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Found 707 results

  1. brick-builds

    [MOC] steam locomotive 0-10-0

    Hello, our latest moc train-base, we tried a 0-10-0 and it works fine in normal lego curves :
  2. Here in Portugal I've always felt alone when it comes to model trains, I've never had other people who could discuss ideas and improve my constructions, there are people who have tried to make replicas of Portuguese trains, but actually here it's everyone for themselves and I feel I have nothing new to learn with them. I aspire to know more and I've been following the work of Dutch colleagues for a long time, I decided to send a message to a distinguished builder, who has works that I love, @raised I told him I was interested in taking the leap to 8wide and if I could make some constructions inspired by his ideas. The answer was positive, and he present me to another two great builders, Erwin and Nicolas, since then after some study I have done my first 8 wide project, Replica of newly recovered Arco carriages. Biggest challenge was making the sides of the carriage. on the boggies I got some help from Raised. The first pieces are already on their way to make this real. Lego - CP Arco by Sérgio Batista, no Flickr CP 2627 by Nelso Silva, no Flickr
  3. The last years, we have used a NXT brick for controlling the train. For Lego World 2017, we want to use EV3 bricks only. Since the RFID sensor is not supported anymore, we needed another way to determine the train location. I have build a proof of concept of a loco: Wheels are directly connected to a EV3 medium motor Location detection based on a color sensor (the combination of yellow, red and green makes a unique pattern) And it works fine! A video of this proof of concept: Of course, the train needs a bit (... ) of restyling ;-) Enjoy, Hans
  4. A little LEGO Digital Designer project I have been working on since the beginning of March...now rendered in stud.io using highest settings and a very large size of 4800x3600 Odense Banegård The train station was drawn by Danish architect Heinrich Wenck and built in 1913-1914 in the city of Odense, Denmark. It was used as such until 1995. The building was later bought by the city, housing the city's music library for several years. The actual Odense Banegård My model: Scale: Minifig or approx. 1:50 Area: 3 x 8 baseplates 32 x 32 Number of parts: 23.223 The ground floor consist of 2 wings and 1 main building which all can be separated. The roof consists of six sections which can be removed, giving access to the building inside. The platform consists of multiple sections which can all be clicked together for added stability. Frontside: Facing one of the city's many old parks, Kongens Have (The Royal Garden), separated only by road (and a light rail line from 2021). Trackside: A mix of its appearances during different ages with a few modern train station equipment added as the building isn't used as such anymore...and I didn't want to fill this side completely with bicycles Rigth wing: Facing musikhuset Posten (live music venue) which was originally built as a parcel post office in the same architectual style. The two buildings are separated only by a small paved area, now a parking lot. Left wing: Facing Danhostel Odense City or what is left of the hotel when the new monstrosity Odense Banegård Center was being built in 1995 and needed the space. The main clock: The main platform doors:
  5. I've not posted for a while but that's because Lego is a winter pursuit for me and the dark evenings have prompted me to get busy again. My Art Nouveau Station, Botanical Gardens, was everything I wanted it to be, and I've decided that I have to complete the building: The first instalment was only 1/3 of the conceptualised structure. So, here is a teaser for the next stage to be completed, the middle section, with grand staircase, lifts (not working), left luggage and entrance to stairs down (to underground station, toilets, and platform 2). The rest of the design is in my head, with the front of the station and the platforms/glass roof already planned. http://www.tubemapcentral.com/legodesign/Botanical_Gardens_Extended/Grand_Staircase.jpg
  6. Hi all! old pics are gone so take a look at new one on 2 side ;) TX
  7. Bought the Lego Train Projects book lately and startet to build the EMD FL9 locomotive. Made some pictures from the current status. Missing some minor detail pieces. I also made some changes to the front to some smother look. Sadly the roof can't easily be removed so I need to made some further changes and the whole build is not suited for a PU motor. Overall I like the color scheme of the locomotive .
