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Found 132 results

  1. Warning: long post ahead! Go and get your cuppa first... This thread was supposed to be my 3-stage WIP-story and entry for the BMR OcTRAINber 2019 Technic Challenge. I was ecstatic when the theme was announced, trains+technic is exactly what I like building. Unfortunately, life conspired against me, and I have no access to my bricks this month. I can still enter the contest, but with an unpublished 3.5-year-old version of the model, rather than a new one as I would have liked. This also means the pictures and videos are far from ideal, since they were only taken for a personal record rather than a contest entry. Nevertheless, here we go. My subject: the British Railways Plasser Theurer "General Purpose Crane" GPC72. A fairly simple, robust and versatile self-propelled maintenance crane, they were often used for track laying. They could be coupled up and work in tandem to replace large track panels on double track lines, or work over one end lifting individual rails and components. For a whole host of prototype photos, visit Paul Bartlett's amazing site: https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/plassercrane My model V1 was built in March 2015. I had only recently acquired Power Functions components, and decided to have a go at building a decent, functioning rail crane. The result looks a bit of a mess, but worked rather well and proved the concept worked in LEGO. The two switches were used to operate the two m-motors, mounted side-by-side under the chassis. The nearest one is clearly connected directly to the winch spool, whilst the far one operated a gear train to slew the superstructure. The boom was raised and lowered manually, using the mini linear actuator - I'd ran out of motors and space by this point, and the switches meant this was never going to be a fully remote-controlled model anyway. Of course, it was a bit of a cheat. Power, propulsion, and speed control of the functions was provided by a "PF wagon". I could have built it into a Class 08... but I didn't. Overall, the crane worked surprisingly well and was great to play simulate operations with, but it just looked a bit... odd. I wasn't really satisfied with messy cables and the PF wagon either. Therefore, a year later, V2 was built. The functionality and controls remained exactly the same, but everything from the mechanism to the aesthetics was rebuilt from the ground up. And she looks much better for it! Slightly longer buffer-to-buffer and adhering to my now-standard 7w (perfect for British models), there's more space to fit everything in. The battery box is mounted sideways under the front bonnet, which makes it slightly too blocky for the prototype but it looks good enough. The motors are in similar positions to before, and the switches have moved to the rear bonnet. The IR receiver was the one component I didn't bother to hide, but the real thing has a fair amount of clutter above deck too so I wasn't too bothered. The boom is only red because I didn't have a yellow one when I took these photos! Use of this part over standard bricks allowed me to include boom extension as a manual function. Eventually I got a yellow boom, and replaced the over-sized pulleys with twice as many smaller ones. Note that the battery box had also been stolen for something else by this point! Annoyingly, these sub-standard photos and unpolished model must be my entry for "OcTRAINber - The Technic Challenge", since it's the latest model I've built and filmed. So here it is. But that doesn't mean this model doesn't stop there! I've been building several digital versions since 2016, culminating in V3 - the ultimate. This was what I'd hoped to get home, build and enter for the contest, but it's not going to happen until at least Christmas now. With cleaner (if blockier) lines, stronger motor mountings and another complete redesign for the superstructure, she's better than ever. I pondered fitting in a micro motor to control the boom remotely, but it didn't sit well, would prevent unlimited 360-degree rotation, and I can't find many sold in the UK. I did make sure this design allows easy replacement of the switches with an IR receiver though, and vice-versa. If some of the part choices seem a little odd, it's because I'm planning to build it from my existing collection of bricks - I hope to build this latest model, if there's time over Christmas. Until then, more photos and V3's LDD file are available at https://bricksafe.com/pages/Collet22/general-purpose-crane. Happy building!
  2. Hello! Recently I built an alternative model using only parts from set 42108. It is a roto-telehandler, mainly based on JCB Hydraload. All functions are manual: - boom raise/lower - fork tilt - turret rotation - 4 wheels steering - stabilizers There are 2 attachments: fork and hook. It is in the same scale as my other models (1.21) and instructions can be found here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-43871/technicprojects/jcb-roto-telehandler/?inventory=1#comments Functions summary: I hope you like it!
  3. Motorized model of a crawler crane with Mindstorms EV3. Features driven tracks, and superstructure functions controlled by an automated distribution gearbox. Functions/features: Driven tracks Boom elevation Boom extension Winch Superstructure rotation Ever since TLG released the rotary catch pieces from the Bugatti set I sought to incorporate it in a distribution gearbox so that I could control 4 functions with 2 motors. However, I did not want the play experience to be constantly interrupted by shifting the gearbox. For instance, if I used PF and installed a stepper mechanism to control the gearbox, I'd constantly have to count how many "shifts" I've done to ensure the right function is engaged. With that in mind, I realized Mindstorms EV3 is the perfect solution to this - by simply utilizing a touch sensor, the mechanism can detect how far the shifting motor has rotated thus automatically selecting the right function. The gearbox, which sits at the heart of the superstructure, features a cam attached to the shifting motor to hit a touch sensor. When a command is received from the remote, the shifting motor rotates until the touch sensor is pressed, then the EV3 tells the shifting motor to rotate a certain number of degrees to select the corresponding function. This utilizes a switch/case for the remote, and because it features up to 11 button combinations all superstructure functions are controlled from the same channel (channel 2 on the remote). This gives controlling the model a very natural feel, and sometimes I even forgot that I was controlling a distribution gearbox because the EV3 shifts it so seamlessly. As for driving, it too uses a switch/case for the remote. Because it's just a simple tank drive, the commands for this are much more straightforward compared to the gearbox functions. Driving is controlled from channel 1 on the remote. Additionally, there are sound effects that play while operating the crane. Pressing the left two buttons together in the 1st channel starts the engine (thus starting the program), and pressing the right two together stops it (thus ending the program). Because the PF IR remote uses levers instead of buttons, this effectively makes the model inoperable with only a PF remote. The EV3 remote feels more natural for controlling this model too, as some superstructure functions (boom elevation and superstructure rotation) involves pressing two buttons simultaneously. In the end, I'm pretty satisfied with how this model turned out. I was initially worried that this gearbox I had in mind won't work as smoothly as I imagined, but it turned out to work flawlessly. It often made me forget that I was even controlling a gearbox as the EV3 does the shifting for me. Of course, there's still areas that could be improved - for instance, the boom extension and winch operate pretty slowly. Not using a worm gear in those mechanisms probably would've helped, but that would mean the mechanism becomes "unlocked" as soon as the gearbox disengages it. Occasionally the gearbox would jam, making me restart the program, but overall the finished model met my expectations. Video: Photos:
  4. Hello everyone! Before I start I want to wish all of you to stay healthy, survive and win the disease! Today at my birthday I decided to share with you my latest MOC. This is a brand new Liebherr LR 11000. From the previous model, it took only some boom sections and proportions. The chassis and superstructure built from nothing and were rebuild several times. Below please let me share with you some dry specifications of the model: - Crane is about 2 meter high - weights 5 kg - requires at least 5 big battery boxes for been fully operated - can be managed by 3 sBrick units. - has 10 PF motors (4 are in the chassis) - Has 9 pneumatic cylinders + a pump - Has a full-size V6 diesel fake engine like the real crane - Has 6 winches, 3 of them are installed to the boom like in the real crane, but none of the motors are on the booms. - Crane is able to assemble and disassemble back from horizontal to working condition without any human help. - Has 4 pneumatic features, three of them are operated from the cabin, two of them are operated from the operators work seat Now is hte time for it's features: - Driving and steering - one XL motor per each track. Torgue increased 1:25 - Slewing by 2 M motors - L Motor for SA Frame winch - L Motor for the Main boom winch - M motor for the luffing jib winch - M motor for the secondary hook winch - L motor for the main hook winches - Pneumatically adjustable operators cabin - Pneumatically adjustable derrick counterweight horizontally - Pneumatically adjustable derrick counterweight vertically - Pneumatically rising chassis for (dis)assemble. - L motor for the pump and V6 engine - Individual Sbrick custom profile - 3 Pair of lights: - Front LED - Cab LED - Main hook winches LED Here is the link to photos, I'll post some directly here: https://bricksafe.com/pages/Aleh/2020-lego-liebher-lr-11000 Bonus: Here is the performance of the superstructure stability without boom and without counterweight(!), only one battery box insalled for fotors activity. Boxes are full with batteries (24 pcs) Easy to fix the front suspension: https://bricksafe.com/files/Aleh/2020-lego-liebher-lr-11000/IMG_2983.jpeg/800x600.jpg 1,5 kg load. Please enjoy and feel free to ask any questions.
