Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'locomotive'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • The Military Section
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 128 results

  1. The War Department "Austerity" 2-10-0 is a type of steam heavy freight locomotive that was introduced in WWII in 1943. It was designed by R.A. Riddles, the same man who latter went on to design the British Railways 9F 2-10-0 type. I've backdated my 1950's 9F type into this 1940's Austerity class by removing the side smoke deflectors and changing around some small features here and there. As most of this engine still exists as-built from my previous 9F build from 2014 (that itself was inspired by @ScotNick's model of Thomas and Friends' 9F-type engine Murdoch) or so, I just need to get wheels, a tender draw-bar connector, pistons / side-rods, and the little bit of parts to convert it to a Austerity type. It should be done rather soon.... I hope by March. The tender should have a "WD" printed on it in 1 x 1 tiles, standing for War Department. 602 goes on the cab walls as well. The reason I've numbered my example 602 and nick-named it the Gray Ghost (or G.G. for short), is as the Longmoor Military Railway only had two Austerity 2-10-0's (600 - Gordon, and 601 - Kitchener respectively) of which only 600 - Gordon survives today from that railway, although other Austerity types exist, some even in other countries such as Greece. That UK engine, however, was the inspiration for this build change, so I thought I would honor it by continuing the sequence started by Gordon. Here she is in original 9F form sometime in August 2016, before she got stripped of her running gear, wheels, pistons, and front bogie. The old wheel lineup never really worked right at that point in time with the BFBFB setup with a two wheel pony truck, hopefully this newer arrangement will be better! (BFBBF plus the Emerald Night 2 wheel pony truck at the front.) I've never tried this before, so if anyone has any advice about this, please let me know! As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome.
  2. First off: I did not design this steam engine! I modified it heavily to suit my tastes from this Eurobricks post (link here) from user @damangos. I did, however, rework my original 7 wide Emerald Night tender from 2014 instead of the 6 wide tender used by damangos in the original model, and I also reworked his model to suit my tastes and be cheaper on BrickLink. The engine in question is modeled in LNER dark green, and is numbered one higher than the A3 engine series ever went, though it is still called the the Emerald Knight. (just the set 10194's name with an added K, as you may have noticed.).... and yes, it's a bit dusty. I just noticed, and it's too late to retake the pictures now. (It's been sitting in a open-top bin waiting for the coaches to be built for a while, and I thought I dusted it thoroughly.) LNER is the name of the railroad that built the locomotive (like it's real-world inspiration, the Flying Scotsman, 4472), and it stands for London North Eastern Railway. The number 2509 was chosen because the A3 class of engines never went that high in numbering. (2508 was the highest, and was the last one built in the mid-1930's.) These four regular coaches, (and one guard's coach, seen below) are inspired by the recent Hogwarts Express cars, to save money on wheels and train car bodies / frames. They don't have any of the interior details the Hogwarts Express has, though. I based the colors of the coaches on a inverted set 10194 (Emerald Night) coach color scheme. I always thought the colors looked better like this, and it avoids the problems of the tan 1 x 4 x 3 train windows used in the original set. (which are very expensive!!) Fictional locomotive backstory: Fictional locomotive backstory: This is loco 2509, built January 1936 as the very last A3 to roll out of the factory for London North Eastern Railways (LNER). It was given the name Emerald Knight, a name which, while being the name of a wining racehorse from the mid-1800's also matched it's dark green paint job. The engine was usually assigned the the Kings Cross to Scarborough line, hauling the Scarborough Flyer until being withdrawn in 1965. The engine survived WWII in remarkable shape of maintenance during those hard years due to the heroic actions of it's engine and shed crews who were said to have taken a shine to "well-riding" and "good tempered" engine. Steaming never was an issue, and the fire was always roaring right when you wanted it according to a fair amount of it's crews from 1940 to 1947. British Railways (BR) took over in 1948 and the engine was painted "Express dark blue". Loco 2509 soldiered on for 17 more years until 1965 when it was deemed unnecessary for future use and sold for scrapping. Thankfully, unlike 99% of the rest of it's class (except for the Flying Scotsman, which was also saved), it was not condemned to the scrap line for very long, as it was saved in 1966 by the Lego Rail Transportation Society (LRTS), a preservation group with aims to restore the trusty engine to it's former glory. LRTS backdated the loco to it's original 1936 exterior specifications, while keeping abreast of any interior improvements made to it's sister loco "the Flying Scotsman" (loco number 4472) over the next forty years. In early 2018, the engine was rolled into the shop for it's new boiler ticket tear-down, when it was announced it would wear LNER dark green again instead of the BR dark blue. The engine rolled out of the LRTS shops on December 26th, 2019, just in time for the engine's 84th birthday celebration in January 2020. Well, that's all I got for now... just need to get my layout up and running again! Comments, questions, and complaints are welcome as usual!
  3. The coaches are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The Lego Land Railway runs the train from World City to Heartlake City with stops at Classic Town, Paradisia Coast, Duplo-Ville, Ninjago City, (where the electric loco is replaced by a steamer or vise versa for the rest of the trip) Fabu-Land, Technic Town, Fort Legoredo and the Castle Realm. (with extensions into the Forest of Failed Themes and the Outer Dimension of Galidor at certain times of the year.) This loco's styling of the steam loco was inspired by the two Dreyfuss Hudson locomotives by Anthony Sava. I narrowed the boiler back down to it's original 4-wide width for a cleaner, more accurate look. (Please note, the tender and wheels / running gear still exist in real life from the previous version, but the rest are a under refurbishment to this updated design standard.) The rear of the engine has a ladder, two hand rails and a red marker light. It should also say "Lego Land Railway" in black 1 x 1 printed tiles on the tender sidewalls, while "8929" goes on the cab. As both sides are the same (even for the headlamp color), I decided to take only one picture of the ends of the bi-polar electric loco. As you may have noticed, the LEGO version has two "floating" third axle bogies that were inspired by Anthony Sava that allow the engine to float over switches and curves easily. The engine runs beautifully over the little bit of track I still have access to, but due to my lack of a layout and tables at the moment, (I've been forced to pack it all up for about a year now) I couldn't get any pictures of that taken. This model was inspired by both a 1999 version of the engine built by Flickr user legosteveb user and a couple of digital-only designs by @Sunder. There are two opening doors in the middle compartment, though they don't really go anywhere. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the lowered position here, though normally the one closest to the train it was hauling would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp to the repair shop. Also, in case you didn't know what bi-polar means in a mechanical sense, here's the basic meaning: They are called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. This baggage / passenger car is called a combine which is short for "combination". All the doors can open on this train, even the sliding ones shown here. The three 1980's-style coaches are identical in every way. The observation car, the rear-most coach on the train, features a platform for sight seeing. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 12/17/19: Added revised real life pictures. Comments, questions and suggestions are always welcome!
