gold dust. After Lady was brought back up into steam and returned to Sodor, Diesel 10 found her and began to chase her, Thomas and Burnett across the island, until they reached the viaduct, but not before Splatter and Dodge betrayed him. Lady, Burnett and Thomas managed to cross the viaduct safely while it was collapsing, but it had already done so by the time Diesel 10 came over it and he plunged into a barge of sludge below the bridge, and was sent away in disgrace. The roof of both front and rear facing cabs can bee removed to place figures in the driver's seats. The rooftop arm can raise and lower, and the claw itself and open and close. Here we see it in the raised and open position. (picture of Thomas and his coaches coming soon!) The front of Thomas is lacking a face, but I'm not concerned about that... I pretend he's sleeping when kids ask. The rear of the famous tank engine. There is a bit more inside details this time for his cab controls. The car on the left (Clarabel) is mostly passenger seating in the front three-quarters, with the guards compartment (and luggage storage) in the rear-most section. The other coach (Annie) is meant for passenger seating only. (Yes, Annie and Clarabel are missing their wheels. The parts are on order to fix that!) Have any Thoughts, Comments, or Questions? All are welcome here!
  2. DISCLAIMER: This steam locomotive featured below was heavily inspired by pictures of @SavaTheAggie's 4-4-0 from 2007, visible here. I added a tender inspired by another Sava loco (his 4-6-0, also from 2007) as seen here. I also made the front bogie actually connect to the front of the loco. (before, in the original design it was totally free-floating) I also made a few structural / style tweaks here and there, to make it "my own". My dad is getting this loco for his 65th birthday, as I wanted to make him something he would find relatable to his own collection of 1990's / early 2000's 9v era trains, of which he has most of what was released. This engine is meant to go with a few copies of 10015 - Passenger Wagon, and a single 10014 - Caboose will accompany this engine. The loco isn't motorized however, but it can be by removing the tender's wheels and adding in a 9v motor instead. Sadly, when I gave it to him I forgot to get pictures of the whole train together... this older picture will have to do until I can get a proper one taken. Thoughts?
  3. Of all shown below, credit is due to Zephyr1934, SavatheAggie, and TJJohn12 for making awesome models / instructions that helped me with this. Below you will see breakdowns of all these trains. Conjunction Junction, Katy Caboose, and 2-8-0 "Consolidation" This 2-8-0 engine pulls the Conjunction Jct. freight train along with Katy Caboose, who brings up the train's rear. In 2010, I bought instructions for @SavaTheAggie's "2-8-0 Consolidation" six-wide steam locomotive from Bricklink. I never really used them beyond learning techniques for useful building steam engines that could actually take curves - unlike my own late 2009 4-4-0 MOC that worked well only on straight track! You can see Sava's original 2-8-0 model here (in red / yellow with oil tender) at his new-ish online home for his awesome instructions. Both sets of instructions were dusted off recently, and I used the boiler design for this loco seen here. I had to shorten the engine to make it fit in a three and a half track space, otherwise the original cab and other items would be here. (Basically, all that remains from those instructions is the boiler.) The tender is smaller than the one Sava used, but it must fit inside the loco shed I'm building. The first two (NOT + THIS) are obviously Boxcars. The BUT tanker (most likely hauling Butane) and THAT boxcar. Next up, AND (which is possibly a refrigerated goods wagon) plus an OR (ore) hopper. Heavily inspired by a @zephyr1934 MOC of "Katy" from the classic children's book "The Caboose who got Loose" by ex-Disney animator Bill Peet. Zephyr's version can be seen here, from which mine was reverse-engineered via pictures. Emerald Express and 2-6-0 "Mogul" This 2-6-0 engine pulls my Emerald Express heavyweight passenger train. I had to change out the Pacific as the Sava-inspired 4-6-2 wouldn't fit in my train shed as it was too long for the stall. So, I slapped a new boiler (identical to the style used on the 4-6-2 Pacific) on my older set 7597-style 2-6-0 and thus this Sava-style 2-6-0 was created. As for the 2-8-0, I removed the walkways on that locomotive to make it better match the 2-6-0. The tender is the same one I used before on my newer 4-4-0's and 2-6-0's and is identical to the 2-8-0's as well.  This combination baggage and passenger car (known as a combine) relies heavily on techniques taken from the Disney Retlaw baggage car MOC instructions by @TJJohn12.  The two identical day coaches have inset doors I designed myself.  The observation car of the Emerald Express. The rear deck isn't the best, but it works using the parts available in dark green... a not too common color in some brick varieties! NOTES: Models completed as of 7/19/22. Thoughts?
  4. Hi all, since I read the very, very interesting thread about Torben Plagborg creations, I've been trying some new designs (some are just sketches, just to understand how things could work). Now, in this nice thread some nice 12v creations can be seen - but one captured my interest more than others. It's a little blue steamer with a black 12v motor. It seems pretty big, so I'd say it was an 8-wide experiment. In general, all the top shelves are very interesting. Starting from that little steamer, I began to think about a 12v locomotive in 8-wide. So I started designing another small steamer (I'd say a well known prototype): the great Deutsche Bundesbahn BR-80. 8-wide is not a common scale for me - I only tried it two times in my whole life, so it was a trial and error process. I tried to use parts that could have been available in the last 80s /first 90s - during the Phase II of the Gray Era and the advent of 9v era. And here it is...it recalls me a "fat" 7727/7730, with a touch of 7810... 8-wide gives some possibility also to work with odd number of studs (boiler is 5 studs wide instead of the classic 4-wide used in standard 12v steamers). I kept the standard cylinders, the ladders, rods, red buffers and magnets, which fit nicely an keep the 12v feeling alive. I used Some SNOT for the doors, using headlight bricks. Everything was already experimented at the time (e.g. the B-model wagon with horizontal sliding doors in 7735 instructions). Right side is quite symmetrical to the left one, apart some details. 12v motor looks nice, now that the body is correctly larger. Weights can sit on top of the motor - but the model could already be sufficiently heavy to have some decent traction and pulling power. I think adding lights won't be a problem nowadays, but for sure at the time (80s/90s) it could have been an additional challenge ! But...there are some issues that must be noted: The buffers overhang is quite...massive - and this SURELY will create problems with 12v switches, since the buffers will collide with the switching electric mechanism. Coupling wagons on R40 curves could be impossible...since this BR80 is longer than any other 12v locomotive or wagon not based on bogies chassis. Weight of a complete train could be excessive for the poor 12v motors. I think it has been a very fun experiment, a real "12v+" MOC...but being realistic - in my opinion it's too limited by the motor, wheels size...and 12v track geometry itself . Maybe, with 3d printed 12v wheels and a PF-based motor it could work on PF flexible track - but it would then loose 90% of its "vintage" appeal. I'd classify it as "Virtual Shelf Queen" ! Ciao! Davide
  5. Toxic43

    MOC: Power Tank Engine!

