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Found 93 results

  1. MOC - Lego Clockwork Locomotive

    Hi all, since I like a lot old tin trains (Marx, Hornby) and in particular the clockwork ones, I always wanted to try to create my own clockwork toy train. The first idea was to use the yellow old clockwork motor from the Basic sets of the 80s. Unfortunately, its wheels were designed to accept tires, so double side border and no capability to go through rail switches. From this forum ("Moc Clockwork Steam Locomotive" from RSB04 user) I understood the possibility to change the standard wheels with train wheels and so I did, adding two rubber bands. I can say it works fine, with all its limitations. I ended up creating a "reloaded" 115 set with parts of the 70s I had around. All cars are very light, and I greased the axles with tamiya Mini4WD grease in order to eliminate noises and to reduce drag. On a circle track, it makes 1 and 3/4 turns. On straight track, it travels more or less 4 meters. It is a toy train, no more no less, but I wanted something more modern.
  2. The 4-10-4 (four leading, ten driving, four trailing) "Rainhill" wheel arrangement was so named after the Rainhill Trials of October 1829 in Rainhill, England of which the famous Rocket was the only entrant to complete the Trials. The Rainhill type was designed in 1927 and built in early 1928, though it was originally called the "Gigantic" type, but the planned Centenary of Steam celebration sealed the deal on the naming of the type. (Unfortunately, the plans for the potential celebration were postponed in July 1928 and finally cancelled one day before the Stock Market Crash of 1929.) The steam locomotive prototype of the 4-10-4 Rainhill type was painted a red and gray color-scheme with a black box on the tender and was sold by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928 to Brick Railway Systems, but due to teething troubles was nicknamed the Red Devil. The engine worked the trans-continental route on the "Spirit of the West" passenger train from New York to Los Angeles, with the Red Devil or one of it's type worked the portion west from St. Louis to Las Vegas. The original engine (Red Devil number 7975) worked this route from 1930 until being bumped to freight duties in early 1958. The engine then worked freights in diminishing numbers until being sidelined in 1966. The Red Devil was pulled out of the mothballs in 1973 for potential use on the 1976 American Bicentennial train but politics intervened and Texas and Pacific 2-10-4 number 610 got the job instead. After that, the engine's future looked bleak until the "Save the Red Devil" Committee was formed which raised enough money to restore the engine to working order by 1978 and has kept the engine in working order ever since until the Red Devil Incorporated moniker. This company uses five former Brick Railway Systems-styled coaches on fan trips, but they are wholly owned by Red Devil Inc. In reality, there was no 4-10-4 type of steam locomotive. It was strangely skipped over in the age of steam... none of this wheel arrangement were ever built. The name Devil was chosen because the 4-14-4 type of Soviet Russia was the closest analogy to my loco... except mine works fine, while the Russian one never did much as it spread the track, ruined switches and pulled the freight cars' couplings apart due to it's raw power. The second reason for the name is the other Red Devil, a heavily modified South African 4-8-4 engine with a gas producing combustion system and many modern improvements. That engine worked beautifully, but was sadly mothballed in 2003. The baggage car. These cars were all inspired by The Santa Fe Super Chief cars (10022 and 10025) and the Emerald Night's coach. (10194) The three streamlined coaches of the train. Each car on this train is 28 studs long, which is longer than my usual 24 studs long standard. Observation car of the Spirit of Legoredo passenger train. The original way these cars were styled had them all black and with a red base stripe, but I have added dark bluish gray fluting and more red to the mix to make them easier to take pictures of. The whole train. Comments, Questions, Complaints, and Suggestions for the future are always welcome!
