• Announcements

    • Bonaparte

      Eurobricks Event 2018, Billund Denmark   12/09/17

      As 2018 is coming closer we have posted everything you need to know about our next Eurobricks Event. You can find all information and the sign-up topic in our event forum. Eurobricks Event 2018 - Information Topic

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'steam'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic, Mindstorms & Model Team
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 94 results

  1. Dear fellow LEGO enthusiasts, I am in dire need of some help from you folks who are definitely more knowledgeable than I. In this case, I am needing help with the replication of the RMS Titanic's Reciprocating Engines and Turbine. I am in the midst at the moment of working on the project below, though I have not updated it in a great while due to university work. See this link here for the project thread. But this is a minifig scale project, with every door, every window accounted for. This means that in regards to the engines, I am also seeking to make them at least somewhat true to scale and able to work as intended. Obviously this is a big job of some top notch Edwardian-era engineering, but I am hoping that there might be some out there not as technically-challenged (pun totally intended) as I am, willing to help me get this part of the project off the ground. Some of the features I I am looking for include a fully air-powered system, where the air supply would come from tanks hidden in the mock-boilers, that are then funneled at somewhat high pressure to the Triple Recip. Engines, which means that the pressure would go down as it goes through each cylinder (HP, IP, then two LPs). The leftover air at a much lower pressure then goes to a junction that can either go to the Parson's Turbine at what was historically 4 psi, or can go directly to the condensers. With the latter I intend just to make the outside of it and hide inside some custom compressors like this. That would then return to the original air supply. With this I am hoping that I will have a self-supplying system with ideally no more than 5% leakage, or enough compressors that leaks are compensated for. WIth the Parson's Turbine, that can be an accurate shell with whatever is needed inside to include a working turbine, and probably with an gearbox and ascending set of gear ratios to give it the necessary torque. These engines and turbine are meant to actually turn the propellers, perhaps even in water! Some other features would include a replica of the Brown-type reversing engine on the side of each of the Recip engines, making it so that the Stevenson-type eccentrics can change the direction of rotation. Considering the scale, the reversing engine doesn't technically have to be much more than a slightly-hidden piston that does the required job, but any more realism doesn't hurt. If something like this is possible, please let me know. I am really wanting to continue with this project, and this is a central part of it. But without the pieces in front of me instead of on a computer screen, what little I know of engineering definitely doesn't help without that tactile interaction. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your replies! If it is possible, then I can follow up with the intended dimensions. Here are some references for any that wants some: View of turbine and condensers through wall from main engines rotor shaft model of port-side recip. engine overall basic view path of the steam of original, pressurized air for mine
  2. Hi all, After finishing my first steam train MOC 6 months ago- the iconic Gresley streamliner 'Mallard', I was eager to get started on another engine. After digitally designing a large roster of engines to the same scale, I decided to stick with the classic LNER designs and build my own take on the iconic Flying Scotsman. The build has evolved slightly since the original design, but not by much. Below is the original render which included the bar along the and green tender wheels. The build began with laying out the wheelbase. This also matches the wheelbase of the Mallard MOC. Then, the tender- complete with all the power functions elements! The motor's proportions meant the tender has 3 wheels instead of the accurate 4. Note the clipped wheel cover on the front axle. It wasn't an easy decision but the details look so much neater because of it. The boiler was next, and after a swift bricklink order the pieces came together very nicely. Lastly, the wheels! I can't say I've seen any MOC's that have used Big Ben Brick's Green wheels before, but here they are, and they look fantastic. There is still plenty to work on, such as decals and working piston rods (that don't obscure the width of the build too much). Fr now though, I'm happy to call this finished. For now. EDIT: I recently made a Youtube video taking a closer look at the MOC, where it can also be seen in action. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the build, please feel free to leave a comment! I'll leave with a few more images of the build. - Isaac Info on the Mallard MOC can be found on this thread:
  3. While the winter train and station were taking form, done this little side job for my kid to play, got excited and forgot what I was building in first place... Oh, and "Catzilla" finished the big sets.. snowflake train 01 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr snowflake train 02 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr
  4. The Blue Comet

    I would like to present my latest modeling project, the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet. You can read all about this train in my Brick Model Railroader article. http://brickmodelrailroader.com/index.php/2017/10/26/a-tail-of-the-blue-comet-the-seashores-finest-train-in-lego/#comment-1172 Photos can be found on my Flickr page. https://www.flickr.com/photos/steampoweredbricks/albums/72157665457857519 Comet Train Set 01 by Cale Leiphart, on Flickr Comet Locomotive 01 by Cale Leiphart, on Flickr Comet Observation 03 by Cale Leiphart, on Flickr Cale