    Stupid name, I know. It wasn't intended to stick, but here we are... This MOC started out as a chassis test and grew from there. I was trying to build as compact a steam based driveline as possible, similar to my Powered Up Shunter from a while back. While that was the smallest I felt I could go with a Diesel (using strictly LEGO parts and legal techniques only) this was kind of the same exercise but with a steam locomotive. Obviously I couldn't hide a battery box in the loco anywhere, so I made a tender. Not prototypical, I know, but this isn't based on anything in particular. It's fantasy for a fictional railway that doesn't really even exist outside of a couple of locos with the WFLR initials on them! That being said, here is my design process so far. Power Tank Engine MOC on Imgur. Sorry for the whole external host thing. Maybe I'll modify the post once I get time to manually resize all the images and embed them from the Imgur links. For now, the external link will have to do. Sorry! I may convert this into a proper tank engine at some point with a coal bunker on the back and a boxcar for the battery box, but I'm pretty happy with it for now.
  6. This railway engine shed was mostly inspired by user @lightningtiger, who designed the basic Technic frame on his own smaller shed for his town in 2018, and I ran with the technique to create this wooden western-style steam locomotive shed. It is also slightly inspired by by the shed used to store the replica Union Pacific "119" and Central Pacific "Jupiter" 4-4-0 steam locomotive's over at the Golden Spike National Historic Park. (link is to Wikipedia article on the site) located at Promontory Summit, Utah. The shed is 3 1/2 tracks long with a total of 56 studs from back wall to the leading edge of the baseplate. (I ordered 3D printed half-track segments for the model, which aren't in LDD. The model shown uses a full length straight instead, and is thus much longer than it will actually be when finished.) The building also features a cow skull on the front between the locomotive stalls, just to give it that Wild West flair. The roof of the shed is not removable, but it can fold open a bit on clips on either side. The model neatly fits both 4-4-0's I recently made that were inspired by 7597. (These loco's also are heavily inspired by 119 and Jupiter, in case you couldn't tell!) The rear of the shed features a personnel door for workers. Up on the roof, you may have noticed those round black things: they are the vents for smoke and soot from steam engines to exit the building. Slight update to train shed as of 7/14/22: The 3D printed half-track pieces I bought didn't want to attach to the baseplate properly, so they have been removed. Also, the 8x16 bricks were hitting the side-rods of the steam locomotives, so they were replaced with a multitude of 6x8 plates to lower the platform to a height where they wouldn't collide. ...And that's all I have done for now. More real world WIP pictures will comes as soon as possible. As usual, comments, complaints, and suggestions on this model welcome!
  7. zephyr1934

    [MOC] Daylight to Brickworld

    I will be taking the Daylight to Brickworld... [to be continued] [album on flickr]
  8. The look of this train was partially inspired by several 4.5v and 12v-era sets, such 7715 / 7818 for the color scheme and 7740 along with it's supplemental sets 7815 and 7819 for the general look of the coaches. Some parts of this train (the coaches) have already been built from about five years back, while the loco is still a WIP for now. This steam locomotive was slightly inspired by the Rhodesia Railways "15th class" that was used in what is now Zimbabwe. This 4-6-4+4-6-4 Garratt type was 74-units strong and was built by Beyer-Peacock and Company starting in 1940, and after WWII from 1947 to 1952 in seven total batches. You can read more about this specific loco class on Wikipedia. My LEGO MOC version is 'fueled' by oil, whereas the real-world 15th class was coal fired. This is one of the reasons why I said it was "inspired by" and not an exact duplicate of a 15th class. However, the front unit does features a prototypical streamlined casing, and the rear unit partially does too. This LEGO model can take some serious curves (much more than what's shown above!), but that's what you get for building a Garratt: it's one of this type of locomotive's strengths. This picture just shows off the articulation points of my MOC, but technically it could split a switch* and still work just fine with the front engine on one track and rear unit on a second one! *NOTE: Don't try that with a real-world steam loco! The doors on the cab of the loco are supposed to be the 1980's ones with blue print on the lower half. Another missing print is on the oil tank hatches, while number / letter tiles go on the front and rear units. (The front unit gets the numbers, while the rear section gets the letters saying LLR, which stands for LegoLand Railroad.) This baggage / passenger car is called a combine which is short for "combination". All the doors can open on this train, even the sliding ones shown here. The three passenger coaches are identical in every way. The observation car, the rear-most coach on the train, features a platform for sight seeing. The steam loco is still being parted out using pieces from the previous streamlined electric engine and from parts from my collection. Until it's done this is a WIP thread, but suggestions / comments / questions are always welcome no matter the project stage. Drop your thoughts below!
  9. (Built and designed for my father, not for me) The Disneyland engines with consists in order from Left to Right: 4-4-0 "C.K. Holliday" (engine 1) from 1955 pulling the my semi-fictionalized version of the Retlaw 2 freight train 4-4-0 "E.P. Ripley" (engine 2) also from '55 is pulling the post-1971 fictionalized Retlaw 1 passenger train 2-4-4 "Fred Gurley" (engine 3) started service in 1958 and is pulling the Holliday Blue excursion train 2-4-0 "Ernest S. Marsh" (engine 4) began service in 1959. Most of the 4-4-0 models use 9v motors, as my father has that system as his preferred train propulsion type... and GatewayLUG uses the 9v style-track / motors too, so it makes it runnable at shows. The Fred Gurley is not able to be powered this way, sadly. C.K. Holliday 4-4-0 and Retlaw 2 freight train There were two trains at Disneyland opening day in 1955, and these were the Retlaw series. Retlaw 1 was the passenger train which was pulled by E.P. Ripley and consisted of one baggage, four passenger cars, and the observation car. Five of which are no longer used or were sold. (but the observation car is still used - as the Lilly Belle parlor car as seen in the official set) Retlaw 2 was the freight train, pulled by the engine as shown above - C.K. Holliday - and consisted of three cattle cars and three gondolas, plus the caboose. As you may have noticed, I chose to only use two cattle cars from that train, and no low-side gondolas... There are no pictures of those as far as I can tell before the freight cars were all converted into another train type, the same as are in LEGO set 71044. The tanker car and coal hopper are my own invention. The two cattle cars. The two doors on each