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Found 90 results

  1. This is my own creation of a Mercedes-Benz G550 4x4² SUV. Check out my Rebrickable post for instructions which you can download for free: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-43865/BrickHugger171/mercedes-benz-g550-4x42/?inventory=1#comments
  2. Hello everybody, I am glad to introduce you my last big project : a pneumatic steam locomotive ! I think it's one of the firsts pneumatic locomotives, using only Lego parts. First of all, the YouTube video and some photos: The idea with this model is to replace the steam of a real Locomotive by compressed air, and this for as much functions as possible. Here are the main functions : Movement of the train : Using 4 pistons, 2 on the sides, and 2 inside, the train can move forward. It works like a classic LPE, with 2 pistons shifted 90° from the others. 4 pistons consume a lot of air, but they guarantee enough power to move the whole train. To make the rotation smooth, a free wheel is hidden inside the boiler part of the locomotive. Its rotation is 25 times faster than the wheels of the train (40t/8t x2). The train isn't moving very fast because the pneumatic elements aren't modified. However, it's fast enough to make it interesting to look at the connecting rods and wheels moving. The breaks : On a real locomotive, compressed air is produced by a compressor (powered by steam) and is used to press some brake shoes against the wheels. Here, the same technique is used : a small piston is filled with compressed air, and thanks to some rods, brakes shoes are pressed against the wheels. It's cool but...it's not enough. Plastic against plastic isn't very efficient to stop the train's movement. Therefore, another rod is connected to the brake system and press another brake shoe against the free wheel. Because its rotation is faster (and therefore, with a low torque), it's is way easier to stop it. The Whistle : A system that I love in this locomotive is the whistle. Currently there isn't any whistle produced by Lego that could be used in the locomotive, so I had to think a little for finding something working. I can give you more details if you want but I used some lego parts that are empty inside and have a small aperture. By blowing air on these parts, we can produce a noise that is a little similar to a whistle noise. This whistle is activated by a switch in the cabin. The Cabin : Nothing much to say except that in contains 3 switches for the 3 main functions (whistle, wheel movement and brakes). There is also a pressure gauge showing the pressure coming from pumps. The train moves with a minimum of 1 bar. A 2-2.5 bars, the movement is faster. The air supply : There are several possibilities for the train : we can directly pump with Lego pumps, or store the air into 6 to 8 airtanks or produce the air with Lego motors and small pumps. For instance I use 4 pumps side by side, linked to some air tanks, but I don't what the final model should work. Maybe some motors and pumps could be cool ? The design : The hard part was to make the boiler of the locomotive. It's a little hard to make cylinders with Lego technic parts but, with flex axles passing through Technic beams, I managed to make something satisfying. Some details are visible on the locomotive, I tried to make it look a little crowded like a real locomotive with fake air/sand tanks, fake compressors and mechanical elements. It's probably possible to make it look better, but for instance I am happy with it. The rails are "homemade" with Lego bricks. The locomotive is too big of course to work on Lego railtracks. The wheels aren't perfectly flat so the train is "blocked" in position inside the rails. Therefore, the train can move foward cur cannot go out of the railtracks (which is great for a train). Finally, as a bonus functions, there are some bumpers at the front and back of the locomotive to imitate the real bumpers used to absorb small chocs on a Locomotive. That's it for now, I hope the model is interesting to you and if that's the case, don't hesitate to support it on Lego Ideas ! Click Here to support :) If you have any question or comment, please reply to the post, I'll be glad to discuss with you !
  3. The mechanical detail is more aesthetic than plausible. Yet, there are elements taken from what an early steam walker should have looked like, besides the vibrant colours. Most of its inhards are shown, there are very few largue pieces of metal, structural elements take over shape design. It is somewhat outlandish, taking a mechanical shape similar to that of many tin toys. Even if it seems to be something rather decorative, there are a few tricks to make it more resistant than it seems. Legs rest directly over the axle pillar and the superstructure it hides. Feet are also anchored to the base to avoid deformation.
