MajklSpajkl

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About MajklSpajkl

  • Birthday 08/27/1982

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  • What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)
    <p> My favourite LEGO theme is LEGO Technic and my most recent set is 42083 Bugatti Chiron. </p>

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    http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=MajklSpajkl

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    Ajdovščina
  • Interests
    LEGO Technic & LEGO in general

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    Slovenia
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  1. MajklSpajkl

    42125 Ferrari 488 GTE “AF Corse #51”

    That is really nice to have high es pics immediately after the announcement. A lot of things are clearly visible, like that mudguard extension piece, the front lights details etc. - the only thing that is troublesome about this grat model is the price unfortunately. But nonetheless - fantastic model and on my desired list for sure. What engine does the real car have? - there is definetly a fake piston engine of a V shape inside - it is visible on the photos.
  2. MajklSpajkl

    [C-model] 42106 - Pullback Vehicles

    Suddenly that set doesn't feel so bad anymore :-) Amazing alternatives. I like the car and the locomotive best. Congratulations!
  3. Excelent!!! Very good bodywork, I love what you did on the rear mudguards. Rotary engine is something fresh, even though it is not 100% accurate. Bravo!
  4. MajklSpajkl

    42124 Off-Road Buggy

    I think I will just get the tires. I like the violet colour too.
  5. MajklSpajkl

    [WIP] Straddle Carrier

    Hi @Lasse D, great project! I kinda overlooked your topic until today. Perhaps I can share my experience, as I built one back in 2018, but never made a presentation cause it was a failure in my eyes and the reason was driving and steering. I was super happy with the crane part. It was built for the scale of Mack truck set and containers of that cross section as used there (also my Kenworth truck) You can see a couple of photos of mine here and there is also one in my too-big signature photo :-) Maybe one day I will show more of it in a separate topic... I used ropes to lift the crane and the containers were grabbed from front and back, so different approach on the crane as yours - as far as the drivetrain and steering goes, you are on a similar bus as I was, but I think you still have a chance to change the destination to Success and not to Failure, where mine ended :-) So to explain why mine was a failure and why I believe you could succeed, should you make some changes... 1. Driving steered wheels: In my opinion those two together are not possible with LEGO. The problem is, that there is always some slack in the steering mechanism from top table to the bottom wheels. And at least in my case, when a wheel was driven, it always had tendency to rotate a bit as well, which resulted in stretching the two sides apart or shrinking them together. So, I believe a 6-wheeler is a better (but way less cooler) option with 1st and 3rd wheel steered and only the second driven, but fixed. Left and right driven wheels should be connected with a differential in order to compensate different trajectories, they are running on (had those on mine). With second wheel only driven, driving won't affect the distance between both sides. I had a problem even when driving straight as the wheels had a tendency to rotate just because of torque through the turntables. I didn't want to give up on the 8 wheels setup and couldn't find the solution for that problem... I hope you do, but as said – 6-wheeler has better chances IMHO. 2. Steering: I see you have left and right side of steering connected to one motor. I don't know if you considered that, inner side of the carrier should turn more that the outer side due to different radius of the trajectories of the wheels and when you turn the other way it goes vice versa. You need a sort of Ackerman steering. And to avoid lateral stretching or shrinking both sides need to have the same centre of the steering radius and front/rear wheels need to turn exactly enough less then wheels on 2nd and 3rd axis in order to keep the correct radius. While I kinda got correct difference between rotation of axles 1+4 vs 2+3, I wasn't able to find any mechanical solution for the Ackerman, so I decided to steer left and right side separately, each with its own motor and tried to visually adjust turning angles to get the proper radii of inner and outer wheels. Why I think you could do better than me? Mindstorms! Unfortunately, I don't have it, but I guess it is possible, with some math behind it - that you program proportional steering for left motor and right motor so that the turning radii would be in the correct relation between inner and outer side of the turn. I believe also the real machine has to have something like that, because each wheel is separately rotated. Also, if I am not mistaken the real machine has driving motors in the wheels so there is no drivetrain through the turntables and there is no effect of torque on the turn table. So, I will keep an eye on your progress here, as I really would love to see you succeed - I think straddle carriers are awesome piece of machinery so I really am cheering for you. Best regards, Miha
  6. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] M60A1 AVLB - Armored vehicle-launched bridge

    @KRocans Thank you very much. I hope someone might use it for a diorama, I am affraid I won't be able to do it, as I practically have not enough bricks to make such a big diorama. Maybe in (long) time...
  7. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] M60A1 AVLB - Armored vehicle-launched bridge

    Thank you very much. I agree - having an interior would be really great. Maybe I abandoned the idea of the interior of the tank too soon. As an excuse - quite a big portion of the volume of the chassis is taken by the suspension and of connections between technic parts and system parts. Igues I could steal a couple of plates height inside but not enough for the whole minifig to sit in. By the way, does anyone have to much tan and dark tan bricks??
  8. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] M60A1 AVLB - Armored vehicle-launched bridge

    Thank you ;-) Thanks. No, the bigger one was definitely not featured anywhere. This is the first time I mentioned it, it was a failure, bridge was way to heavy to be able to operate with LA's - but there are some fantastic and functioning models presented on YT indeed. I just wanted to much detail which added to much weight...but I guess it was a learning curve that led me to this one :-)
  9. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] M60A1 AVLB - Armored vehicle-launched bridge