side of the identical cattle cars fold down. The roof sections come of now as well. As you can see, no seats are inside these cars as there were none installed in Retlaw 2 on opening day 1955! The two gondolas have been shortened from the original versions on the original Retlaw 2, but they are pretty close to it in looks! The caboose. I made up this car, as I couldn't get the real four-world axle caboose to look good in LEGO. The caboose has a removable roof too. E.P. Ripley 4-4-0 and Retlaw 1 passenger train (fictional post-'71 rebuild) Retlaw 1 was the passenger train which consisted of one baggage, four passenger cars, and the observation car, which were pulled by E.P. Ripley on opening day in 1955. Five of which are no longer used or were sold. (but the observation car is still used - as the Lilly Belle parlor car as seen in the official set) However, in this fictional revised version of the train, this retirement didn't happen, though they were modified to suit side-seating. The real Retlaw 1 was originally a yellow painted train, featuring front facing seats until it was mostly retired in 1971. The observation car of Retlaw 1 then became a parlor car known as the Lilly Belle after Walt Disney's wife Lillian. This fictionalized train is in the revised, post-1971 color scheme of the Lilly Belle, (which is in set 71044) and also has two passenger cars plus a baggage car with opening side doors. These cars all have side facing seats, as if Retlaw 1 were around and used in modified format after the 1971 overhaul of the Lilly Belle. As a side note, each of the cars feature a removable wall for getting at the inside details, as in set 71044. My revised version of @TJJohn12's MOC of the Disneyland number 2 steam loco. I made it using parts ordered by my father, but it's still missing the 9v motor in this picture. As you can see, the loco is mainly dark blue, as it swapped colors with the originally dark green real-world engine. This is because the C. K. Holliday model in the Disney train Lego set is also color swapped, from what should be dark blue to dark green. So, basically, Lego used bits from both engines for the set, and we continued this trend here. The baggage car features two sliding doors in red, though other colors are an option to stand out more. (I prefer black doors, but that's not prototypical!) The side wall comes off, as it does on all the cars, to reveal seating. In this car, that means luggage room and two seats. The two coaches are identical in every way, and are also quite similar to the parlor car at first glance. The inside features side seating, as in the Disneyland park... this also allows for easier moving of figures, and placing them in any of the five seats per car. This car is in the LEGO set 71044, but I thought you guys would like to see it alongside everything else. Fred Gurley 2-4-4 and Holliday Blue excursion train The Holiday Blue train was added in early1966 to replace the original Retlaw 1 passenger train which was going to be being pulled from service due to slow loading / unloading at stations. (It is also notable as the last consist added to the Disneyland Railroad.) Here it is being pulled by the Fred Gurley, also known as Disneyland number 3. Here is my Dad's (now finished IRL!) third Disneyland loco, to accompany the C.K. Holliday one in set 71044 and the E.P. Ripley MOC I just finished for him: it mimics the real world Fred Gurley pretty well too. The real 2-4-4 loco has been at Disneyland since early March of 1958. This paint scheme isn't 100% accurate (black boiler / black domes are dark green / red here), but IT IS in line with the modification my Dad and I have already done to the other locomotives. The roof lifts up as normal for this series. This loco is one of my Dad's few unpowered engines, as it is impossible to fit a 9v motor underneath... or any motor block, really! The "Holiday Blue" car by themselves, with only tail-lights added to them. The Disney train my father bought has added three Bricklinked cars with some new cartoon passengers courtesy of "The Minifig Shop" LEGO resale store in Kirkwood, Missouri. Still need get the 4th car and the Lilly Belle car built from the actual set, and add the Star Wars characters to it and the empty one on the right. I should probably put Donald Duck as a he fireman as seen in the cartoon short 'Out of Scale" from the late 1950s. Ernest S. Marsh 2-4-0 Just to complete the first four locomotives from Disneyland, here is Ernest S. Marsh. It's a 2-4-0 based off the 1871 Denver & Rio Grande loco number 1, "Montezuma" and was readied for service at the California park for the first time in late April 1959. This LEGO version is also inspired by LEGO set 71044 for the two-axle tender, piston design, and general look of the engine, while the boiler design originally hails from set 7597. The tender is powered by a 9v motor, and weighed down for traction by a standard weight brick. Notes on the post and future additions: Real life pictures will be added whenever possible. Also, Disneyland RR Number 5 - Ward Kimball - is a relative newcomer to he park and is a 2-4-4 like the Fred Gurley. It would not be interesting to have two more identical locos on the roster, so it is not included, and as it arrived in 2005, it's not quite from for the time period my dad and I are attempting to model. (He is kind of not sure if he wants another loco after Fred Gurley, so the 2-4-0 steamer Ernest S. Marsh might not get built either!) Any questions, suggestions, or complaints? Let me know below! EDITED 8/26/21: added Fred Gurley (Disneyland number 3) steam loco's real world MOC pictures to this post!
  10. Today i would like to present you a steam powered machine shop like they used to exist before electric power was widespread. It includes a powered up medium motor hidden in the side building and a train hub for powering the line shaft and making everything move. But without further talking here are the pics: as you can see it is still in the wip phase but you get the idea here is a view of the inside. you can see the powered up motor + hub in the small side building. there is a steam engine, its boiler, the line shafts to transmit the rotary power throughout the entire shop,a drill press, a workbench table complete with a benchvise and a lathe. i am planning to add more tools like a vertical mill and/or a shaper to it. a closeup of the steam engine: it features a moving piston rod and crank/flywheel, a flyweight governour and the various oilers necessary to keep the engine running. a closeup of the drillpress: it also has an oiler to oil the bottom bearing and it features an arrangement of belts (not shown here) to get the power to the head of the drillpress to get the drill spinnnign a closeup of the lathe: this one was inspired by nwbricks on rebrickable but was modified to work and look like a belt driven lathe with its two pulleys for selecting different speeds for turning various diameters and the obligatory oilers that these early bearings needed to keep running smoothly. the build was heavily inspired by Dave Richards from youtube who has built himself a workshop just like back in the steam era days complete with various steam powered metal working machines. Hope you like my model(s)!