  4. This train is named the 909 National Limited, a (fictional) early 1930's steam-powered train run by Brick Railway Systems. This transcontinental train has it's respective east or west bound sections leave New York (or Los Angeles) on Monday at 9-AM sharp for the 3-day "Day" trip to the final destination, 72 hours distant, at 9:00 AM on Thursday. Then, after that train is cleaned and restocked in less than 12 hours, than it, or the standby train if their is delays, can be sent back as the "Night" section on-wards at 9-PM Thursday to 9-PM Sunday night. At 9-AM Monday morning, the whole cycle repeats anew for the next week. Their are five complete train-sets, two being used at any one time, two being cleaned and restocked on a bi-weekly basis, and one for standby in case of breakdowns. Also, coaches are in ready to use condition in several yards in large cities, just waiting to be dropped into place if a car needs to be worked on en-route. There are seven of the streamlined 4-8-2 "Mountain" type engines (numbers 4307 to 4314) assigned to the 909 National Limited, with a rotating pool of rolling repair and preventative maintenance schedules vigorously followed. Here we see engine 4312, it was built in the late 1920's by Lima locomotive Works. It was one of the lucky few of the 50 engines bought by Brick Railway Systems to receive a complete streamlined casing shortly after being assigned to 909 National Limited in 1931, along with six other's of it's type. It is painted in reddish brown with a fluted black side stripe on the engine and black box stripe on the tender to keep it in line with the passenger cars of the 909 National Limited, it's assignment for the foreseeable future. In reality, this locomotive was inspired by the South Australian Railways 520 class 4-8-4 and the hover mono-rail engine from the Legend of Korra TV Show, while the train coaches were inspired by a vintage 2009 LEGO model of "Galaxy Express 999". (Link to Brickshelf here ) The real story behind the of the name 909 Limited is a combination of this fantasy train and the Beatles song "One after 909", which is sort-of about a train. This is where the food is cooked and baggage is stored on the transcontinental journey. I don't know if such a car type really exists, but if not, I'm not sure what to call it... any suggestions? One of these cars is a sleeper, one a dining car, and one is a coach. But YOU get to guess which one is which! (Answer: They are exactly the same externally and there is no inside details. Only my imagination provides the difference!) The observation car at the end of the train has a viewing platform for looking at all the wonders this country has to offer as they go by. Builders Notes: So I looked back through the forum archive, and didn't see a topic posted for this train by itself. I saw one with other trains with it, but not one by itself, and it wasn't even in real bricks... so here is my updated for 2019 pictures and detailed description for this revised model. Also, the three day journey each way is plausible, as I asked Google, and it spit out a map from 1930 that said it took a train three days (72 hours) to get from Los Angeles to New York City. Now, I know that most trains headed to LA started in Chicago, but I'm ignoring that fact in my alternate reality LEGO-world here steam never died off completely, Amtrak doesn't exist in the semi-corporate mess it does today, and the electrification of the Milwaukee Road reached from the Twin Cities region to the Pacific ocean and are still there today. On that note, the North East Corridor wires stretch all the way to Chicago. ...anyway, kinda got off topic there. As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or complaints, please post them below!
  5. "I've been working on the railroad, all the live-long day!" This train consists of a ALCO diesel locomotive (specifically a RSD-12 type) and six cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - tool / worker bunk car - weed killer tanker - wide-vision bay-window caboose. The train model features several neat printed pieces found in several Juniors sets and and seven generic track workers. (as seen below) ...while the roadbed crew consists of: -Bucket-lift truck from set 3179 (Repair truck) -Dump Truck from set 7789 (Lotso's dump truck) Drill vehicle MOD from 7936 (level crossing) Front end-loader from set 7630 (front end-loader) ...and a official's inspection car MOC - not yet built This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. (no picture taken yet of this car) This car is not your ordinary tanker car - it contains weed killer for use on the ballast the train lays down. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) Here we see how the crane is hooked up to the depressed center flatcar most of the time. The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I tunrned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom door open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. (no picture taken yet of this car) This is the workers tool car. In reality it's empty, but it's supposed to have rows of racks for tools, and a special box for broken tools to be fixed when they get back to the division HQ. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. This is where the job site foreman has a little office. The med kit is also located here. This is the headquarters for my Maintenance of Way operations for Brick Railway Systems. I was inspired by set 60009 (Helicopter Arrest) from 2013 for most of the building, while most of the inside details came from set 10027 (Train Engine Shed) in 2003 a whole ten years before the other set was even produced. As for the billboard on the roof, I borrowed the letter's design from my brother's model (with his permission), and put them on a billboard to spell out OCTAN. The tracks on the side of the building are for my ALCO RSD-12 and it's accompanying six car work train to sit and await their next task. The inside on the lower floor is furnished with a lathe, drill press, fire extinguisher, oil drum, and a vise. The upper floor (the break room) has a table, a few chairs, coffee machine (with paper cups!), fireplace, and a recycle bin. I will be updating this with the two missing pictures soon. As for the digital items, I will built them as funding allows. As usual, Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!!