  4. Like many people, I regarded steam locomotives as rather dark and monstrouos machines untill I first saw their early iterations. It was a novel technology at the time, so embelishing them for the amazed crowds and potential contractors should have been appropiate. The mechanical detail is more aesthetic than plausible. Yet, there are elements taken from what an early steam walker should have looked like, besides the vibrant colours. Most of its inhards are shown, there are very few largue pieces of metal, structural elements take over shape design. It is somewhat outlandish, taking a mechanical shape similar to that of many tin toys. Even if it seems to be something rather decorative, there are a few tricks to make it more resistant than it seems. Legs rest directly over the axle pillar and the superstructure it hides. Feet are also anchored to the base to avoid deformation.
  5. The prime method of transportation to and from the North Pole for children is now arriving at your front door! So, grab your robe (but don't rip the pocket in your haste to get outside!) and head on the adventure of your life... "Well, aren't you coming!? This here is the Polar Express!" This engine began life based on my design of the Frisco 1522, a 4-8-2 Mountain type. I copied-pasted it and switched the front and rear bogies, (making it into a 2-8-4 Berkshire) and replaced the tender with a coal burner type. This is more accurate to the Pere Marquette 1225, on which the book - and movie - engine was based. NOTE: I just realized the front wheel is hidden behind my photography sheet. (Sorry about that, was in a rush and didn't notice while taking them!) Let's just pretend it's plowing through a small snowbank... Being almost all black, the engine requires few other parts in other colors with makes it difficult to see the details, but they are there - such as the front end railing for the conductor and his two young passengers to hold on to during the Glacier Gulch sequence.... or just for the mini-figures to be placed there. (Also, I just dusted this engine before the shot, and it's dusty again in the close-up photos. Now you know why all my steam loco's are different colors - not black!) The inside of the locomotive's cab, with the firebox door clearly visible. This is the saddest car in the film: the recycled toys baggage car, which thankfully is empty here, but in the movie was full of tangled marionettes and broken toys galore. This car features a sliding baggage door in addition to the usual opening regular doors. (which in turn were styled after the Emerald Night's coach's doors) These two coaches feature opening doors on each end. The color scheme chosen for the cars was inspired by @SavaTheAggie's Polar Express, and not the movie. (Dark red windows and medium blue train cars are accurate, but way too expensive!) This is the observation lounge car, and features a viewing balcony on the end of the car. From left to right these people are: - Narrator child - Engineer (I'm calling him Max) - Fireman (now named Joe) - Conductor (named Charlie, as far as I'm concerned) - The mysterious ghost hobo (who I'm trying to write a story linking him between the movies Emperor of the North and Polar Express. It will explain how he got onto the Express, and how he died at Flattop Tunnel. Based on a deleted scene from the Polar Express.) Any comments, questions or complaints are welcome. I've been working on this one since December of last year, finding parts, tweaking the model and, more recently, - forgetting to take pictures - until today. Oh well, there is only 243 days until Christmas, and then this train becomes relevant again!
  6. Topher

    [MOC] CFD Engine 51

    First post so hello there! Over the years, LEGO has created a mass of various, more or less successful sets. Some of them should be refreshed or something similar to the UCS series. Below is my variation of the fire city sets. Ladies and gentlemen, from NBC tv Show Chicago Fire, Engine 51 on scene. This is just one of several well-known CFD fire trucks that I build for my own city. Enjoy ENGINE 51 by Topher, on Flickr Engine 51 by Topher, on Flickr Engine 51 by Topher, on Flickr
  7. legomanijak

    [MOC] Messerschmitt Me 262

    The Messerschmitt Me 262 was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft. A historical documentary I saw on TV inspired me to build this aircraft in particular. It features retractable landing gear and just enough space to fit a minifig head inside the cockpit. The main colour of the fighter is Dark bluish gray while the underside of the plane is mostly done in Light bluish gray. by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr In order to retract the landing gear a small hatch has to be removed first and afterwards the landing gear has been retracted the hatch can be returned to it's position. by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr
  8. To show off engine I've built for TC18 entry constructed this mini-MOC - an engine trolley. Moves like a real one where paired wheels have 360 degree rotation, so it is easy to steer and place an assembly.
