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Found 81 results

  1. Hi all! I'm mostly a technic moc builder, and during the last few years, I didn't post about anything except technik, but now I'd like to present my mini tanks and self propelled guns. The theme is the first world war, except a few, there will be posted mocs only about real tanks. Prototypes, which were built in relality (but never seen combat), also can be found here. My concept: all tanks (no SP guns, because there was one-two prototypes only) are built in more or less microfig scale, my reference is the Tiger1 german tank, it's 6 studs wide, so 6 stud is 3,7 meter. So 1 meter is eqaul to 1,62 studs. The width is determinative, the smallest tanks are 3 studs wide, the small ones are 3-4, the mediums are 4-5. The heavy and super heavy tanks have 6 or 7+ width. All mocs in this topic are built only digital so far, but I'm planning to make them in reality, too, as my financial status and time allows. All tanks were made in LDD, and rendered with Pov-ray. I will update this topic frequently, as a new tank is done. Sooner or later I'll post also real pictures beside renders. Some tanks requires special stickers and thchniques (like covering a part to be in the requested color, or connect the tracks with strings), I will write that in these cases. I tried to use only real colored parts (except few cases, where they are covered with stickers). I tried to catch the characteristics of tanks, instead of being 100% proportional, but I tried to make them as proportional, as possible in this size. Sometimes there aren't a lot of possibilities to make proportional, for example: the tank should be 4,5 studs wide. Width can only be a round number, so a tank which should be 4,5 w, is disproportionate already. Main folder of all tanks: http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=548239 I render one picture about one tank, if you want to see more, ask for it, I can make more in LDD, or render about the requested part/viewpoint. There will be a lot of mocs, so I also opened a topic for WW2 tanks, see here: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=100891 The tanks: 1. Renualt Ft-17: French light tank, mother of all modern tanks, the first one with 360° rotatable turret. Was quite fast and effective. Info: http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Renault_FT Big picture: http://www.brickshel...nualt_ft-17.png It's a typical 3 studs wide very little tank, but thanks to it's individual shape, can be recognize easily. 2. Mark IV (male version): The first british tank in combat, very iconic and famous. Had no suspension and was pretty big with more than one guns. Info: http://en.wikipedia....ki/Mark_IV_tank Big picture: http://www.brickshel...-IV/mark-iv.png The front shape around the tracks is very special, angled and rounded, I think brick technique is better here than plates. There isn't a lot of variations from hoses, the big cannons standard 3mm wide (like in most of my tanks), the smaller machine guns are screw drivers. I'm planning to make all significant ww1 tanks, like K-wagen, Tsar tank, A7V, Gun carrier Mark 1, Whippet, Saint Chamond, etc... to be continued...
  2. CDKiii

    french R35

    Gentlemen i designed an accurate french adrian helmet modèle 1935 modified for armor crew (my eyes were bleeding seeing the traditional plane pilote genuine lego helmet with glasses on all the amazing WW2 tanks pictures). I needed a french tank to fit my crew inside. I confess, i was on ALI EXPRESS and find a nice R35. it looks good, but it was a huge mistake, so painfull to build( but minifigs stickers was good). But i am a little proud of what it renders with my accurate equipped crew. TADAH..... Equipage r35 by LA BRIQUE DE CAMBRONNE, sur Flickr the adrian helmet mle 1935 modified Equipage r35 by LA BRIQUE DE CAMBRONNE, sur Flickr have a nice day.
  3. legomanijak

    [MOC] Horten Ho 229 V3

    Minifig scale replica of one of the first flying wing aircraft powered by jet engines constructed in 1945. It is modeled after the V3 of the aircraft, the only version of the aircraft that still exists today (on display at the Smithsonian). The MOC features fully retractable landing gear and a dual colour scheme. The biggest challenge was trying to get all the angles and shapes as true to the original as possible because there isn't that much source material out there on the web. The original pilot would have worn a pressure suit but sadly Lego hasn't released one of that kind yet so I used the next best thing I could find. If you're interested in getting the instructions for this moc feel free to contact me at brickster.creations@gmail.com Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr Lego Horten HO 229 by legomanijak, on Flickr
  4. Moving Through Halfaya Pass, April 1941 Moving through Halfaya Pass, April 1941 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Moving through Halfaya Pass, April 1941 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Moving through Halfaya Pass, April 1941 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  5. Rogue Redcoat