  8. Hello everybody, my last construction project took me to Scotland. The Jacobite Steam Train still operates between Fort Willam and Maillag. Various steam locomotives are used for this train, e.g. the LNER class B1 No. 61264, the LNER class K1 No. 62005 (when I visited in 2005) or the LMS Class 5 "Black Five" No. 45231. They all serve as wagons of British Railroads Mk. I coaches. The classic British steam train passenger car par excellence. As a locomotive I chose the LMS Class 5 "45231". This promised a challenge as a Lego model: a conical boiler and angled cylinders. Exciting. The locomotive has 2 Lego PU motors as a drive. 1x in the locomotive on 2 of the 3 large main axles (BigBen XL wheels), 1x in the tender on 2 of the 3 tender axles (BigBen M wheels). Each engine has its own HUB. The locomotive is controlled via the Lego PU remote control. However, since the motors have to be operated with different power due to the different wheel diameters, a tablet / mobile phone with the Lego PowerUp APP is interposed between the remote control and the locomotive. The APP accepts the travel commands from the remote control and forwards them to the two HUBs in the locomotive. The lighting of the locomotive consists of self-soldered LEDs, connected to the Power UP HUB in the locomotive. A normal Lego Led for PowerUP is installed in the tender. The entire lighting is controlled via the handheld remote control and the APP. Forward travel: steady light at the front, optionally flashing light or off at the rear Reverse: front flashing light or off, rear continuous light The flashing is realized via the APP. Built from Lego parts with the following third-party parts: - BigBen wheels S, M, XL in new dark red - Linkage from the 3D printer - Lighting partly self-made - Self-made lettering / decoration But only a locomotive is no train.... The classic: British Railroads Mk. I passenger car. Built in the 50s in very large numbers and in many variants, these cars are still in use today on tourist trains and in collections / museums. The color "new dark red" was attractive and difficult at the same time. There aren't many windows and if you do you can't pay for them ... So I first looked for a solution for the windows: buildable, affordable and based on the model. In particular, the 4 small windows above are the mark I also found the variety of variants impressive and couldn't really decide which one to build. So I build all ;-) The cars are all built according to the same basic scheme and yet completely different. There are some with an open compartment (e.g. FO - First open) and some with individual compartments (e.g. SK - Second Corridor). I have 1st and 2nd class. 1st class has dark blue upholstery and a side table with a lamp. The 2nd class is more simply equipped. It was very interesting during the construction: the left / right sides of the car are often very different. E.g. In the case of the corridor cars, the doors are on the corridor side in line with a compartment door. In this way, in the event of war, the wounded could be pushed into the compartment on couches through the outer door. The bogies were of course important to me again: Model type Commonwealth: All cars are again equipped with ball bearings. The reason is simple: the cars are long and heavy, and weigh around 900-950 grams. Most cars can drive Lego R40 curves, only the two very long ones cannot. Since my locomotive also needs R104, I prefer to use the cars on large radii. The roof of all cars can be partially removed to insert figures. With the corridor car you need little fingers ^^ BR Mk. I 3093 Florence FO (First Open): An open 1st class car. 1st class cars typically had maiden names as proper names: BR Mk. I 4951 SO (Standard Open): An open 2nd class car with an open-plan compartment. In terms of construction, this car is longer for me than most of the others, this has to do with the spaces between the windows. All of the cars have the correct number of windows, but the wall between windows in 2nd class cars was smaller than in 1st class cars. It's hard to do with Lego. So I decided to use the length differences. BR Mk. I 1840 RMB (Restaurant Mini Buffet): A restaurant car with a small bar / kitchen for coffee / tea / snacks. In the fan area is the bar. To the left of the middle door is a small storage room. BR Mk. I 13320 FK (First Corridor) Anna: A 1st class carriage with a corridor and 7 individual compartments with 6 seats each. Ok, only 2 Lego figures per compartment because of excess width ... BR Mk. I 99035 BSK (Brake Second Corridor): A 2nd class carriage with a corridor and a brake / attendant compartment. It also serves as a luggage cart. This car belongs at the end of the train. In the case of "runaway" wagons (the wagons were torn off from the locomotive), the train attendant was able to recognize the situation via periscopes (the angles on the roof) and brake the wagons. This is why this car has the rear end for me. This is implemented as a flashing light and can be switched on inside. BR Mk. I 21266 CK (Composite Corridor): A corridor car with 1st and 2nd class. The car transitions are designed the same for all cars: The aim was: the smallest possible gaps when cornering: This is what the car transition looks like in an R104 curve: Enjoy: Thomas
  9. This modular station was inspired by a long since expired Cuusso / Ideas project, (not mine), and set 2150 Train Station from 1996 while the clock tower is inspired by Big Bentley Bust-Out (from Cars 2 set 8639) from 2011. I added a removable six track long platform and put a luggage ramp from the street side for use by the wheelchair pieces LEGO recently made. By the way: the logo right below the clock is the official LEGO trains logo built in bricks, while the words in the center (just between the middle pillars) reads "Ironwood Union Depot" in printed 1 x 1 tiles. The street side of the station has been extended towards the edge of the base-plate, allowing for a more room (and more details!) inside the building. The year of the stations completion, 1928, is right above the main entryway. The lower floor has the central ticket desk, plus pizza restaurant (complete with opening oven!) on the right side with seating available