  6. Inspired by set 149 (Fuel Refinery) from 1976 as seen above (pic from BrickSet), this model takes the 4.5v era Shell refinery and turns it into a two-bay diesel locomotive / oil burning steam engine fuel depot for the modern PF age. The new refueling depot model features two floors with removable roof sections, two track-bays for servicing locomotives, plus a 1950's style tanker truck inspired by set 8486 (Mack's team truck, which hasn't been built yet.) The Santa Fe Bluebonnet model proudly uses no stickers, only printed parts. It's road number (327) is of a real-world Santa Fe bluebonnet engine, one that no longer survives after it's eventual conversion to a CF7 and scrapping sometime later. Sadly, all the Santa Fe F-series diesels were converted to CF7's, (whole body shell stripped away for viability reasons) and boy, were they ugly. Not many of the CF7's survive today, if any. As a side note, the locomotive bays are tall enough to let any official car through, including the double stacked container car from the Maersk train. The upper floor of the depot features a control station for monitoring the flow of fuel from the tanks on the roof to the service bay, or from the as-yet-unbuilt tanker truck to the storage tanks. The roof of the facility comes off in two sections. The upper floor features a opening door to the tanks and staircase to the lower floor and the flow-monitoring systems. Emergency fuel shutoff valve and fire extinguisher are at the top level next to the door to the tank area. This is a heavily modified version of set 8486 (Mack's Team Truck) 1950's style semi truck, like the one seen in the 1970's Spielburg movie "Duel". This time, it's a tanker truck in the OCTAN colors scheme. The model can seat one mini figure at the wheel, and features opening doors, a removable roof and a detachable tanker trailer. The tanker section features a moving stand to keep the tank stable when the cab is not there. The trailer is supposed to feature this print on both left, right and rear sides of the tank where the white 1 x 4 tiles are. The idea for this bluebonnet came to me in 2014 when I came upon @raven1280's very similar model, as seen here. I didn't want to use stickers at that time like he did, so I waited, modifying and tweaking the design until the parts came out in the correct colors to warrant it's building. (Particularly the windscreen!) Inside of the cab unit. Inside of the booster unit, with cab unit connected on the left hand side of this locomotive. (Yes, I placed it backwards to what it should be!) (NOTES: Real life model 98% done, just need the tanker truck built.) As usual, Comments, Questions, Suggestions & Complaints are always welcome!
  7. My first Lego locomotive MOC. Modeled after a BNSF ES44AC locomotive. 6 studs wide, 50 studs long and powered by two Lego Power Functions train motors. The three axle bogies have enough articulation to negotiate the standard Legos curves. It's made up of about 1200 bricks, took about 50 hours to design in Lego Digital Designer, 8 hours to assemble and cost a little over $200 to build, complete with electronics, from parts purchased off Bricklink. I've included the .lxf file below and welcome anyone to build, copy, modify or just examine my building techniques. I took great care to create many different groups to make the digital version easy to disassemble an examine. I've also included a link to a YouTube video of it running. It negotiates the standard Lego curves with no problems. I hope you like! Here's the .lxf file... https://bricksafe.com/pages/sed6/bnsf-es44ac-locomotive Thanks for looking!
  8. Good evening, everyone, Today I would like to present you our model of the German "war locomotive DR BR 52" of the "Deutsche Reichsbahn". This is a tender locomotive, of which more than 7000 units have been built since 1942. It is often called a war locomotive, because it was designed and built especially for war conditions and the resulting shortage of raw materials. Even after the war, these locomotives were still in use for a long time, distributed throughout Europe. The retirement of the Deutsche Bahn took place in 1962. The model can be powered by two Power-Functions L-motors. Both engines and the infrared receiver are installed in the boiler. The battery box finds place in the tub tender. The locomotive consists of approx. 1218 components and is approx. 64 studs long. The model has some details, such as the undercarriage, the superstructure on the boiler or the striking tub tender. Various SNOT techniques were used during construction. Have fun watching and many greetings Comments and criticism welcome These and other pictures can be found in our Flickr folder and on our homepage.
  9. Good evening everyone, Today I would like to present another "international" model. This is the "NSB Type 49 - Dovregubben" of the Norwegian State Railway. It was built between 1935 and 1941 and was mainly used on the "Dovre-Railway", that´s the reason why the locomotive is also called "Dovregubben". The model consists of approx. 1020 individual parts, is 58 studs long and approx. 10 studs wide. It can be driven by two M-engines, one above the other in the boiler. The IR receiver is located in the cab and the battery box in the Vanderbilt tender. This model was developed from a former customer request and was a special challenge, since there are unfortunately only very few meaningful photographs or pictures in the Internet to find. Usually only black and white. Therefore we mainly used photos of a H0 model. Praise and criticism are very welcome. Kind regards Martin Further pictures in the flickr-folder or on our homepage
  10. Since the 2018 Hogwarts Express (set 75955) is lacking in realism, (with the engine and tender in particular!) I decided to revise my custom version with ideas from the set, including printed 1x4 curve tiles with Hogwarts Castle printed on them. The locomotive is a heavily modified version of LDDModelmaker's Black 5 model with some parts from set 79111, Constitution Train Chase. The tender features a three wheeled bogie design modified from the one in Anthony Sava's ALCO MRS-1. The middle axle moves side to side, as to allow going through switches and curves without issue. The inside of the cab features two gauges and the firebox. In this false-color image, the red parts slide, the blue ones stay put to allow for the loco to go around curves and switches. (BTW: There are parts underneath that keep the sliding bogie from falling out.) The roof and side wall of each coach come off independently from each other, to reveal four seats for students and / or the occasional teacher. The Hogwarts Express is usually made up of four corridor BR MK I passenger coaches, although sometimes a special fifth coach is attached with an open floor plan. (however, in this Lego design, they are all open floor plan!) Also, the end car is not accurate to the films, but is what I prefer to the alternative: a gangway leading nowhere with no red light on the end. In-universe / Film History for the Hogwarts Express: Leaving from Kings Cross' Platform 9 & 3/4 to Hogsmeade Station at exactly 9 AM, the Hogwarts Express carries students (and sometimes faculty) to and from Hogwarts' School of Witchcraft & Wizardry in the Harry Potter series of books and movies. It has been seen in every Harry Potter film, from it's first appearance in the beginning of Philosophers Stone to it's (so far) last at the end of Deathly Hallows. (part two) The Hogwarts Express is usually only in the film for a short while, and it is generally a pleasant journey from Kings Cross to Hogsmeade, although Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and a certain Flying Ford Anglia might beg to differ! Hogsmeade station is the terminus for the Hogwarts Express on it's school-ward journey. This 100% fictional version of Hogsmeade station (as in, not based on any of the Harry Potter films) was inspired by several sets, chiefly sets 4554 (Metro Station) 41167, (Arendelle Castle) and 71044 (Disney Train and Station) from which I took the tower roof design, main floor general "look", and attic windows, respectively. (I was originally going to make this a generic European station, but then realized the Hogwarts crest 2 x 2 printed tile can fit just above what became the 1 x 4 Hogsmeade station sign on both the street and tracks sides.) The model is modular, and features a track side platform, ground floor, second floor, and tower roof. The street side features the same basic look as the other side, but in this case their is a staircase.... which could cause a problem for luggage trolleys as their is no ramp! Top floor features the Station master's office, which includes fixtures such as a desk, telephone, and some filing cabinets. This floor features the two ticket counters, indoor seating, and fireplace. Every floor & platform is grouped separately in LDD, as seen above. As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 10/5/19: Hogsmeade station LDD model added. Real bricks coming eventually. (Hopefully soon!)