  11. Ever since buying my first copy of Toy Story 3 LEGO set 7597 in May / June 2010, I've wanted to make the steam engine in the set look more realistic. The lack of tender bothered me greatly, and so did a few other things I talk about below. I created my first steam loco MOC I could call my own from it's framework, but that failed hard to even make turns at all when built in real life. (I suspect R120 wouldn't even work with that model.) So, it was scrapped in 2012 after sitting around for two years despite my best attempts to get it working. The Lone Ranger sets came out the following year, and I forgot about the odd 7597 engine as years went by and my skills increased. Then, in July / August of this year, a decade after I bought the original copy, I saw set 7597 sitting complete in a window of my local LEGO resale store. It was purchased, and I started working on a design soon thereafter. Of course, the person who purchased it for me (It cost a bit) wouldn't let me get at it physically until November, but nonetheless, here is that design all polished up and ready to roll into your collection via the free LDD file you can find at the end of this post. The locomotive as it is in LDD upon opening the file, which you will find at the bottom of this post. Almost all the needed parts for this MOD are grouped in the file. Everything else should already be on the stock loco model from the set, though it will need to be mostly taken apart to allow you to rebuild it with my changes. if you are building the MOD from set 7597, there are only two printed 1 x 4 green bricks on the tender that should be printed like so. However, if you are building the loco from scratch, use four of the above parts, (two on tender, two on the loco) and one of these 2 x 2 red printed bricks for the number on the headlight. 99.8% of the parts needed for the conversion from the set are shown above. The printed parts are unprinted as shown, and the red wheels are shown, but not available from BrickLink. You will need need one of these custom wheel parts packs in red color (plus 4x part 2878 for holding said custom wheels) for the tender wheels from BrickTracks to complete the tender. Among my changes, I lowered the loco cab floor of my copy of 7597 (Western Train Chase) loco by a brick or so to compensate for the roof being a brick fewer height-wise and to better match the floor of the tender. This still allows for the taller 2010 Toy Story figures to still fit inside the loco cab, and also making for a smoother transition from train cars to steam engine. This change also made the left-to-right swiveling driving wheel section impossible to keep, (I didn't like it anyway!) and by extension the front bogie had to change too. Thus, the connection to the leading wheels from the driving wheels was changed to a 10194-syle design to allow for you to push the train on the track without derailing. I also never liked the awkward original piston design in 7597, so I changed it to have a more stable, non-floppy connection to the engine via a double Technic pin connector. Actual working cylinders connected to the new side rods will never be a thing on this engine due to the way the pistons are attached to the new moving front bogie instead of the boiler, but I can mimic the effect pretty well with the design I have here. You can find the LDD file here at my Bricksafe page for it. I haven't quite finished taking pictures of my version of the model, but this photo of it and it's sister loco (dark blue steamer NOT Included in file!) will do for now. Please note, the model shown has color changed side-rods and "pistons" due to parts I had on hand from my collection. It isn't quite like the LDD file because the parts in said file are cheaper when colored like they are. (Thought I'd save you guys a couple dollars / yen / rubles / euros, etc.) Plus, it makes my different than everybody else's! Thoughts?
  12. brick-builds

    [MOC] steam locomotive 0-10-0

    Hello, our latest moc train-base, we tried a 0-10-0 and it works fine in normal lego curves :
  13. Hello guys: today i would like to present you a small steam locomotive based on the ones used in industrial or logging settings in the early days of steam locomotives. it isnt based off of any real prototype, i just wanted to capture the look and feel of one of these locos. it features a moving piston that moves up and down as the locomotive moves. sadly it is not motorized as there was just no space to do so. Hope you like the model and happy new year to all of you!
  14. In this latest model series, I decided in order to keep the "toy like" proportions of it's inspirational genesis, set 71044. (Disney train) Now, people who know my design style are probably scratching there heads right now in confusion, as I don't EVER build in 8-wide for trains. But in order to make it look as good as possible with the original 2010 Toy Story figures and their stretched appendages, I had to do 8-wide. My current setup... minus a few things on the other table not shown. This scene will change, as the freight 4-4-0 needs revision on the tender, and the passenger 2-6-0 and it's train need heavy work done, as you will see! Loco Number 1 - 2-6-0 Mogul w/ passenger train This 1890's style train is to be pulled by my revised Western 2-6-0 steam loco, and will be made from my older three yellow train cars. These newer cars are four studs shorter, so I can fit a fourth car in the storage box with the extra space. Also, the sidewall closest to the camera comes off on all the cars so you can get at the inside details. The coal-burning straight stack-styled locomotive is a mish-mash of two steam locomotives, the 4-4-0 from the Toy Story 7597 set and a British 2-6-0 train model designed by Block Junction. I repainted the British engine into a Toy-ish color scheme, then added 8-wide late 1800's American-style features with printed parts from set 7597. Oh, and I built a brand new small size tender from the rails up, which uses new red wheels from BrickTracks.. The rear of the engine features a coal tender with a ladder from the water tank-top down to the magnetic coupler. This tender is smaller than before, as it looked very silly next to my 2-6-0 IRL, and even worse next to my blue Western 4-4-0, which currently has an exact copy of the earlier tender version as well. The baggage car features two sliding freight doors in red along with two non-functional passenger doors in black. The side wall comes off, as it does on all the cars, to reveal seating. In this car, that means lots of luggage room and two seats. The two coaches are identical in every way, and are also quite similar to the parlor car at first glance. The inside features side seating, as in LEGO set 71044's Lilly Belle car... this also allows for easier moving of figures, and placing them in any of the five seats per car. The observation car features a rear platform, plus a red drumhead ready for the train's logo. The inside is the same as the two coaches, with five seats. Loco Number 2 - 4-4-0 American w/ freight train This freight-hauling locomotive is meant to be built from sets 7597 (Western train Chase from Toy Story 3), 71044, (Disney Train and Station) and set 10014. (Caboose from the My Own Train series, albeit a bit bigger width-wise!) I also used set 10013 (Open Freight Wagon, also from My Own Train) as a guide for the pipe-carrying car, plus model 15 (Tanker) from set 10183, Hobby Trains for the tanker car. This loco shares the same tender as my other Western 8-wdie loco from this time period. The engine itself, however, is an enlarged version of 7597, in yellow and blue. It's also meant to have inside pistons as it's an early-to-mid 1860's locomotive. (thus the lack of visible pistons!) The locomotive is missing these printed parts. They are as follows: The four yellow 1 x 6 bricks are supposed to be printed with this number 2. while the headlamp is supposed to have two of these printed yellow 1 x 1 tiles. The firebox door requires this print. This boxcar is an enlarged to 8-wide and recolored boxcar from set 3677 (2011's Red Cargo Train). The printed doors (not shown) and from set 7597. (2011's Western Train Chase) The coal-filled 8-wide gondola was inspired by a sub model from set 10183. (2007's Hobby train) This water tanker is a version modified of set 2126's (Train Cars) design with newer reddish brown tanks instead of the vintage 1998 brown of the original