on the left wing. These wings also allow for access to the platform under the twin canopies. The second floor has the switching control room and station managers office which floats inside the exterior walls on some tile-topped pillars. This assembly is barely connected to the build by two studs. (NOTE: No stairs to the upper floor were made because that's how the official CITY sets are, so I didn't include any as I was going for an official LEGO set feel.) This a closeup of the four-sided clock tower and brick-built LEGO Trains logo. The modular station features two platform sections, two lower roof sections, one upper roof section, and the removable second floor on top of a cafe (with seating) on the lower level. The station platforms fit via Technic pins while the other sections attach via a few studs. The station building shown above has been built since 2018. I've been trying to add a good looking canopy and passenger stairs to it since about late 2019, but gave up and added one that is solid in roof panels to my Disney-lookalike instead in early-to-mid 2021. Then, in early October I saw 76183 (Riddler face off from the new "The Batman" line) and knew I had found a solution to the pedestrian staircase between both platforms. I hashed out a better, more see-through version of the canopy on the MOD Disney station which should work... it has a half stud gap right now, but it most likely is an LDD problem instead of a design one. (I hope!) The stairs are a color changed MOD of the ones in the set with more space between the tracks and a bit more height in the middle section by way of bumping the whole structure up a brick or two. There is eleven bricks of clearance from the railhead to the bottom part of the arches, meaning the twin staircase's fit most of my trains through with room to spare. However, the pantograph's on electric loco's and a caboose cupola for a freight train won't fit under the bridges. This view also showcases the neat little hanging lights used under the canopy area itself. The bridges are missing eight black candlestick parts for the lights on the part of the walkway, where the stairs have their landings. I'll also have to cut the two 48 x 48's down by eight studs on one side per baseplate to better fit the footprint of the canopy. EDIT 11/9/21: This canopy project would would cost around three hundred US dollars (or more) if I didn't have 850 of the more expensive parts already found from my own collection and with serious help from my brother. Sadly, the Disney Station MOD's canopy has been sacrificed to make this project work as well. (Using those parts knocked it down to about $160 for what you see above.) Thoughts on new development or the original station? Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  10. Hi everyone, i'm back again with more MOCs based on the Waterford and Tramore Railway, which was a small seaside branchline in Ireland that ran for over a hundred years! (1853 - 1960) Today I'm sharing some simple coaches I've designed for this ongoing project to one day recreate the railway as a layout. I've previously shared the engine itself in this topic; it's only had minor updates since then, the main one being it's now self powered with a circuit cube motor! The W & TR featured a plethora of coaches from the many different eras it ran through, though I've mainly based these off of the six-wheeled compartment coaches, which were the main carriage the train hauled in the 1920s-30s era I'm basing it on. Although, for impossibility on curves reasons, I've kept them to four wheels.😁 As the carriages are twins, I'll only include the one from here out. The decals you see on the side are just temporary ones I made using yellow electrical tape, and green sharpie. It looks fine from a distance, but when I have the means to, I'd like to use some proper decals I've designed myself. Despite the long wheelbase, they seem to pull fine by the little engine on curves! The actual train only had functioning doors on one side of each carraige (the hinges and bolts being taken off the unused side), because there were only two stations on the line (or more specifically, a platform at one side), with a turntable and siding for the engine to get back around to the front of the train. I've included doors, although, they're a little less than conventional and functional, as they're either open or closed, which requires removing their section. I don't mind though, as I've made these on a budget and the fact they open at all is a bonus to me 😅 Each carriage dissassembles like this, easy access to put minifigs inside. I haven't furnished the inside yet - that'll be something I'll tackle much further down the road, but it'll be fairly simple seats. Here's the actual carriage itself for comparison's sake, taken from The 5-Minute Bell by Frank O'Donoghue: I know its not as detailed as many of the other amazing train MOCs I see here are compared to their real counterparts, but for me, I enjoy the more simpler Lego aesthetics of trains like 7710 (which helps when building on the cheap!) So in general I would try to strike a balance between aesthetics and details, leaning on the aesthetic side. What's next for me in this project though? That'll be The Hearse! But its not as grim a coach as it sounds, in fact, its ironically near its opposite's namesake in function - but I'll save that story for when I share the MOC! 😁 I've designed it in Studio, just a matter of tweaking it a bit, and saving up for the pieces. It'll fit nicely as the last carriage on the train. And after that? I've mentioned above that the train pulled coaches from all sorts of era's across its life time, so I may take a stab at some open Victorian era carriages, which were blue in colour in their heyday, long before the CIE Green i've emulated above. Maybe technically arachronistic, but variety is the spice of life! 😁 Way down the line is designing the large station which still stands today, but in the meantime I may design something smaller that I can afford 😅 And if you're still here, thanks for reading, and let me know what you think! 🙂 Also, don't know if I'm alone in this, but I quite like the look of using the 5-link chains to connect trains. Anyone else??
