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Found 27 results

  1. I have quite a few denizens of the deep - both good and evil - in my display collection, but only currently have a picture of the latest ones using parts from the Disney, Ninjago Movie and TLBM S2 CMFs. I imagine the skeleton-ghost as a soldier who died at sea in tragic circumstances. In due course, I hope to photograph all my deep sea dwellers. Feel free to post your purist and non-purist underwater MOCed minifigures in this thread .
  2. I built this 103-stud long 1920's Adventurers tramp steam ship from two Adventurers sets: I used the boat from set 5975 (T-Rex Transport) and modified slightly to resemble set 5976 (River Expedition). The ship features a lifeboat, steering wheel, and a smoke-stack plus I have the bridge with removable roof for the top deck of the ship, and captain's quarters for the lower floor. I also have signs on the front of the ship spelling out the name of the vessel: the Eastern Star. Built in 1915 for the Octan Petroleum Corporation as an ocean going tramp steam ship (made for hauling huge pumping gear out to remote oil fields in the Middle-East), the Eastern Star ran aground off the coast of southern Italy in mid-1916 while heading to England. Captain Karloff (who now owns the ship after buying the wrecked hulk), with help from mechanical genius Mac McCloud, rebuilt the vessel to be sea worthy once more. This ship has been an great help in getting huge treasures, such as the lost golden dragon of Marco Polo, back to western civilization and into museums where they belong. The ladders hanging on the side of the lower deck lead the way to the ship's bridge on the upper level. The life boat is also back here, just in case of emergencies! Here you can see inside the ship's bridge (upper deck) and captain's quarters. (lower level) Some of the recent cargo of the Eastern Star includes: - a gyro-copter (set 70913 MOD) - silver ingots and coins - silver and gold nuggets - Dynamite (the accompanying plunger is in the Captain's Quarters / map room) - Ancient spears - the Maltese Falcon - the Burma Chicken (long-lost cousin to the Falcon) - two halves of a long-lost pirate's treasure map - Money - large rough-cut ruby - poison bottles - antidote bottles Here is a closer look at the gyro-copter model which was heavily modified from set 70913 (Scarecrow Fearful Face-off) from the LEGO Batman Movie line. I added the classic two seat Adventurers cockpit piece which is usually used on land vehicles, plus a new set of vintage 2003 landing skids. This model also comes with red and green navigation lights and two independent propeller blades. The gyro-copter is usually used in tandem with the Eastern Star steamship, scouting ahead for signs of villainy and danger and reporting back to the Eastern Star and / or home base at the supply depot. The copter is nicknamed the Lightning Rod, for it was Charles "Lightning" Kilroy who designed it. When not in use, the copter is stored on the cargo deck of the tramp steamer. As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome!
  3. 42064 Ocean Explorer is subject to a lot of complaints about the lack of functions. While I agree that the set is sorely lacking in functionality, I also find complaining too easy. The hard part is suggesting an alternative. So that's what I want to do: convert 42064 to a Technic set. Edit: for the finished model, see here: (end of edit) First, the plan. Let's ditch the heli and mini sub - these could have been €10 sets, and only eat up parts budget here. The helipad can go too. The superstructure can be reused as a module later. Let's remove the crane, the gray platform in the back, and generally everything else, keeping nothing but an empty hull. Now, part of the challenge of designing a set is staying in budget. As there's plenty of room, let's make it shorter. Ok, the functions. First, there are no propellors. Let's connect the front wheels to some propellors. This requires redesigning the steering module with the rudders. (As you see, I use color coding for functions in MLCAD.) The structure inside the bow that holds the curved panels is very voluminous and can be reworked provide a nice open space, that perfectly fits a V8 cylinder engine, also connected to the front wheels. So that's the basics. Now, what functions to add? Elsewhere I read about the lack of an A-frame gantry. So let's add that. It has two functions. Move crane with LAs, and a winch (not drawn). How will this be driven? Manual is nice, but why not