model, and now in 8-wide. This model was built from instructions seen at the Old Workhorse's Lego Ideas page as seen here. (I am not affiliated with the creator of that page, I just used their free instructions, visible further down in the updates section, to build the traction engine seen here.) This car is a mashup of set 10013 (2001's Open Freight Wagon) and the bed area from set 60059. (2014's Logging Truck) This caboose was inspired by set 10014 (Caboose) except this versions is 8 wide and the main two colors are reversed. Loco Number 3 - 4-10-0 Super Mastodon w/ military train This entire eight-wide military transport train was inspired by sets 71044, 60052, 79106, and 79111. It is inspired by the 1975 film "Breakheart Pass", which features an US Army resupply train traveling to a Western frontier Fort under siege. This train also has a couple play features, such as a rotating Gatling gun, moving steam engine side rods, and a exploding jail car wall, among a few others. This engine is basically a stretched version of my Western 2-8-0, with another driving axle and a four wheel truck in front. The wheel diagram show which six wheels will be blind and which four will be have a flange. I've tried a similar (albeit reversed) setup on my UK 2-10-0, so I know the wheel arrangement works in it's basics, I'm just not sure how the magnetic coupler will like this new arrangement. (My 2-10-0 doesn't like having a magnet, so it's hard-connected to the tender by a lift-arm on that MOC.) I included the working pistons, and a more cohesive color scheme of red and green, with a splash of yellow as on the previous 2-8-0 steamer. Big Ben bricks' medium size wheels, 4 with flange and 6 blind, are meant to take the place of the gear wheels in the order shown above. You can buy them at his site here. The tender and cab walls are supposed to have four of this printed red 1 x 6 piece inserted into them: The front headlight is supposed to have two of this printed 1 x 1 placed on it. This horse car was originally a cattle car from set 60052, (2014 Cargo Train) but I've re-purposed it for my Army officer horses. These cannons are from set 79106 (Calvary Builder Set) and were placed on a generic two-axle flatcar for transport by rail. The rotating Gatling gun you see here was taken from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) This car has the basic "look" of the Lily Belle parlor car from 71044, (Disney train and station) but is less ornately furnished due to be a second-hand coach refurbished cheaply for use by the US Army of the 1880's. The right-side wall is removable for access to the inside. The jail / baggage car you see was originally from set 79111, (Constitution Train Chase) with the basic coach styling of set 71044. This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the jail cell via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. When pushed back towards the other end of the car, the lever on the left side pops the back wall out and the bad guys can escape! Also, the right-side wall is removable for access to the inside. Loco Number 4 - 2-8-0+0-8-2 Garratt w/ rotary snowplow train This blue train is marked (2-8-0+0-8-2 Garratt, for heavy duty rotary snow plow jobs) number 4, and joins the family of similar mid-1880's engines such as the large 2-8-0 for military transport, the inside-piston 4-4-0 for freight, and the fancy 4-6-0 for passengers. This 8-wide Garratt-type steam locomotive is perfect for use on the mountainous terrain of Colorado Rocky Mountains, with it's double steam locomotive pistons sets. (Before anyone says anything about Garratt loco's not being ever sold into the North American market, I'll say it's an lost experimental prototype to help with a motive power shortage. It may have been seen by the owner as a economical way of sending one locomotive to do the job of two.) This steam powered rotary snowplow was inspired by the real-world Denver and Rio Grande's narrow gauge plow "OY", as now seen on the Cumbres and Toltec RR in New Mexico / Colorado. I've decided to name my plow "YO" in tribute to my inspiration, using four of this part from the original Toy Story sets as a sort of marker. The rear of the plow features the coal tender. This 8-wide engine was originally a SRW locomotive works product, (made by Anthony Sava and formerly available on Bricklink until LEGO sadly removed most of his models.) I reworked the engine to have working pistons and side-rods plus a longer frame. This made it from 2-4-0+0-4-2 to a 2-8-0+0-8-2, among other smaller updates to the engine. I also substituted a Disney train-style boiler onto the engine to backdate it to the mid-1880's or so. Even with the added pistons, the engine can go around corners and switches quite easily. A simple caboose, for the snow plow train. I used a pair interesting windscreen parts for the cupola windows. Loco Number 5 - 0-6-0ST shop switcher Locomotive number 5 is an eight wide model of a generic 0-6-0 saddle tank steam engine from the later half of the 19th century, and was inspired by a @ScotNick build of Stanley from Thomas and Friends for the stripe work, and this build of Percy (also from Thomas) from the L Gauge site for the front of the boiler/ piston assembly. Here is the coal bunker / driving controls shot for this 8-wide yard goat. NOTE: The color scheme is red and yellow, though sadly here red looks pink. Loco Number 6 - 4-2-4T w/ RR office car I created a more realistic version of the 2016 Winter Village holiday train (set 10254) for all the train fans who didn't like the engine. I added working pistons, and more colorful (and less festive!) color scheme plus two more sets of fuel bunker-based wheels on the rear of the engine. The accompanying business car is for the WXYZ railroad president, and features a accessible interior, like the Disney Train (set 71044) it's modeled after. This private car has been given the name "Mount Clutchmore", after the tallest peak and highest point on the WXYZ line, at the tunnel under said mountain in Colorado. This locomotive is modeled after the unique C.P. Huntington of the Central Pacific railroad. The model will be numbered 6 for use on my Wild West railroad, and and features a (small) balloon stack, yellow and blue paint scheme, with red accents. This railroad office car is modeled after the dark red observation car as seen in the Disney Train LEGO set. It has been changed to a blue paint scheme, with red doors/ windows and brown trim, with a black roof. As the car has been stretched by four studs to fit the longer frame, there is more room inside. The Mount Clutchmore office car features three chairs, a table with drinks for investors / newspaper reporters, and a planter on a table at the rear-most end. Almost the whole wall is removable to get at these inside details. Loco Number 7 - Automotive Rail-Speeder The early '50's automotive rail-speeder is inspired by this fairly recent @hachiroku build here and by @Cale's pictures of Ma & Pa RR 101 as seen here. The vehicle is numbered "7", for use on the WXYZ Railroad, and rolls quite well on the track with no problems in stock switches or standard R40 curves. The rear has two coverings almost fully obscuring the rear wheels, in true retro style. This model is designed for track inspector's and high-up executive's to get up close and personal with the railroad. The roof is removable and the doors open, with seating for two figures side-by-side. Loco Number 8 - Galloping Goose (freight version) This Galloping Goose's front half was inspired by @hachiroku and his Indiana Jones staff car MOC, as seen here. The rear of Number 8, with all the doors open. Loco Number 9 - 2-4-0 Old English w/ silver ore and mine payroll train This very short train is based off set 7597, Toy Story 3's Western Train Chase, which my dad purchased for my birthday gift for later this year. I digitally converted the 4-4-0 "American" into a 2-4-0 "Old English" type which I then based off the real world 2-4-0 'Montezuma'. That 1871-vintage engine was the Denver & Rio Grande's first steamer. (which was the basis for the fourth Disneyland loco, the Ernest S. Marsh, by the way.) I had a real urge to name the LEGO version of the engine after Achu, the South-American tribal leader from the Adventurers' "Jungle" subtheme as a tribute to the real-world Montezuma engine and it's namesake Aztec leader. But I didn't think anyone would get the reference, so I didn't... at