  5. hi, This is a large ev3 magnetic crawler crane.It uses five motors, two sensors and two EV3 bricks.Two L motors for drive, one M motor for hook and two NXT motors for boom. Buiding instructions here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-43016/mic8per/track3d-crane-an-ev3-magnetic-crawler-crane/?inventory=1#comments Video:
  6. The upcoming 42082 Rough terrain crane has inspired a whole list of possible improvements because I believe that at this scale some cool functions could/should be modeled (in random order): Two stage outriggers, preferably PF controlled Multiple steering modes (minimal 2: 4WS and front wheel steering) Pendular front axle Luffing jib, folding away against the boom Second winch for secondary hook Replace LA’s which lift the boom with an actuator with a longer stroke for bigger range in the boom angle Cosmetic changes to cabin, engine cover and upper structure to resemble real cranes more like Grove or Terex Some of these are probably overly ambitious and I’m not claiming to be able build all these MODs in one single model, but I am curious to see how far I can take this. My first step is to take a look at possible two stage outriggers. So far I’m tinkering in LDD to find mechanisms for the horizontal stage which are rigid enough to support the Crane and compact enough to fit on both ends of the 42082. I think it must be possible to fit the outriggers in a module measuring 5x7x23 studs. The ultimate goal would be to lift the crane from its wheels, but considering the size and weight of the 42082, I would be happy if the outriggers can simply provide actual support. Progress so far:
  7. Hi Everyone, I built a Luffing Tower Crane, I tried to make it as realistic as possible. Sorry for the poor image quality, lighting wasn't the best. I am currently working on a High-top Tower Crane.
  8. I am a real fan of Lucio Switch, but I also like to do my own models. This one was based on Lucio 8x8 truck, but adding some personal touch. To be honest is a little bit fake. I run of of pieces and due of this, only one side of the model was completed. The brick consumption of this scale is terrible. I don´t know the exact number of bricks, but must be around 11000. ) electric motors, 4 x power function batteries and 4 x RC controls from the Volvo wheel loader. This model is very good looking, but absolutely senseless. Too big, too heavy and it squirms under its own weight. Next one will be smaller, for sure, but was a nice try.
  9. Yes, another C-model of the 42078 set In the last 3 months I enjoyed my spare time in building a C-model of the 42078 Mack Anthem. My truck is an 8x4 flatbed version, with foldable crane behind the cab. I worked a lot on the cab shape, as already mentioned in @grego18f topic, who was building a Volvo FH too! It has opening doors but no tilting cab and no fake engine (I preferred a better looking cab than changing the shape to let the cab tilt). The crane is functional (all functions are manual), knobs are on both sides of the model. Main problem is the absence of the turntable. The crane is quite stable, but of course cannot load heavy loads. You can of course mod it adding a small turntable Outriggers control knob is on the back: I added 2 attachments: fake hook with chains, to move a small container, and forklift to move small pallets. Video: Model consists of around 1500 parts (so you have around 1000 leftover parts - mostly small parts and Lego System bricks). Instructions can be found on rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-34643/technicprojects/volvo-crane-truck Stickers are custom made and could be available for purchase soon. I hope you like it!
  10. Hello everyone! I finally finished my build, made the video, edited the video, aaaannnnnnndddddd..... POSTED THE VIDEO!!! I would like to say thanks so much to everyone who offered advice and critiques throughout the build process. Please read through the build log below for more information about the truck, but for now, please enjoy the video! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I started out with a bit of a classical Mad Max-style build... A hot-rod, with an oversized engine, and high suspension... And nice pointy bits sticking out all over the place. It has since morphed into a hot-rod mated with monster truck, sprouting a crane from the middle, on Claas tires and requiring 12 shock absorbers... And its motorized! Photos will come tomorrow with the sun and the good lighting.