  3. This steam locomotive is a 2-6-0+0-6-2 Double Mogul (Garratt-type) steam engine. This type of wheel configuration was built for use on railways in South America, Australia, Africa, and England in at least six different track gauges, according to Wikipedia. None were built for use in North America like my model is supposed to be, but I'm ignoring that fact. The engine I have made traces it's lineage to a model originally designed by Anthony Sava as a 4-6-0+0-6-4 but with fake pistons and with small-size friction bearing wheels. I added Big Ben Bricks medium flanged and blind driving wheels for use with the working pistons. The very inspirational original Sava engine is available for purchase in PDF instructions format at Mr. Sava's official Bricklink store here. Even with the added pistons, the engine easily can go around corners and switches quite easily. I did have to add two weight bricks for the pistons to grip the rails sufficiently to move instead of scrapping along the track like they were before. The engine also features a nicely decorated cab with plenty of printed tiles. (The letters BRS are the initials of my fictional railroad: Brick Railway Systems.) I got this picture from Google as an example of how close my LEGO Garratt engine is to the real deal. (I couldn't find a "real" picture of this specific type, but I know it exists according to Wikipedia. So this O gauge model of it will have to do...) As usual, I have a color-matched train in the works that this engine is to pull. To see the Maintenance of Way crane train's topic click this link. Please let me know if you have any comments, questions, suggestions or complaints. Thanks for looking at my model! EDIT 10/16/17: I edited the engine by extending the boiler four studs. The pictures have also been updated as well.
  4. Trains from pavlo.

    I'm trying to drag a very good builder of trains to EB and everything related to railway construction, pavlo, which lives in the Russian Lego forum. I obtained permission from him, I will now publish his works here. They are valuable in that they cover a diverse railroad park of the USSR / Russia, the work is done in the same style and at different scales (in 6, 8 and 10 widths), have an LDD file, and those who wish can collect these, modelism in the part of railway. Let me know if you are interested. Thanks in advance. First of all, a picture with several of his works. Gradually I will replenish this topic with new models from pavlo
  5. I was thinking of building a locomotive with a boiler that is 3 studs in diameter. Part #30360 fits the bill nicely, but I cannot think of a part that will fill the middle gap. Do you have any ideas on how to do that, or is there another part that is 3 studs in diameter that does the same job better? Fig. 1 Part 30360 was produced by The Lego Group between 1999 and 2012.
  6. GWR 14XX moc

    Hello eurobricks train tech!! I bring you today my first lego train moc. I am new to eurobricks so please point out any mistakes I may have made. I was inspired by scotnick's 14xx and decided to have a go at it. The construction of the model went very smoothly and I had originally used the 2x4 turntable for the trailing wheel. When I tested it, it wouldn't function properly and I had to replace it. So for two hours, I experimented with many different designs until I came up with one utilizing the ring plate and that err...longish blueish pin thingy! But it fit the bill and I'm happy! It is powered by the lego train motor with lights for the Lantern and the receiver in the cab. I do plan to build a autocoach to go with it which will house the battery box. Another problem I encountered was I had none of the I think 4x4 round bricks with holes in dark green, and since I don't buy any parts, I just used the 4x6 long half circle brick (I'm not that great with piece names!) And used some double sided tape to stick on the domes and an ausini clone brand chain for the chain on the front (I'm unarmed don't shoot! ) So stay posted guys, and look out for more projects coming soon! Comments and tips are very much welcome.
  7. "I've been working on the railroad, all the live-long day!" This train consists of a ALCO diesel locomotive (specifically a RSD-12 type) and four cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - caboose The model features several neat printed pieces found in several Juniors sets and six mini figures, including four generic track workers, one track boss / conductor and the locomotive engineer. This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) Here we see how the crane is hooked up to the depressed center flatcar most of the time. The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I tunrned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom door open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. The mini-figures seen above are stationed on the MOW train. As usual, Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!!