try and fit in PF? The space above the engine is perfect to fit a battery box. The bridge will be right behind that. The gearbox to select the functions can go below the bridge. With this in place, there's only one thing from the set missing: lifeboats. The orange 1x3 beams from the set received some flak as well - these can't be serious attempts at lifeboats. So I built slightly bigger lifeboats, with the orange panels from the mini-vehicles. First, I wanted to put them on the superstructure, but after looking at some pictures of ships on the internet, I figured they could be at the sides of the hull too. There's room behind the superstructure. With a mini "crane" (just a 4x4 bent beam), the lifeboats could be deployed. This is the third motorized function. This means the space below the bridge is the only palce left to put the function-switcher gearbox. The only place for the PF motor I could find was between the white angular panels. A perfect spot, if you ask me :) The gearbox has four outputs, so one of them (drawn purple) is unused right now. Maybe it can operate a small ramp at the back, between the blue 3x6x3 panels. Of course, all this is merely some digital designing and virtual doodling. The next step is building this in real bricks, which will certainly pose problems with things not fitting or not working. So I will try to build it and make everything actually work. I'll keep you informed when I have notable progress :)
  4. NOTE to the MOD: First off, I am sorry if this is in the wrong place. I wasn't sure where to place it, as it is a model using both System and Technic parts / techniques. Please move this as you see fit, if you need to move it at all. I just finished turning an elongated and enlarged version of set 42064 (Ocean Explorer) into a Adventurers style tramp steamship I call the Great West. The lift-away roof and bridge sections come off easily for access to the inside, and all the cargo is removable / interchangeable. Here is the original model, set number 42064, Ocean Explorer. I stripped the deck clean of all play features and attached models to give me a good foundation for my modifications. I also got rid of the helicopter and submarine. This ship is missing a few parts such as one of this for the bow in red, and two of each of these parts for the ships name, the Great West. The ship's name plates are located on the front of the bridge and the rear of the ship. I made the ship a whole section taller and longer to make it more proportional at mini-figure scale. The ship also feature wheels on the bottom for rolling along the floor / table / whatever. The two inside sections are mostly empty, but the captain's quarters goes on the lower deck, and the command bridge on the higher level. I'm not sure what to put in the lower section, but the upper section is mostly done except for the missing chart table. Any thoughts? Technic-heads, Ship-builders and Adventuresome fellows please chime in, as I am seeking feedback on this model. The LDD file is available here. Comments, Questions & Complaints are always welcome!
  5. Way back when (around 2010) I designed this ship as a standalone piece for my desk. I spent about $120 USD on Pick A Brick from the online LEGO shop & from 3 Bricklink sellers. (I later found I could have saved a bunch of money by going through Bricklink alone.) Since it's original construction around seven years ago, I have added another brick layer to the ship's base and 18 studs of length to for decks. The model is in micro scale, and sits about 114 stud long, which is very close to three feet long. Printed 1 x 1 tiles should spell out the name ACADIA on the left and right sides, and on the rear of the ship. (The tiles haven't been ordered yet, should be bought by the eighth of this month) The font of the ship. (also called the "bow".) The rear of the ship. (also called the "stern".) The raised portion of the deck is for the docking bridge when the ship is in port. The left hand (or port, and the right side would be the starboard side.) profile shot of the vessel alongside a yard stick. This ship is just a hair longer than three feet long, or 114 studs. This has officially become a Seriously Huge Investment In Parts, or SHIP! This is the red star line flag, and below is the fictional history and statistics: The RMS Acadia was designed in 1914, but World War One prevented it's construction by Steele & Sons Shipbuilders to start until 1919. The ship was modified from it's original design to burn oil, and was completed in February 1921. The