  9. This blue train is marked (2-6-0+0-6-2 Garratt, for heavy duty rotary snow plow jobs) number 4, and joins the family of similar mid-1880's engines such as (4-2-4, for military transport) green 1, (4-4-0, for freight) yellow 2, and (4-6-0, for passengers) red 3. The Garratt-type steam locomotive is perfect for use on the mountainous terrain of Colorado Rocky Mountains, with it's double steam locomotive pistons sets. (Before anyone says anything about Garratt loco's not being ever sold into the North American market, I'll say it's an experimental prototype to help with a motive power shortage. It may have been seen by the owner as a economical way of sending one locomotive to do the job of two.) This steam powered rotary snowplow was inspired by the real-world Denver and Rio Grande's narrow gauge plow "OY", as now seen on the Cumbres and Toltec RR in New Mexico / Colorado. I've decided to name my plow "YO" in tribute to my inspiration, using this part from the original Toy Story sets on the tender as the marker. The roof of the front of the plow comes off to reveal the cab for the plow operator. (Yes, the front "blade" does spin around.) The rear of the plow features the coal tender with a ladder from the water tank-top down to the magnetic coupler. This engine was originally a SRW locomotive works product, (made by Anthony Sava and formerly available on Bricklink until LEGO sadly removed most of his models) I reworked the engine to have working pistons and side-rods plus a longer frame. This made it from 2-4-0+0-4-2 to a 2-6-0+0-6-2, among other smaller updates to the engine. The rear of the steam locomotive. This part in black goes on the cab walls (it's the number 4) A simple caboose, for the snow plow train. I used a pair interesting windscreen parts for the cupola windows. NOTES: The Garratt is already 100% finished, some of the parts for the plow and caboose are already found... doing a major reorganization of the parts supply, and am amazed at what I'm finding already!
  10. Dear fellow LEGO enthusiasts, I am in dire need of some help from you folks who are definitely more knowledgeable than I. In this case, I am needing help with the replication of the RMS Titanic's Reciprocating Engines and Turbine. I am in the midst at the moment of working on the project below, though I have not updated it in a great while due to university work. See this link here for the project thread. But this is a minifig scale project, with every door, every window accounted for. This means that in regards to the engines, I am also seeking to make them at least somewhat true to scale and able to work as intended. Obviously this is a big job of some top notch Edwardian-era engineering, but I am hoping that there might be some out there not as technically-challenged (pun totally intended) as I am, willing to help me get this part of the project off the ground. Some of the features I I am looking for include a fully air-powered system, where the air supply would come from tanks hidden in the mock-boilers, that are then funneled at somewhat high pressure to the Triple Recip. Engines, which means that the pressure would go down as it goes through each cylinder (HP, IP, then two LPs). The leftover air at a much lower pressure then goes to a junction that can either go to the Parson's Turbine at what was historically 4 psi, or can go directly to the condensers. With the latter I intend just to make the outside of it and hide inside some custom compressors like this. That would then return to the original air supply. With this I am hoping that I will have a self-supplying system with ideally no more than 5% leakage, or enough compressors that leaks are compensated for. WIth the Parson's Turbine, that can be an accurate shell with whatever is needed inside to include a working turbine, and probably with an gearbox and ascending set of gear ratios to give it the necessary torque. These engines and turbine are meant to actually turn the propellers, perhaps even in water! Some other features would include a replica of the Brown-type reversing engine on the side of each of the Recip engines, making it so that the Stevenson-type eccentrics can change the direction of rotation. Considering the scale, the reversing engine doesn't technically have to be much more than a slightly-hidden piston that does the required job, but any more realism doesn't hurt. If something like this is possible, please let me know. I am really wanting to continue with this project, and this is a central part of it. But without the pieces in front of me instead of on a computer screen, what little I know of engineering definitely doesn't help without that tactile interaction. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your replies! If it is possible, then I can follow up with the intended dimensions. Here are some references for any that wants some: View of turbine and condensers through wall from main engines rotor shaft model of port-side recip. engine overall basic view path of the steam of original, pressurized air for mine