    M4 Sherman

    Here's my first tank build, the classic American M4 Sherman, I built it a while back but never posted it here so here it is... Yeah, I know I got bad lighting in the photos... Just Lego pieces, no customs The back looks okay, I never decided on a variant, in retrospect, I probably should have. The other side, the whole build is built with 1 stud = 1 foot, so there is no interior but thanks for taking a look :)
  6. Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Supporting the Resistance, Western France 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  7. The Sienar Technologies board of directors did not really appreciate that Rothana Heavy Engineering - one of their direct competitors - started selling the Katyoucha variant of their TX-225 tank to the Empire. (see the full article from 3 years ago here). Clearly, by proposing a relatively cheap rocket-launcher, Rothana would start grinding some of Sienar's market shares. But Sienar did not waste time before reacting and quickly started their own project of a rocket-launcher for the Imperial Army. In order to remain competitive from the pricing side, Sienar took two important decision. First, the new design should reuse as many existing components as possible. This first decision quickly make Sienar look toward their TIE families and existing designs. The second decision was to use the same model of rockets as Rothana. This would allow the Empire not to change their ammunition supply chain and permit in theory to quickly swap the Rothana TX-225 Katyoucha by the future design from Sienar. The project resulted in a fast prototype delivery and the TIE-Calliope was released. It was based on the existing TIE-Crawler which was already in use inside the Imperial Army but on tope of the existing Crawler a rocket launcher was mounted. But Sienar did not mount any small rocket launcher. They designed a rocket launcher that could carry no less than 50 rockets! And the TIE-Calliope could fire these one by one, in salvo, or even all of them within a handful of seconds. Useless to that the the impact of such firepower on any target was devastating. On top of that, the noise produced by the rockets during their flight generated a frightening feeling on the receiver's end. Thanks to this impressive solution, Sienar could even develop a great commercial argument: the ratio between the firepower and the deployed man on the field is way above whatever any competitor can offer (and almost 10x higher than the Katyoucha ratio). Indeed, the TIE-Calliope is equipped with 50 rockets, 2 blaster canons, and one turbolaser canon while only requiring a single pilot. On the other side, the TX-225 Katyoucha is only equipped with 16 rockets and 4 medium blaster canons and requires 3 crewmen to operate. Definitively, Sienar knows how to market their products. TIE-Calliope by Veynom, on Flickr But enough of the historical speech and let's discover the beast: TIE-Calliope by Veynom, on Flickr TIE-Calliope by Veynom, on Flickr TIE-Calliope by Veynom, on Flickr TIE-Calliope by Veynom, on Flickr Both of them together: TIE-Calliope & TX-225 Katyoucha by Veynom, on Flickr Naturally, before creating the Calliope variant, I had first to build a TIE-Crawler. Here it is, without its launcher. TIE-Crawler by Veynom, on Flickr You can see the 2x3 plates inside the track module panels. They were intended to receive the rocket launcher. In the final version, these plates were moved backwards. After all, when moc-ing, it is all about doing and undoing, isn't it? TIE-Crawler by Veynom, on Flickr TIE-Crawler by Veynom, on Flickr For those of you following our Desert Wars project, the TIE-Calliope will replace the Katyoucha as of June 24. Have a thought for the poor Katyoucha. Katyusha! by Veynom, on Flickr Please note that neither the TIE-Calliope, neither the TX-225 Katyoucha appear in any Star Wars material. They are both designs I created, aiming to propose ideas that could exist in the Star Wars universe. And while the old TX-225 Katyoucha was based on a soviet rocket launcher truck from WW2, the TIE-Calliope is based on a M4 Sherman tank variant. In the end, it is quite common to derive Star Wars designs from WW2 materials. Comments welcome, hope you liked it. PS: in the end, the Imperial Army selected the AT-AT from Kuat to mass equip their forces. Sienar and Rothana only received minor orders.
  8. Hi there everybody! It's been a while since I posted anything here, but allow me to present my latest Project: A small scale Tiger II tank! Years ago when I got first into World of Tanks Blitz, the Tiger II was my favorite tank. I still play it sometimes, so I decided to build it. My goal for this Tank was simple: To get all the functions big RC tanks have in a small scale tank model, and still make it look good. - RC driving (powering the front drive sprocket) - RC turret rotation - RC gun elevation/depression - Suspension system to replicate the torsion bar suspension From the beginning it was clear that this would not be possible using LEGO electronics due to the size constraints. I used a CADA Battery box, 2x M motor (drive) and 2x Micro motor (Turret+Gun) to power the tank. The rest of the Tank can be built with 100% LEGO with some minor color changes, especially on the insides to save money. Building istructions are on Rebrickable I hope you like my little gray cat and am looking forward to your comments Gray Gear
  9. Breakdown in North Afrika 1942 Breakdown in North Afrika 1942 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Breakdown in North Afrika 1942 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Breakdown in North Afrika 1942 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  10. A_Goodman