  11. Heavily inspired by @zephyr1934's MOC of "Katy" from the classic children's book "The Caboose who got Loose". His version can be seen here in his topic. As for the book itself, it is a children's picture book written and illustrated by ex-Disney employee Bill Peet. (You might know him from his work on film "The Sword in the Stone" which he storyboarded and designed the characters of.) Anyway, Wikipedia had this to say about it on it's entry for the (quite wonderful and well-done) book: The Caboose Who Got Loose, published in 1971, tells the story of Katy Caboose, a caboose who is tired of being dragged around at the end of the train by the Engine. She dreams of being part of the beautiful sceneries she passes during her trips, but she cannot because she is always on the move. One day, when the engine is pulling the train up a steep mountain grade, the caboose is jolted loose from the train and flies back down the track towards a turn. Upon arriving at the turn, she has too much speed and she flies into the air off the track. Luckily she gets wedged between two trees, and she spends the rest of her days happy living in a beautiful place. I didn't want to use stickers for Katy's eyes like what's being done by Zephyr1934, so I decided to use the eyes from set 43186 (Bruni the Salamander buildable character) from the Disney Frozen II line. I also added a actual mouth, as just the two eyes without something between them looked kind of odd, most likely because of the specific eyes I chose. The MOC I based this on used a different method for the mouth using a lot of SNOT-work.... I used a brick with 2 studs on the sides and two quarter tiles to give her a open mouth. The "rear" of the caboose is the forward facing part closest to the engine, which is a part of Katy we never see in the book. Confused yet? I took some liberties with his design, such as changing the ladders at each end to black from red, removing two wheelsets + the roof chimney, and redoing the roof itself to be much simpler. (This last one was done because I couldn't figure out the original MOC roof's curved design!) I did keep the basic SNOT-work design, but made it so both halves would be stud-inwards. All of this makes the models less accurate to the book it's based off, but I don't really think anyone in the general public will notice. (The general LEGO community might know of some discrepancies and fellow train modelers not of the LEGO-type will not care even if I did make it accurate, as it's not a "real" train.) Now, as a train head, this model and the book it's based on only bother me in two ways: There is no red light for the end of train, and where in the heck did the conductor go when Katy landed in the trees! It certainly makes a guy wonder what kind of Mickey Mouse-organization this railroad is running here! As usual, comments, questions, and complaints welcome!
  12. Hello everyone,today I want to share my new MOC with your. "Dongfeng" diesel locomotive is a diesel locomotive produced in China from 1958 to 1972. (The appearance of Dongfeng 3 diesel locomotive is consistent with that of Dongfeng, and the production year is 1972-1974) The Chinese pronunciation of "Dongfeng" is " 东 风 ", which means the wind in the East. It means that the east wind brings hope and vitality to the country and people. Today, the diesel locomotives have all been retired, and some locomotives have entered museums and parks for display. (These pictures come from the Internet.) Next is my work display. This picture was taken in my garden. The slope of the front is what I'm proud of. The back carriage are also my MOC. I chose the most conventional green for the locomotive body, because this green can show different depths in different light environments, which is very interesting. The sticker is designed by myself and uses ordinary paper. This is my favorite photo, which can highlight the characteristics of the locomotive.There are two lights on the front of the locomotive. On the side of the locomotive, I used a lot of "32028" to depict the body, making the work more vivid. The back of the locomotive is provided with number and allocation place. The roof can be easily removed.The power uses the Bluetooth battery box of mouldking and two XL motors of LEGO. There is no problem with the locomotive running. I am very satisfied with the traction.I can use my mobile phone to remotely control the locomotive. The diesel engine in the middle is movable, and a rod is connected to the motor. In July this year, I attended a Bricks lovers' Party in Guangzhou. This is a group photo of my locomotive and other MOCER s' locomotive. I'm the head of the train area for this party,I took a lot of photos for this party. If you are interested, I will open another new topic to show you the photos. Finally, thank you for watching.
  13. Hey I purchased 60198 City cargo train set and I run may train either with the remote or with my smartphone powered up application. For me powered up has much more potential when used with pybricks. So I tried to use my city/train hub with pybricks to write some programs to run my train. Unfortunately, I got stuck on installing firmware for pybricks (bootloader). I followed guidelines from their webpage, so was holding green button till light started blinking in purple and then clicked "Install Pybricks firmware" button in Pybricks code webpage opened in my browser. Light on hub is blinking red/green/blue and there is shown progress in % (Pybricks code webpage) after it reaches 100% error message occurs: "Hub took too long to respond" and hub led blinks red/green/blue in infinite mode - you need to put off batteries to stop it. On Github pybricks/support I found whole topic regarding that error message "Hub took too long to respond" and probably there is solution to that problem but I am beginner at Python programming so don't know how to solve this problem. Should I write some kind of input file to get through that issues with bluetooth or other? They put some code file there but I totally do not know how to use it. Here is link to that support page: https://github.com/pybricks/support/issues/256 Any help welcome :) Regards
  14. AlexxInc

    Octraintober 2021

    This year's Octraintober is my first year participating in this event and what better way to dive in then creating a Model 40! The model can be classified as a critter because it lies on 300 HP. It can easily be controlled by a Circuit Cube Blue Tooth Hub, as normal power functions are obviously to large. Here is how the model looks. I had created this over several iterations, with a couple challenges along the way of course.