  5. The 4-10-4 (four leading, ten driving, four trailing) "Rainhill" wheel arrangement was so named after the Rainhill Trials of October 1829 in Rainhill, England of which the famous Rocket was the only entrant to complete the Trials. The Rainhill type was designed in 1927 and built in early 1928, though it was originally called the "Gigantic" type, but the planned Centenary of Steam celebration sealed the deal on the naming of the type. (Unfortunately, the plans for the potential celebration were postponed in July 1928 and finally cancelled one day before the Stock Market Crash of 1929.) The steam locomotive prototype of the 4-10-4 Rainhill type was painted a red and gray color-scheme with a black box on the tender and was sold by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928 to Brick Railway Systems, but due to teething troubles was nicknamed the Red Devil. The engine worked the trans-continental route on the "Spirit of the West" passenger train from New York to Los Angeles, with the Red Devil or one of it's type worked the portion west from St. Louis to Las Vegas. The original engine (Red Devil number 7597) worked this route from 1930 until being bumped to freight duties in early 1958. The engine then worked freights in diminishing numbers until being sidelined in 1966. The Red Devil was pulled out of the mothballs in 1973 for potential use on the 1976 American Bicentennial train but politics intervened and Texas and Pacific 2-10-4 number 610 got the job instead. After that, the engine's future looked bleak until the "Save the Red Devil" Committee was formed which raised enough money to restore the engine to working order by 1978 and has kept the engine in working order ever since until the Red Devil Incorporated moniker. The 28-stud-long tender should say "Brick Railways Systems" in printed 1 x 1 tiles on both left and right sides, while the cab should have 7957 in the same style of 1 x 1 tiles. The cab of the locomotive should have this print on the 2 x 2 slope brick. In reality, there was no 4-10-4 type of steam locomotive. It was strangely skipped over in the age of steam... none of this wheel arrangement were ever built. The name Devil was chosen because the 4-14-4 type of Soviet Russia was the closest analogy to my loco... except mine works fine, while the Russian one never did much as it spread the track, ruined switches and pulled the freight cars' couplings apart due to it's raw power. The second reason for the name is the other Red Devil, a heavily modified South African 4-8-4 engine with a gas producing combustion system and many modern improvements. That engine worked beautifully, but was sadly mothballed in 2003. Here is the LDD file for the steam loco, if anyone else wants to built it in real bricks like I am planning on doing early next year. Comments, Questions, Complaints, and Suggestions are always welcome!
  6. This steam locomotive is a 2-6-0+0-6-2 Double Mogul (Garratt-type) steam engine. This type of wheel configuration was built for use on railways in South America, Australia, Africa, and England in at least six different track gauges, according to Wikipedia. None were built for use in North America like my model is supposed to be, but I'm ignoring that fact. The engine I have made traces it's lineage to a model originally designed by Anthony Sava as a 4-6-0+0-6-4 but with fake pistons and with small-size friction bearing wheels. I added Big Ben Bricks medium flanged and blind driving wheels for use with the working pistons. The very inspirational original Sava engine is available for purchase in PDF instructions format at Mr. Sava's official Bricklink store here. Even with the added pistons, the engine easily can go around corners and switches quite easily. I did have to add two weight bricks for the pistons to grip the rails sufficiently to move instead of scrapping along the track like they were before. The engine also features a nicely decorated cab with plenty of printed tiles. (The letters BRS are the initials of my fictional railroad: Brick Railway Systems.) I got this picture from Google as an example of how close my LEGO Garratt engine is to the real deal. (I couldn't find a "real" picture of this specific type, but I know it exists according to Wikipedia. So this O gauge model of it will have to do...) As usual, I have a color-matched train in the works that this engine is to pull. To see the Maintenance of Way crane train's topic click this link. Please let me know if you have any comments, questions, suggestions or complaints. Thanks for looking at my model! EDIT 10/16/17: I edited the engine by extending the boiler four studs. The pictures have also been updated as well.
  7. To create this steampunk-like Adventurers vessel, I added six studs of length to the Destiny's Bounty (set 70618), removed the sails, lanterns, flags, plants and assorted details. I then put twin smokestacks on the deck, and dual paddle wheels amidships. I was inspired to do all this by this picture of a prototype of the Destiny's Bounty from the "Making of the Ninjago movie" book. (Pic courtesy of legozeba's Flickr page) The rear of the ship is supposed to feature "Deja Vu 2" in printed 1 x 1 tiles next to the telescope on the balcony. I'm still working on the inside details, which should hopefully have an engine room with boilers to power the paddles. I haven't thought up a backstory for this ship.... yet. (I'm still working on incorporating it into my Adventurers / Monster Fighters / Pharaoh's Quest / Alpha Team shared universe story-wise.) Any thoughts, ideas, criticism, or complaints are welcome, and are helpful in making the ship better, so please, post away!! EDIT 101/10/17: I just added restyled and enclosed ship's bridge with actual windows, plus a new name: Deja Vu 2. I bet you heard it somewhere before...