  8. The BR class 38 seen here is a one-off prototype. Engine number 7939 was made in 1989 to compare a Metro-Cammell made class 38 to a Brush Traction built class 60. The class 60 won the contract, and subsequently Metro-Cammell was sold and closed. The single class 38 soldiered on until 1997, when British Railways was fully privatized. The engine was then sold with a number of spare parts to Lego Rail Transportation Society, which has kept the engine running ever since as unit 7940. In the real world, the class 38 was never built. It was proposed and then dropped in favor of the class 60, which is what I based the story on. Metro Cammell really existed and was dismantled in 1989 sometime after loosing out to Brush Traction for the class 60 contract, and everyone knows that British Railways was taken apart in the mid-1990's. This LEGO model is a mash-up of a William Howard's diesel locomotives and the official Lego sets 7939 and 60098, with a set of Anthony Sava-derived three wheel sliding bogies. The rear of the bidirectional loco. The numbers "7940" go on printed 1 x 1 tiles on the sides while "LRTS" goes on the front and rear ends. The color scheme for this model was inspired by the British Rail Class D16/1 (also known as LMS engines 10000 and 10001), the first two mainline diesel locomotives in Great Britain. (see here for more on them.) Both ends of the locomotive have a engineer's cab that opens up to seat a figure at the controls, just like sets 7939 and 60098. (I just noticed there is one letter spot too few on the ends of the loco for the railways name as seen in the pictures, as there should be four studs, not the three shown) Bricksafe LDD file link: BR class 38 file Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome!
  9. Old West Steam Locomotive

    This project was my first After getting the horizon express (my awakening from the dark ages), tried to learn something using the lone ranger constitution train, and a file or two from Murdoch17 (whom I cant thank enough, for helping the newcomers like I was, with the lxf files available), and after some modding and a trick or two here is the never ending project of mine, soon some passenger wagons to be added, for now just the locomotive and tender in black and white, literally... rahzmocOldWestwip01 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr rahzmocOldWestwip02 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr rahzmocOldWestwip03 by Rafael Costa, no Flickr
  10. [MOC] Train Engine Shed

    Another creation for diorama on incoming event - in winter edition. No interior has been made. I also try to put on some icicles, but I didn't like them at all. When I'll put it on diorama, some utensils, decorations and accessories will be added. For now it is, what it is. Credits for "Stop buffers" goes to Karwik. I like the idea, but I made my own version of it.
  11. Locomotives never built in lego

    I have always thought about certain trains in lego. These are some I haven't seen. images are glitchy. Cnj g3 pacific Southern 630 prr turbine feel free to comment. I would love to see others you know of.
  12. Need some steam locomotive tips

    I just need some tips to build a steam loco. what parts would look good? also, would a single axle front truck, unflanged driver unflanged driver flanged driver unflanged driver config work?
  13. This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design, plus the curved ends match the RSD-12 better than the sharp-ended MRS-1. ..and here is my Lego model of it, as Brick Railway Systems loco number 7924. I even thought about putting two of this part under the headlights at both ends, but I think the model looks better the way it is now. NOTE: The printed letter tiles with the railroad's initials "BRS" will go on the long hood. I misplaced the two letter "R" tiles, and need to order some more, but the rest of the letters are on my desk. (They are hard to keep from rotating without the middle letters to hold the others in place, so they are not on the model yet.) The center axles on these six-wheel bogies slide left and right to allow for tight turns on switches and flex-track. I took Anthony Sava's original design and beefed it up, making it a lot stronger and a little taller. Here is the picture (not mine) I found that matched my model. I also believe this is the last ALCO RSD-12 left. (I could be wrong, though.) The photo is originally from here. Here is the LDD file for the diesel loco as shown above. Comments, Questions, Suggestions, and Complaints are always welcome!