ship could hold 3280 people total, with 1140 being Crew, with 270 being First class, 530 in Second class, and 1340 being the steerage, or Third class. The ship sailed it's maiden voyage in July 1921 from Southampton to New York City. The ship was English, and as such, was immune to American law of Prohibition. The ship took off-season sailings (informally known as Liquor Cruises) around the Atlantic, returning to the port of origin within a couple days. The ship managed to hold a steady service record, and remained relatively full-up until the Great Depression really took hold in 1931. The ship's owners, the Red Star Line, managed to stay financially afloat long enough to get the ship through the worst of the Depression, until the ship was requested by the English Navy as a troop ship in late 1939 for use in World War Two. The Acadia's fancy woodwork was put in storage and the ship was turned into a troop ship relatively quickly. The ship was strafed several times by enemy aircraft during the war, and narrowly missed being torpedoed in 1943, but it survived the war not too much worse for wear. When it was handed back over to Red Star Line, it was given a complete overhaul mechanically and electrically. The whole ship was rewired, and the oil burning engines converted to diesel. The Acadia's woodwork was painstakingly restored to it's original grandeur, and she was ready for for sailing by 1948, almost a year after being handed back to it's original owners. In the early '50's the ship began sailing luxury cruises to the Mediterranean from England and the United States, in addition to it's usual scheduled Atlantic crossings. The ship began showing it's age by the late 1960's, when it's original glass dome began to leak badly. A handful of cracks in the reinforced glass caused the ship to be dry-docked, but before it could be fixed the huge dome collapsed in on itself, causing the grand staircase to be heavily damaged. Luckily, the accident happened in the middle of the night, and no one was on board at the time to get hurt by all that broken glass. The ships' dome was replaced, but only because the ship's owners knew of it's heritage and couldn't bear to see the old girl scrapped. (Not to mention it would have cost more to scrap the ship than fix the dome) By 1975, she was last four-stack ship in existence, and the owners were planning the Acadia's 55th Birthday for the next year. The Acadia celebrated July 1st, 1976 as her fifty-fifth birthday, and as part of the celebrations she was given to a preservation group dedicated to keeping the ship sailing as an "ambassador of history", as a peek into the way things were and how the men and women visiting and working on the Acadia went about their lives through each period of this ships stoic history. Many former passengers and crew detailed their experiences on the ship in writing or on film for the beginning of what later became known as The Acadia Living History Museum. Today, the ship features a feature-length film that chronicles the story of the ship and it's many passengers and crew through out the ships commercial and wartime lives. The film is shown in the Second Class movie theater, built into the ship in 1947 after World War Two, flowing seamlessly into the 1920's flavor of the ship. The ship still sails, making stops in New York and London (substituted for Southampton) at least twice a year. Ship Name: RMS Acadia Ship Type: Atlantic Class Passenger Liner Owner: Red Star Line Ship Built: 1919 – 1921 Capacity: 2740 passengers, 1340 crew (3280 persons total) Lifeboats: 60 boats with 60 people per boat (3,600 people total capacity) Builder: Steele & Sons Shipbuilders Propulsion: 24 Boilers, 2 turbines, 4 steel propellers Top Speed: 28.5 Knots Fuel: Diesel (originally Oil) The LDD file for the updated digital version is here. Any thoughts, complaints, questions or suggestions are always welcome!
  6. NOTE: THE FINAL VIDEO WILL BE POSTED IN THIS THREAD SO C&C PLEASE! Here's a WIP which is meant to be a 2-3 day build. As of now it's getting done, so here are the pictures of the building process. It has 6 RC functions controlled by 3 motors and a gearbox. The crane can slide 6 studs along the deck, it can slew, and it can go up and down (of course). Sorry for the bad picture quality. Finished model should have much better pictures. Here is the first instance of the wheelhouse. It has a helipad and sort of looks like a box, but it is not even close to done. Video of the crane: Thanks! C&C PLEASE! BrickbyBrick
  7. Mark of Falworth