  15. Hello! I have recently created a self unloading coal hopper. The correct term for this is Falns (as said in Germany I believe). It is created using common parts, allowing a wide variety of color options. The coal can easily be removed, revealing some inside detail (not accurate detail though). Dimensions: 8 studs W 37 studs L (with buffers) 12 studs H If you want to build this model for yourself, instructions can be found here. LEGO MOC Self-Unloading Coal Hopper (Falns) by AlexxInc. | Rebrickable - Build with LEGO
  16. AlexxInc

    40' Flat car

    This is my model of a 40' flat car with detachable pipe cargo.Pipes are optional.Dimensions:8 studs W39 studs L (with buffers)9 studs H (with pipe load) If you want to build this model for yourself instructions can be found here. LEGO MOC 40' Flat Bed Car by AlexxInc. | Rebrickable - Build with LEGO
  17. Hi all! Here we go again with big Lego trains running on 45mm G Gauge track! Some of you may remember the yellow Toy Train locomotive I prepared back in 2019 -it was one of my first experiments with G-Gauge trains. This little locomotive was based on a small Powered-Up battery box and a Medium motor. Here it is during a night run on the new 45mm copper track with wooden sleepers I restored to be used on my small garden railway. Here's a detail of the old chassis with the original 1,667:1 gear ratio. This solution proved to work fine on a flat track at home, but was completely useless on the garden line, which can be easily considered a "mountain railway". A 3:1 gear ratio worked better, but gears were too stressed and speed was ridicolous. Plus, with some wagons, the motor always needed to work at full speed. Therefore, back to the lab, I completely revisited the heart of the locomotive, and updating some details on the exterior. Here it is, the Mark II (TADAAAAAAA) !!! And...what's new??? Actually, at body level, it did not change so much from the older one . Handle bars, and headlights have been modified and a new exhaust scoop has been added over the hood (there's no more a red On/Off button). The real new part is under the bodywork: A completely new chassis has been introduced, and now features a new 4-ports PuP Hub and a more efficient Large Motor. Gear ratio is now 2.779:1. It is very strong and smooth - the big battery/bluetooth hub helps traction (which can be increased with the use of rubber bands around the wheels), and the L-Motor is a great improvement over the M-Motor. I've prepared some workflows on the PuP application to work at 25/50/75/100% of the power. The chassis can be detached from the body with four "fast unlock" pins, so changing the batteries is now an easy task. Then, with a locomotive now up to the task of garden railroading, I needed some rolling stock. I've some LGB wagon bases with studs on top (item number 94063) which are the perfect chassis for some wagons I've designed in Stud.io. Both axles are steering, to help the wagon working on tighter curves. So here it is the small gondola , in a bright blue color: And the tan/beige gondola with taller sides: The LGB chassis runs smoothly and really helps the whole train to roll better. Sometimes these things are available (used or new) with an acceptable price, so I get them. A final photo of the consist (fat least for the moment)! Next to come, a passenger and a closed freight wagon with sliding doors (let's see who comes first). I'll try it on the garden railway soon and give some feedbacks (for now only some pretty satisfactory tests were conducted on homemade ramps) I hope you like it!!! Ciao! Davide
  18. Haddock51

    My Own Lego World

    Three years ago, I finished my Lego Train 9V Extreme Project. And now it's time to inaugurate My Own Lego World, a Project that - on and off - has been ongoing for approx. 30 months. This layout includes many vintage Lego sets from the time our daughters grew up. Most of these sets are from the 70s, 80s, 90s and 00s. Some originate from more recent years. My Own Lego World covers the following themes: City Paradisa & Beach Container Port & Shark Bay Outdoor activities World Cup Soccer (1998) Space & Space Center Airport, Aircrafts and Air Show Tivoli Train 9V In addition, it also includes several MOCs (e.g. signal box, track traverses, observation tower, stairways, open-air cinema, church, windmill and cableway base station with "elevator" tower) and a battery driven cableway (Rigi Lehmann). Addendum #1: Technical data & details Construction: Level 0: 74 cm above floor Level 1: 17 cm above level 0 Level 2: 36 cm above level 0 Top of Lego World: 214 cm above floor Layout dimensions: Level 0: 3.8 x 3.8 m (with two islands of 0.75 x 0.75 m) Level 1: 0.5 x 3.6 m plus 0.5 x 0.5 m Level 2: 0.5 x 2.1 m Total layout area (excl. Moon Base and Top of Lego World): approx. 17 sqm Train 9V: Total track length incl. sidings and dead-ends: approx. 51 m Total track length incl. Lego Train 9V Extreme layout: approx. 224 m with - all in all - 67 power connections to rails Including train shelves, 2 296 rails and switches are now deployed in this room with a total length of approx. 311 m: 1 871 straight (whereof 675 for train shelves), 330 curved, 51 modified straight (4, 8, 10, 12 and 14 studs), 19 standard-, 14 halfcurve and 11 crossover switches (eight switches are electrically operated). Movable train bridge between My Own Lego World and Lego Train 9V Extreme layout Gradients: approx. 