  14. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  15. Missed out on the Lego Emerald Night. I reckon that I should build my own steam locomotive instead of getting one on the market. After few months of bricks purchases, precious advice from fellow Eurobrick members(e.g. Motor power functions Torgue, learned about quartering technique), and several rounds of reworks and modification, it is finally completed! Sharing my 8-wide build Santa Fe 4-4-2 "Atlantic" Locomotive, with Cargo Wagon and Passenger Car. Hope you guys like it! Train: Santa Fe 4-4-2 "Atlantic" Locomotive Specs: Engine [8-Wide]. Tender [7-wide], Cargo Wagon [8-wide], Passenger Car [8-wide] Power functions: 1 x XL-Motor, 1 x Power Function Light (Front Lamp and Rear Boiler), 1 x AAA Battery Pack, 1 x IR Receiver, 1 x Extension Wire This is the one of the only few photos of ATSF which I can find for reference during my build:
  16. Hello! I have been a member for a while and first jumped into Eurobricks with a tread about my Rise from the Dark Ages full of all the things I had be building in LDD. Now I present to you, the locomotive that started my whole enlightenment in the first place. The Union Pacific 4000 class. I chose to number mine after 4017 which is on display in Green Bay, Wisconsin since that is the one I have gone to see. If you poke around my Flickr long enough you might be able to find some earlier versions than the one you see in the photos below. I'm sorry I do not have professional photos this engine made its debut at the last NILTC show this past weekend. They were gracious enough to let me join them. I know some of them took a whole lot more photos and videos than I but here are a few that I have. Coaster was there and it was a real treat to see this run through his custom R104 double cross-over. For some interesting notes: The version in brick is 8.4. That is I have almost completely rebuilt this 8 times in LDD and have made 4 minor revisions. This engine has 2 XL motors in the boiler and is geared to the same as the Emerald Night. BrickStuff lighting gear lights up the head light, the front marker lights, the cab, and the rear red light on the back of the tender. I do plan to do a proper photo-shoot but I am moving soon so it will not take place until some time this summer. In the mean time...enjoy!! I would love to hear all comments and critiques. This next is not very good, but it handles curves just fine. I'm sorry I don't have any videos yet...but I have one and will post it later. I hope you enjoy and I will update once I have had time for a proper photo-shoot!
  17. This engine is modeled after the GE 44 ton switcher locomotive. Why 44 tons, you may ask? I give you the answer from the Wikipedia article on this loco type: This locomotive's specific 44-short ton weight was directly related to one of the efficiencies the new diesel locomotives offered compared to their steam counterparts: reduced labor intensity. In the 1940s, the steam to diesel transition was in its infancy in North America, and railroad unions were trying to protect the locomotive fireman jobs that were redundant with diesel units. One measure taken to this end was the 1937 so-called "90,000 Pound Rule" :[citation needed] a stipulation that locomotives weighing 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) – 45 short tons – or more required a fireman in addition to an engineer on common carrier railroads. Industrial and military railroads had no such stipulation. The 44-ton locomotive was born to skirt this requirement. The loco is bi-directional, and doesn't have much to differentiate between the "front" or "rear" expect for the air horn and exhaust stack on one end in real life. My LEGO model lacks these, so it's only way to tell which is front is by the headlights: clear for front, red for rear. I am going to name this loco WFP number 7007. (WFP stands for Wabash Frisco & Pacific, which is the name of a 12 inch gauge ride-on railway in St. Louis, MO.) They don't have a real 44 toner there, but do have a Fairbanks Morse H10-44 (number 704) in the same color scheme, so I made this engine as a companion to the H10-44. In the spoiler tag below, you will find a real life picture of a 44-toner loco. (I got the picture from railpictures.net, It is NOT mine!) Just for comparison purposes, here is the H10-44 I was talking about. NOTE: The H10-44 is NOT included in the GE 44-ton's LDD file! The (updated) LDD file for the GE loco is available here. Build updated 3-14-17 with a better 44 ton GE unit, courtesy of Henry Durand over on Facebook's LEGO Train Fan Club. Thanks Henry! Comments, Questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  18. (NOTE: This model will be built when funding allows, hopefully by beginning of 2018!) Inspired by set 149 (Fuel Refinery) from 1976 as seen above (pic from BrickSet), this model takes the 4.5v era Shell refinery and turns it into a two-bay diesel locomotive / oil burning steam engine fuel depot for the modern PF age. The new model features two floors with removable roof sections, two track-bays for servicing locomotives, plus a 1950's style tanker truck inspired by set 8486 (Mack's team truck). NOTE: This part goes above both ends of the locomotive refueling bay. while this part here replaces the 2 x 4 x 3 brick on the wall. The flag should be printed too. As a side note, the locomotive bays are tall enough to let any official car through, including the double stacked container car from the Maersk train. The upper floor of the depot features a control station for monitoring the flow of fuel from the tanks on the roof to the service bay, or from the tanker truck to the storage tanks. The roof of the facility comes off in two sections. The upper floor features a opening door to the tanks and staircase to the lower floor and the flow-monitoring systems. This is a heavily modified version of set 8486 (Mack's Team Truck) 1950's style semi truck. This time, it's a tanker truck in the OCTAN colors scheme. The model can seat one mini figure at the wheel, and features removable cab roof, replaceable tanker section, and opening cab doors. The trailer is supposed to feature this print on both left and right sides of the tank where the white 1 x 4 tiles are. The cab features opening doors, a removable roof and a detachable tanker trailer. The tanker section features a moving stand to keep the tank stable when the cab is not there. The LDD file for the truck and fuel depot is here. As usual, Comments, Questions, Suggestions & Complaints are always welcome!