  11. Here is Lady the steam loco and her train consisting of coaches Victoria and Elton, driven by Burnett Stone and Mrs Conductor. They travel between the worlds of Sodor, our world (circa the year 2000), and many other rail-gateways, to bring the vital magic gold-dust, paying passengers and small amounts of cargo to their respective destinations in the multiverse. It's a difficult and dangerous job (especially with Diesel 10 on the prowl) , but somebody's gotta do it. Builders note: These two engines were my most beloved thing to watch in childhood up until the Polar Express movie came out to displace it in 2004. I loved to play with my wooden railway models, and would have thought I'd have died and gone to heaven if I'd had the Lego models described below when I was little, around the time the movie came out when I was 6 or 7 in 2000 / 2001. So, in short, look on, younger Murdoch17 and gasp at what you've been able to accomplish with the help of many others and quite a few years of knowledge and learning. I still am a passive Thomas fan, BTW, (my collection of books is still around somewhere!) but everything after the switch from the models to CGI turns me off., so I haven't watched the show in 10 years, just in case anyone is wondering. Oh, and the Polar Express models by @SavaTheAggie were what inspired me to get this serious into LEGO trains in 2011 or so, so I've come full circle - from Thomas to Polar Express from the movies, then from Polar Express and back to Thomas the long way round via LEGO. This model was originally Hunter Dobbs steam locomotive and is based off of "Lady" from Thomas And the Magic Railroad (you know, the 2000 Thomas And Friends film that sadly, flopped horribly.) I redid the boiler using @ScotNick design from the BR Class 9F 2-10-0. Here is a link to Hunterdobbs' original engine. Fictional background (from Thomas and friends wiki) for this engine, as seen in the Magic Railroad movie. (Also, the figure in the cab of the engine is a representation of Burnett Stone, caretaker and driver of Lady, as played by Peter Fonda in the 2000 movie.) Lady once came to the Island of Sodor a long time ago, when she was found by Diesel 10, an evil diesel engine who wanted to destroy her. Lady and Burnett Stone both ran away from Diesel 10, but during the chase, Burnett used up all her coal and made her go too fast, causing Diesel 10 to catch up and crash her. Lady was taken back to Muffle Mountain and stored inside Burnett's workshop, where he spent years desperately trying to restore her to working order, but he did not have the right coal to make her steam. Years later, Lady was still out of service, and without her, the Magic Railroad began to lose its magic. That all changed when Lily, Burnett's granddaughter, and Thomas brought a truck of coal from Sodor to Muffle Mountain, which proved to be the coal necessary to make her steam. Lady came back to life and returned to Sodor, where she was once again chased by Diesel 10. Lady, Burnett and Thomas successfully managed to escape Diesel 10, and she gave the Conductor Family the Gold Dust they needed. As a side note, while watching Thomas and the Magic Railroad as a kid back in the early 2000's, I always wondered how it was supposed to be a technical railroad if Lady (the magic steam engine who powered and ran the warp-gate railway) had no coaches for people to sit in. She had a station on Sodor, and one on in the real world in the form of her owner's workshop, (as explained in the movie) but where were the coaches she most likely used to deposit people at these points? Well, now there are two brand-new coaches ready for service! The rear of the loco, with the red headlamp. These cars have been named Victoria and Elton. These names were chosen for several reasons, but mostly for these facts: Victoria was because of when Lady was supposedly built (in the 1890's) in "Thomas and Friends" canon and that is who was Queen at that time. Elton because I was listening to a good Elton John song ("This train don't stop here anymore") and decided then and there he was going to model the second car. So, we have a stuffy, quiet-loving type coach of the late 1800's, and a flamboyant, lovable, with a passion for singing out load coach from the 1890's, but with the heart and soul of Elton John. Oh, and they are both painted bright magenta to match Lady, who is still driven by Burnett Stone, but conducted by a female version of the Mr. Conductor character from the Magic Railroad film. Burnett Stone (Played by Peter Fonda in the 2000 movie) and Mrs Conductor (played by a actress as yet unknown... fill in your favorite one!) This 6 wide BR "Warship"class with hydraulic claw (AKA Diesel 10) model has been heavily modified by me from a old Class 37 file by LazarusBricks to have new removable roof sections for the cabs with seats for figures and cab controls. As you can see, I chose to leave off the face to keep the engine more in line with the rest of my locomotives. The rear of the locomotive. This in-universe background info is from the Thomas and friends wiki and concerns the events of The Magic Railroad movie (though he is still in the TV show to date, unlike his opposite number, Lady the magic steam engine): Diesel 10 once visited the Island of Sodor a long time ago, and caused trouble for the steam engines while he was there. During his visit, he found Lady, the engine responsible for keeping Sodor alive, and chased her, making her crash. Following the accident, Lady's caretaker, Burnett Stone, hid Lady in his workshop and tried to restore her, but failed to bring her back up to steam. Several years later, Diesel 10 came back to Sodor when the Fat Controller was on holiday, intending to destroy Lady forever. He was first seen by Thomas and Gordon when he raced past them at Killaban Station, and brought his two lapdogs, Splatter and Dodge, to the railway, who were present when he was scheming. He caused several problems for the steam engines, such as dumping sneezing powder around Tidmouth Sheds and later destroying the scaffolding that had been placed beside the shed. When Mr. Conductor travelled across Sodor to find the windmill, Diesel 10 found him and held him over the Big Dipper, intending to drop him. However, Mr. Conductor managed to escape by cutting one of the hydraulics hoses to his claw with a pair of wire cutters, causing him to fling Mr. Conductor across the island and to the windmill. Diesel 10 was later present at the Coaling Plant, where he was covered in coal when he was teaching Splatter and Dodge “how to stop being stupid”. After Junior flew in the air after riding the windmill's sails, he landed on Diesel 10's cab, who raced across the island and to the smelter's yard, where he tried to push James and Junior into the melting pit. Fortunately, Junior