6.5 and 8 percent Min. clearance: approx. 12 cm Track Design Program: Track Designer Application (R) version 2.0 by Matthew D. Bates (Matts LEGO (R) Train Depot) Electrics/Electronics: 1 power supply unit Voltcraft EP-925, 3-15V(DC), max 25A 2 modified train speed regulators (4548) with LM350T regulators, 3A diodes, outside heatsinks (with a thermal resistance of 1.9 K/W), mini fans and digital thermometers to measure temperatures inside the speed regulator boxes 3 standard train speed regulators (4548) 15 power connections to rails approx. 200 m RK cable 1.5 sqmm 1 LED strand (2 m) with dimmer Märklin pins and sleeves Cableway: Distance: aprox. 4.8 m Height difference: approx. 1.0 m Construction materials: 10 tables 0.75 x 1.5 m and 3 tables 0.75 x 0.75 m wood (45 x 45 mm) and wood strips (22 x 43 mm) MDF boards (6 and 10 mm) ground grass and ballast (Busch, Faller) fishline 0.47 mm cable conduits angle irons straps paint Addendum #1: Pictures Addendum #3: Videos Cableway:
  19. This is my first train MOC (and my first post!) that started out as a "simple" upgrade to set 75955 and, well, I just got a little carried away. I originally wanted to add a bit more detail, but after researching the "Hall" class locomotives, a dozen bricklink orders, wheels from Big Ben's Bricks and the Brick Train Depot, and 4+ months of on-and-off-again building, I think I have finaly something that looks like a locomotive! I've had more fun, challenges and frustration than from any other MOC I've ever built before, but I'm now hooked on building ONLY Lego trains....and maybe some Star Wars stuff.....and modulars......and............. Still plenty to do, but as I'm stuck on a couple SNOT connections, I'm going to be asking for your help with this as I finish up the build. Some details: it will run on standard track but it is big at 62 studs long with the boiler 6W to accommodate an L motor, PFx brick and lights (the flickering coal in the fire box looks so cool) 7W walkway, 8W cab, and the battery and speaker in the 8W tender (9W at the top) Hope to get the plans ready by Christmas! Thanks! DMRR Wolfe
  20. The Stellar Zephyr transports Nexus Force personnel as a very high-speed, high-security ground transport between the northern-most city of St. Nicklaus and north-pole-hugging outpost of Ice Station Odyssey, around 500 miles away. (this all takes places on the ice-bound planet of Beta Polaris, which orbits what we here call the North Star, far away from Earth.) Unlike the slower Earth trains, the Stellar Zephyr type of space-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 110 MPH (135 is the loco's top possible speed) on it's special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-a-way's over hundreds of miles, all while using Positive Train Control (PTC) on the the mostly double-track mainline, where all vehicle crossings are flyovers and switches virtually non-existent once out of St. Nicklaus city limits. This train runs along with nine other identical versions of this train (10 total trains in all) on the route with up to seven in running order on the route and at least two in the maintenance shed / in emergency backup storage at any one time. You may have noticed the train model is NOT in the original light gray "stainless steel" of the original Pioneer Zephyr on which is was (kind-of) based. The orange and white color scheme is because it's for my Nexus Force theme... to be honest, it's not even really a Zephyr that much anymore. It's more of a mix of the Aerotrain, Pioneer Zephyr and several other concepts that began in the 1930's - '50's era, like the dome car. (To call it a hodgepodge would be accurate!) This model features six joined cars, with the (much-longer) power car up front, two coaches, diner-dome in the middle, two more coaches then the observation lounge at the rear. None of the car's roof sections come off, and their is no interior, to save on costs when this model is eventually built in real life. The following parts aren't in LDD and as such aren't seen above in what's left to find. You can find the windscreens at this link, and it is are used in pairs of two for both front and rear ends of the train. The repurposed 2014 CITY Arctic logo slopes near the front of the engine and on the automobile are missing prints, as are the three dark bluish gray "donut" tiles on the loco unit. (these parts should have a engine fan / rotor print) As you can tell by the parts picture, this train is about ~55% complete without ordering anything yet. Here we see the automobile I hinted at in the parts picture. This road vehicle is a heavily modified take off @hachiroku's 1940's US Army staff car from Indiana Jones - Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. (I've lost track of how many things I've changed on that model, to be honest.) You can find the original model here on his Flickr stream. I'm trying to get it done before November, but I'm not sure I'm gonna make it before these MOCs are supposed to go to a local show... You can see more details on the arctic / space base shown above in this thread in the Sci-Fi forum. Be warned, it needs to be updated with some newer stuff I designed! Thoughts on this model?