least not yet! The locomotive as it will be later in the year. I used the basic look of the Disney set 71044's engine for the two wheel tender, as it was too good an opportunity to pass up. (and it's accurate to the real engine it's based on, too!) I also managed to add working pistons, though quartering was not possible, sadly. The rear view of the engine, which will be numbered 9 in my numbering scheme for the Wild West-era W.X.Y. & Z. Railway. (This means it is replacing the 2-6-2 loco on the wanted list.) These three silver ore cars are taking their loads to the U.S. Mint in Denver to be made into coins. The mine payroll boxcar will feature dollars signs on the doors, as in the Toy Story 3 set. The caboose will have printed parts on the sides, saying "GREAT WEST". The inside with the roof removed. The Wichita Xenia Yazoo & Zephyrus Rail-Road (Stock market trade name WXYZRR) was a mid-19th / early 20th century enterprise also known as the Wasted, eXausted, Y bother & Z*. (*No one could figure out an insult to the railroad that started with the letter "Z") The railroad started in Wichita, Kansas in 1868, then went straight through Xenia, Oklahoma, while then meandering into Yazoo, Colorado and barely making it into Zephyrus, New Mexico by 1875. Other stations included several army forts dotted along the route through Oklahoma and Colorado, along with scattered mining camps and agricultural towns across the maps of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Kansas. The railroad is hardly mentioned anywhere in writings of journalists, except in scathing "letters to the editor" of various newspapers about lack of the promised service on the line in the early years. Also, the much derided company slogan "last railroad you'll ever need" did not work out well for the new railroad, but it did vastly increase questions fielded to the main office about coffin, headstone, and various other memorial shipments from all over the area from which the railroad served. It is therefore shocking the railroad lasted as long as it did, a substantial fifty-six years from incorporation in 1867, to it's sale at auction in 1923! The old WXY&Z railroad had about 35 locomotives on the books at the maximum, but most of these were already very old when purchased and broke down frequently so they were chronically in the workshop for some reason or another. In fact, the seven additional 4-4-0 locomotives purchased third-hand from engine dealers were of the long-obsolete inside-piston variety of the mid-1850's, yet were bought in the early 1870's! However, what the railroad lacked in regular service motive power, it made up for in the snow plow-train department. A single prototype of what would later be called a "Garratt" (a doubled-power-unit steam loco with a single boiler not normally found in North America) was first run on the "High Line" between Fort Legoredo, Colorado and Glencoe, New Mexico in the steep Rocky Mountains. This is where the railroad really shined, in keeping the trains running through steep mountain passes with a single experimental train with a rotary snowplow at the head end... of course, there were other plow trains, but only two rotary trains. (One would work from either end of the Glacier Gulch Pass, and meet in the middle on a passing siding. The Garrett would be on one train, and two regular locomotives pushing the other.) After 1923's closing of the railroad, it was bought wholesale by a consortium of stock brokers from Denver, with plans to redo the line with less sharp grades and more snow sheds. However, during this reconstruction, the 1929 Great Depression began, leaving half the line with old grades though most of Colorado mountains, but new grades on New Mexico were finished in time. The passenger car fleet was upgraded, but the freight engines (downgraded passenger power, really) and rotary plows remained vintage as far back as 1878 for motive power. The older inside-piston locomotives went for sale once the Depression really started up, and one was snapped up for a potential history museum in Glencoe, while the rest were scrapped. Then, a miracle happened: the movie industry intervened, and several production houses bought some of the oldest rolling stock, engines, and the line was given enough cash to stave off it's dismantlement until 1941, when trains of heavy munitions from companies on the line came rolling through for the War effort, making the line the busiest it had ever been. The profits from this, and the later 1950 / '60's movie companies use of the stunningly scenic "High Line" line for motion pictures saved the line. When the good times started to dim in the early 1970's, the railroad was jointly bought by the states of Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, & New Mexico for tourists, occasional movie trains, and the freight that still used the line, as the original stock broker consortium had by then been dissolved. The "new" WXYZ railroad, (the town names were shortened to just the initials for simplicity's sake) was thus founded in March 1st, 1971. It has been running, mostly non-stop and is closed during the three winter months of December, January, and February for running of the single remaining rotary snowplow to get the line ready for opening day on March 1st of every year since the early 1970's. (NOTES from the writer: Only Wichita (Kansas) and Xenia (Illinois) are real-world towns, with them being based in name ONLY on real places. Yazoo, for example, is really a river in the state of Mississippi, while Zehyrus was simply because I needed a "Z" name that sounded plausible, and the Colorado Zephyr train was on my mind at the time. The rest of the story is also fiction, as no Garratt ever rode the rails of North America.... ever. Also, the WXYZ logo is an old Union Pacific logo from the early 1910's, while the railroad name's initials have never been used ANYWHERE on a railroad in the USA.) EDITED 8/3/21: added screenshots of engine No. 9 and it's train. I still need to take real-life photos of the private car and 4-2-4T, and now the blue 4-4-0 and it's freight train require photos too.
  15. Hello everybody, my last construction project took me to Scotland. The Jacobite Steam Train still operates between Fort Willam and Maillag. Various steam locomotives are used for this train, e.g. the LNER class B1 No. 61264, the LNER class K1 No. 62005 (when I visited in 2005) or the LMS Class 5 "Black Five" No. 45231. They all serve as wagons of British Railroads Mk. I coaches. The classic British steam train passenger car par excellence. As a locomotive I chose the LMS Class 5 "45231". This promised a challenge as a Lego model: a conical boiler and angled cylinders. Exciting. The locomotive has 2 Lego PU motors as a drive. 1x in the locomotive on 2 of the 3 large main axles (BigBen XL wheels), 1x in the tender on 2 of the 3 tender axles (BigBen M wheels). Each engine has its own HUB. The locomotive is controlled via the Lego PU remote control. However, since the motors have to be operated with different power due to the different wheel diameters, a tablet / mobile phone with the Lego PowerUp APP is interposed between the remote control and the locomotive. The APP accepts the travel commands from the remote control and forwards them to the two HUBs in the locomotive. The lighting of the locomotive consists of self-soldered LEDs, connected to the Power UP HUB in the locomotive. A normal Lego Led for PowerUP is installed in the tender. The entire lighting is controlled via the handheld remote control and the APP. Forward travel: steady light at the front, optionally flashing light or off at the rear Reverse: front flashing light or off, rear continuous light The flashing is realized via the APP. Built from Lego parts with the following third-party parts: - BigBen wheels S, M, XL in new dark red - Linkage from the 3D printer - Lighting partly self-made - Self-made lettering / decoration But only a locomotive is no train.... The classic: British Railroads Mk. I passenger car. Built in the 50s in very large numbers and in many variants, these cars are still in use today on tourist trains and in collections / museums. The color "new dark red" was attractive and difficult at the same time. There aren't many windows and if you do you can't pay for them ... So I first looked for a solution for the windows: buildable, affordable and based on the model. In particular, the 4 small windows above are the mark I also found the variety of variants impressive and couldn't really decide which one to build. So I build all ;-) The cars are all built according to the same basic scheme and yet completely different. There are some with an open compartment (e.g. FO - First open) and some with individual compartments (e.g. SK - Second Corridor). I have 1st and 2nd class. 