    CCC 14 - Moravian Warknarr

    (CCC14) Moravian Warknarr by Mark E., on Flickr (CCC14) Moravian Warknarr by Mark E., on Flickr My third entry to the CCC! More pictures in this album.
  8. Or is it? My stream: https://www.flickr.c...9613@N07/rCaHw8
  9. Hi Everyone! - [snip] - ub39t21y3hok.jpg x8nyp4x59dgy.jpg asde3i2v4lf8.jpg y9n9ko7viayy.jpg Miniature Frigate Ship- approximately 500 pieces. Length is 7 inches, height is 8 inches, and width is about 1.5 inches. This project is actually on LEGO ideas. I'd appreciate your support! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/133047 For more photos, my flickr stream: https://www.flickr.com/gp/90319613@N07/6c0z8w
  10. Hey everyone It's been some time since my last upload here on EuroBrick. I finished this project around December, but only got around to taking pictures this week. This time, I decided to build an island that has never been explored, until now. As always, any feedback (both positive and negative) that are constructive are welcome. The Island build itself (Without the explorers). A closer look at the beach. The 2 bravest explorers make their way onto the island (1). The 2 bravest explorers make their way onto the island (2). Please excuse the sloppy masking, just installed Illustrator last night and I'm still getting used to it. Thanks for your time, ~Pat
  11. snaillad