  21. Here is my other Via Rail train, The Corridor. To see more pictures, please see Via Rail Canada - The Corridor. I'd love to hear any feedback, comments, questions, or criticisms. It's a big set, so let's tackle it one car at a time. :) If you like it, please support on LEGO Ideas if you believe it would make a great official set.
  22. Jet Engined Rhino

    MoC Double Decker Train review

    Hello 😁! Here's a review of a MoC double Decker passengers train I made a few years ago (don't mind the colours...I wasn't focusing that much on it back then and never found the opportunity to rebuild it with appropriate colours). It's my first review and topic for Eurobricks so if I'm doing anything wrong just tell me, thanks ! https://youtu.be/zVFIpIOOhiE
  23. A utilitarian space / Arctic freight train for my ice-bound Nexus Force base... it may not look very spacey, though. (I tried, it's more difficult than it looks!) This MOC features: - ALCO RS-11-like four axle diesel loco - boxcar with removable top and opening doors. - Nuclear waste flask car. Try not look at the glass sections for very long! - two couple of sectioned gondolas loaded with comet / meteorite samples.... and maybe a few frozen aliens inside! - bay window caboose for nuclear flask guards and train crew This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 (which you can see in his instructions store here) built by @SavaTheAggie, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching and found another ALCO locomotive, a RS-11 that looks (kind of) like my new loco. Both my MOC and the new prototype have the four wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design as the MRS-1 that preceded it. I changed out the original grille bricks at the rear for grille tiles SNOTed-in sideways for a more consistent look when compared to the roof vents. I added back in Sava's maintenance cabinets from the MRS-1, yet attached them differently using newer parts. I also shortened the frame by six studs to fix the spacing problem created by the missing two wheels. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear. The printed Nexus Force logo (from CITY Arctic 2014) goes on the curved 2 x 2 x 2/3 slopes on the front and rear hood ends, underneath the lights. This boxcar was heavily inspired by Time Gould boxcar design from the dying days of the 9v-era, otherwise known as 2008. (You can see it and his entire vintage train it came from, here on Rebrickable for free.) The roof comes off this car type and the loading doors open up. This nuclear waste flask car is loaded and ready for delivery to a waste storage facility at an undisclosed location. These open air gondolas are loaded with icy meteorite fragments, which may or may not contain hostile alien life frozen inside! No interior on this part of the train, as it's too crowded inside due to needed SNOT-work for the bay windows. This car was originally puzzled-out from this MOC's pictures. I'm already parting out the diesel engine, but the train will have to wait. You can see more details on the arctic / space base shown above in this thread in the Sci-Fi forum. Be warned, it needs to be updated with some newer stuff I designed! Thoughts? EDITED 9/6/21: added nuclear car photo and updated the main picture.
  24. Rise Comics

    Silver Bullet

    This is an original creation of mine, and also one of my favorite MOCs. Though I referenced some real life streamliners, the design is wholly original. It is a streamlined Heavy Pacific locomotive, with its shape and silver accents garnering it the moniker of Silver Bullet. This MOC uses mostly vanilla parts in Bricklink Studio, aside from many of the silver parts, custom single studs used for lighting effects, and the XL wheels from Big Ben's Bricks. It also has fully modeled valve gear made entirely out of Technic, as well as an original design of corridor tender. Feel free to comment your thoughts and feedback, and lemme know what y'all want to see next.
  25. (Built and designed for my father, not for me) The Disneyland engines with consists in order from Left to Right: 4-4-0 "C.K. Holliday" (engine 1) from 1955 pulling the my semi-fictionalized version of the Retlaw 2 freight train 4-4-0 "E.P. Ripley" (engine 2) also from '55 is pulling the post-1971 fictionalized Retlaw 1 passenger train 2-4-4 "Fred Gurley" (engine 3) started service in 1958 and is pulling the Holliday Blue excursion train 2-4-0 "Ernest S. Marsh" (engine 4) began service in 1959. (picture coming soon!) Most of the 4-4-0 models use 9v motors, as my father has that system as his preferred train propulsion type... and GatewayLUG uses the 9v style-track / motors too, so it makes it runnable at shows. The Fred Gurley is not able to be powered this way, sadly. C.K. Holliday 4-4-0 and Retlaw 2 freight train There were two trains at Disneyland opening day in 1955, and these were the Retlaw series. Retlaw 1 was the passenger train which was pulled by E.P. Ripley and consisted of one baggage, four passenger cars, and the observation car. Five of which are no longer used or were sold. (but the observation car is still used - as the Lilly Belle parlor car as seen in the official set) Retlaw 2 was the freight train, pulled by the engine as shown above - C.K. Holliday - and consisted of three cattle cars and three gondolas, plus the caboose. As you may have noticed, I chose to only use two cattle cars from that train, and no low-side gondolas... There are no pictures of those as far as I can tell before the freight cars were all converted into another train type, the same as are in LEGO set 71044. The tanker car and coal hopper are my own invention. The two cattle