  11. REVIEW - 42082 - ROUGH TERRAIN CRANE INTRODUCTION The biggest set of the second wave of 2018 sets is the Rough Terrain Crane. Actually, it is THE biggest Technic set ever, with 4057 parts, surpassing the 42055 - Bucket Wheel Excavator, which has 3929 parts. This set contains 128 parts more than the BWE. Which immediately raises the question; has TLG purposely made this set bigger, so it has the highest part count ever? The reason I am asking out loud, is that there has been some debate in the Technic Forum about the growing size of the sets, related to the functions. Some say that the part count is intentionally high, without adding significantly more (or better) functionality. While I do see a trend in sets getting bigger (i.e. higher part count, thus higher price), I don't think that TLG designers are filling their workday finding out ways to add lots of unnecessary parts. I do like to think that the style of building is adapting/evolving to the contemporary standards/requirements. Of course, I don't want to sound too naive, because at the end of the day, it's all 'bout the money. It's all 'bout the dun dun do do do dumb. I don't think it's funny to..... Anyway, why not use this review to dive into this delicate matter. Before we start I like to point out that I do like big sets. The experience of opening the box and seeing the plethora of parts is overwhelming. On the other hand, with Technic sets getting more and more expensive, I can understand that people stop buying the (bigger) sets. In this review, I simply want to find out if this set could have been made with, let's say, 3000-odd parts while maintaining the same functionality. Another thing I'd like to address in this review is the use of extra elements (playable items), like a chains, tools etc. There has been some debate about this in the Technic forum, so I like to give you my opinion. If you see this icon, you can click the image on the left or right side of the image, to cycle through alternative images. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42082 Title: Rough Terrain Crane Theme: Technic Released: 2018 Part Count: 4.057 Box Weight: > 5kg (I forgot to weigh the box, because my kitchen scale couldn't handle it.) Box Dimensions: 57,5 cm x 47,2 cm x 16,5 cm Set Price (RRP): £ / $ 299.99 / € 229,99 Price per Part: £ / $ 0.074 / € 0,056 Links: Brickset, Bricklink So, with an RRP of 229 euro, the price per part comes down to 5,6 cent per part, which is a steal. It's even slightly less than the BWE (5,9 cents per part). This makes it one of the cheapest Technic sets in terms of price per part. Let's compare some stats with previous flagships. COMPARISON WITH OLDER SETS 2011 - 8110 - Unimog - 189 euro, 2048 parts, 9,3 cent per part. 2012 - 9398 - 4x4 Crawler - 169 euro, 1327 parts, 12,8 cent per part. 2013 - 42009 - Mobile Crane Mk II - 199 euro, 2606 parts, 7,7 cent per part. 2014 - 42030 - Volvo L350F - 219 euro, 1636 parts, 13,4 cent per part. 2015 - 42043 - Arocs - 199 euro, 2793 parts, which is 7,2 cent per part. 2016 - 42055 - BWE - 229 euro, 3929 parts, 5,9 cents per part. 2017 - 42070 - All Terrain Truck - 249 euro, 1862 parts, 13,4 cent per part. 2018 - 42082 - Rough Terrain Crane - 229 euro, 4057 parts, 5,6 cent per part. All of these sets have Power Functions, some more than others. The Volvo is literally packed with Power Functions, which explains the high price and low part count. A potential candidate for a comparison with the 42082 - Rough Terrain Crane is the 42009 - Mobile Crane Mk II. The 42009 packs 2606 parts for 7,7 cent per part, while the 42082 packs 4057 parts for 5,6 cent per part. So, the universally praised Mk II crane has a 37,5% increase in price per part. Or the 42082 has a 27,3% decrease in price per part, depending on how you want to look at it. That is 5 years ago, and I'm not taking inflation into account. In other words; for 30 euro extra you get 1451 extra parts. This comes down to 2,1 cent per parts, which isn't bad at all. Some of you might argue that this is not the way to compare two sets, but these numbers are based on RRP and part count, which are numbers we can work with. Since this set has four of the big Claas wheels, a gearbox, and not a lot of PF, I could also compare it to the 42070. But that set was way overpriced, so I don't think that would be fair. The average price of a part in a flagship, based on these 8 sets, is 9,4 cent. So for 229 euro you can expect 2155 parts. You get 1901 more than that. Thus drawing the preliminary conclusion that this set is big, but the price is more than reasonable. Of course, the original debate wasn't focused on the price per se, but whether the models are getting unnecessarily big. Let's carry on unboxing so we can find out. THE BOX The front of the box shows the model and its Power Functions components, a Battery Box and a Large Motor. No sign of new Powered Up elements yet. It also shows a picture of the model with an extended boom, measuring 100 cm high till the end of the boom and a chassis size of 48 cm long. Going by the size this isn't some two-bit crane. But size doesn't always matter. The box has the same width and height as last year's flagship (42070 - 6x6 All Terrain Truck), but it's a couple of centimeters deeper. INSIDE FLAP Like the 42070, this box also has the flap, common to flagship sets. The inside shows a big picture of the model, which is most likely almost 1:1 scale. It's pretty impressive, that's for sure. You can also see that the upper body with the boom can rotate freely, thus 360 degree. This means that most of the mechanics, and battery box, are probably placed in the upper body and not in the chassis. This makes sense, and we have seen it before. Another picture shows the boom can be raised up to 60 degrees. BACKSIDE The back is divided into two sections/sides. The left side shows the functions of the main model, while the right side shows the alternative model, a Mobile Pile Driver. I will express my love for the B-model later this review CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1x Inner box 1x Sealed pack with two booklets and the sticker sheet 4x Rim 4x Tire 25x Numbered bags (8 of which are in the inner box) INNER BOX The inner box contains the sealed pack with instruction booklets and sticker sheet. And it contains the bags for steps 1 to 4. INSTRUCTION BOOKLETS Two instruction booklets. One for the chassis and one for the crane. Makes you wonder if one person can start building the chassis, while the other starts working on the crane. STICKER SHEET Quite a few stickers to decorate this model. A construction vehicle just isn't the same without black and yellow stripes. And of course, a bunch of stickers indicating how to operate the functions. POWER FUNCTIONS ELEMENTS A battery box and a large motor. TIRES These, so called Unimog Tires, seems to be very common nowadays, but they have only been used in two Technic sets before. RIMS Four big red rims, also used in the 42054 - Claas Xerion and the 42077 - Rally Car. TIRES ON RIMS Here a picture with the tires fitted on the rims. NUMBERED BAGS A total of 25 numbered bags. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS Actually there is only one interesting part in this set and that is the 11 x 11 Curved Gear Rack (or banana gear as some call them) from the 42055 - Bucket Wheel Excavator in a new color black. I am very happy that this gear has appeared in a color which can more easily be used in a MOC, for example an EV3 Robot Not sure why I forgot to take a picture of the part itself, but here is a picture of the subassembly. This set contains a total of eight of these curved gear racks. PART LIST A whopping 4.057 parts, but still only two pages with parts. THE BUILD Bags, bags, bags and more bags. Lucky for us, they are numbered. If you like a challenge, open all the bags and create a big unsorted pile. That will keep you busy for quite some time. I will simply go from step to step As expected we start with the chassis. And to be more precise; with the gearbox in the chassis. Really, orange pins?! Yes, really! Right off the bat, lots of gears are added to the chassis. A white clutch gear is used in the bottom of the chassis. This indicates that these gears/axles will be connected to the Power Functions. At the end of the first step the center of the chassis has finished. This chassis with center gearbox is kind of reminiscent of models like th 8110 - Unimog and the 8258 - Crane Truck. Lots of gears, densily packed in a small space. There's little room left. The bottom of the gearbox. This set contains the 5x7 frames in two colors, light bluish grey and black. This is what you can do with two different color frames. I am not really fond of these kind of solutions, but I understand it can be convenient. Ohhh, and then there's the green liftarms. Because we need green in a red vehicle. I reckon someone opened up the bucket with green dye, so we do need to use more of these of parts in green Actually, I am being semi-serious here. The Forest Machine uses these liftarms in green, so it's probably cost-effective to use them in multiple sets. We are seeing this with other parts as well. For example, the beforementioned orange 3L pins with bush and white 1L connector, etc. TLG tends to minimize the overall number of different parts used in (Technic) sets. I reckon this has something to do with optimizing their warehouse space. New parts are added every year and storage space is limited. Instead of using five different colors TLG uses one (maybe two) color. Doing this over the entire range of sets will save up a lot of space. Technic seems to be the ideal theme to use these kind of strategies. And it adheres to the "color vommit in the chassis" strategy. One of the wheel assemblies. As you can see there is no actual suspension. Not even pendular suspension. Which seems odd for an Rough Terrain Crane, but I am no expert. Here's the subassembly attached to the center of the chassis. An almost similar assembly attached to the other side. Instead of green liftarms, this one uses orange ones. This way you can more easily tell the sides apart. This is actually not a bad thing. I have mentioned it before, but I am actually a big fan of the color vommit approach. Altough I must admit that using these orange 3L pins with bush is definitely pusing it. Blue might have been a better choice, but that would have confliced with the Bugatti color scheme. Therefore, I think TLG made the decision to use orange in this as well. By the way; this set does also contain 40 of these 3L pins with bush in black. The picture below shows how you can align the wheels. After aligning them, you slide the 16T gear in position. When I was building the set, I wondered why there was space between the gear and the liftarm, but it soon made sense. A subassebly for the outriggers. I do like the design, but as with most outriggers on Technic models, they op...e....ra.....te.....ve......ry......slow......ly. I would love to show you a video of the outriggers, but since it's Tuesday now, I don't have enough time to lower them before the embargo date of this review Just kidding of course. They do take a while, but since they are outriggers I find this acceptable. As long as the other functions aren't that slow. The chassis with front and rear wheel assemblies, and the front and rear outriggers. This is what you would expect from a crane this size. No unncessary use of extra parts so far. Next stop is the V8 engine with white oil filter and orange propellor/fan. I really like the oil filter. It's simple, but it adds detail to the model. The choice of orange as the color for the propellor seems odd, but it's likely a safety precaution. The emphasize that this is a part you need to watch, since it will be rotating when you move the crane. Not entirely sure, but it must be something along these lines. After the engine you will be building the connection between the chassis and the upper structure (crane body). This is done by using eight curved gear racks and an ingenious system in between. Click on the images to construct the ring. At that point you will attach the rims and the chassis is done. Worth noting is that the wheel caps in the rims use a lot of extra parts. Per cap approximately 12 parts are used, which boils down to 48 extra parts, just for the caps. This picture will be very hard to shoot with the crane attached, so I will give it to you now. This model implements Ackerman Steering Geometry. Or Reversed Ackerman Steering. Or even Reversed Reversed Ackerman Steering hehe. Not sure what the consensus in the forum was. I am no expert on steering assemblies, but Ackerman Steering boils down to the inner wheels turning at a different angle than the outer wheels, due to the fact the outer wheels have to travel a wider diameter. Ackerman Steering is something Technic fans like to see in models. For more information I suggest you start with Wikepedia and go from there SECOND BOOKLET This is an interesting part in the build. Reminds us of the 8043 - Motorized Excavator. Admittedly, I didn't think of this myself, but it has been addressed in the forum. Since the two 20T Bevel Gear with Pinhole have been placed on opposite sides of the actuators, this results in them turning in a different direction when the boom is raised (or lowered). Basically, this means that when the boom is raised, one of the LA's extends, while the other retracts. If one of the 20T gears was placed the other way around, this problem would not occur. Of course, the turning direction of one of the axles feeding the LA should be reversed for this to work. Since the gears attached to the LA's only rotate a tiny fraction when raising the boom, it leads me to believe that this is a calculated flaw. In this video I try to demonstrate the issue at hand. You continue to work your way back to the rear of the superstructure. Again, lots of gears and space which will be filled with gearboxes. This is the point in the second booklet where you can't build any further, untill you finish the first booklet. At this stage you will attach the upper section to the chassis. The boom is really massive. Feels solid like a rock. I am impressed with the sturdyness of this boom. It does a lot of panels and H-frames, so it's only logical, but I was still impressed. No wormgear to extend the boom this time. The other side of the boom with a white clutch gear for safety. The boom attached to the crane. Needless to say I am having a hard time getting the entire boom in the picture. The back of the upper section is closed with panels. The black ones can be removed for easy access to the battery. There are two gearboxes on the top of the crane. The left (bottom) one is to switch between crane and chassis functions. The right (upper) one is to switch between raising/lowering the boom, extracting/retracting the boom and lowering/raising the hook. The chassis functions are rotating the super structure and raising/lowering the outriggers. COMPLETED MODEL It is rather difficult to shoot decent pictures in the photo studio. I sure hope sets won't get much bigger than this. Looking at this model, I think TLG has done a remarkable job with this Rough Terrain Crane. The black chassis, with red elements, combined with the red super structure looks spot on. Lots of technic gears and elements provide an interesting build. I love how the two (or three) gearboxes work together. Here you can clearly see the gearbox on this side of the chassis is used to rotate the crane. Because of the weight, the chassis tends to bend a little, but nothing to worry about. The boom of the crane can exend way more than this, but that makes is impossible for me to take pictures. A close up from the front of the vehicle. The cabin door swings open to reveal the interior of the cabin. And one from the reaar. I'm sorry I don't have anymore pictures of the completed model, but I think you have seen most of it. You can find out more by building it yourself FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS This model packs features you would expect from a mobile crane. Raising/Lowering the boom Extracting/Retracting the boom Raising/Lowering the hook Raising/Lowering the outriggers Four wheel (Ackermann) steering Working fake engine Other than that there are some details like two cabinets which can be opened to store some gear. TLG has even added some walls which can be turned into part of a house or cabin. OUTRIGGERS Okay, let's get this out of the way. The outriggers are slow, really slow. I turned them on this morning and when I came home from work, they were halfway. Obviously, I am joking...I