  11. Hi all, I recently went on a bit of a designing spree during my holidays and thought I'd share the results. I've been developing these models at a slightly smaller scale than usual (Hence 6-wide), but it's been a fun challenge and one I would like to develop into more actual models if I have the time. I thought i'd share them all at once as I didn't want to clog the forum xD MALLARD (LNER A4 Class) The first design I did of this scale and the only model I have physically made. You'll notice that the boiler is different from the render as those arch blue pieces are horrendously expensive. If you are interested I go into more detail about it in this MOC video on my Youtube channel. FLYING SCOTSMAN (LNER A3 Class) Classic design to follow on from. The wheelbase is copied from my Mallard build, which forms the base for all my pacific class designs. TORNADO (BR Peppercorn A1 Class) Developed this by tweaking the Flying Scotsman build. I know of better ways to do the smoke deflectors, but unfortunately the parts weren't available on LDraw. GWR HALL CLASS I developed this for a friend's Hogwarts Express build, but also as a bit of fun. With a couple of tweaks this could always pass for a King or a Castle. LMS ROYAL SCOT CLASS I think the front of this engine could be different if the parts were available, and I wasn't able to do the wheel arches, but I'm happy with the tender and the shaping of the cab. SR KING ARTHUR CLASS I thought i'd try and to an engine from each of the major British steam companies. The obvious one for Southern was a Merchant Navy or West Country, but I've already done a lot of Pacific engines. BR STANDARD 4MT TANK The one major drawback is that it isn't motorised. I've been considering making a motorised carriage that would not only move un-motorised engines, but help the bigger motorised ones around the corners better. That, of course, comes with its own set of drawbacks. THE FLYING SAUSAGE (LNER 10000 - 'HUSH HUSH') I wasn't lying in the title, this is such a wonderfully absurd engine that I had to try it. my only major niggle is the colour scheme, but I suppose experimental engines are hardly worth sprucing up. I hope you've found these MOCs interesting, I'd love to hear any tips, comments or suggestions for future builds! I'm planning on building the Flying Scotsman before long, then maybe a set of coaches. -Isaac
  12. Since the 2018 Hogwarts Express (set 75955) is lacking in realism, (with the engine and tender in particular!) I decided to revise my custom version with ideas from the set, including printed 1x4 curve tiles with Hogwarts Castle printed on them. The locomotive is a heavily modified version of LDDModelmaker's Black 5 model with some parts from set 79111, Constitution Train Chase. The tender features a three wheeled bogie design modified from the one in Anthony Sava's ALCO MRS-1. The middle axle moves side to side, as to allow going through switches and curves without issue. The inside of the cab features two gauges and the firebox. In this false-color image, the red parts slide, the blue ones stay put to allow for the loco to go around curves and switches. (BTW: There are parts underneath that keep the sliding bogie from falling out.) The roof and side wall of each coach come off independently from each other, to reveal four seats for students and / or the occasional teacher. The Hogwarts Express is usually made up of four corridor BR MK I passenger coaches, although sometimes a special fifth coach is attached with an open floor plan. (however, in this Lego design, they are all open floor plan!) Also, the end car is not accurate to the films, but is what I prefer to the alternative: a gangway leading nowhere with no red light on the end. In-universe / Film History for the Hogwarts Express: Leaving from Kings Cross' Platform 9 & 3/4 to Hogsmeade Station at exactly 9 AM, the Hogwarts Express carries students (and sometimes faculty) to and from Hogwarts' School of Witchcraft & Wizardry in the Harry Potter series of books and movies. It has been seen in every Harry Potter film, from it's first appearance in the beginning of Philosophers Stone to it's (so far) last at the end of Deathly Hallows. (part two) The Hogwarts Express is usually only in the film for a short while, and it is generally a pleasant journey from Kings Cross to Hogsmeade, although Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and a certain Flying Ford Anglia might beg to differ! Hogsmeade station is the terminus for the Hogwarts Express on it's school-ward journey. This 100% fictional version of Hogsmeade station (as in, not based on any of the Harry Potter films) was inspired by several sets, chiefly sets 4554 (Metro Station) 41167, (Arendelle Castle) and 71044 (Disney Train and Station) from which I took the tower roof design, main floor general "look", and attic windows, respectively. (I was originally going to make this a generic European station, but then realized the Hogwarts crest 2 x 2 printed tile can fit just above what became the 1 x 4 Hogsmeade station sign on both the street and tracks sides.) The model is modular, and features a track side platform, ground floor, second floor, and tower roof. The street side features the same basic look as the other side, but in this case their is a staircase.... which could cause a problem for luggage trolleys as their is no ramp! Top floor features the Station master's office, which includes fixtures such as a desk, telephone, and some filing cabinets. This floor features the two ticket counters, indoor seating, and fireplace. Every floor & platform is grouped separately in LDD, as seen above. As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 10/5/19: Hogsmeade station LDD model added. Real bricks coming eventually. (Hopefully soon!)