  8. NOTE to the MOD: First off, I am sorry if this is in the wrong place. I wasn't sure where to place it, as it is a model using both System and Technic parts / techniques. Please move this as you see fit, if you need to move it at all. I just finished turning an elongated and enlarged version of set 42064 (Ocean Explorer) into a Adventurers style tramp steamship I call the Great West. The lift-away roof and bridge sections come off easily for access to the inside, and all the cargo is removable / interchangeable. Here is the original model, set number 42064, Ocean Explorer. I stripped the deck clean of all play features and attached models to give me a good foundation for my modifications. I also got rid of the helicopter and submarine. This ship is missing a few parts such as one of this for the bow in red, and two of each of these parts for the ships name, the Great West. The ship's name plates are located on the front of the bridge and the rear of the ship. I made the ship a whole section taller and longer to make it more proportional at mini-figure scale. The ship also feature wheels on the bottom for rolling along the floor / table / whatever. The two inside sections are mostly empty, but the captain's quarters goes on the lower deck, and the command bridge on the higher level. I'm not sure what to put in the lower section, but the upper section is mostly done except for the missing chart table. Any thoughts? Technic-heads, Ship-builders and Adventuresome fellows please chime in, as I am seeking feedback on this model. The LDD file is available here. Comments, Questions & Complaints are always welcome!
  9. Hi all, I recently went on a bit of a designing spree during my holidays and thought I'd share the results. I've been developing these models at a slightly smaller scale than usual (Hence 6-wide), but it's been a fun challenge and one I would like to develop into more actual models if I have the time. I thought i'd share them all at once as I didn't want to clog the forum xD MALLARD (LNER A4 Class) The first design I did of this scale and the only model I have physically made. You'll notice that the boiler is different from the render as those arch blue pieces are horrendously expensive. If you are interested I go into more detail about it in this MOC video on my Youtube channel. FLYING SCOTSMAN (LNER A3 Class) Classic design to follow on from. The wheelbase is copied from my Mallard build, which forms the base for all my pacific class designs. TORNADO (BR Peppercorn A1 Class) Developed this by tweaking the Flying Scotsman build. I know of better ways to do the smoke deflectors, but unfortunately the parts weren't available on LDraw. GWR HALL CLASS I developed this for a friend's Hogwarts Express build, but also as a bit of fun. With a couple of tweaks this could always pass for a King or a Castle. LMS ROYAL SCOT CLASS I think the front of this engine could be different if the parts were available, and I wasn't able to do the wheel arches, but I'm happy with the tender and the shaping of the cab. SR KING ARTHUR CLASS I thought i'd try and to an engine from each of the major British steam companies. The obvious one for Southern was a Merchant Navy or West Country, but I've already done a lot of Pacific engines. BR STANDARD 4MT TANK The one major drawback is that it isn't motorised. I've been considering making a motorised carriage that would not only move un-motorised engines, but help the bigger motorised ones around the corners better. That, of course, comes with its own set of drawbacks. THE FLYING SAUSAGE (LNER 10000 - 'HUSH HUSH') I wasn't lying in the title, this is such a wonderfully absurd engine that I had to try it. my only major niggle is the colour scheme, but I suppose experimental engines are hardly worth sprucing up. I hope you've found these MOCs interesting, I'd love to hear any tips, comments or suggestions for future builds! I'm planning on building the Flying Scotsman before long, then maybe a set of coaches. -Isaac
  10. I was thinking of building a locomotive with a boiler that is 3 studs in diameter. Part #30360 fits the bill nicely, but I cannot think of a part that will fill the middle gap. Do you have any ideas on how to do that, or is there another part that is 3 studs in diameter that does the same job better? Fig. 1 Part 30360 was produced by The Lego Group between 1999 and 2012.