    Found this photo together with the big Technic Mastodon failure i mentioned in the first post. Interesting size comparison Also note the sag of the suspension due to bridge weight. I guess I could lock the rear road wheel but decided to build a small pedestal to put it under the hull and keep the fully suspended road wheels. Best regards.
  10. Dear LEGO fans!I present to you my LEGO MOC, my all time favourite armored vehicle, the M60A1 AVLB - Armored vehicle-launched bridge. When I first saw this video of the real machine, I was mind-blown. Being a mostly Technic builder, I instantly wanted to try building it fully functional. There are some fantastic Technic models already out there. But most suffer from abstract looks of the bridge in particular, due to obvious weight problems. Well, unfortunately I learned about it the hard way, as the plate & tile clad bridge was just too heavy for the launcher to be able to lift it, even when the bridge was stripped of all the cladding. (Here is the link to some photos of my fallen Technic Mastodon, if someone is interested). To heal my wounds after Technic debacle, I decided to try it out in minifig scale, trying to make it as accurate as possible with at least manual functionality of the real machine. The result is in front of you. I must admit, I am very satisfied with the result, and this is why the model is still sitting on my shelf in my LEGO room for almost two years now (I usually disassemble all my creations very quickly). So after almost two years I finally managed to edit photos and also make instructions and a short video. So, about the actual MOC... I must admit that I was at first heavily inspired by this fantastic M60A1 Brickmania's Cody Osell. This video and a couple of their photos was the only brick built reference material, so the only similar thing might be the looks of the underside and it was helpful to determine the size of the tank and the bridge afterwards. According to dimensions of the real one I found on-line, it is built in approximately 1:33 scale and is a completely manual model, although the cores of both the tank and the scissor bridge are made of Technic bricks. It has some moderate play-ability, like independent torsion suspension of all road wheels, but it is more meant to be - and I absolutely love it that way - a display piece. Since I decided to go for more or less authentic looks and not so much for the actual functions, the bridge is actually heavier than the launcher, so I hope it is clear, that the tank cannot hold the bridge in raised position by itself. I used two pillars made of trans-clear panels below the hinges of the bridge to support it. The loose end of the bridge on the other hand is only supported with a string - "steel cord/cable" on the hinge. There is some photo editing done on the raised bridge photos to look like it is elevated solely by the tank. I hope you don't feel too fooled by that. I'm sure that those readers and fans, that know much more about the M60A1 AVLB, than I do, will find many details not accurate, but overall, I think that the main presence is there. Enough writing. I'll let the photos speak. The V12 engine is only indicated with visible 6 pistons, the other 6 (nonexistent in the model) are "deeper" under the hull :-) Here an example of IRL display, where translear pillar is visible to aid keeping in the position on those slippery tiles. Also, when bridge is carried on the tank, i used a special brick-built pedestal to aid the rather soft independent torsion suspension of all road wheels. It was my wish to see it on some diorama, alongside a ruined bridge or something... who knows, maybe someday... Some data of the model are in order as well I guess... The final part count came down to 2233 parts (1100 for the bridge 1133 for the tank) in 266 different lots + 2x 30 cm of non LEGO stiff and strong (non elastic) string + some short thin string to attach some of the clutter on the tank. Launcher dimensions (LxWxH): 20,5 (24,5) x 11,5 x 11 cm or 26 (31) x 14,5 x 14 studs with the launching arm put over the hull. Launcher weight: 546 grams Bridge dimensions (LxWxH): 57 x 14 x 3,6 cm or 71 x 17,5 x 4,5 studs when extended. Bridge weight: 738 grams. Here are some comparisons with the sketches I found on-line. As you can see on the second one, the height on the tank is close, but I wasn't able to keep the bridge thin enough to perfectly match the scale. I guess the road wheels could be a bit bigger too, but it is LEGO after all and with smaller scales compromises are inevitable. I also prepared a short video presentation with some nice animations from stud.io, although I admit photos do this model more justice: With this creation, I decided for the first time to seriously venture in creating a digital model, some renders and building instructions by using Stud.io designer. It took some time and ended up consisting of 420 pages and 627 steps in total. I didn't get into modelling of the strings with other CAD software (I found this is the only thing to improve in Stud.io at the moment), so I enhanced the instructions with some photo and text guides as well. This said - the string for "steel cable" for the hinge is the only non lego part of the build. The instructions can be found and purchased (yes trying to get on the money train , not that I'm too optimistic) here on rebrickable.com. Below I add a couple of renders used to "enrich" the building instructions and some pages of the actual instructions as well. Thank you for taking time to read this through and thank you in advance for your constructive criticism and support. I hope someone decides to build it as well. Best regards, Miha
  11. MajklSpajkl

    Has the pandemic slowed your building?

    Any slower could be noted as zero...
  12. MajklSpajkl

    Has the pandemic slowed your building?

    My answer to the topic question would be NO. My building was already very slow before the pandemic
  13. MajklSpajkl

    Lego Mini Tatra 815-7 8x8 1/18

    I love both versions! Very good job!
  14. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] Tatra T813 KOLOS by MajklSpajkl

    @JintaiZ, there are no limits, except for time and money
  15. MajklSpajkl

    [MOC] Tatra T813 KOLOS by MajklSpajkl

    Hi again, Well, it took long enough, so this can be considered "bumping an old topic" , but building instructions are finally available for FREE, sticker sheets included. https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-49990/MajklSpajkl/tatra-t813-kolos/#bi Huge thanks to @SWL for all the efforts in making them. I hope you enjoy it, best regards, Miha