  13. Hello everyone, I have built a model of one of Britains classic race cars, the Bentley 4.5l ‘Blower’, a project that was never actually approved by W.O Bentley (company founder) but nonetheless took part in the 1930 Le Mans 24hr race and French Grand Prix where it finished second behind a much more agile Bugatti type 35. Its claim to fame was not through racing victory but through its racing stories. The model has working ‘worm and wheel’ steering and a removable bonnet to expose the 4.5 litre, 4-cylinder supercharged engine. Accuracy and realism was key right from the chassis frame and the parts were spray painted to give two new green colours. For more info and images please Click here to take a look at the project on Lego Ideas. Many thanks...
  14. I wanted to build a Mazda RX 7 FD ever since I finished the NSX...but a RX 7 needs a rotary engine... So I was forced to make one :) I have been working on this little guy way too long, and when I finally got it working today, I literally had tears in my eyes Its still WIP, but I am so happy right now. Hope you enjoy. Gray Gear
  15. lego engine 2 by michael waterfield, on Flickr lego engine 1 by michael waterfield, on Flickr lego piston head by michael waterfield, on Flickr About 2 months ago I started building said engine, single cylinder 4x4 bore 5 stud stroke (no glue), for the ignition I used a system made for model engines with magnetic based timing and powered it via the Lego rechargeable battery / wire from a dead motor. The first incarnation used gate style valves but they where sticky and lost a lot of pressure, so I switched to using technic caped axles through lego system which is amazingly air tight and looks/works like a real engine (4 valve total arranged in a flat head configuration). The valves originally had variable timing via two diffs but I later removed it not due to the resistance but retiming the engine every time got tedious fast (the ignition magnet was driven by the same gear train as the valves (1/2 from the crank, 12 tooth too 24). Now for interesting part the running, the area behind the valves is in a open top box and its this I spray the fuel into. O don't use solvent of any kind, with gas type lighter fluid lego holds up with no sigh of damage after a few minutes of inconsistent firing, but I ran out and due to crippling stupidity/laziness I just grabbed the next most flammable thing I had - a solvent spay. After less than 10 seconds firing on the starter motor (two xl gear up x5 about, 42 8) the engine slowed and when I opened it up both the exit valves had their caps melted and there was some waviness to the piston top. After replacing the axles and getting some more lighter spray I changed the flywheel from a geared up Unimog wheel to a aluminium pully about 8 cm across and 2cm deep. With this configuration the engine runs for a few seconds (yes without the starter connected) a few seconds after fuel is added no matter what I try I cant get the engine to run without these gaps in ignition, It seams like there is too much fuel and after a few cycles the fuels concentration becomes low enough for combustion, this is where I believe the most improvement can be made and yes I mean a working lego carburettor, or at least something better that my box method. While running the engine sounds like some of the first ic engines made, probably due to the bad burn and merely non zero compression. . Now I imagine most of you are curious how I got useable pressure containment and no hang-ups with a lego cylinder/piston without glue, gaskets or any modification to the lego , well unfortunately that is hard to explain even though it is ldr friendly its a bit unorthodox, but you can see in the pics. But during building the cylinder I put the piston in and blew in the other end and the piston went 4 feet across the room consistently. I plan to make a video as soon as I get more than a few seconds of ignition out of it (first running lego engine hello youtube gold). O and finally I made it four stoke due to it being easier to run at low rpms and my ptsd from nitro cars has yet to leave me. Any advice/interest? (hopefully I added pics correctly)
  16. Hello there! Even though TLC finally stepped out of using big blocky engines, the newest rendition of fake engines isn't very good. Mostly due to the ugly long brown axles and big "crankshaft". Now, it is possible to use the ovaloid-shaped liftarms as the crankshaft with 2l axles and half-bushes, but the entire assembly still occupies a lot of vertical space, specially the Ø3L crankshaft. Now, making something smaller with Technic pieces wasn't possible, so I resorted to System parts. 1x1 plates with 1x1 round plates were the solution looked for. Even though the "pistons" don't have much vertical movement, the engine still sounds great and both inline and v-shape setups can be made, theorically with infinite cylinders as the crankshaft isn't limited by maximum Technic axle length but by how many 1x1 plates can be stacked together. Advantages: Small volume - 3 studs vertical by 2 studs width Little extra space required - approximately quarter of a stud around the crankshaft (Technic axles can be placed alongside it) Produces sound as well as other fake engines V-shape or Inline engines possible Disadvantages: small vertical piston travel Crankshaft doesn't use Technic pieces so can be difficult to correctly space (stacked plates height vs Technic stud width) and might break if too long or abused too much Here's a video showing both setups and sound (e-motor is very quiet so the engine can be heard)