    MOC: Paradisa Cafe

    Hello everyone, I was Inspired by a couple of sets I had when I was a child - Breezeway Cafe - 6376 and Sand Dollar Cafe - 6411. The colour combinations used were cheerful and I always wished I had bricks using the colours of the Sand dollar baseplate in particular! Thanks to the 'friends' theme for bringing more choice of bricks in lighter colours I can create something I've had in mind for sometime now. The main part I wanted to use was the large curved window pieces which I purchased a while back. The ground floor houses a bicycle and surf board rental shop and the Paradisa cafe bar area, the upstairs lifts off in one piece and has more seating for a great sea view! No parrots included, although I have added the much loved seagull, a splash of pink and the usual palm-tree. I would have loved to have done a fully rendered background in the style of Paradisa but don't have the know how so I've simply used a couple of the typical colours. On with the 3 and only 3 pics (Hopefully Santa will bring me a new Camera!) You can view them on my flickr page here https://www.flickr.c...s/52656812@N04/ Any comments of feedback welcome! Best wishes for winter! Bring on summer
  12. rock raider

    [MOC] Diving for Pearls

    I've been a member for a while but not had anything worth sharing. Now, finally my first real MOC. A diver has just struck Gold... Err.. Pearl. Diving by Fred Cleaver, on Flickr Diving by Fred Cleaver, on Flickr Diving by Fred Cleaver, on Flickr
  13. Hello! Hope you like this one Newest entrance to the phantasy Realms series. what you think of it? Let me know and if you like this feel free to support it at - https://ideas.lego.com/projects/111670 Cheers
  14. mrcp6d

    [O - H09] Mapping Wastyria

    Location: H09 - Wastyria Tags: exploration, water vehicle, civil --Weekly Explorer's Transmission-- --Log of Eagle-Eye Silver-- -- 21 Junali 3815-- Exploration of sector H09 and the local planet Wastyria has been rather uneventful. Unlike the insane predators of Arium Major, the chill of this cold water ball seems to have stifled the size of most native creatures—though there apparently are the Rockback Whales discovered by pilot Hannibal, I haven’t yet seen any yet. Perhaps they are both rare and reclusive? Anyway, with the lack of animal encounters on this planet so far, I’ve been mapping out as many of the tiny islands that dot Wastyria’s watery surface. The cold of the planet is just enough in most regions to freeze the ocean spray on the local plant life, but not enough to solidify the ocean water itself; so I bought down my Barracuda Special from orbit and have been skimming around the ocean at speed for a few days. The pilots and drivers sure think they’ve got a , but exploring is where the real fun’s at. We get all the fun toys from the engineers before those guys do, and since we’re the ones with the alien close encounters, we hang on to the good stuff! This little speedboat is amazing. It’s blindingly fast and incredibly maneuverable making it perfect for Wastyria with all its random rock piles sticking out of the ocean. Bombing around in this little baby for a few days has been a fun vacation from the crazy monsters I usually have to take out or run from. We’ll see where Lord Business sends me next week, maybe there’ll be more action.--End-- This one was a quick but fun MOC. C&C appreciated!
  15. Location: F10 - Arium Major Tags: Exploration --Weekly Explorer's Transmission-- --Log of Eagle-Eye Silver-- -- 21 Junali 3815-- I need to buy the Octan Corp. engineers a case of good stuff! The underwater robots they send to help us explore Sector F10 have been invaluable—especially since the large equatorial ocean of Arium Major supports some extremely large predators! The Vampire Ray is one of the largest apex predators, and apparently one of the most common. Our Octan Corp. submersible drones recorded many predation events in which a Vampire Ray attacked and consumed large (for Earth) sharks and whales. Attached to this report is a still image of one of these attacks. For scale, the shark in the picture is approximately 3 meters long, meaning that the ray here has a wingspan of roughly 5 meters. The teeth are equally enormous, they’re probably about 50cm long and are robust. These rays tend to shake their prey after biting down, so the teeth’s strength is clearly important. There is a group of spines near the base of the tail but we have not seen them used to aid in hunting. It’s unknown if these barbs are poisoned like in the terrestrial stingrays. I highly recommend that any human-piloted vessels sent to Arium Major be significantly armored against bites from the underwater creatures here. Frankly, I wouldn’t go into the water without some pretty big guns on a fast sub with hefty armor, once again, I’m glad we have the drones here! Eagle-Eye out. --End-- A couple more angles on Flickr, C&C appreciated!
  16. Jody Meyer