and James managed to escape by using the last of the former's gold dust. After Lady was brought back up into steam and returned to Sodor, Diesel 10 found her and began to chase her, Thomas and Burnett across the island, until they reached the viaduct, but not before Splatter and Dodge betrayed him. Lady, Burnett and Thomas managed to cross the viaduct safely while it was collapsing, but it had already done so by the time Diesel 10 came over it and he plunged into a barge of sludge below the bridge, and was sent away in disgrace. The roof of both front and rear facing cabs can bee removed to place figures in the driver's seats. The rooftop arm can raise and lower, and the claw itself and open and close. Here we see it in the raised and open position. Originally Inspired by the Carolina Train Builders set "3105-STD" from 2001, this engine has gone through significant upgrades, including Big Ben Bricks medium driving wheels, pearl gold whistles, and printed number 1 tiles. I still haven't got the face figured out though, and I feel like I like it that way! The rear of the loco. (EDIT: Thomas and Diesel 10 have had their real world pictures added.)
  12. I hope this is the right forum to post this :) Recently I got challenged by my friend Felix to build a micro-scale steam locomotive. I have never tried building anything like this but I gotta say I was surprised how much fun it can be. The new pieces definitely open the whole another world of possibilities when it comes to tiny builds like this. And I am really quite pleased with the result :) If you want to build your own, I put together building instructions which you can get for free on Rebrickable!
  13. Terry Akuna

    TNTX Dieselpunk Locomotives

    This is the kind of locomotive you build when you run out of wheels. Fantasy Train by Terry Akuna, on Flickr Fantasy Train by Terry Akuna, on Flickr Fantasy Train by Terry Akuna, on Flickr
  14. An old project finalized after seven years Herningværket Vestkraft I/S All three typers of wagons were part of the company's famous coal train "kultoget" transporting coal from Vestkraft in the costal city of Esbjerg to Herningværket power plant in the inland city of Herning from the year 1982 to 2000. FALS coal wagon Digital model but built in 2012The 18 coal wagons were built in Denmark by Scandia in 1981-82 on license from Talbot in Germany.All were sold to France in 2000.My model:Scale: ~1:50Lenght: 30 bricksWidth: 8 bricksBricks: 312Weight: 335gDesigned: 2012 (slightly updated in 2018)Very high setting render from Stud.io with custom decals done in the PartDesigner tool. The doors can be opened up to 45 degrees: Top view: ASJ tank wagon Digital model but being built very soon... The six tank wagons bought by Vestkraft I/S in 1981 were originally built in 1948-49 by AB Svenska Järnvägsverkstäderna (ASJ) in Falun, Sweden. All six were scrapped in 1991. My model: Scale: ~1:45 Lenght: 26 bricks Width: 6-8 bricks Bricks: 302 Designed: 2019 Very high setting render from Stud.io using custom decorations from Stud.io, LDD to Pov-Ray and manual editing. Side view: The two 1-axle boogies can rotate and are held in place by a Hose, Flexible Ribbed with 8mm Ends, 10L. Technique used for the mid-cylinder: AVG tank wagon Digital model. The two AVG tank wagons bought by Vestkraft I/S in 1991 were originally built in 1968 by AB Gävle Vagnverkstäder (AGV) in Gävle, Sweden. Both were removed from service in 2002 and scrapped in 2003. My model: Scale: ~1:45 Lenght: 40 bricks Width: 6-8 bricks Bricks: 361 Designed: 2019 Very high setting render from Stud.io using custom decorations from Stud.io, LDD to Pov-Ray and manual editing. Some of the custom decorations were truly horrific to render due to their bend Top view: Technique used for the mid-cylinder: The locomotives (!) Both types of locomotives were from the Danish State Railways (DSB). In the the earlier years of operation from 1982 to 1993 two Litra MX (1001 & 1024) were used, one in the front and one in the back whereas in the later years from 1993 until the end of operation in 2000 a single more powerful Litra MZ (I) (1404) were used. DSB Litra MX The Litra MX locomotives were built on license from General Motors by Nydquist & Holm AB - Bofors-Nohab in Trollhättan, Sweden. 45 were built from 1960-1962. The Litra MX were very similar to their big brother Litra MY but had a smaller engine and lower weight with less pressure on the tracks making them popular on smaller railroads. Quite a few are still used today by private railway companies either domestic or abroad. One locomotive is on display at a railway museum in the city of Stuer, Denmark. My model: Digital model but based on my very first train MOC from 2011 with the same basic design. DSB red and black livery used in the 1980s. Room for lights in all headlights and the interior. Scale: ~1:60 Lenght: 40 bricks Width: 6 bricks Bricks: 546 Powered: 1 or 2 x PF, PUp or 9v train motor(s) Designed: 2019 (variant of my Litra MY update in 2018) Very high setting render from Stud.io with custom decals done in the PartDesigner tool. Interior: One of my pictures from 2013 with a Litra MY pulling some of the coal wagons: DSB Litra MZ (I) The Danish State Railways (DSB) powerful Litra MZ (I) locomotives were built by Swedish Nydquist & Holm AB (Nohab) in Sweden and subcontractors in Denmark on license from General Motors. 10 were built from 1967-1969. 61 in total were built across all MZ variants (I-IV). Quite a few are still used today by private railway companies either domestic or abroad, in Iran, Norway and Australia. My model: Digital model but based on my second train MOC from 2011 with the same basic design. DSB red and black livery used in the 1980s. Scale: ~1:60 Lenght: 40 bricks Width: 6 bricks Bricks: 653 Powered: 1 or 2 x PF, PUp or 9v train motor(s) Redesigned: 2015 (4st revision) Very high setting render from Stud.io with custom decals done in the PartDesigner tool and some manual color replacement of the upper headlights. The top can easily be lifted providing access to the battery box and all others parts inside: Photo inspired by LEGO train builder Sérgio Batista