  17. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] Southern Pacific 4-10-2

    The 4-10-2 wheel arrangement, often referred to as the Southern Pacific for the railroad which put it to use most successfully, was a unique design that utilized three-cylinders instead of the traditional two. In terms of steam locomotive evolution, it followed the 2-10-2 Santa Fe but the American Locomotive Company's (Alco) desire to advance three-cylinder technology proved somewhat problematic, at least for the Union Pacific (which referred to its roster as "Overlands" for its Overland Route main line). The SP on the other hand found their fleet quite useful and reliable in regular service and continued to use them for nearly 30 years until diesels finally took over. Hey guys! I wanted to share my completed model of Southern Pacific's 4-10-2 steam engine. I designed this model myself taking inspiration from brass models of the engine and techniques from various builders here on EB and Flickr. This model took me several months to design, build, and test but it is finally completed! The best part? You can purchase your own set of instructions to build the same model! Yes, that's right. Have all of those amazing BMR rolling stock and maybe one or two of my SP & UP PFE cars but no engine to pull it? Well now you can build an expertly modeled steam engine that will fit in with your rolling stock perfectly. Instructions can be purchased here: https://www.bricktraindepot.com/product-page/southern-pacific-4-10-2 The model is powered by two XL PF motors, and a AAA battery box in the tender. An SBrick is housed in the tender as well. Features side rods by @zephyr1934. This engine can haul a LOT of rolling stock. Was going to test with all 45 of my train cars here soon but I am positive it will work exceptionally well. Let's get on to some pictures! Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Hope you guys like it! Let me know what you think. -Jeffinslaw
  18. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/
  19. These are typical "concrete" steam locomotive coaling and water towers of the mid-1900's for North America. Both models feature lowering chutes / spouts, for the imaginary fuel to flow down into the waiting engine below. (Which in this case is a 0-6-0ST switcher locomotive that has been built for some time. You can see it in it's own thread here.) For the coal tower, I was inspired by the website LGauge. However, unlike my more recent smaller versions of said tower, I have gone back to the larger 2014 version with it's odd-stud dimensions. This means it's a lot taller, wider and has a ton more pieces than before. It also has two chains to hold the new chute at the optimum height to clear the roof-top's of locomotives, while not being to high to look silly. The rear of the coal tower. The girders in the rear are supposed to "hold" a conveyor bucket system to get coal to the top of the tower to replenish the supply inside the structure. Of course, since it's Lego, this system is imaginary. With the brand-new water tower design, however, I was inspired by my Father's work with a smaller version of the same basic idea. I enlarged the basic dimensions dramatically and used castle wall-top pieces to boost the structural integrity of the now 14 stud-wide model. The rear of the water tower. What you see above is what you will get in the ldd file, which is available here at Bricksafe. It's a slightly older model, but all it's missing is the two 16-L chains and the two 32 x 16 base plates. Enjoy the file, and as usual: comments, questions or complaints are always welcome!
  20. Redimus

    Modified Emerald Night

    OK, so I have never made any secret that I think Emerald Night is crap. Odd proportions, terrible tender, complete lack of understanding of what several parts actually represent, looking *nothing* like the source material,.... I also know (from bitter experience) how difficult (and expensive) making a decent replacement is. After having built some really nice Pullmans, and building a disappointing pacific (which was miles better than EN), taking it apart, starting again, running out of inspiration, then getting made jobless so I couldn't afford to buy bits had I come up with an improved design, I decided to finally do something about my Emerald Night that had been sat in a corner with no wheels for at least 2 years. Things that I wanted to change: Give the front a footplate. Use the cylinder fix. Do something about that god awful (lack of) dome. Raise the cab so it doesn't look too daft with my coaches. Build a completely new tender (seriously, f**k that tender, that city cattle wagon was less lazy). Add lights and S Brick (which I had done a long while ago). So here are the results: Loco The new footplate, added tiles to the front bogie, replaced the green 1x6 plate with a black one, and the improved cylinder innards. New dome with S Brick underneath. Slightly raised cab. Tender The tender was a complete rebuild, but used basically the same chassis. It was however, a little lazy, and relied heavily on what I happened to already have. New Tender Completed Engine with Train. I intend to replace it with an actually good loco one day, but until inspiration and funds allow, this is a vast improvement.