    WW2 Brécourt Manor

    Brécourt Manor June 6th, 1944 U.S. Airborne Soldiers of Easy Company take out German artillery firing on the invading Allied forces on the Normandy Beaches. Brécourt Manor by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Brécourt Manor by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  11. Just a small build of scenery for a Panzer IV L/70 Advance through the Ardennes, December 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  12. Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 Marines of the 1st Division attempt to reach the sea wall under heavy enemy fire following an amphibious landing on the Island of Peleliu. Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Operation Stalemate II, September 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  13. Another go with a WW2 action scene. Here is a small vignette showcasing a German Nebelwerfer in action, probably on the East front. Nebelwerfer 41 in action by Veynom, on Flickr Nebelwerfer 41 in action by Veynom, on Flickr The model is mostly based on the BrickMania design, except for the wheels and ammunitions. The Nebelwerfer - literally "smoke launcher" - was originally designed as a rocket launcher with a name purposely chosen to deceive its true nature. Rocket researches in Germany started during the 1920s and were fruitful in the late 30s. The "Nebelwerfer" name was used to go around the restrictions from the Versailles treaty preventing Germany to develop and produce weapons. In reality, the Nebelwerfer could launch smoke, of course, but also combat gas and highly explosive rockets. It was used during the entire WW2 conflict on all fronts. As I do not like to simply "copy" an existing model, I also built a light blueish grey version which has a different undercarriage and mounting system. The undercarriage is based on a modified plate 2x2 with pins while the mounting system relies on a technic connector. It allows for larger and more realistic wheels and a lighter mounting system. Nebelwerfer 41 by Veynom, on Flickr Here, the rear view of both Nebelwerfers shows you the loaded one firing its first rocket (left) and one without any ammunition in it (right). Nebelwerfer 41 by Veynom, on Flickr Hope you like these. I have been contemplating to build a white-ish version representing the winter paint job used on the East front as well but I lack the necessary bricks. And I have no winter soldier as well. ;)
  14. Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Down the Net, Saipan June 1944 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  15. Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr Behind the strange name of Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G (also shortened into "StuG III"), we can find one of the most successful German armored vehicle of WW2. Initially designed as mobile and armored artillery support for infantry, the StuG III quickly revealed itself as a very effective tank destroyer. In fact, it was so successful that it became the most produced German fully-tracked vehicle of WW2, and the 2nd most produced armored vehicle (just behind the Sdkfz 251 half track). Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr So, why manufacturing a tank destroyer when you already have the best tanks around (Panzer IV, Panther, Tiger)? The answer is quite simple: cost. The StuG III was cheaper and easier to produce than all other more modern German tanks. Still, it could carry the devastating 7.5cm anti-tank gun. Moreover, it offered easy maintenance when on the field. Thanks to that, more than 11,300 units were built (all versions included). This number is to be compared with the number of built Panthers (6,000), Tiger I (1,500), or even with the total number of armored vehicles built on the Panzer IV chassis (8,500). Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr The Stug III's low profile made it hard to spot and target, as the above picture can illustrate. Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr The side armored plates are named "Schürzen" and offer additional protection. The Ausf. G version is characterized by the wider superstructure, and the rotating cupola with periscopes. My model depicts an early-to-mid production model. late-production models have a sloped and rounded gun mantlet and a machine gun on top of the structure. Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr Another characteristic of the StuG III is its capacity to store and carry a lot of equipment behind the superstructure. This was often used to carry spare parts (tracks & wheels), food, water, gas, and ammunition (ok not when in the front line). Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G by Veynom, on Flickr For the build, my model is freely inspired by those from Brickmania (BKM), Custom-Bricks (CB), and other MOCs from the Internet. The minifig and crate stickers are from BKM. The tracks and tanks stickers are from CB. All of my olive green tiles were used for the camo. That was a challenge: it had to look realistic and yet, the model had to hold together. Enjoy!