  15. Belus was a series of experimental locomotives within the dystopian apocalyptic fictional universe of The Final Station. There was only 8 locomotives in total, with the series discontinued after the main project supervisor went missing and the project team going bankrupt, ceasing production and maintenance of the Belus locomotives whatsoever. According to the game wiki the train's wheel arrangement is supposed to be 6-2-0 (I am not versed in train wheel patterns), but I depicted only the four that show up in the gaps between the plating. EDIT: Yesterday before sleep I've tried to make the Belus to actually have three pairs of smaller wheels, as is suggested by the info from the wiki. I think it looks much better, even though not much have changed on the surface: Here's what lies under the plating though: Here's the train's in-game appearance: As you can see, I had to work with a design that was ever represented only in a side-view, so it was a challenge to turn it into a 3D and pick a good width. In the end, I am glad that I even managed to more-or-less adjust the wheels to stand on the standard LEGO train tracks. All in all, it was a fun build that I wanted to tackle for a while! Also, please do check out the game, it's gorgeous and has a really good atmosphere! The model is made in Lego Digital Designer and adjusted in Stud.Io. The decals were applied via Stud.Io Part Designer. Here's a turnaround animation: https://i.gyazo.com/c860b0e9068f664dd29f8a4cdb9dce3f.gif
  16. Good evening Community, Today i want to present a small German Steam-locomotive. The DR BR 24 was a passenger locomotive for main use on secondary lines. It was built in the late 20s to 1940. An interesting fact about this locomotive is that many components, such as the boiler, the engine or the cylinders, were identical in construction to those of the DR BR 64. A total of 95 units were built by manufacturers such as Borsig or Krupp. The LEGO model consists of approx. 775 individual parts, it is 48 studs long, 9 studs wide and 12 studs high. It is very easy to motorize with a Power Functions M-Motor, which can be placed under the boiler. The IR receiver is installed in the cabin and the battery box in the tender. There were a lot of different variants, like different smoke deflectors or different tenders. We have decided for the most widely leaded ones with large Wagner wind deflectors and the three-axle tender. The middle axis of the tender can be shifted sideways to allow cornering. Just like the DR E 94 we had exactly this variant on our H0 system at that time. And now have fun looking at the pictures. Criticism welcome. The example (Source: Bahnbilder.de) PDF-Instructions available on our Homepage: www.bricks-on-rails.de With kind regards Martin | Bricks-on-Rails
  17. Dear Community, The week has passed very fast once again and like promised I would like to present a model for the start of the weekend. But first a little text. Some of you may have already seen it while browsing through my Flickr channel. It's the "German Crocodile", the DR E 94. It was built from 1940 and was mainly used in heavy goods traffic in Germany and Austria. 200 units were built. The nickname "German crocodile" was given to the locomotive because of the optical similarity to the "Swiss crocodile, the SBB Ce 6/8", which comes much closer to a crocodile. But the real nickname is not "crocodile" but "iron pig". They were designed for freight trains with up to 2000 tons. This heavy electric locomotive fascinated me already as a child on our domestic model railway layout. Apparently effortlessly she pulled the at that time seemingly endless coal train over our 4m² plate. The model is approx. 43cm long, 8.5cm wide and approx. 12.5cm high, with extended pantographs even higher. The locomotive can be motorized with two Power-Functions M motors, one of which is housed in each "crocodile snout". The IR receiver and battery box fit easily into the spacious cab. Inside, it was even possible to design both cabs. The detailed roof can be removed for easy access to the interior details and electronics. The two chassis, each with three axles (all driven) are pivoted and also very detailed. Here were not the "standard railway wheels" used, but the large spoke wheels of the Emerald Night, as these fit much better to the scale. By the way, the size of the model fits perfectly to the already introduced "SBB De 4/4". What has always bothered me with this locomotive, as well as with the "sister" from Switzerland and other locomotives of similar design, is the relatively large gap, which is between the driver's cab and the two " mouths " (also to be seen with the crocodile from LEGO set 10183). This gap is usually quite large with LEGO models, as the available curve radius is very small compared to the scale. In the real model, however, the gap is hardly noticeable. My goal was to "develop" a system that allows cornering but keeps the gap as small as possible. The solution is relatively simple. Below the cab there is a kind of rail system which is attached to both " mouths " and thus enables the three elements to be pulled apart if necessary, e.g. in curves. On a straight line, the elements are pulled together again by means of an attached rubber band. The assembly attempts have left a good impression on me. Unfortunately also a long, heavy train causes, that the elements can pull each other a little bit apart when driving straight out. As with the "SBB De 4/4" it is possible to build the locomotive in three different colours: - dark green (still my favourite) - grey - blue (DB colouring) And now have fun looking at the pictures. Criticism welcome. The example (Source: Wikipedia) More pictures in the flickr album With kind regards Martin | Bricks-on-Rails
  18. Hey Community, Finally, after a long time beeing absent, we´re back. And we´re here to re-introduce ourselves and to present something new. Some of you may know us from the time before we disappeared. By the way, we were not away we were just calm. Now, since beginning 2019 we´re back and we´re happy to be back again. Enough to us... ... here is the model. The model, that we like to present isn´t actually a new one. It is more like remake of a previous version (history). It´s a railcar, the "De 4/4 or Fe 4/4" of the SBB (Swiss railroad company). The example was used in the late 1920s in swiss. Overall there were 25 units built in different versions. The model is approx 40cm long, 7.8cm wide and about 12cm high. It is possible to motorise it with up to two Power Functions XL-motors. That will power up all four axles at the two boogies. The IR-Transmitter and the battery-pack will take "a seat" in the cabin. One of the two cabins is equipped with a small interior. The doors protrude a little to convey an impression of functionality, but the doors and the roof could not be opened due to the interlaced-design. The roof, with the extentable pantographs, the boogies and the substructure is highly detailed. During my investigation i found three major designs, that´s why it is possible to build the model in these three designs. - dark-green - brown - light-blue Now it´s enough with texting. Here are some 3D-Renderings. More pictures can be found in the flickr-folder.