cars. The two doors on each side of the identical cattle cars fold down. The roof sections come of now as well. As you can see, no seats are inside these cars as there were none installed in Retlaw 2 on opening day 1955! The two gondolas have been shortened from the original versions on the original Retlaw 2, but they are pretty close to it in looks! The caboose. I made up this car, as I couldn't get the real four-world axle caboose to look good in LEGO. The caboose has a removable roof too. E.P. Ripley 4-4-0 and Retlaw 1 passenger train (fictional post-'71 rebuild) Retlaw 1 was the passenger train which consisted of one baggage, four passenger cars, and the observation car, which were pulled by E.P. Ripley on opening day in 1955. Five of which are no longer used or were sold. (but the observation car is still used - as the Lilly Belle parlor car as seen in the official set) However, in this fictional revised version of the train, this retirement didn't happen, though they were modified to suit side-seating. The real Retlaw 1 was originally a yellow painted train, featuring front facing seats until it was mostly retired in 1971. The observation car of Retlaw 1 then became a parlor car known as the Lilly Belle after Walt Disney's wife Lillian. This fictionalized train is in the revised, post-1971 color scheme of the Lilly Belle, (which is in set 71044) and also has two passenger cars plus a baggage car with opening side doors. These cars all have side facing seats, as if Retlaw 1 were around and used in modified format after the 1971 overhaul of the Lilly Belle. As a side note, each of the cars feature a removable wall for getting at the inside details, as in set 71044. My revised version of @TJJohn12's MOC of the Disneyland number 2 steam loco. I made it using parts ordered by my father, but it's still missing the 9v motor in this picture. As you can see, the loco is mainly dark blue, as it swapped colors with the originally dark green real-world engine. This is because the C. K. Holliday model in the Disney train Lego set is also color swapped, from what should be dark blue to dark green. So, basically, Lego used bits from both engines for the set, and we continued this trend here. The baggage car features two sliding doors in red, though other colors are an option to stand out more. (I prefer black doors, but that's not prototypical!) The side wall comes off, as it does on all the cars, to reveal seating. In this car, that means luggage room and two seats. The two coaches are identical in every way, and are also quite similar to the parlor car at first glance. The inside features side seating, as in the Disneyland park... this also allows for easier moving of figures, and placing them in any of the five seats per car. This car is in the LEGO set 71044, but I thought you guys would like to see it alongside everything else. Fred Gurley 2-4-4 and Holliday Blue excursion train The Holiday Blue train was added in early1966 to replace the original Retlaw 1 passenger train which was going to be being pulled from service due to slow loading / unloading at stations. (It is also notable as the last consist added to the Disneyland Railroad.) Here it is being pulled by the Fred Gurley, also known as Disneyland number 3. Here is my Dad's (now finished IRL!) third Disneyland loco, to accompany the C.K. Holliday one in set 71044 and the E.P. Ripley MOC I just finished for him: it mimics the real world Fred Gurley pretty well too. The real 2-4-4 loco has been at Disneyland since early March of 1958. This paint scheme isn't 100% accurate (black boiler / black domes are dark green / red here), but IT IS in line with the modification my Dad and I have already done to the other locomotives. The roof lifts up as normal for this series. This loco is one of my Dad's few unpowered engines, as it is impossible to fit a 9v motor underneath... or any motor block, really! The "Holiday Blue" car by themselves, with only tail-lights added to them. The Disney train my father bought has added three Bricklinked cars with some new cartoon passengers courtesy of "The Minifig Shop" LEGO resale store in Kirkwood, Missouri. Still need get the 4th car and the Lilly Belle car built from the actual set, and add the Star Wars characters to it and the empty one on the right. I should probably put Donald Duck as a he fireman as seen in the cartoon short 'Out of Scale" from the late 1950s. Ernest S. Marsh 2-4-0 Just to complete the first four locomotives from Disneyland, here is Ernest S. Marsh. It's a 2-4-0 based off the 1871 Denver & Rio Grande loco number 1, "Montezuma" and was readied for service at the California park for the first time in late April 1959. This LEGO version is also inspired by LEGO set 71044 for the two-axle tender, piston design, and general look of the engine, while the boiler design originally hails from set 7597. The tender is powered by a 9v motor, and weighed down for traction by a standard weight brick. Notes on the post and future additions: Real life pictures will be added whenever possible. Also, Disneyland RR Number 5 - Ward Kimball - is a relative newcomer to he park and is a 2-4-4 like the Fred Gurley. It would not be interesting to have two more identical locos on the roster, so it is not included, and as it arrived in 2005, it's not quite from for the time period my dad and I are attempting to model. (He is kind of not sure if he wants another loco after Fred Gurley, so the 2-4-0 steamer Ernest S. Marsh might not get built either!) Any questions, suggestions, or complaints? Let me know below! EDITED 8/26/21: added Fred Gurley (Disneyland number 3) steam loco's real world MOC pictures to this post!