  11. Bilge Punk Pirate Mech

    Something I created last night in the studio. Honestly, I wanted to make a gritty, steam-punk inspired airship, mixing pieces parts from the Ninjago: Skybound 70603 Raid Zeppelin, 70601 Sky Shark, and Day of the departed 70592 Salvage M.E.C. All that I got from that was another pile of bricks. Also, a pilotable mech suit for Pirates. My inspiration was the Skeleton Mech that came with Ronin's Salvage M.E.C. Honestly, I wanted to make a diving suit for my LEGO CMF Series 8 Diver. After putting it together and taking it apart and rearranging the pieces so many times, I ultimately converted the Diving suit into a fully weaponized battle suit for the Brickbeard Pirates. Looking at the build, it looks like an extremely scaled down version of Kai's 70721 Fire Mech. Another source of inspiration, is Captain Metalbeard from the LEGO Movie. By far my favorite character, and set, from the entire thing. (I have made heavy modifications to stock Metalbeard from 70807 Metalbeard's Duel, as well as build from scratch with instructions, An Evil Robot variation of Metalbeard I've come to call Steelbeard. The foot on the left leg is the only thing I dislike about the entire build. It seems flimsy as it is supporting the entire thing, and consists of two bricks. I do like the grating on the angle piece, to make it look like a boot tread though. The major difference between this Moc, and traditional Steam Punk, is that this is more in line with the golden age of Piracy. Ergo, in lieu of a Steam Boiler, this battlesuit is fueled by Rum, grog, or anything else foul smelling that can burn in a boiler. Bilge Punk, if you would prefer to call it anything.
  12. Old West Steam Locomotive

    This project was my first After getting the horizon express (my awakening from the dark ages), tried to learn something using the lone ranger constitution train, and a file or two from Murdoch17 (whom I cant thank enough, for helping the newcomers like I was, with the lxf files available), and after some modding and a trick or two here is the never ending project of mine, soon some passenger wagons to be added, for now just the locomotive and tender in black and white, literally... rahzmocOldWestwip01 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr rahzmocOldWestwip02 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr rahzmocOldWestwip03 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr
  13. About blokbricks...

    I am just curious, how long does blokbricks take to ship to the us? Are they any good? I've been thinking about the class 99.
  14. Need some steam locomotive tips

    I just need some tips to build a steam loco. what parts would look good? also, would a single axle front truck, unflanged driver unflanged driver flanged driver unflanged driver config work?
  15. [MOC] 4-Stud Wide G.W.R. 47xx

    Hi guys. I'm quite new to Eurobricks and this is my first MOC. I'm from Britain so have done a quite recognisable Great Western Railway pannier tank. I've experimented with 2 liveries a British Rail black (post 1948) and GWR green (pre 1948) I have never used LDD that much so any hints are tips will be appreciated. Thanks
  16. "The Crash at Crater Canyon (part 1)" is a thrilling two-part episode of the 1950s / 60s TV series Woody's Roundup. In this episode, Jessie the yodeling cow-girl is knocked out by Prospector Stinky Pete, as she had discovered Pete's plans for Sheriff Woody and the town he protects via the mine tunnels under the town filled with dynamite and nitroglycerin, set to blow up high noon the next day to destroy the town in a giant sinkhole. Jessie is then placed unconscious on a steam loco which is uncoupled from it's train and sent hurtling uncontrollably through the wilderness to Crater Canyon, where it will meet the Cannonball passenger train on the bridge. (Thus destroying the only fast way to town and keeping Jessie out of the way for the town to explode with Woody saving Jessie and not in town to stop Pete's plan.) Naturally, Woody rides out on his horse (Bullseye) to save Jessie,who has at this point woken up and discovered the throttle lever missing and steam loco's brakes disconnected. This episode ends with this scene above: Jessie reaching for Bullseye and Woody while both trains are barreling towards each other and certain destruction, while the timer on the clock in town square ticks ever closer to noon. What happens in the next episode will never be known, as the show was pulled from the airways as the film office where the future episodes and unfinished scripts were kept burned to the ground, destroying all the un-aired episodes. It is assumed, though, that Woody rescues Jessie, stops the town from exploding, and jails Pete all before the credits roll. The real scene takes place on my Eads bridge with engines 2 and 3, plus the passenger train for the latter loco. The yellow steamer is not even finished: the side not shown is missing one wheel and moving piston and was carefully staged to hide this fact! The story behind the picture is 100% fake, as the Woody's Roundup only exists in Disney / Pixar "Toy Story" films. (specifically the second one) I tried using every to make the story sound believable for that era of TV it was set in, such at the middle 1950's to early 60s when Howdy Doody and Westerns in general were very popular. What do you guys think?