  19. The Spirit of Legoredo was my one of my first big trains, and was built in 2011 with a baggage car, three passenger coaches, and observation car. It looked good to me at first, in nearly all black with a red stripe at the base, but over the years was quietly forgotten about, as it was quite dull-looking to others and hard to take pictures of. Then I switched magnet types to the newer ones, and it became even harder show off as it didn't match the rest of my newer train fleet. That is, until I added a new locomotive to the head end and one more passenger car. (changing the colors up a bit from mainly black to mostly red doesn't hurt much either!) This model was originally made out of @SavaTheAggie and his wonderful Emerald Garratt instructions, as seen and purchased here at his store. I turned the eight wide locomotive into a six wide one, and added a brick of height to the whole model in total. I then used the original red parts from my now-dark red 4-10-4 to build most of the model in real life, which as you can see, took a bit longer than I'd hoped when i posted it originally on the 5th of May. Fictional history of the engine type: In late-1929, Thomas Carter was Chief Mechanical Engineer for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), and on vacation to visit family in New Zealand. He was about to get on the train in Christchurch, when he was passed by a new NZR "G" class 4-6-2+2-6-4 Garratt steam engine. Remembering how he was having problems getting the next "big thing" built back in America, he contacted the engine's manufacturer, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and talked about a possible contract in America using the New Zealand "G"class as a starting point. Once he got home to BRS company HQ in St. Louis, Missouri, he got the upper management's final okay, and began final design on the new "DP" class of Garratts. (DP standing for Double Pacific, as it is really just two pacific type loco wheel-set's back-to-back with one boiler.) The engine's entire wheel-width was widened from 3 feet, 6 inches (narrow gauge) to 4 feet eight 1/2 inches (standard gauge) The mechanical stoker was kept, but the piston count was reduced from 6 to 4 in keeping more with American practice. All in all, 10 of these were made as a trial run in 1930, but the Great Depression worsened in 1931-33 so no more were ever ordered. (originally, 15 locos more were planned but never built, which would have brought the grand total up to 25 engines.) (The real world NZR "G" class on which Anthony Sava based his original design can be found here on Wikipedia. Sadly, none were saved for preservation.) The baggage car. These cars were all inspired by The Santa Fe Super Chief cars (10022 and 10025) and the Emerald Night's coach. (10194) The four streamlined coaches of the train. Each car on this train is 28 studs long, which is longer than my usual 24 studs long standard. Observation car of the Spirit of Legoredo passenger train. The original way these cars were styled had them all black and with a red base stripe, but I have added dark bluish gray fluting and a lot more red to the mix to make them easier to take pictures of. The whole train together. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  20. Im currently working on a 4-6-4 steamer. The past few days have been seeing it materialize on my Flickr. Thought id post here for anyone that wants to follow along, im keeping that updated as i go and ill try to remember to keep here current as well. Proof of concept chassis by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr Working on the clearance issues by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr Cab interior by SuRrEaLNJ, on Flickr the inspiration comes primarily from sava and cale's work comment, critiques, discussion welcome
  21. The 4-10-4 (four leading, ten driving, four trailing) "Rainhill" wheel arrangement was so named after the Rainhill Trials of October 1829 in Rainhill, England of which the famous Rocket was the only entrant to complete the Trials. The Rainhill type was designed in 1927 and built in early 1928, though it was originally called the "Gigantic" type, but the planned Centenary of Steam celebration sealed the deal on the naming of the type. (Unfortunately, the plans for the potential celebration were postponed in July 1928 and finally cancelled one day before the Stock Market Crash of 1929.) The steam locomotive prototype of the 4-10-4 Rainhill type was painted a dark red and gray color-scheme with a light gay box on the tender and was sold by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1928 to Brick Railway Systems, but due to technical teething troubles and because of it's unusual color scheme was nicknamed the Red Demon. The engine worked the trans-continental route on the "pan-American Limited" passenger train from New York to Los Angeles, with the Red Devil or one of it's type worked the portion west from St. Louis to Las Vegas. The Red Demon original engine (number 7957) worked this route from 1930 until being bumped to freight duties in early 1958. The engine then worked freights with it's thirty-nine brother's in diminishing numbers until this one was sidelined in 1971, the last of it's kind. The Red Demon was pulled out of the mothballs in 1973 for potential use on the 1976 American Bicentennial train but politics intervened and Texas and Pacific 2-10-4 number 610 got the job instead. After that, the engine's future looked bleak until the "Save the Red Demon 7957" Committee was formed which raised enough money to restore the engine to working order by 1978 and has kept the engine indoors and in tip-top shape ever since under the Red Demon Incorporated moniker. This company uses five former Brick Railway Systems-styled coaches on fan trips, but they are wholly owned by Red Demon Inc. The tender features the name of the railroad (Brick Railway Systems) on it's side, with a light at the rear and a ladder to the top deck. In reality, there was no 4-10-4 type of steam locomotive. It was strangely skipped over in the age of steam... none of this wheel arrangement were ever built. The name Red Demon was chosen because the 4-14-4 type of Soviet Russia was the closest analogy to my loco... except mine works fine, while the Russian one never did much as it spread the track, ruined switches and pulled the freight cars' couplings apart due to it's raw power. The second reason for the name is the Red Devil, a heavily modified South African 4-8-4 engine with a gas producing combustion system and many modern improvements. That cape gauge engine worked beautifully, but was mothballed in 2003. As of 2018, however, the Red Devil is again puling fan trip trains in South Africa! The three regular coaches, all in the same color scheme as the engine. The Pan-American Limited's observation car. The whole train. Comments, Questions, Complaints, and Suggestions for the future are always welcome! EDIT 4/2/19: main post reformatted, pictures replaced with new ones and text updated.