  19. This 2-6-2 Prairie type engine was inspired by the My Own Train series of 2001 and a boiler from set 79111 (Constitution Train Chase). The passenger coaches and baggage car were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The baggage car has two opening doors, two sliding panel-doors and an "exploding" back wall inspired by set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase). The whole train together. Here we can see the rear of the train with the back wall (and dynamite) still in place. (You may notice the baggage car is a modified version of the green Western jail car I already have built) The yellow 1 x 4 bricks used are actually supposed to be green printed bricks with this on them. The tender features a coal bunker, and water tank, plus a ladder at the rear for accesses to the passenger train. The cab features a firebox door (a 2 x 2 round tile) and two printed gauge tiles. The coaches were inspired by set 10015 (Passenger Wagon), and set 10194 (Emerald Night). They feature no interior but all three passenger cars have four opening doors. The exploding baggage car was originally the Jail car from set 79111. (Constitution Train Chase) while gaining the styling of set 10015 (Passenger Wagon) and doors from 10194. (Emerald Night) This car has one play feature that is sure to blow you away: the back wall can be removed to get at the baggage compartment via the "dynamite" on the outside of the back wall. (actually, the roof top lever knocks the wall loose) Then your train robbers can make off with whatever valuable are inside! As usual, the LDD file for the whole train is seen here while the loco and tender by themselves are here. Comments, Questions, Complaints, & Suggestions are always welcome. This train is on my to-do list, but won't be built for a while... maybe this summer?
  20. Durango & Silverton K-36

    Howdy! This is an update of a post I made earlier this year of a Durango & Silverton K-36 narrow gauge locomotive. I recently decided to submit this MOC to the Lego Ideas website as an effort to get Lego to produce more quality train sets. I shared my project with the good people at the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, and I have been blessed to receive their full support and endorsement of my efforts. I consider the D&SNGR to be the finest railroad experience in the country, if not the world. If you haven't had the good fortune to ride with them, do yourself a favor and make plans to go as soon as possible. You will not be disappointed. Check out their Facebook page for information about the railroad and a look at their endorsement of this MOC. https://www.facebook.com/DSNGRR/ If you are passionate about Lego trains, as I am, please visit the Lego Ideas website and show your support for this MOC. Help me convince Lego to make this dream a reality and immortalize the great D&SNGR with the world's greatest toy! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/161449 Back to the MOC. Let's start with the engine. I am not a fan of Lego Digital Designer, so all of my MOCs are built through a trial and error evolutionary process. This is the first picture I stopped to take of the locomotive. By this point, I had nailed down the frame, wheels, and the driving mechanism. I opted for including all the power functions elements in the locomotive rather than the tender. Working on hiding the power functions. Taking shape Experimenting with the stack and the headlight. Finalizing front end. On to the cab. Getting close. Power functions access from the top. The motor makes a nice firebox. A glimpse of how the wheels are powered. Done! Now for a look at the evolution of the passenger car. Finally settling on the SNOT technique for duplicating the look of wood panels and windows with depth. Placing a horizontal stripe in the middle of vertically striped plates was a fun challenge. I eventually found a way to suspend the upper non window portions from the ceiling. I really enjoyed building this car. All done! I didn't really take any pictures of the caboose process. I essentially used the same techniques from the passenger car. The inside is pretty ugly though, as I only had so many pieces available in this color of red. Now for a few shots of the train all together! How about a little scenery? From the good folks at the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad! I took the train to Brickfair in Birmingham, Alabama, and it won staff favorite! Kids loved the bear in the cave. Brickfair is a blast. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in Lego or anyone with kids.