didn't go to work today. It's not that bad, but it would be nice if they operated a wee bit faster. You do need to use the four plates for them to properly reach the ground. STEERING AND DRIVING For a set this size steering and driving work properly. Even better than I expected. CRANE The thing I am most impressed with are the crane functions. These work like a charm. And, unlike the 42043 - Mercedes Arocs, this gearbox (or rather gearboxes) is very easy to understand. One look at the stickers is all it takes to be able to operate this thing. It offers a ton of playability. Linking gearboxes, instead of direct connection to a motor, can cause some slack. This can be seen when turning the crane. But this is just a minor gripe, just like the outriggers. DOOR A nice detail is the sliding door. PLAYABLE ITEMS It's time to talk about the added playable items, like this toolbox. Some people don't feel this is necessary and some even seem to be a bit annoyed by it. I have addressed this in my 42069 - Extreme Adventure review where I state that I like these added details. And I still do. The Forest Machine also packs some extra's like a chainsaw, some logs etc. Actually, I see it in most of the Technic sets. What I have seen is that this greatly enhances playability for younger LEGO fans. I am absolutely aware that this is a 11+ set, so it is not designed for a 5-year old. But seeing a 5-year old play with these Technic models and use all the extra items in the set for his "story" makes you realise that by adding playable items to a Technic set, it suddenly becomes a set for all ages. So, a handful of extra parts might be enough to prepare a 5-year old for Technic enthusiasm later down the line. After all, he (or she) is the future Technic target audience. Therefore, I am 100% in favor of adding these little details to Technic sets, even if these sets are 11+. PART COUNT And now for the part count discussion. No doubt this model could have been made using less parts. It you take away the playable items, wheel caps, grey construction panel and outrigger plates, you already save a couple of hundred parts. In the old days a Technic model used to be liftarms with gears inside. These days are over. Models are becoming more and more realistically looking, which means that less of the interior is visible. This also goes for the boom for example. In the old days we would have seen the interior of the boom and now it's covered with panels. I am not convinced that TLG is deliberately adding parts to the boom just to have more parts. I think TLG is doing this because they need to compete with other toys in the stores and these toys look like the real thing. Therefore TLG wants its models to look more like the real thing to, resulting in adding panels and other embellishments. Granted, TLG's marketing department won't mind having the biggest Technic set every year, so they can use this in Ads. Like I said in the introduction; I am a fan of big sets. I love putting together a 4057 part set. But I reckon people are more upset about the price of bigger sets than the part count. This can be a false assumption, because I know not all AFOLs think like this. But if TLG had used 3057 parts instead of 4057 they could have easily maintained the same RRP. 3000 parts at 229 euro is 7,6 cents a piece, which is still rather cheap. So my conclusion is that TLG might have upped the part count a bit, but still presented this set at a very affordable price. We already see this set popping up for around 179 euro, which boils down to 4,5 cent a piece, which is extremely affordabl for a Technic set. For me it would have been an issue if TLG priced this set at 349 euro RRP. Then I would have figured TLG was doing it on purpose. Basically, this is a UCS-like Technic set and you get it for 229 euro, or less if you do some online shopping. Personally, I think this is extremely good value for money. Of course your mileage may vary, but this is how I see things. B-MODEL The B-model, a Mobile Pile Driver, is a cop out, nothing more, nothing less. I mean, seriously?! 4000+ parts and we get a model that is 95% the same as the original model. And if that's not the worst part, it's ugly AF, as some people would like to phrase it. The Pile Driver extension looks like something I could have built....when I was four . Maybe, well probably, I am insulting someone at The LEGO Group, but I can only hope that they were lacking time and/or resources, so they came up with this at the last moment. The argument of time is rendered invalid, because this is what you can in a couple of days. Well, maybe not everybody, but @nico71 was able to turn this set into a front loader. Nobody will probably argue that this would have been a better B-model. Not sure what TLG's policy is regarding alternate models but the 42030 isn't in production anymore, so I don't see any reason not go for something like this. The rear view of the model. And even the grey construction elements can be turned into something useful. SUMMARY I am a big fan of this set. It packs a lot of functionality and parts, for a decent price. The forum contains pages and pages with potential improvements, but that's out of scope for my review. Almost every set gets improved by AFOLs, so that's no surprise. Bottomline is that this is great set for existing AFOLs and new AFOLs alike. I can remember coming out of my dark ages in 2005, building the 8421 - Mobile Crane, which had a whopping 1885 parts. I remember the endless quantity of parts coming out of the box. Imagine a set with more than twice the part count. And again, this doesn't automatically mean a better set, but you will be impressed when you open this box. Much has been said about the color vommit in the chassis of this model. I have grown fond of color vommit, because I like the variety in the parts. I do enjoy seeing all the colored parts. However, using orange 3L Pins with Bush is pushing it to the limit, especially on a red model. I would have preferred blue instead of orange. My final conclusion is that for around 200 euro, you do get a LOT of value for money. I can see myself getting an extra copy, just because of that. I would almost go as far a stating that this could be considered a UCS Technic set. PROS Good looking model Properly working functions (even Ackermann steering) Several (linked) gearboxes Great parts pack (especially for people new to Technic) Very affordable, almost cheap CONS Some slack due to drivetrains and gearboxes Outriggers operate very slowly No suspension No special parts besides the new curved gear rack in black SCORE How do I rate this set? 9 DESIGN I love the looks, color scheme, everything. 9 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Very enjoyable build with several gearboxes and other functionality. 8 FEATURES Great features, with some room for improvement. No suspension though. 9 PLAYABILITY Implemented features provide lots of playability. 8 PARTS Mostly common parts, but you do get a lot of them. 10 VALUE FOR MONEY Price goes down to 4,8 cent per part if you shop around. It doesn't get any cheaper than this. 8,8 UCS ANYONE? Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  12. Hello, everyone! I've mentioned that a lot of you liked my 42100 mini-replica so the time has come to release another Micro-model in the "Control -" line up :) This time I chose 42082 to be downsized. This crane and mini-Liebherr, both are in almost the same scale. The crane has all the same functions as it's "big brother": -AWD with fake engine -All-wheels steering -Deployable outriggers -Turning the tower -Lifting and elongating the boom -Winch All functions can be controlled via knobs on the sides and on the back of the tower. As bonus thing it also has a compartment for outriggers' plates. Here is the video which shows how all this machinery works. Thanks for watching. Merry Christmas and a happy New Year!
  13. Imma start a dedicated thread for this set as well. All info so far: Rough terrain crane 4057 parts 229 Euro 1 meter telescopic crane. With power functions. Largest TECHNIC set for parts. 4 wheel steering. V8 engine sticking out at the rear, uncovered. Unimog wheels with covers. 5 motorized functions: - Raising boom - Extending boom - Lowering winch - Lowering outriggers - Rotating superstructure B mode: drilling vehicle.