  22. The last time this older 7-wide industrial saddle tanker steam loco design was seen in complete form in the real world was in 2014. I have since added working pistons and an "American" style headlight for use on my US layout. (These working pistons were inspired by Hunterdobb's 2015 replica of Lady from the Thomas and the Magic Railroad movie as seen here on Flickr.) The bulk of the original model was a ScotNick creation inspired by Thomas and Friends engine "Stanley". Here we see the @ScotNick engine circa 2013. The rear of the loco, with the "glowing" firebox showing. As you probably know by now, BRS (as stated on the tank sides) stands for Brick Railway Systems, my fictional railroad company. Anyway, I thought this engine looked cool, and I don't think there was a thread about it that was a stand-alone or at least recent enough to bump up and edit, since just added the pistons two weeks ago. As usual Comments, questions, and suggestions are always welcome!
  23. Welcome aboard the Astro-train! This stream-liner was a mix of the 1910's Earth train called the "Bipolar" built specifically for use by Classic Space forces as high-speed, high-security ground transports for senior level officers such as Benny. Unlike the Earth version, the Astro-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 400 MPH on special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's of tens of miles.\ BUILDER'S NOTES: In reality, I liked my original take on the Classic Space Aerotrain, but it can't be built due to design and motorization issues. thus, I stretched the design into the model you see here but with my Super Bipolar at the head. This will be able to allow the engine to pull freight cars, (such as Benny's road car on a flat car) too. This model was inspired by both a 1999 version of the original, real-world Bipolar engine built by user Legosteveb and by a digital-only design by @Sunder to create the Super Bipolar you see in my picture above. Note, the two 4 x 2 slopes should have this CS print while the four white 1 x 1 tiles should have this "60" print. Also, a bonus for this engine model is if I ever show off this train at a LEGO show, I can replace the middle wheel-set on the loco with another person's 9V motor swapped in to power the train. This is the baggage car, and like the rest of the train, all the doors open. (Although there are no interior details, so it can be whatever you want it to be inside!) These are the two passenger cars. The observation car. This is the complete train. I'm planning on building this in 2019 in real bricks, at some point, hopefully. Anyway, comments, questions, complaints, and suggestions are always welcome!
  24. Hello all, im not a very experienced train builder, but since i saw the movie "Unstoppable", i got inspiration to build trains, so, i made my own version of the 777 train of the movie in LDD, which if im not wrong its a BNSF GE C44-9W, so here it goes: Im not very talented for the aesthetics, thats why it is a bit ugly, it was supposed to have a yellow stripe on the sides, but i think it would look much better with stickers, however, i will see if i can make of bricks. I decided to make it 8 wide, to have more space for details and to make it more scale-realistic. The propulsion system its done by one battery box, one sbrick and 2 XL motors for each locomotive: And this is how it steers (it still can steer to take the normal curves) I hope you like it, i will try to post more pics of the working parts. Thanks.
  25. Bricked1980

    [MOC] Miniature Steam Machines

    Hi everyone This is the first time I've posted a MOC in the train forum and although these models are not trains, they are still locomotives of a sort and I thought this would appeal to train and especially steam fans. "Miniature Steam Machines" is my collection of 3 steam engines designed at a small scale. I set myself a challenge to see if I could build these little engines using a very limited amount of bricks but still maintaining a decent level of detail. They are all very small. The biggest of the 3 models only contains 128 bricks. Traction Engine The Traction Engine is the smallest of the 3 models and only uses 82 bricks. The basic structure of this model forms the basis for all three models and this one in particular is intended to represent a miniature version of my LEGO IDEAS project, The Old Workhorse - Traction Engine. Steam Roller The second model is a steam roller and this one is made from 109 bricks. Showman's Engine The third model is a Showman's Engine. This model is the biggest of the 3 and contains 128 bricks. I designed these mini models to act as a sort of side project and to help promote my LEGO IDEAS model called "The Old Workhorse - Traction Engine". This a much bigger and more detailed model. Here is a picture showing the mini models alongside the Old Workhorse. If you're interested in reading more about The Old Workhorse then it has its own topic here on Eurobricks. The Old Workhorse - Traction Engine If you like the model I'd also be massively grateful if you could please vote for it over on LEGO IDEAS at the following link. https://lego.build/2vRfVGL Many thanks for reading and I hope you like these models.