  21. This 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine & it's six car freight train are hauling generic cargo on it's way to Anywhere, USA. This engine model was first built as a 2-8-2 Mikado (with running gear derived from Scotnick's 2-10-0 Decapod 9F) before having the front pony truck removed and a 4 wheel bogie from set 10194 (Emerald Night) added instead, turning it into a 4-8-0 Mastodon - type. The rear pony truck was removed as well, with the 79111-style boiler shortened and cab re-arranged. Together, these several different engines from four different eras and four separate builders come together to create this one 4-8-0 "Mastodon" type steam engine The coal tender was inspired by Anthony Sava's Pacific 4-6-2 model's oil tender with the letters "BRS" added in the middle of the tender using printed 1 x 1 tiles. I think the loco is much better proportioned to the tender now than before. In my fictional universe, the engine above pulls a generic mid-1900's freight train. This train consists of the following models: This drop side flat car was first part of set 2126 (Train Cars), but it didn't really have a purpose. It was hauling uprooted evergreen trees in the set, but that didn't look very good, so I changed it to generic freight. (My resident hobo usually catches a ride on this car.) This tanker car was inspired by set 7939 (Cargo Train, 2010 version) and by Anthony Sava's recent pick-a-brick MOC-up tanker car. (seen here.) I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build this boxcar (seen here ) They are made to haul generic freight, such as anything from unfinished car parts to prized paintings... and yes, the doors do open! Inspired by the green tractor trailer from CITY set 4204 (The Mine), this bathtub gondola is carrying boulders from the mine destined for the gold refinery where they will be opened up and the metal extracted to make coins and ingots. I have adapted this UK inspired model of a brake van by Fireglo450 (see it here ) to be a more American inspired caboose. The caboose has no interior, and the red marker light can go on either end of the model to represent the end of whatever train it is being hauled behind.
  22. [ MOC ] The Winter Express

    Hi everyone! A little while since I completed and posted my creations. Winter is here, and Christmas is coming, and I think it is time to do something for my winter village. Here is my first try on making a train MOC, and it is an interesting building journey. I have looked at different beautiful locomotive engines online and created my version with a little seasonal deco. I don't want this to be a funny, cartoon Christmas tree, but a formal and decent express train going between the city and the winter village. The engine is the part that took me most time to create. I had the basic form in my head, but the mechanism and details actually required quite some understanding of the actual old locomotives. Luckily, the green Emerald Train gave me much hint and so I ended up with this: I added some interesting details to the front bumper part, using the claw pieces. I also tried a "tilted bottle" arrangement for the chimney part. The engine probably runs on diesel as there is no coal section. The wagon car follows the engine, and that is how you get your presents at the winter village! Freshly delivered from the city center! The passenger car is a simple one with all you need: doors and windows, and a streamlined profile. It looks like it has warm air supply already for your long journey through the winter: The last car is a mail car. Of course, you need to deliver a lot of parcels and Christmas cards to the villagers from the city. So, have we arrived yet? Yes, this is it! Hope you guys like it! :D Have a merry Christmas! ;)
  23. Greetings All, Apologies for being very late to the party, but the TC10 pneumatic competition brings together my favourite parts of what technic is all about and I really wanted to contribute. A number of years ago I had to good fortune to come across a big bunch of pneumatic parts. Having worked on all sorts of pneumatic based MOC's my beloved wife put out the challenge to build her a steam train thus beginning a five year odyssey before finally arriving at the model I present to you all today. Creating a genuinely functioning Lego Pneumatic Locomotive has been a real challenge, searching the internet brings up very few examples. Creating a valve assembly that is both functional and reasonably robust within the confines of lego has proven quite the challenge. Rather than completely reinventing the wheel, I have based my model on a simplified version of Walschaerts Valve Gear that was used on many steam trains through history. I set out at the start of this competition to make a fully reversible valve gear as per the real thing but it proved too much of a challenge at this stage - see how the next few