  14. This model was inspired from this set-733 like MOC by @AFOL7777. I turned it into a railroad-served industrial track ballast loading facility to have the crane load dark bluish gray 1 x 1 round bricks into the crane's bucket. Then you can drop them into train hopper's when they arrive with the pull of a sliding plate. You may have noticed I had to extend the height of the model 1 brick, to allow for Diesel 10 to fit underneath, as he is the primary engine to work the ballast facility. (His claw made him too tall, but it's okay now.) The tan tile parts under the crane are the pull pins to make the coal fall into the hopper cars. Inside of the crane with "controls" for the bucket motors and the crane itself, which travels along some narrow-gauge tracks and can swing from side to side. In reality, the "hand of god" method is used to make the crane move, with a rope extending to the roof of the crane cabin which I can wind and unwind to load and unload the ballast into the train cars. The office of the owner of the ballast operations. The reason for the odd footprint is the factory MOC I made earlier this year resulted in a base-plate piece (dimensions 16 x 48 studs) that I was looking to use somewhere.... enter into the picture this model, and now I've nearly solved that little issue. This 6 wide BR "Warship"class with hydraulic claw (AKA Diesel 10) model has been heavily modified by me from a old Class 37 file by LazarusBricks to have new removable roof sections for the cabs with seats for figures and cab controls. As you can see, I chose to leave off the face to keep the engine more in line with the rest of my locomotives. Diesel 10 works the ballast facility most of the time, so I included him here. I'm going to have my Diesel 10 model pull 6 of these coal cars plus a brake van inspired by the 1980's 12v era red/ yellow sets to my gravel facility. The 12v era model and Diesel 10 are already built, and the plank wagons are on order as of 1/11/2020. NOTE: All credit for the six dark grey wagon models seen in the picture above goes to @Pdaitabird, who designed them. See here on Flickr for the awesome tutorial by him for the construction of the BR plank wagon. BUILDERS NOTES: The ballast facility is now done, but the trucks to be filled with the crushed rocks are not (yet). More pictures to come soon!
  15. Hi, Probably not the wisest move with three other projects ongoing, but a couple of weeks ago I couldn't resist starting again on designing the Liebherr LTM11200 crane: Some of you may remember the first version of this, which I designed a couple of years ago: This time however I try to iron out all the kinks that were present in the earlier version. It is still work in progress and even though the performance has improved over the earlier version I am still far from a smooth operating, well working machine. Especially the retracting of the outriggers and the whole steering system are still pretty poor performance wise. As you can see I have changed the colour scheme to a more available white with orange livery. Comments, questions and advice are welcome Leg godt Jeroen
  16. Has anyone tried to motorise this large turntable. It is approximately 60mm diameter compared with the standard, smaller, 55mm turntable but I cannot find a gear combination that lines up with the standard beam hole spacing. Help please!
  17. "I've been working on the railroad, all the live-long day!" This train consists of a ALCO diesel locomotive (specifically a RSD-12 type) and six cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - tool / worker bunk car - weed killer tanker - wide-vision bay-window caboose. The train model features several neat printed pieces found in several Juniors sets and and seven generic track workers. (as seen below) ...while the roadbed crew consists of: -Bucket-lift truck from set 3179 (Repair truck) -Dump Truck from set 7789 (Lotso's dump truck) Drill vehicle MOD from 7936 (level crossing) Front end-loader from set 7630 (front end-loader) ...and a official's inspection car MOC - not yet built This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. (no picture taken yet of this car) This car is not your ordinary tanker car - it contains weed killer for use on the ballast the train lays down. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) Here we see how the crane is hooked up to the depressed center flatcar most of the time. The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I tunrned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom door open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. (no picture taken yet of this car) This is the workers tool car. In reality it's empty, but it's supposed to have rows of racks for tools, and a special box for broken tools to be fixed when they get back to the division HQ. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. This is where the job site foreman has a little office. The med kit is also located here. This is the headquarters for my Maintenance of Way operations for Brick Railway Systems. I was inspired by set 60009 (Helicopter Arrest) from 2013 for most of the building, while most of the inside details came from set 10027 (Train Engine Shed) in 2003 a whole ten years before the other set was even produced. As for the billboard on the roof, I borrowed the letter's design from my brother's model (with his permission), and put them on a billboard to spell out OCTAN. The tracks on the side of the building are for my ALCO RSD-12 and it's accompanying six car work train to sit and await their next task. The inside on the lower floor is furnished with a lathe, drill press, fire extinguisher, oil drum, and a vise. The upper floor (the break room) has a table, a few chairs, coffee machine (with paper cups!), fireplace, and a recycle bin. I will be updating this with the two missing pictures soon. As for the digital items, I will built them as funding allows. As usual, Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!!
  18. Minifig Lecturer

    [MOC] Building site

    I started this a little into the new year and let me say the good thing about a building site MOC is it doesn't have to look finished to be so. Woohoo! I realised then that I had never made a building site MOC which seemed a dereliction of duty considering building buildings is what us AFOLs do right? Being firmly stuck in the past when it comes to LEGO dimensions (the mathematical measurement method, not the game console games) I like to build 4-wide vehicles and so generally build buildings to a slightly smaller height than is common these days. Way back in 2007 or thereabouts I picked up the Tower Crane set (#7905). Looked great on the box but to be kind to it it looked terrible when included into my city at the time (like the Eiffel Tower did). Size of course was the big problem, too high and too wide, detraction. Conscious that the scale needed to fit be appropriate to the style of my city and also that the road needed to connect to another road the building site area was quite restrictive at 24x34 studs. This made it a little tricky to fit in everything (actually I didn't include any external scaffolding or portable cabin as a result of having no space to put it but in the end I added a further 16x48 baseplates to accommodate the roofed hoarding and side lane) but I find the restrictions made the build overall more enjoyable as there a little challenges here and there. The tower crane is 5x5 studs which itself introduces a few problems mainly related to the attachment of the ladders and boom. Two counterweights for the boom are used, one the official weight black brick but seeing that in reality you usually see grey concrete slabs (or things that look like concrete slabs) being used I tried to replicate this look. The big problem here was the simple fact that my counterweights combined were not heavy enough to support the boom with any significant load. So off I went to raid the tool box and filled a revised hollowed counterweight with nails (see here). Speaking of booms, the builders built this in record time to cash in before the next crash. Hope you Town fans and 4-wide loyalists out there like this build. Happy to hear people's thoughts or comments on it! I will look to replace these waste shoots with a white or another colour version at some point, just to add a splash of colour, not that too much LBG is bad or anything. Would like the 1x1x2 cylinders used for the streetlights not to have cutouts. Got the calculator out and the office area is accurate. Made a little microscale version of the 'finished building' for this billboard. The construction company logo is the jumping frogs. Maybe because they jumped legal hoops to avoid being prosecuted on health and safety grounds? Finally can get that Welder to work! Also you can look down the dry riser. Someones's not happy. Fact. All tower crane operators end up with glasses due to eye strain despite in cabin cameras. Just made that up.. The view from above. Please make sure your figs are not afraid of heights before looking down.