  17. L-motor Frames

    Hello fellow builders! I felt that it was finally time to share with you all something that I've been working on/ playing with for a while now: My L-Motor Frame. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr The concept for this project was to create a stable platform on which (primarily) steam engines could be produced with less motor& cable obstructions. L-Motor Block Types by Nick Jackson, on Flickr This would then allow the engine's body to be built relatively free of electrical components, or crammed with them in the case of tank engines. L-Motor Block Variants by Nick Jackson, on Flickr I think that the most interesting part of the frame is the fact that it is easily modifiable, and can essentially go from 2 to 7 axles! At the time of writing this however, I've only dared to go up to 4 axles for a related project. L-Motor Block Variants (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Hopefully these frames and their different gear ratios will inspire you to make a steam engine! Although, there are a great many European engines that are not steam, but employ connecting rods for their drive wheels. L-Frame with Medium-Large wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Lastly, here are some alternative wheel sizes that you may be interested in. These are made possible by the work of BigBen Bricks and @Shupp. The smallest feasible size would be the Medium-Large drivers by Shupp. These would need a bit of reworking from a standard L-Frame in order to clear switches and such. New Wheels!!! (2) by Nick Jackson, on Flickr Here, a set of XL wheels from BigBen fit nicely on a standard frame. L-Frame with XXL wheels by Nick Jackson, on Flickr And, by upgrading to the longer frame size, you could even accommodate 6 of Shupp's XXL wheels! Hopefully this post will benefit everyone, but moreso people who've had a difficult time getting into trains, and especially steam! Please, let me know your thoughts, and definitely share your ideas for a potential future build that might benefit from this design! Oh, and here's the link to the files: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9xAgBdzDImZaFFsM2lGVkdmcEk Thanks for reading, ~M_Slug357~
  18. This 2-6-2 Prairie type engine was inspired by the My Own Train series of 2001 and a boiler from set 79111 (Constitution Train Chase). The passenger coaches and baggage car were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The baggage car has two opening doors, two sliding panel-doors and an "exploding" back wall inspired by set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase). The whole train together. Here we can see the rear of the train with the back wall (and dynamite) still in place. (You may notice the baggage car is a modified version of the green Western jail car I already have built) The yellow 1 x 4 bricks used are actually supposed to be green printed bricks with this on them. The tender features a coal bunker, and water tank, plus a ladder at the rear for accesses to the passenger train. The cab features a firebox door (a 2 x 2 round tile) and two printed gauge tiles. The coaches were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The exploding baggage car was originally the Jail car from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) while gaining the styling of set 10015 (Passenger Wagon) and doors from 10194. (Emerald Night) This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the baggage compartment via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. (actually, the roof top lever knocks the wall loose) Then your train robbers can make off with whatever valuable are inside! As usual, the LDD file for the whole train is seen here while the loco and tender by themselves are here. Comments, Questions, Complaints, & Suggestions are always welcome. This train is on my to-do list, but won't be built for a while... maybe this summer?
  19. Durango & Silverton K-36

    Howdy! This is an update of a post I made earlier this year of a Durango & Silverton K-36 narrow gauge locomotive. I recently decided to submit this MOC to the Lego Ideas website as an effort to get Lego to produce more quality train sets. I shared my project with the good people at the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, and I have been blessed to receive their full support and endorsement of my efforts. I consider the D&SNGR to be the finest railroad experience in the country, if not the world. If you haven't had the good fortune to ride with them, do yourself a favor and make plans to go as soon as possible. You will not be disappointed. Check out their Facebook page for information about the railroad and a look at their endorsement of this MOC. https://www.facebook.com/DSNGRR/ If you are passionate about Lego trains, as I am, please visit the Lego Ideas website and show your support for this MOC. Help me convince Lego to make this dream a reality and immortalize the great D&SNGR with the world's greatest toy! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/161449 Back to the MOC. Let's start with the engine. I am not a fan of Lego Digital Designer, so all of my MOCs are built through a trial and error evolutionary process. This is the first picture I stopped to take of the locomotive. By this point, I had nailed down the frame, wheels, and the driving mechanism. I opted for including all the power functions elements in the locomotive rather than the tender. Working on hiding the power functions. Taking shape Experimenting with the stack and the headlight. Finalizing front end. On to the cab. Getting close. Power functions access from the top. The motor makes a nice firebox. A glimpse of how the wheels are powered. Done! Now for a look at the evolution of the passenger car. Finally settling on the SNOT technique for duplicating the look of wood panels and windows with depth. Placing a horizontal stripe in the middle of vertically striped plates was a fun challenge. I eventually found a way to suspend the upper non window portions from the ceiling. I really enjoyed building this car. All done! I didn't really take any pictures of the caboose process. I essentially used the same techniques from the passenger car. The inside is pretty ugly though, as I only had so many pieces available in this color of red. Now for a few shots of the train all together! How about a little scenery? From the good folks at the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad! I took the train to Brickfair in Birmingham, Alabama, and it won staff favorite! Kids loved the bear in the cave. Brickfair is a blast. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in Lego or anyone with kids.