years pans out. The Model: Classic 4-8-2 locomotive configuration using 62.4 tyres for driving wheels old style clear pneumatic cylinders for drive old style pneumatic valves Six manually operated pneumatic pumps - this thing need lots of air. All parts use are original, unmodified, genuine Lego items. The reason I have used "old" style valves is that they are the ones that I could find with minimal resistance, allowing the whole system to function property. Starting with the final result for those of us into instant gratification; This is the final interpretation of my pneumatic locomotive. I will, however make you scroll further for the video. The key to the success of this model is has been in effectively copying the principals behind the walschaerts valve system where the throw of the valves is delayed by the eccentric on the main driving wheel. It is only once the piston ( pneumatic cylinder) has reached the end of it's stroke that the valve is thrown in the opposite direction to push it back the other way. The two valve trains on either side of the loco are offset by 90 degrees so that they "help" each other past the dead spot at the limits of each cylinder's stroke. No matter what I tried, the fundamental principal was "More Steam Coalmam!' In manual form, 6 pumps are required to provide adequate air supply. Four air reservoirs for the testing phase and three in the final model smooth the pulses from six manual pumps to a point that we have reasonably smooth motion. Lucky last, a brief video showing how it works. I'll try to post an ldraw of the basic mechanism in the not too distant future but instructions are well outside my current skill set. If you've got this far, thanks very much for taking the time, I hope it's proven interesting. The Brown Hornet
  24. The coaches are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The Lego Land Railway runs the train from World City to Heartlake City with stops at Classic Town, Paradisia Coast, Duplo-Ville, Ninjago City, (where the electric loco is replaced by a steamer or vise versa for the rest of the trip) Fabu-Land, Technic Town, Fort Legoredo and the Castle Realm. (with extensions into the Forest of Failed Themes and the Outer Dimension of Galidor at certain times of the year.) This loco's styling of the steam loco was inspired by the two Dreyfuss Hudson locomotives by Anthony Sava. The rear of the engine has a ladder, two hand rails and a red marker light. The electric loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the rear one would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp to the repair shop. This baggage / passenger car is called a combine which is short for "combination". All the doors can open on this train, even the sliding ones shown here. The three coaches are identical in every way. The observation car, the rear-most coach on the train, features a platform for sight seeing. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 6/25/17: Added real life pictures!
  25. The Spirit of Legoredo was my one of my first big trains, and was built in 2011 with a baggage car, three passenger coaches, and observation car. It looked good to me at first, in nearly all black with a red stripe at the base, but over the years was quietly forgotten about, as it was quite dull-looking and hard to take pictures of. Then I switched magnet types to the newer ones, and it became even harder show off as it didn't match the rest of my newer train fleet. Eventually, the baggage car was scrapped, as the train with it's longer 28-stud base plates would not fit in my boxes with the locomotives with five cars. That will soon change though... First off, this diesel model was inspired by Valgarise and his model called "Invencible". It looked like an nice big ALCO model (and in the right colors too!) so I built it and a booster unit sometime in 2014. Since last uploading this model, I changed the grille bricks from black to dark bluish gray in order to make the engine stand out more. I also edited the short hand rails to be three studs long instead of four. The rear of the loco. The locomotive is supposed to be a American Locomotive Company (ALCO for short) diesel two unit semi-permanently coupled set. However, several differences exist between the real world and the model, so it's not a exact match. The rear of the train features four 1 x 2 macaroni bricks as the back window's curved glass. Here we see the redesigned cars which are more colorful with a red stripe around the windows down the length of the train. The whole train together. NOTE: These updates will happen probably after Christmas, but rest assured it will be finished by January / February. Here are the LDD files for the above models. ...for the engine: http://www.moc-pages...1473611680m.lxf ...for the whole train: http://www.moc-pages...1473611473m.lxf Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!