    [Challenge 1] Bone yard [O - E01]

    For my Competition build I choose E01 - Donwarr - "Forest covered mountain ranges dominate the large continents here." I went towards the underwater ocean scene E01_f2 by Meyerj, on Flickr E01_f1 by Meyerj, on Flickr Specials thanks to Creator of Bluerender. Over and out Jody Meyer d to make it .Sorry for the repost but had to be 24x24.. my bad.
  17. Way back when (around 2010) I designed this ship as a standalone piece for my desk. I spent about $120 USD on Pick A Brick from the online LEGO shop & from 3 Bricklink sellers. (I later found I could have saved a bunch of money by going through Bricklink alone.) The RMS Acadia in all her glory. I have updated the ship twice, and rebuilt the stern (rear) three times. (I now have great respect for someone who can build a boat stern that looks realistic.) I am going to use the 1990's boat bow, (Boat Bow Brick 8 x 10 x 1, part # 2622) as my stern, as It is the only (cheap) way get that curved look. The top view features 44 lifeboats, (I'm pretending the 22 brown tiles are actually life boats stacked on top of each other) & the four funnels. Ship Name: RMS Acadia Ship Type: Atlantic Class Passenger Liner Owner: Red Star Line Ship Built: 1919 – 1921 Capacity: 2140 passengers, 1140 crew (3280 persons total) Lifeboats: 44 boats with 75 people per boat (3300 people total capacity) Builder: Steele & Sons Shipbuilders Propulsion: 24 Boilers, 3 turbines, 3 steel propellers Top Speed: 28.5 Knots Fuel: Diesel (originally Oil) The bridge shown here is in mini-figure scale. It is supposed to be a sized-up version of the one on the actual ship model seen above. Th Acadia's bridge features: -the Ships wheel -dual nautical telegraphs, (those things with the paddles on them near the wheel) -large table with lamp for studying charts and messages -a radar screen (added to the ship in 1947) The flag of Red Star Line, owner of the RMS Acadia. LDD file for the ship & bridge: http://www.mocpages....1395333580m.lxf Here is the real life model of the ship: Fictional Background: The RMS Acadia was designed in 1913, but World War One prevented it's construction by Steele & Sons Shipbuilders to start until 1919. The ship was modified from it's original design to burn oil, and was completed in February 1921. The ship could hold 3280 people total, with 1140 being Crew, with 270 being First class, 530 in Second class, and 1340 being the steerage, or Third class. The ship sailed it's maiden voyage in July 1921 from Southampton to New York City. The ship was English, and as such, was immune to American law of Prohibition. The ship took off-season sailings (informally known as Liquor Cruises) around the Atlantic, returning to the port of origin within a couple days. The ship managed to hold a steady service record, and remained relatively full-up until the Great Depression really took hold in 1931. The ship's owners, the Red Star Line, managed to stay financially afloat long enough to get the ship through the worst of the Depression, until the ship was requested by the English Navy as a troop ship in late 1939 for use in World War Two. The Acadia's fancy woodwork was put in storage and the ship was turned into a troop ship relatively quickly. The ship was strafed several times by enemy aircraft during the war, and narrowly missed being torpedoed in 1943, but it survived the war not too much worse for wear. When it was handed back over to Red Star Line, it was given a complete overhaul mechanically and eclectically. The whole ship was rewired, and the oil burning engines converted to diesel. The Acadia's woodwork was painstakingly restored to it's original grandeur, and she was ready for for sailing by 1948, almost a year after being handed back to it's original owners. In thew early '50's the ship began sailing luxury cruises to the Mediterranean from England and the United States, in addition to it's usual scheduled Atlantic crossings. The ship began showing it's age by the late 1960's, when it's original glass dome began to leak badly. A handful of cracks in the reinforced glass caused the ship to be dry-docked, but before it could be fixed the huge dome collapsed in on itself, causing the grand staircase to be heavily damaged. Luckily, the accident happened in the middle of the night, and no one was on board at the time to get hurt by all that broken glass. The ships' dome was replaced, but only because the ship's owners knew of it's heritage and couldn't bear to see the old girl scrapped. (Not to mention it would have cost more to scrap the ship than fix the dome) By 1975, she was last four-stack ship in existence, and the owners were planning the Acadia's 55th Birthday for the next year. The Acadia celebrated July 1st, 1976 as her fifty-fifth birthday, and as part of the celebrations she was given to a preservation group dedicated to keeping the ship sailing as an "ambassador of history", as a peek into the way things were and how the men and women visiting and working on the Acadia went about their lives through each period of this ships stoic history. Many former passengers and crew detailed their experiences on the ship in writing or on film for the beginning of what later became known as The Acadia Living History Museum. Today, the ship features a feature-length film that chronicles the story of the ship and it's many passengers and crew through out the ships commercial and wartime lives. The film is shown in the Second Class movie theater, built into the ship in 1947 after World War Two, flowing seamlessly into the 1920's flavor of the ship. The ship still sails, making stops in New York and London (substituted for Southampton) at least twice a year. The ship from a top-down view. The mini-figure standing nearf the side is the Captain Edgar Danforth Fuller (or E.D. Fuller for short) We can also see the Grand Staircase's glass dome, which is between funnels two and three. This is the Captain's suit, in case any one wants to know: http://www.bricklink...?P=973pb0294c01 EDIT: Here is a little comparison with another ship to show you how big the Acadia really is: This ship in the foreground is the Tramp steamer "Morrow II" which is in scale (or as close as possible) with my passenger liner "RMS Acadia" in the background. Here is the statistics for each ship: Ship Name: Morrow II Engine Type: steam-fed turbine to double screws Vehicle Configuration: tramp steamer Vehicle type: ocean going freighter Designer: (unknown) Build Date: 1917 Builder: Throwing Star Freight Lines Current Owner: Captain Karloff Ship Name: RMS Acadia Engine Type: steam-fed turbine to triple screws Vehicle Configuration: luxury passenger vessel Vehicle type: ocean liner Designer: Steele & Sons Shipbuilders Build Date: 1921 Builder: Steele & Sons Shipbuilders Current Owner: Red Star Lines LDD file: http://www.mocpages....1434723184m.lxf Oh, and just so you know, this is the Morrow II in mini-figure scale: You can draw you your on conclusions on how big the Acadia would be if it were mini-fig scale!!
  18. Anduin1710