  20. This 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine & it's six car freight train are hauling generic cargo on it's way to Anywhere, USA. This engine model was first built as a 2-8-2 Mikado (with running gear derived from Scotnick's 2-10-0 Decapod 9F) before having the front pony truck removed and a 4 wheel bogie from set 10194 (Emerald Night) added instead, turning it into a 4-8-0 Mastodon - type. The rear pony truck was removed as well, with the 79111-style boiler shortened and cab re-arranged. Together, these several different engines from four different eras and four separate builders come together to create this one 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine The coal tender was inspired by Anthony Sava's Pacific 4-6-2 model's oil tender with the letters "BRS" added in the middle of the tender using printed 1 x 1 tiles. I think the loco is much better proportioned to the tender now than before. In my fictional universe, the engine above pulls a generic mid-1900's freight train. This train consists of the following models: This drop side flat car was first part of set 2126 (Train Cars), but it didn't really have a purpose. It was hauling uprooted evergreen trees in the set, but that didn't look very good, so I changed it to generic freight. (My resident hobo usually catches a ride on this car.) This tanker car was inspired by set 7939 (Cargo Train, 2010 version) and by Anthony Sava's recent pick-a-brick MOC-up tanker car. (seen here.) I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build this boxcar (seen here ) They are made to haul generic freight, such as anything from unfinished car parts to prized paintings... and yes, the doors do open! Inspired by the green tractor trailer from CITY set 4204 (The Mine), this bathtub gondola is carrying boulders from the mine destined for the gold refinery where they will be opened up and the metal extracted to make coins and ingots. I have adapted this UK inspired model of a brake van by Fireglo450 (see it here ) to be a more American inspired caboose. The caboose has no interior, and the red marker light can go on either end of the model to represent the end of whatever train it is being hauled behind.
  21. The trains I'm going to show you use a lot of unique models to make this train setup possible, including sets 10254, 60052, 79106, 79111, and 10015 for the Army train, and 7597, 10014, and 10015 for the passenger train. (This is both a single MOC and several MODs at the same time.) These trains are also 100% build-able in real life... I haven't got the green one built, but the red one is 98% finished! They are done, so you can see them below! US 1870's MILITARY TRAIN & 4-2-4 STEAM LOCO Let's start with the newest train: the 4-2-4 and the US Army train. This is a more realistic version of set 10254 (Winter Village holiday train) for all the train fans who don't like the engine. I added working pistons, and a more cohesive color scheme plus two more sets of wheels on the engine. This is a tank engine, and as such does not have a tender. The rotating Gatling gun you see here was taken from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) This horse car was originally a cattle car from set 60052, (2014 Cargo Train) but I've re-purposed it for my Army officer horses. These cannons are from set 79106 (Calvary Builder Set) and were placed on a generic flatcar. for transport by rail. This coach was inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and features no interior. T The jail car you see was originally from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) while gaining the styling of set 10015. (Passenger Wagon) This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the jail cell via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. When pushed back towards the other end of the car, the rear wall pops out and the bad guys can escape! Here is the whole military train all put together. US 1870's PASSENGER TRAIN & 4-6-0 STEAM LOCO Next up, the modified passenger train which I have shown before on these forums, but has received a bit of a face-lift. This engine was originally modeled after set 7597 (Western Train Chase) with some design inspiration from TF Twitch's "Humble Sapphire" 4-4-0. The engine also features a boiler copied from set 79111 (Constitution Train Chase) to keep it inline with the rest of my steam locomotives. The rear of the loco features a ladder to the tender-top. These passenger cars were mostly inspired by set 10014 (Passenger wagon) but repainted red instead of green and with fancy part 30613 "Brick, Arch 3 x 6 x 5 Ornamented" on the end of the cars. I might be mistaken, but Ben Shuber may have been the one to inspire these coaches with his own red versions of set 10014. The end of my passenger train features this little four wheel caboose. It was designed after set 10015 (Caboose) with some features taken from set 7597 (Western Train Chase) Here is the whole passenger train all put together. US 1870's FREIGHT TRAIN & 4-4-0 STEAM LOCO Since I turned the red 4-4-0 into a 4-6-0, the slot has been opened up for another "American"-type. Thus, I created Yellow 4-4-0 number 2, to go along with red 4-6-0 number 3 and green 4-2-4 number 1. The engine is supposed to feature four of this part on the tender and cab walls where the green bricks are located: http://www.bricklink...09pb011#T=C&C=3 This log car was also designed by my brother, and is quite ingenious for using set 60059 (Logging Truck) but on a train base. The logs are floating