1st class has dark blue upholstery and a side table with a lamp. The 2nd class is more simply equipped. It was very interesting during the construction: the left / right sides of the car are often very different. E.g. In the case of the corridor cars, the doors are on the corridor side in line with a compartment door. In this way, in the event of war, the wounded could be pushed into the compartment on couches through the outer door. The bogies were of course important to me again: Model type Commonwealth: All cars are again equipped with ball bearings. The reason is simple: the cars are long and heavy, and weigh around 900-950 grams. Most cars can drive Lego R40 curves, only the two very long ones cannot. Since my locomotive also needs R104, I prefer to use the cars on large radii. The roof of all cars can be partially removed to insert figures. With the corridor car you need little fingers ^^ BR Mk. I 3093 Florence FO (First Open): An open 1st class car. 1st class cars typically had maiden names as proper names: BR Mk. I 4951 SO (Standard Open): An open 2nd class car with an open-plan compartment. In terms of construction, this car is longer for me than most of the others, this has to do with the spaces between the windows. All of the cars have the correct number of windows, but the wall between windows in 2nd class cars was smaller than in 1st class cars. It's hard to do with Lego. So I decided to use the length differences. BR Mk. I 1840 RMB (Restaurant Mini Buffet): A restaurant car with a small bar / kitchen for coffee / tea / snacks. In the fan area is the bar. To the left of the middle door is a small storage room. BR Mk. I 13320 FK (First Corridor) Anna: A 1st class carriage with a corridor and 7 individual compartments with 6 seats each. Ok, only 2 Lego figures per compartment because of excess width ... BR Mk. I 99035 BSK (Brake Second Corridor): A 2nd class carriage with a corridor and a brake / attendant compartment. It also serves as a luggage cart. This car belongs at the end of the train. In the case of "runaway" wagons (the wagons were torn off from the locomotive), the train attendant was able to recognize the situation via periscopes (the angles on the roof) and brake the wagons. This is why this car has the rear end for me. This is implemented as a flashing light and can be switched on inside. BR Mk. I 21266 CK (Composite Corridor): A corridor car with 1st and 2nd class. The car transitions are designed the same for all cars: The aim was: the smallest possible gaps when cornering: This is what the car transition looks like in an R104 curve: Enjoy: Thomas
  16. Hi all, during a pleasant discussion in this thread... ...a very interesting question was raised by @SDLgo9 member: The 7777 idea book pages mentioned here are those three pages showing the blue matter (!) unloading station and the famous auto-unloading wagons. These wagons are pulled by an obscure locomotive, which is never fully depicted. In fact - the front view is missing, and there's no clear view of the boiler. I've NEVER taken care of it, nor analyzed it too much. It really seems a 7730-based locomotive, but simplified in some details. There's a strange combination of "simple look" and now overpriced rare parts. So maybe it's simple - but it is a wanted effect? Analyzing the whole scenery depicted in the book - it's not a place for a fancy locomotive. There's work to do - wagons are fully loaded and heavy, so that unloading station surely needs a workhorse. And these workhorse is powerful, maybe not so good looking, but simple and solid, ready for its everyday duty. Here's a rear view, similar to the one in the Idea Book: It's a long locomotive and it's not using the classic train base (like 7810). It's pretty boxy and looks heavy. I had to take the scans from Brickfactory and to modify the photos to see a bit better. But which parts were used of the body is pretty unknown to me. So, we have the 2x2x1 black windows on the rear part - being a 7730 derivate - there are also doors, and at this point, the 1x2x1 small black windows. But it seems (to me) that these are not facing towards the front, and instead are used as small side windows. Side reservoirs are big, so fitting the two weight bricks was not a problem. The smoke stack is visible and there's not so much to say - but the boiler...is not completely visible. I added a square steam dome just for completeness. There's an headlight on top of boiler, and it seems there are also two headlights on the "nose". They are not fully visible, for this reason I think these are not placed on the corners of the chassis. Let's try: Simple and straight - the boiler is not round, but goes down to the chassis, same "steering wheel" as in the 7730. Headlights are a bit more inwards. All in all it's a simplified 7730 nose. Then, a more "Narrow Gauge" look - always with 7730 parts: There could be more styles, just removing the front steering wheel part and playing with slope parts. Suggestions are welcome!!! Davide
  17. I've been a long time lurker here and decided to finally bite the bullet and post. I don't know how tagging works or what the etiquette is for this site yet, so feel free to yell at me for that stuff it I miss something or whatever. Anyway I've been posting stuff on twitter and other places for a while now but I thought I would break the ice here finally. So here is my most recent build, its all digital for now until I have the funds to actually start building my models. But here is my Railway Series inspired Thomas the Tank Engine. 31.5 studs long buffer to buffer. he's a long boy, so the couplings swivel atm to make it around bends with rolling stock. currently I doubt they will work for pushing, but ill find a solution to that when I build the model physically. pulling should be fine. 15 stud wheelbase from the center of the wheels. (I know the middle isn't a blind in the images and that a physical build would require it) Fully motorized with a PF M motor and an IR receiver and powered by a normal 9v Battery with an adaptor wire. Full decorated cab interior. I've also done my best to make sure he's build out of parts that actually exist and actually physically buildable and legal. This model does have a single illegal technique, the hands holding the flex tube on the left side of the boiler.
  18. Welcome to Feel Good Island! This is your Captain DoubleBU speaking. Thank you for chosing Air "Feel Good Island" for your trip. We're ready for take-off in about 10 minutes, so please switch off your mobile phones and fasten your seat belts. During your flight with us you can experience and enjoy the following features: - Power Functions as well as (switchable) manual mode - Many rotating/moving elements - Detailed environment (with some Easter Eggs) for nice display - Also a stable and heavy structure for heavy play - Accessible battery box withoutdisassembling the whole island, completely hidden inside the structure - A landing mode, optionally with or without the specially designed tensegrity stand. - A tensegrity stand that very stably supports the island in a floating position but also allows you to easily pick it up for play. For further information please refer to our brochures "Feel Good Island" or "Tensegrity Stand" right in front of you. Thank you very much for your attention and I wish you a pleasant flight...!
  19. Rise Comics

    Silver Bullet

    This is an original creation of mine, and also one of my favorite MOCs. Though I referenced some real life streamliners, the design is wholly original. It is a streamlined Heavy Pacific locomotive, with its shape and silver accents garnering it the moniker of Silver Bullet. This MOC uses mostly vanilla parts in Bricklink Studio, aside from many of the silver parts, custom single studs used for lighting effects, and the XL wheels from Big Ben's Bricks. It also has fully modeled valve gear made entirely out of Technic, as well as an original design of corridor tender. Feel free to comment your thoughts and feedback, and lemme know what y'all want to see next.