    James Cook and the HMS Endeavour

    [pid][/pid] LDD 17A Hi everyone, I made a lego HMS Endeavour with the LDD. You can vote for it on lego ideas. All images are on Flickr.
  19. Way back when (around 2010) I designed this ship as a standalone piece for my desk. I spent about $120 USD on Pick A Brick from the online LEGO shop & from 3 Bricklink sellers. (I later found I could have saved a bunch of money by going through Bricklink alone.) The model is in micro scale, is about 2 feet long. Here we see the ship in a side profile. The mini-figure standing on the side is the Captain Edgar Danforth Fuller (or E.D. Fuller for short) We can also see the Grand Staircase's glass dome, which is between funnels two and three. Fictional Background: The RMS Acadia was designed in 1913, but World War One prevented it's construction by Steele & Sons Shipbuilders to start until 1919. The ship was modified from it's original design to burn oil, and was completed in February 1921. The ship could hold 3280 people total, with 1140 being Crew, with 270 being First class, 530 in Second class, and 1340 being the steerage, or Third class. The ship sailed it's maiden voyage in July 1921 from Southampton to New York City. The ship was English, and as such, was immune to American law of Prohibition. The ship took off-season sailings (informally known as Liquor Cruises) around the Atlantic, returning to the port of origin within a couple days. The ship managed to hold a steady service record, and remained relatively full-up until the Great Depression really took hold in 1931. The ship's owners, the Red Star Line, managed to stay financially afloat long enough to get the ship through the worst of the Depression, until the ship was requested by the English Navy as a troop ship in late 1939 for use in World War Two. The Acadia's fancy woodwork was put in storage and the ship was turned into a troop ship relatively quickly. The ship was strafed several times by enemy aircraft during the war, and narrowly missed being torpedoed in 1943, but it survived the war not too much worse for wear. When it was handed back over to Red Star Line, it was given a complete overhaul mechanically and eclectically. The whole ship was rewired, and the oil burning engines converted to diesel. The Acadia's woodwork was painstakingly restored to it's original grandeur, and she was ready for for sailing by 1948, almost a year after being handed back to it's original owners. In thew early '50's the ship began sailing luxury cruises to the Mediterranean from England and the United States, in addition to it's usual scheduled Atlantic crossings. The ship began showing it's age by the late 1960's, when it's original glass dome began to leak badly. A handful of cracks in the reinforced glass caused the ship to be dry-docked, but before it could be fixed the huge dome collapsed in on itself, causing the grand staircase to be heavily damaged. Luckily, the accident happened in the middle of the night, and no one was on board at the time to get hurt by all that broken glass. The ships' dome was replaced, but only because the ship's owners knew of it's heritage and couldn't bear to see the old girl scrapped. (Not to mention it would have cost more to scrap the ship than fix the dome) By 1975, she was last four-stack ship in existence, and the owners were planning the Acadia's 55th Birthday for the next year. The Acadia celebrated July 1st, 1976 as her fifty-fifth birthday, and as part of the celebrations she was given to a preservation group dedicated to keeping the ship sailing as an "ambassador of history", as a peek into the way things were and how the men and women visiting and working on the Acadia went about their lives through each period of this ships stoic history. Many former passengers and crew detailed their experiences on the ship in writing or on film for the beginning of what later became known as The Acadia Living History Museum. Today, the ship features a feature-length film that chronicles the story of the ship and it's many passengers and crew through out the ships commercial and wartime lives. The film is shown in the Second Class movie theater, built into the ship in 1947 after World War Two, flowing seamlessly into the 1920's flavor of the ship. The ship still sails, making stops in New York and London (substituted for Southampton) at least twice a year. The ship from a top-down view. This is Captain Fuller's suit, in case any one wants to know: http://www.bricklink...?P=973pb0294c01 Fictional Statistics: Ship Name: RMS Acadia Ship Type: Atlantic Class Passenger Liner Owner: Red Star Line Ship Built: 1919 – 1921 Capacity: 2140 passengers, 1140 crew (3280 persons total) Lifeboats: 44 boats with 75 people per boat (3300 people total capacity) Builder: Steele & Sons Shipbuilders Propulsion: 24 Boilers, 3 turbines, 3 steel propellers Top Speed: 28.5 Knots Fuel: Diesel (originally Oil) The bridge shown here is in mini-figure scale. It is supposed to be a sized-up version of the one on the actual ship model seen in the other pictures. I haven't built this part of the model in real life yet. Th Acadia's bridge features: -the Ships wheel -dual nautical telegraphs, (those things with the paddles on them near the wheel) -large table with lamp for studying charts and messages -a radar screen (added to the ship in 1947) This is the logo of the Red Star line, original owner of the RMS Acadia ocean liner. LDD file for the ship and the bridge: http://www.mocpages....1425498813m.lxf NOTES: I made the back-story up while posting this model to MOCPages. It is a 100% work of fiction. Any relation to persons, living or dead, is pure coincidence, while most of the events are true. World War One & Two did happen, and some ships were requisitioned for the English Navy as either troop ships (such as the RMS Queen Mary, which was a troop ship during World War Two) or hospital ships. The ship and even the name Acadia is something I made up. Comments, Questions, & complaints welcome!
  20. First up, Kaneta-Bur. The Kaneta-Bur is a reef-dwelling, blind testudine that is largely harmless unless poked in its sensitive feelers. Do not poke the feelers. https://www.flickr.com/photos/114035403@N02/sets/72157648181625432/ Next up, Juru-Ra. A reef-dwelling, long-necked pleiseohominid, this creature is commonly referred to as a sea monkey. Despite the name, they are quite dangerous, especially in packs. https://www.flickr.com/photos/114035403@N02/sets/72157647779467050/ Oh god he poked the feelers Lastly, something completely different: The desert sedge. A sedge slides across the ground on millions of microscopic hind legs, and steers and balances itself with its two large clawed hands. Desert sedges are peaceful creatures. While peaceful, they are not afraid to defend themselves. https://www.flickr.com/photos/114035403@N02/sets/72157648135061206/ How'd I do? Oh, make that four. The Cara-Ni, or Reef Deacon, is a species of violent rahi living in the reefs off the coasts of Po-Koro. No two are alike in coloration, though they are all very vibrant due to the protodermis "blood" of the Mata Nui seeping out into the reefs. All reef-dwellers that have this strange coloration are under the umbrella term "Protodermoid Anomalies". https://www.flickr.com/photos/114035403@N02/sets/72157647778428249/
  21. Hi! It's my entry for the 200 contest! This is a ship with a yellow submarine. Hope you like it! Part count is exactly 200! The creation has four functions, two of them are controlled by hand, and two are controlled by the two black gears at the rear (but by hand ): - telescopic crane - posable robotic arms on the submarine - high or low position of the crane - control the reel inside the ship to put the submarine into the water Thanks for watching!
  22. Legopard