  19. Ngoc Nguyen

    42097 Spider Crane

    A-model functions: - 4 HOGs for each outward expansion of the outriggers. 2 knobs in the front, 2 knobs in the back. In other words, each outriggers swings out independently. - 4 HOGs for lowering of the outriggers through self-locking linkages. - Another 4 HOGs for each telescopic expansion of the outrigger. - HOG for turntable rotation. - HOG for boom lifting, through regular LA. - HOG for boom extension. - HOG for winch. - It appears the base of the superstructure crane has another level of elevation. B-model functions: - 2 HOGs for lowering of the outriggers through self-locking linkages. - 2 HOGs for each telescopic expansion of the outrigger. - I can't spot any knobs for outward expansion of the outrigger. But it doesn't make sense to not have them. - HOG for main tower erection, through regular LA. - 1 or 2 HOGs for main tower telescopic extension. The main tower is composed of two gear racks placed on top of each other. I spot 1 HOG for the bottom rack, but can't see any for the top rack Controlling all 4 outriggers is gonna be tedious... But the linkages are pure genius! Parts in new color: - Dog bone 3x5 in YELLOW. I spot 8 of them. 2 in the boom, 6 in the undercarriage. - Gear rack holder in YELLOW Rare parts: - 3x11 panels in YELLOW - T-liftarm 3x3 in YELLOW - Macaroni 90 degree connector in YELLOW (first appearance in 42094) - 6 holes pulley wheels in BLACK (first return in 42069) - Pin hole with pin in BLUE (first appearance in 42083) It uses the regular LA, not the XL LA in Liebherr. Sorry for this wrong info. The 2 outriggers in the B models have movement limitors. But I can't seem to spot them in the A model. I really wonder what will be used to stop the outriggers from swinging outwards too far.
  20. Hi guys, I’ve been following the forum for some years not, but I’ve been mostly a “lurker in the dark”. But, after 2.5 years designing and building when I had some spare time, I can finally share my 1:20 crawler crane MOC with you. For now it has somewhere around 40.000-60.000 parts (don’t know exactly how many). I’ve tried to build it as close as possible to a real crane in terms of assembly and functionality, with the usual constrains that you have with building out of Lego at this size and scale. As a disclaimer (and as a direct apology to Lego purists), the slewing bearing is not lego, but a cross roller bearing. The drive of the bearing is Lego, using the ¼ gear racks from the 42055 BWE. Took me about 6 monts to find a bearing that fits in size with the internal gearing of the gear racks, so that the driving axles still fit trough. Also, if you look really close, there were some occasions where I got out the Dremel for some adjusting (mainly panels), as I didn’t want to sacrifice strength, or design. Again, sorry to the purists. The crane is powere by 4 BuWizz, one in each central counterweight (between the crawlers), and one in each superstructure counterweights. I love the fact that you can still operate the BuWizz while it’s charging, so I have a power bank battery next to each BuWizz. Like this you get hours and hours of play time even with a large heavy model like this. The drive is as follows: - Each crawler is powered by 4 PF XL Motors (and one BuWizz per crawler) geared down 240:1. The motors don’t drive the ends of the crawler, but 8 sets of 2 gears underneath each of the crawler chassis. Due to weight reasons I used metal axles from Eezo’s Brick Machine Shop from the US. -Slewing is done again by 4 PF XL Motors which sit in the base of the superstructure. - Each winch is driven by a PF L motor. They were powered by 2 PF L motors, but because the winches are worm-driven I had some issues with them not running synchronous and overloading the motors. The winches can be individually taken out from the superstructure for maintenance and use 1mm wax rope. Structurally the main building technique for the crawlers, undercarriage and superstructure is an array of 5x7 technic frames. I’ll come back on another post with some pics of the various building techniques and technical details. Maybe I’ll also do a more detailed video on this sometime soon. The crane is not finished yet. I still need to build the superlift tray and telescope, which will be EV3 controlled so that it self-adjusts, and sadly I need to rebuild all the boom. Until a main boom length of 4.5m everything is ok, but with more than that it starts to bend too much. In the video below I’ve build 4m of boom, because it was pretty windy when we shot the video. The goal would be 7m someday. I want to keep the boom in the main boom+short fixed jib configuration. A luffing jib would be easier to lift (most large Lego cranes that I saw are built in a luffing jib configurations), but as I work in wind turbine assembly, I want to build the boom configuration that we use mostly. Here some pictures from the assembled crane: https://www.flickr.com/photos/164584645@N03/ And here a video about the crane (without wanting to advertise for the channel) As mentioned before, I’ll follow-up with some more pics from the building phase and building techniques. I hope you guys like the crane.
  21. I really like the new city space line and 60229 is my favorite of the line. But there are two aspects of it that I thought should be improved to live up to the name of the set. The crane needed more range of motion and the truck needed to be longer to actually carry more of the rocket components. I extended the truck by one axle and the length of the bed, so that it can properly carry the shuttle portion and single rocket boosters (they still hang off though). The most serious mod is adding another axis of motion to the overhead crane, built on two baseplates. I used the new rollercoaster tracks for this which worked well. I also built a ramped platform for the truck to bring its bed height closer to the bed of the rocket transporter. Lastly I added a cab and supporting railings and ladder to the crane so that it can actually be operated by someone instead of mysteriously moving on its own. Enjoy and comments are appreciated!
  22. Speed-build video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvelE1MXuaA
  23. CommanderJonny1

    [MOC] Rebel Munitions Speeder (& Crane)

    "We got two hours to load those bombers! Move it!" -Rebel ordinance supervisor The Rebel Munitions Speeder is a ubiquitous repulsorlift vehicle within the hangers and warehouses of the Rebel Alliance. Designed to cart cargo and personnel efficiently around Rebel bases, it's equipped with a primary wedge-shaped speeder that is controlled by a single driver and can hold a 3x4 crate in its bed, two pilots or technicians on the side, and is used to pull cargo carts behind it (in a similar way to a train). Although the amount of carts being pulled varies, it usually maxes out to three or four for efficiency reasons. Although more can be added, this would require additional puller speeders, and I have not made one with a connection at both the front and back- though it wouldn't take much to modify one. The carts being pulled can carry pilots to their craft, soldiers to ships or assembly points, cargo to various locations, and munitions to be loaded or stored; they're also equipped with clips to hold chains or tethers, and the side panels can be lifted up to help access the repulsorlifts or be raised to form a small bridge. SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #1 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #2 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #3 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr The bomb rack is the same as the one in the 2016 Y-wing, just recolored. SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #5 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr With the bomb rack as a basis, I designed a similar missile rack. Although not shown in this picture, you can fit three more missiles in between the four shown here. In addition, the pinhole brick is there so this can be laid down on a bed of some speeder 'truck' via a stud, or swing from a technic pin; the modified tile on top is there for a similar purpose, being either clipped into place, or being hung from a hook- this is all to give some more options. SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #4 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr Although not technically part of the 'set', the crane was developed alongside the munitions speeder, and is meant to be used in conjunction with it. This was originally just an enlarged version of the crane from the 2016 Y-Wing set, with it later being changed to fit my tastes, and using parts from two of those cranes. This repulsorlift vehicle is fairly quick, and has two arms. The secondary arm in the back can be made bigger, though this may necessitate a redesign; currently it's used to pull things behind it or hang small things off its hook to be hauled around. The modified tile on the back arm can be detached and used to both move weapon racks on and off the cargo carts, as well as move astromech droids up into starfighters. SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #6 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #7 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr Here's some rough pictures of the munitions speeder and the crane. SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #1(R) by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr SW Rebel Munitions Speeder #2(R) by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr If you want to build this for yourselves, here's the instructions: https://drive.google.com/open?id=11u-Y0sUKkJ-tCg6gHOvNngsbRYxv6Hwd As always, any feedback would be much appreciated And may the Force be with you, always.