  20. Rise Comics

    Rise Comics's trains

    So this is gonna be like my default thread for posting lego trains. Anyways, lemme start off by posting this double pacific Garratt, complete with railings, fully modeled valve gear, number plates, and full articulation Here's a side view with light effects
  21. It has been almost if not exactly or more than a year since I created the Z-6 challenger. I originally thought I could not improve it any further, but it turns out I was wrong in more ways than one. The model you see before you is a MASSIVE upgrade compared to the one I originally made. It features new trailing truck and tender bogies which have been needed to be worked on for quite some time. Those bogies that were once on the original model were both blocky and incomplete at the same time. The trailing truck is now more gradually sloped and the tender bogies now look like they were off the prototype. I also was able to number AND letter the locomotive where it represents an MTH version of the model (The MTH version of the locomotive was the source of my inspiration to constructing this behemoth and how I became a fan of this design). If you have noticed the display track the locomotive sits on, I bet you can guess what is going to become of it. But to leave no one on a cliffhanger, I will say that it will be going to the Lego Ideas website to become an actual product. If you wish to have this model on YOUR Lego train layout, be sure to support it. I will let you all know when it appears on the Lego Ideas website when I update this topic.
  22. There were two trains at Disneyland opening day in 1955, and these were the Retlaw series. Retlaw 1 was the passenger train which consisted of one baggage, four passenger cars, and the observation car. Five of which are no longer used or were sold. (but the observation car is still used - as the Lilly Belle parlor car as seen in the official set) However, in this fictional revised version of the train, this retirement didn't happen, though they were modified. (Also, Retlaw 1 was NOT normally pulled by the engine C.K. Holliday, instead, it was pulled by the E.P. Ripley. But I forgot about this fact when I digitally built it / took the pictures.) The real Retlaw 1 was originally a yellow painted train, featuring front facing seats until it was mostly retired in 1971. The observation car of Retlaw 1 then became a parlor car known as the Lilly Belle. (named after Walt Disney's wife Lillian) This fictionalized train is in the revised, post-1971 color scheme of the Lilly Belle also has two passenger cars plus a baggage car with opening side doors. These cars all have side facing seats, as if Retlaw 1 were around and used in modified format after the 1971 overhaul of the Retlaw 1 observation car into the Lilly Belle. As a side note, each of the cars feature a removable wall for getting at the inside details, as in set 71044. The baggage car features two sliding doors in red, though other colors are an option to stand out more. (I prefer black doors, but that's not prototypical!) The side wall comes off, as it does on all the cars, to reveal seating. In this car, that means luggage room and two seats. The two coaches are identical in every way, and are also quite similar to the parlor car at first glance. The inside features side seating, as in the Disneyland park... this also allows for easier moving of figures, and placing them in any of the five seats per car. This is the stock LEGO set 71044 version of the parlor car, but I thought you guys would like to see it alongside everything else. The inside of the Lilly Belle is different than the other cars, featuring a table, three seats, and a bunch of table-top items (I couldn't find the teacups in my program, or make the flower pot work, so they are missing here!) The rear of the whole train. This train was designed with my father and his trains in mind, though he doesn't want to build them in real life. (This explains the 9v motor hooked onto the tender, as that's his preferred system) Thus I'm going to give away the LDD file for them, which you can find it at on my Bricksafe page.
  23. Does you track need to be repaired after a major storm? Want to connect Point A to Point B with a brand new rail-line? Did the Flying Kipper have another accident on the main line? Or maybe you want to upgrade the signaling and double track the line at the same time? Call out the Maintenance Of Way (MOW) train to fix all these problems and more! This train consists of a late-1950's diesel locomotive, or a mid-1930's large eight-driving wheel steam engine and six specialty cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - a tanker car - workman's tool car - caboose The 4-8-4 steam loco is new-to-me, and began life as a 2-8-4 Berkshire type built by Plastic_Goth and purchased from Rebrickable a seen here. To make this steamer, I upped the wheel count of @Plastic_Goth's locomotive by another leading axle, making it into a 4-8-4 Northern-type from the original 2-8-4 as built in the instructions. The new piston / wheel assembly is entirely my own work, as is the completely new 7-wide tender. The inside of the cab features two gauges and the firebox door. This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by @SavaTheAggie, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. This car carries liquid weed killer for use after the track has been laid. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. (sadly, it seems his Flickr profile and pictures has been deleted) I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of prefabricated railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I turned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom doors open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. This old passenger car carries the workmen and their tools. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. If you like what you see in this topic, check out the home base of the train and assorted other vehicles in this thread here! Thoughts? Comments, Suggestions, & Complaints always welcome!
  24. This 7-wide steam loco began life as a 2-8-4 Berkshire type built by @Plastic_Goth and purchased from Rebrickable a seen here. This train features an 4-8-4 "Northern" -type steam engine that was purchased and modified a month ago from the link posted above. However, it still hasn't been bought parts-wise IRL. The coaches are just recolored and modified versions of my dark green / black Emerald Express cars, with the rear car having a rounded window instead of a open platform. I upped the wheel count by another leading axle, making it into a 4-8-4 Northern-type from the original 2-8-4 Berkshire. The pistons are entirely my own work, as is the 7-wide tender. I chose the Wabash Frisco and Pacific as the name of the owner of the engine, because the real world ride-on 12-inch gauge railway is re-opening soon (Yay!) and because I felt the shark-nose Baldwin diesel units (plus the passenger train as well) I made in a similar paint scheme could use some company. The coal tender will have the letters W-F-P on the side, standing for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, while the cab will feature the number 2980 on both sides. This is a scrambled homage to real world WFP 4-8-2 engine 928, which is so strong, it's pulled every piece of rolling stock the railroad owns -at one time- with ease! The inside of the cab features two gauges and the firebox door. This combination baggage and passenger car (known as a combine) relies heavily on techniques taken from Retlaw baggage car built by @TJJohn12, as seen here. The three identical coaches have inset doors I designed myself. The streamlined observation car of this train should feature two of these windows in white (which sadly aren't in LDD).
  25. The 0-6-0T (T standing for Tank) steam engine seen below was inspired by this English 0-4-0T shunting loco made by Block Junction. I made the loco look a bit more American and gave it a grayscale color scheme so it could be owned by my fictional version of the real-world Wabash Frisco & Pacific 12-inch gauge ride-on steam railroad. The loco gives me a 1920's commuter-engine feel, so I hooked it up to four, two-axle commuter cars which were created by using this tutorial made by @Pdaitabird here to build the coaches. I heavily modified the coaches by enclosing the entry doors area and adding inter-car connection doors. The loco is a 7-wide six wheel model, with (working!) outside pistons. Big Ben Bricks medium wheels will be used for the driving wheels, with two being blind, and the remaining number will be flanged. The engine will feature the letters WFP (standing for Wabash Frisco & Pacific) on the tank side, while 771 will go on the cab walls. The rear of the tank loco, showcasing the coal bunker and inside details. The four-wheel baggage car. The are two commuter coaches. The observation car, designed to give a little class to the workday commute with a rear platform at the rear of the train. This train will go alongside the shark-nose diesel loco with mainline passenger train and the (as yet unbuilt) 4-8-4 steam locomotive that will pull the Conjunction Junction freight train on my layout. What do you all think? Comments, Questions, and Complaints welcome!