place, as they would be resting on the bottom of the car in real life. It was quite a pain to position them into place as seen here. The flat car is heavily inspired by the one in set 3225 (Classic Train), except this version features two bogies unlike the original set. This vintage water tanker is a modified set 2126 (Train Cars) design with four wheels on the two bogies instead of two wheels stuck to the frame. Set 7597 was the original model for this boxcar, which has been made so the doors can't open.... though you can remove the handle on the side of the car and it will open fine. This caboose was inspired by set 10014 (Caboose), but my version lacks the top part of the caboose, which is traditionally called a cupola. Here is the whole train together. US 1870's LEGOREDO MODULAR TRAIN DEPOT This old railroad station was inspired by set 7594 (Woody's Roundup!) which I have named the Fort Legoredo passenger depot after the famous set number 6761. (Fort Legoredo) This railroad station was built in 1874 after the original station structure (built 1867) burned to the ground in late 1873. It was confusingly named Fort Legoredo at that time by the railroad in an attempt to persuade potential settlers that this land was protected by the army, when in fact the Federal government was planning on closing down the actual Fort Legoredo. (this plan was eventually gone through with, as the Fort ceased operations when it burned to the ground in 1885 and was not rebuilt) The station has since stood for 140+ years with only slight modifications, such as adding computer control systems to the upper floor in 1980 to control the switches and monitor train traffic to the still-active silver mines. The station also serves as the oldest building in the city and is featured heavily in tourism advertisements for the city and it's historical reproduction of the original Fort Legoredo. (the US Army base, that is) The station is modular, as the roof and second floor come off and the two side platforms come apart by means of Technic pins. This lower floor features two waiting rooms with a ticket office in-between them. This office features stairs to the upper floor. The upper floor features a vintage safe that is used to hold silver dust / nuggets that is still payable for a train ticket. The metal is weighed on the scale (seen next to the safe) to ensure it is the correct type. (Read: not fake). The newspaper contains the daily precious metals prices, so that is is fairly measured and properly payed for. Eventually a special train comes though the station and the dust / nuggets are exchanged for proper paper currency, with the expensive metal being shipped back east to Denver to be made into coins and bars. The anachronistic modern computer system was added in 1980 to control the switches and monitor train traffic to the still-active silver mines. US 1870's MODULAR COLLAPSING TRAIN BRIDGE This bridge was inspired by Bad Cop's Pursuit (set 70802) and the short section of railroad bridge included with that set. When I first saw it, I thought it would make a great play feature for a train bridge that is actually usable by trains. Here is the result of all that working and reworking: 12 sections of PF / RC train track (It won't work with 9V, sorry!) with 1 section "failure point" consisting of 2 tracks pieces, plus 2 studs of space to separate the moving from non-moving items and allow the hinge to do it's job. The track leading up to the "failure point" as I call it, is raised ever so gently at an angle of (at most) 1 1/3 bricks high per 1 section of track. (The angle of ascent / descent depends on which part of track you are on, but for the most part it's consistent.) The design of the bridge is modular so that you can easily disassemble the bridge for transport. It disassembles into 2 lower ramp sections consisting of 4 tracks each and 2 flat sections placed onto plates with the 1 "failure point" module consisting of a hinged (on one end) track piece in the middle. The bridge when the track is safe to cross: the pins are inserted and it should be stable. Naturally, a very heavy engine will snap the Technic rods in half, breaking the bridge permanently. Thus you can only use this engine with Small engines like my 2-6-0 + it's consist, (AKA the Lone Ranger train) the My Own Train series engines, or something of comparable weight. This is how it works: Their are two hidden Technic rods under the track that should allow trains to pass by safely overhead. Pull the Technic connector and your bridge collapses. Lift the bridge up and move the rod back in to reset the bridge for the next adventure. US 1870's TRAIN STUFF - LDD FILES LDD file for the green 4-2-4 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1471631241m.lxf LDD file for the green loco and it's train: http://www.moc-pages...1471631317m.lxf LDD file for the red 4-6-0 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1473035459m.lxf LDD file for the yellow 4-4-0 loco only: http://www.moc-pages...1473035594m.lxf LDD file for the yellow loco and it's train: http://www.moc-pages...1473101156m.lxf LDD file for the modular train station: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1456867526m.lxf LDD file for the collapsing train bridge: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1472495977m.lxf EDIT 9/18/16 - Added real life pictures of the train station and digital pictures of the bridge. The LDD files were added for both as well. Comments, Questions, and complaints are always welcome! Thanks for looking!