  21. The last time this older 7-wide industrial saddle tanker steam loco design was seen in complete form in the real world was in 2014. I have since added working pistons and an "American" style headlight for use on my US layout. (These working pistons were inspired by Hunterdobb's 2015 replica of Lady from the Thomas and the Magic Railroad movie as seen here on Flickr.) The bulk of the original model was a ScotNick creation inspired by Thomas and Friends engine "Stanley". Here we see the @ScotNick engine circa 2013. The rear of the loco, with the "glowing" firebox showing. As you probably know by now, BRS (as stated on the tank sides) stands for Brick Railway Systems, my fictional railroad company. Anyway, I thought this engine looked cool, and I don't think there was a thread about it that was a stand-alone or at least recent enough to bump up and edit, since just added the pistons two weeks ago. As usual Comments, questions, and suggestions are always welcome!
  22. dr_spock

    MOD: 60052 Cargo Train

    I bought and assembled 60052 Cargo Train. The holes on the top of the engine bother me so I wanted to cover them up. I ended up making a bunch other modifications along the way: Added Power Function LED ditch lights Changed style of radiator grills Added air intake grills Added dynamic brake grills Moved fan #1 forward for dynamic brakes Moved fans #2 and #3 further back Added exhaust port Covered up unnecessary openings in the roof Changed to smaller sized horns Changed style of fuel tank Switched doors around so they are no longer suicide doors Added dual transclear stud lights to back Changed bley brack in front roof to black I guess it looks a bit like an EMD GP38 now. Please excuse my messy building table. 60052 MOD by dr_spock_888, on Flickr
  23. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  24. LegoEmbodiment

    Lego Pneumatic Engine

    https://youtu.be/UFPNWZeeXQw Lego Pneumatic Engine. What is it? How to make it? The first it needs to finish Lego fake cylinder like in this video https://youtu.be/HcHneyewATE or https://youtu.be/0aZvWva41Ek. The second - to add o-ring to Lego piston like in this video https://youtu.be/wZu-l32Dajw or .
  25. This type of geared type loco is called a "Shay" (specifically a type "A", which means two pistons and two trucks) and were named after their original inventor of the type, Ephraim Shay. These loco's could only go about 20 miles per hour (or about 32 Kilometers per hour, if that's your thing) at top speed, and were very steady on rough track, hauling logging and mining trains up grades that would easily stall conventional steamer types. You can read more about Shay geared steam locomotive's at Wikipedia. Please NOTE: The design of the original Shay I redid into my version was by Stephan Pakbaz over on Flickr, as seen below. (His LDD file allowed me to build my version) as seen here. The 1 x 1 tiles on either side of the coal bunker are supposed to be printed with the number "4" The Shay type only has pistons on one side, with the other side being kinda sparsely decorated. Usually, their would be various accessories and such on this side, but i liked it better devoid of any clutter. The Shay geared steam loco bends in a odd way... but at least it works. NOTE: The angle shown is quite a bit more severe curve than the loco will ever have to handle.... but it looks pretty cool! This raw ore car was modeled after a custom Brick Link item by @wildchicken13 except mine is narrower and uses two wheels for a Wild West flair. You can see the original item that inspired me here. The caboose follows my standard pattern for my Western trains, with only a few color swaps and a missing cupola on top to set it apart from the others. Here we see the mining train consisting of four silver ore cars and a caboose, without the Shay. This is my latest (and most likely last) Western styled train, and it will join my other four steamers and their trains in my Wild West collection sometime later in 2018. (The reason I say "last" is that I've run out of railroad-related ideas for my Wild Western layout and am planning on focusing on the updated Native American camp, revised Fort Legoredo and the remaining frontier town buildings after this.) As you may have suspected, the ore the mining train holds comes from my well-protected silver mine, which can be seen in it's own topic. ...and as usual, comments, questions, complaints and suggestions are always welcome!