  16. The images for my model are too large to put here, so here's a link to them on Bricksafe This model is a 1:25 scale replica of a ship that served in Czechoslovakia and Germany in WWII. While in Czeckoslovakian service it was named Presedent Masarysk, named after their first presedent. It was a river monitor that was the leader of their brown water flotilla. It was launched in 1932 and in 1936 when Czechoslovakia was annexed by Germany was transferred over to their navy and renamed Bechelaren. It mostly did escorting on the Danube river, however it partook in the German counter-offensive on Budapest in 1944. In 1945 the ship was turned over to the allies, whom disarmed it then gave it back to the newly reformed Czechoslovakia in 1947. It was used as a working platform until it was scrapped in 1978. The model, if built out of actual lego would be exactly 2 METERS long. Despite minifigure scale normally being either 1:32 or 1:45 I've personally found that I prefer 1:25 scale for minifigs. Also it was originally a typo that I didn't catch until I had already finished the model. I made it so that you can remove everything on the deck and take the hull apart by bulkhead. I had to get creative with the interior since I couldn't find anything about it other than how many bulkheads it had. I also kept finding conflicting numbers as to how many crew it had, so I put in as many beds as the largest of the numbers I came across. (43) If you'd like to build the model you can buy the instructions here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-81516/Legodudelol9a/bechelaren-presedent-masarysk-river-monitor/#details
  17. Dear all, I'd like to show a MOC I finished last month: the Curtiss P-40E Tomahawk in the colours of the Flying Tigers in China. Tiger_11_wheelup by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr As you can see it's in dark green and khaki; colours which aren't readily available in LEGO sets. I had to order these bricks from CADA and wherever I could find them, so I hope I am not violating any rules there since these bricks are not from LEGO. Still, I don't regret it as my 'original' colour-vomit set made from mostly 42039 pieces just didn't have the right look to it: spareparts by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr It started innocent enough, with me making the front cowl and canopy... but you know the feeling, once you are that far it becomes a life mission and needs to be finished. halfway by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr At first the canopy could open, but I had to let that idea go when the controls were added. canopy by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Really happy with the dihedral there. I used some black 15-length liftarms, which I have not been able to take out and switch to light grey. dihedral1 by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Once the model was fairly complete, I ordered the various green and khaki parts, and came up with this: Blank_08_topview by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Blank_03_sideview by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Blank_05_bottomview by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr The flaps fell off right after I took this photo, so I fortified them since. They are controlled with a level in the cockpit, but I like the way they slope in down position: Blank_07_frontview by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr The flight surfaces are controllable by a small joystick behind the cockpit. It was very hard fitting the mechanisms in there, and I am afraid to take it apart for a picture as it'll be a challenge to put it back again. Tiger_12_controls by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr I am most proud of the landing gear retraction system. As you may know, the gears of a P-40 retract one after the other, so I always wanted to make it fully manual operation. Here below you can see how it works. You turn the small black cog to drive the linear actuator. this will push the gear axle back and forwards. A fixed cog at the base drives the wheel axle, and the 90 degree turn becomes a 90 degree twist, making the wheels fold neatly under the wings: Blank_13_wheelhalf by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Blank_12_wheelturn by Roel Cruijff, on Flickr Here is the mechanism in case you'd like to try it: https://www.mediafire.com/file/fqgxwfmazzuclv0/Gear_retracting_mech.io/file The decals are simply laminated colour prints stuck with double sided tape. Works like a charm. Hope you like it and that it may inspire more WW2 aviation models!
  18. Veynom

    [MOC] Heia Safari!