  22. Greetings, Train Tech. It's been about a year since CommanderWolf and I built the GE boxcabs, so here's another "boxcab": ... "glass box", that is. These locomotives were originally built for the Royal Bavarian State Railways with the designation "PtL 2/2". The unusual design featured a semi-automatic coal feed system, which did away with the fireman and allowed single-person operation. The boiler was surrounded by a cab with many windows, leading to the nickname of Glaskasten ("glass box"). During nationalization they were lumped into class 98 ("branch line locomotives"). Some survived the war to join the Deutsche Bundesbahn, which is the livery I've chosen to model here. This is another model with a large amount of SNOT-work; there are studs pointing in all directions. The frame is built studs-forward, the body features studs facing left/right for the doors and sides, and the side windows are upside down. Did I mention it's powered? The entire thing is powered by a micromotor driving the front axle: Note that the jackshaft doesn't actually extend through the locomotive; the 2x2 round plates on either side are carried along by the connecting rod between the front and rear axle. I used this technique to try to give extra grip to the BBB medium wheels. The battery box is in the cab. The smokebox comes off for access to the power switch: Here it is with the two-axle passenger car I posted a couple months ago. This loco struggles a lot more in turns than the 23-ton boxcabs did... Brickshelf gallery here (pending moderation). Thanks for reading!
  23. This loco is a 1926 oil burning 4-8-2 "Mountain" type, (4 leading, 8 drivers, 2 trailing) that was made surplus in 1951, donated to the Museum of Transportation (of St. Louis, Missouri) in 1959, and restored to working order in 1988 for it's excursion career. It's new lease on life lasted until 2002 when insurance costs and a failing boiler made the engine enter it's second retirement, while will be probably be forever. This may not be the best interpretation of the Frisco 1522, but it seems to be the one of the few I've seen built out of Lego. (this loco is the only other 1522 I've found and it really blows mine away. ) The model you see here has been my dream ever since I was 5 or six years old and rode behind the steamer on one of it's last public trips. (I don't remember much of the trip, but I do remember the sense of awe and respect for the power of steam after seeing the loco pull past us on it's journey back to the museum and into what looks to be permanent retirement.) The cab walls on both model and real engine have the name of the railroad (Frisco) on it's side, while the number of the loco (1522) goes on the tender sides. The way to do this is using printed 1 x 1 tiles. The real engine is publicly displayed at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri. The Lego model of the loco is sitting on the front of the loco, just above the cowcatcher. Here is the most recent LDD file for the engine and tender. NOTES: Hopefully next year the Frisco 1522 and Milwaukee Road Bi-Polar will be built in real bricks, ready to be displayed beside the Southern Pacific 4460 and the GM Aerotrain that I already own. Please, if you have any complaints, praise, questions, or anything like that, please post it below. Feedback is always welcome, and I would like some advice on things I could improve on. Thanks in advance! EDIT 9/28/17: Updated ldd file and added new pictures. The device in between the two domes (I forgot it's technical name, "feed water heater" maybe?) is now more like the real engine, with two cylinders instead of none like I had before. This engine should be built by early next year. EDIT 10/6/17: the parts for the Frisco 4-8-2 steam loco + '57 Plymouth Fury parts are finally here! NOTE: Two tender wheels and all the letters / numbers are not here because I need to place that order separately later on by myself. So it's really not all here, but it's about 99% arrived. EDIT 10/27/17: Here we can see my newest brick-built model, Frisco 1522 (4-8-2 "Mountain" type) meeting my long-built Southern Pacific 4460 (4-8-4 "Northern" type). More close-up pictures of the 1522 model coming this weekend! UPDATE: Real life pictures added! Above you can see it next to my other already-built Museum of Transportation models.
  24. [WIP] C&O Heavy Pacific

    EDIT: Yes, I somehow jacked up the title it should read "[WIP] C&O Heavy Pacific" In the early Twentieth Century, the Chesapeake & Ohio used a fleet of Pacific 4-6-2s to haul some of its passenger trains. http://mrr.trains.co...RRNP0214_39.jpg http://s3.amazonaws....-11128_4081.jpg I have been working on and off on this one for several years now. This is not continuously, mind you. I would say I am about 75% done with this. The tender is a placeholder as I would like to build a better normal one or the more accurate Vanderbilt tender that the prototype comes with. However, I am trying to think how to properly do the tank portion as I currently use the tender to power it with 9V motors and have the tender filled with weights for better traction. Things I'm trying to sort out The under the smokebox shape. It's complicated because of the way the cylinders attach. I want to replace the brick built cylinders with technic liftarm based ones as the currents ones have a habit of randomly exploding whilst running... Sorting out the greebling, namely above the drivers. Giving the cab an interior. It seems to run well around stock curves although the cylinders have to be realigned after awhile of running.
  25. Hello Everyone, Check this Air engine Out. We can all agree that Pneumatics wont do this. This Air engine is a recreation of the USS Monitor Steam Engine which is an early American War Ship that was built by Swedish American John Ericsson. This engine is pretty interesting with how it was designed to function. Its very elaborate engine design with opposed cylinder piston that functions a lever arm which is connected to a center crank shaft and it also is name the vibrating lever engine. It was such a neat build I made more then one videos to. I made another video where you see inside and can watch the cylinders move up and down.