  24. Hello! After a few months of hiatus, some updates from my town :) Here we are the latest update of my construction site, with a more realistic tower crane, partially insipired by set #7905. Enjoy the pictures and I hope you'll like!
  25. CommanderJonny1

    Modular Ship Project

    This took me a few months to complete, for a few reasons. I decided to post this, even though I technically haven't finished this project, but this past week I decided to post this weekend if I couldn't think of anything new to add. The genesis of this project was my modding of my Brick Bounty (nothing much, just some improvements here and there), and I wanted to create something more substantial. To be clear, this is my first ship MOC, as well as my second large MOC. I don't say this in hope for leniency (go ahead and bash me), I just want to give some context. I recognize this as a learning project; indeed, you can see some progress (albeit not much) in the pictures below. I'm already doing MSP Phase II, which incorporates a few techniques that improve the design quite a bit. This project was divided into two batches: Batch 1, which is a Supply Ship and a Armed/Converted Merchantman; and Batch 2, which is Frigate, a Prison Hulk, and a Sheer Hulk. I wanted something that gave me more than just a warship, and I think I covered my bases fairly well. In addition, this project (and to a lesser extent Phase II) is a kind of a bridge between official Lego sets (in my case, the Brick Bounty) and bigger and better MOCs (such as the beautiful specimens here on Eurobricks); as such, I wasn't too concerned with making great MOC (or even necessarily a good one), but rather a decent one that would go fine with Lego's ships, and perhaps (hopefully) wouldn't look too out of place alongside proper MOCs. Batch One: The first ship up is the 'Supply Ship', a.k.a. the Tub. This is meant to be a ship used to move troops, equipment, or victuals to wherever they're needed. It's not pretty, but it gets the job done. I started off by making sure a minifigure can stand straight up inside (5 bricks tall). I've kept this throughout this project, but I have changed to a smaller height in Phase II. I also used the 1x2x3 inverted slope for the hull sides. This is a real thing, though it's more used in modern times than in the Age of Sail (a flare, as opposed to a tumblehome). This shows the inside, and probably the main point/draw of this batch- the anchor system. You can see the channels for the anchor chains; string might be better, but I wanted to use chains like Lego does (there's a couple reasons why, mainly because chains are more readily available to me). 'Modular Ship' (Supply Version) #4 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr Here's a look down the inside. The two Technic connectors under the Technic plate are meant for the chains. The end of the chains are attached to the top one, and wound in between the two, similar in concept to what's on the Brick Bounty (sort of). 'Modular Ship' (Supply Version) #5 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr A more overall view of the ship (with Bosun Bob at the helm). I wanted the ship to have some kind of defense, so I put some some carronades on top. 'Modular Ship' (Supply Version) #1 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr A top down view of the deck. Besides the anchor, the only real feature is the grate/cover. 'Modular Ship' (Supply Version) #2 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr A view of the stern area. The bracket is meant for a nameplate or something similar (the inverted slopes around it can be removed and replaced to widen it if necessary). 'Modular Ship' (Supply Version) #3 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr The second part is the Armed/Converted Merchantman', a.k.a the Lumberer (I don't know if it would actually qualify for a 'HM_'). This is basically an 'upgraded' version of the Supply Ship, armed with cannons and carronades to help defend, and comfortably keep pace with, various convoys. A view of the bow; not much, but the bow mount (modified plate) gives me some options. 'Modular Ship' (Converted Merchantman) #2 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr Here's a view of the gunports; also a better view of the bow mount. 'Modular Ship' (Converted Merchantman) #1 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr I think Lego's cannons look better; it's probably because the ship's a bit chunky. 'Modular Ship' (Converted Merchantman) #3 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr Batch Two: The third ship (and the pinnacle of Phase I) is the Frigate. In the British system, which I base most of my information and inspiration from, it's actually not a frigate, but rather a 'Post Ship'. Many Sixth Rates were of these types, but all were commonly called frigates anyways, and so that's what I labeled this as. I found a picture early on of HMS Euryalus that I took a lot of inspiration from, if not direct translation of some design elements. This is also the only ship that's actually modular; the rest are built in a way to make it easy to make it modular, but also easier to build in the first place (I admit a bit of laziness probably crept in there, but I wanted to move on to other stuff). Here's the ship, piece by piece, form bow to stern. There's 20 pictures, so I put it here to shorten the post a bit. The fourth and fifth 'ships' aren't really ships- at least not anymore. These are what are called hulks (specifically a prison hulk and a sheer hulk). They were once warships, but once they were too old to be really useful anymore, they were converted into some kind of hulk. I've searched on here before, but I haven't found anybody who has made either one of them. I'm sure the talented shipwrights here could have a much better crack at such projects than I, but even if I just spread the idea around, that would be enough for me. The fourth ship is the Prison/Accommodation Hulk. These were used as floating prisons to keep prisoners of war, mutineers, or just overflow from the regular prisons on land. Accommodation hulks were like floating barracks; used in a similar way to the prison hulks. The fifth and final ship is the Sheer Hulk. These craft were floating cranes, usually implemented in putting masts onto new ships (or replacement masts for those ships that lost theirs in some way, shape, or form). After the Age of Sail, though still in the 19th Century, purpose-built sheer hulks were made to help increase maritime construction. Multiple capstans were used to power the crane, and the sides/railings of the ships were usually cut down near the deck. Modular Ship (Sheer Hulk) #1 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr I've found many photos of different sheer hulks, and all have some different kind of combination (rigging, number of crane arms/booms, etc.), but I tried to build what was sort of the average of what I saw in my reference photos. I didn't end up finishing this one, as I couldn't really make the crane fit together quite right. If anyone can think of anything, feel free to make your own (just make sure to send me a link ). Modular Ship (Sheer Hulk) #2 by Jonathan Wallace, on Flickr This has been my Modular Ship Project (Phase I). I haven't made instructions for this (mostly I don't feel it's really a MOC worthy of it, but also I'm busy/lazy), but I do plan to make them (*ahem* eventually ). Phase II has already begun; I'll still be using prefab hulls, and I plan to make a Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Rate. I've already discounted a First or Second Rate, but I'm holding out on a Two Decker. Although I will work on a Three Decker a bit in my Testbed before I close Phase II. Any comments, suggestions, or critiques of any kind are welcome; I await the feedback!