    My entry for the BrickPirate challenge "Comme dans un livre ouvert". (As in an open book) Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr The goal of the challenge is to select a book, build it (open or closed and then depict a scene from it. Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr I have been highly impressed by the “Rommel Papers” book since I first read it 25 ears ago. This is a book collecting the notes written by the German field marshal Rommel during WW2, edited by the historian Liddell Hart and amended by General Bayerlein and Rommel’ son. For the contest, I decided to depict a possible scene from the North African campaign. We see an English Bren Carrier having been captured by the Afrika Korps and immediately re-used. It has been equipped with a 3.7cm PAK 36 light gun and is now patrolling in the desert. Many Bren Carriers were captured by German forces in France and in North Africa, so it is common to see them re-used, particularly in North Africa where German supplies were sparse. Documentation exists about the PAK 36 variant, but I could not confirm that such variant actually served in North Africa. Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr “Heia Safari” is an old marching song from 1916 and used by the German Afrika Korps during their campaign. Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr Stickers are from Tamya and Verlinden. Some accessories are from BrickMania and BrickArms The Bren is inspired from the BrickMania model. Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr Heia Safari! by Veynom, on Flickr
  19. crazymotion

    Lego WW2, Winter war 1939

    My recent history brickfilm about war in Finland in 1939
  20. A Marine squad cautiously moves through the jungles of Guadalcanal, towards the newly captured Henderson Field 1942. March to the Airfield, Guadalcanal 1942 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr March to the Airfield, Guadalcanal 1942 by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  21. Hi all, It's a Soviet light bomber used in WW2. You will see the building technique similar to that applied in my last model, Bf109E. Enjoy! Features: - 2 x 23mm cannons on wings - 2 x 7.62mm MG on wings - 1 x 12.7mm Berezin defensive MG (can be aimed freely) - 6 x 100kg bombs (4 carried inside the wings, 2 mounted below) - 8 x 82mm anti-tank rockets (laser shooter bricks) - Cockpit accepts 2 minifigs - Throttle lever tilts back and forth - Landing gear retracts completely into the wings (VERY sturdy as well!) - Navigation lamps. (red, green, white) It's an homage to the tradition of Lego's airport sets that always had navigation lamps on the commercial airliners. - Engine may be separated for repair - Intake and exhaust slits for the radiator and oil cooler - National insignia is made out of bricks; no stickers used. Designed to be visible from all sides. - All white winter camouflage - Retractable skis for landing/takeoff on deep snow (optional) I have posted a video on YouTube so that you can see the moving parts:
  22. Here is a WW2 1942 build inspired by Call of Duty 2's Stalingrad Missions Repairing the Wire by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr Repairing the Wire by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr
  23. Brickopath

    [MOC] Focke-Wulf FW190A

    Features: 2 x 8mm MG 4 x 20mm Cannon Canopy slides back to open Throttle lever Cockpit accepts a minifig pilot Naviagation lamps (red, green, white) Retractable landing gear National insignia built in bricks; no stickers used Camouflage painting applied on all sides using bricks Engine can be separated for inspection
  24. A_Goodman

    MOC A Band of Brothers

    A Band of Brothers by Nicholas Goodman, on Flickr A super simple build but with the new military section I thought I would post it
  25. Hi all, This is a German jet fighter in WW2. Features: - 4 x 30mm cannon barrels visible on the nose - National insignia made in bricks; no stickers used - Canopy opens backwards - Accepts a minifig pilot - Retractable landing gear - Navigation lamps (red, green, white) - Fuselage can be broken into 2 parts - A transparent support is required when the gears are extended because the tail is heavier than the nose. In the real fighter the nose would be way heavier because of the cannons and the engines, but my model is all ABS plastic so the weight difference cannot be put into practice.