    [HSH] Cat A - Steampunk Kraken

    Hello there I had some dark weeks without that much building, but the Home Sweet Home-Contest gave me motivation to build again. There are several cool Lego-Space themes, but i took the chance to build once again in one of my favorite Sci-Fi-worlds: Steampunk! "Every style-conscious Gentleman needs his home. Some have mansions at the sea. But why living at the sea when you can live in the sea?" -Sir Octavius- This is the home of the steamy gentleman Sir Octavius and the scene stands on a round base. The base is not nearly 48 studs in diameter, but i wanted to have space to play with the tentacles overlapping the border of this circle. All photos on MOCpages. Stay creative and steamy! *toof* *toof* Jonas
  23. pabloglez

    MOC Lego Cars Island

    Hi all, This is the latest MOC I built after not having built anything for a long time. This MOC comes from the idea of making my son Omar a garage for his Lego Cars collection. After several attempts we finally decided to make a resort on an island The island has a cave that communicates with the interior saltwater lake. On the first floor is the island´s branch of Flo’s V8 Cafe from Radiator Springs. On the first floor their is multipurpose room, movie theater, and ballroom. On the third floor there is a gym with the most modern machines. Over the gym there is a terrace with stunning views of the ocean. All this is topped with the logo of the Island "Cars Island". Below there are some photos. Click on the images or links to view larger. Hope you like it. Lego Cars Island_01 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_02 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_03 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_04 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_05 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_06 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_07 by pabloglez and Omar, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_08 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_09 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_10 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_11 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_12 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_13 by pabloglez, on Flickr Lego Cars Island_14 by pabloglez, on Flickr Thank you
  24. Mark of Falworth

    A Clever Stratagem

    A continuation of my Pirate story. Previously The Spanish galleon rocked lazily to and fro some distance off shore, when the sentry saw the glimmer of armor on the beach. "Carlos, look! El Capitan returns!" "Si Pascal, I see him by his armor, I dearly hope he has blotted out the pestilence from these islands… ...But then again, he would not return if he hadn't." Unfortunately for the Spanish, it was not their captain in the rowboat. "Myar har har! This be the best plan ye ever hatched Cap'n!" "Quiet mates! We wouldn't want to spoil the whole plot! Let me do the talkin'. I know a few words of their gibberish that will get us safely aboard." As the rowboat approached, the soldier hailed. "Hola, Señor Capitan! We are so glad to see you back safely! With a wave of his hand, and keeping his face turned down, Captain Mark replied. "Si, si! We beat the scoundrels badly! Throw down the ladder, mi amigo, and I will tell you all about it! ___________________________________ To be continued. Arrr.. Thanks for viewing and have a great day! I'm sure most of you have seen this boat already, but I'm trying to finish the story.