Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'engine'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • The Military Section
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 97 results

  1. Top view with locations Impostor Green is waiting for red... The Reactor and upper engine. Upper part of the ship including the cockpit at the front below the arch. Views Side View The accessories of the characters can be easily swapped around and shared between them creating impostor and non impostor versions as well as looks of different skins, like in the game. Added a ghost version of the famous red player design. If you like it, it is also a set on LEGO ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/29f9ebe5-b5a0-4fdb-bbaf-86f9e96d0865 http://tinyurl.com/amonguslego
  2. This rotary plow-fronted train is ready to keep the other trains running in the worst winter weather using good old-fashioned steam power! 100% fictional history of the steam engine type (and the whole train, really): In late-1929, Thomas Carter was Chief Mechanical Engineer for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), and on vacation to visit family in New Zealand. He was about to get on the train in Christchurch, when he was passed by a new NZR "G" class 4-6-2+2-6-4 Garratt steam engine. Remembering how he was having problems getting the next "big thing" built back in America, and that he was having a steam power crunch when it came to rotary snow plow duty up in the Rocky Mountains, he contacted the engine's manufacturer, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and talked about a possible contract in America using the New Zealand "G"class as a starting point. Once he got home to BRS company HQ in St. Louis, Missouri, he got the upper management's final okay, and began final design on the new "DC" class of Garratts. (DC standing for Double Consolidation, as it is really just two Consolidation 2-8-0 type loco wheel-set's back-to-back with one boiler.) All in all, six of these (assigned numbers 4834 - 4840 by the railroad) were made as a trial run in 1930, but the Great Depression worsened in 1931-33 so no more were ever ordered. (originally, 10 locos more were planned for general freight service but were never built, which would have brought the grand total up to 16 engines.) Six engines were permanently paired off of with a dual snow plow team: two DC engines on each plow, with each engine team working the two track main line, one team per track, one way, until they met at the halfway point of Continental Divide (also known as the town of Summit Point), which was a vital steam-era crew exchange and refueling point near a inter-state highway. The third team of two engines and it's plow (The one marked YO seen above) was used as replacement engine for the two crews already mentioned, and were only used if another rotary crew was down for regular maintenance or due to an accident. After diesels came on the scene to replace the steamers (plows and engines alike) in the mid-to-late 1950's, the only two steam engines left of the DC type in North America were pushing the spare steam rotary plow YO. One of these locomotives (no. 4840) was found to have a severely rusted water tank and front engine frame, and was thus kept for spare parts to keep the other loco (no. 4839) running. This severely impacted the surviving engine's ability to push the rotary plow hard enough to make it through the dense banks of Colorado snow. After a few unsuccessful modification attempts to keep the 34-year old engine going, it was decided to send the entire train (plow, engine, and caboose used for the train) to a railroad museum in Missouri. They would also be sent with all the remaining parts from engine 4840 as it might be prudent to re-steam the engine in the future. So, in 1963, the YO and 4839 were sent to National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, where it still sits today. (The following part of the story is actually true!) This steam powered rotary snowplow was inspired by the real-world Denver and Rio Grande's narrow gauge plow "OY", as now seen on the Cumbres and Toltec RR in New Mexico / Colorado. I've decided to name my plow "YO" in tribute to my inspiration, using a 2010 Toy Story printed part for the "YO" designation. Oh, and yes, the front "blade" does spin around, but is not motorized. This model has been updated since the last time I uploaded this, with a better plow shroud because the old one would fall off when I looked at it funny. This one is not upside down on the bottom half like the old one, but it is MUCH more sturdy. (I was inspired by @dr_spock's rotary snowplow to build my own plow. Take a look at his Flickr as he's got a bunch of cool designs there!) The rear of the plow features the coal tender with a ladder from the water tank-top down to the magnetic coupler. (Before anyone says anything about Garratt loco's not being ever sold into the North American market, I'll say this is not from our reality, this is my own railroad mirror-world and does not follow our history as closely as it could. I mean, I've got steam loco's running into the 1970's on main lines hauling premier passenger trains for goodness sake!) This engine was originally inspired by two SRW locomotive works products. (Both were Garratt models made by @SavaTheAggie and formerly available on Bricklink until LEGO sadly removed his instructions) I reworked the model from Sava's 4-6-2+2-6-4 to a 2-8-0+0-8-2. I also added the forward water tank and aft coal bunker from his 2-4-0+0-4-2 Garratt, a custom boiler designed by me and medium Big Ben Bricks drivers to make it from a fast passenger loco into a slow freight hauler. (or in this case, a snow plow pusher!) The engine is flexible to a degree more than this, but not by much. It goes though R40 curves and switches just fine, though. A simple caboose, for the protecting the rear of the snow plow train. I used a pair interesting windscreen parts for the cupola windows. Inspired partially by 2001 My Own Train set 10014, (Caboose) but in blue. NOTES: Finally finished 10/7/2020!
  3. It is the early 1930's. The dark days of late 1929 has worsened into a economic depression of truly epic proportions. Worse, the drought starting in summer 1930 (lasting until above average rains stopped it in 1941) caused the dreaded Dust Bowl and the mass migration of (most) of an entire generation of farmers and their families westward. This time frame also led to the rise of hobos, wandering, jobless people trying to use the one mass transportation still running across the dusty, windswept nation: The freight trains. The backstory on this train is as such: The engine, number 6519, runs daily from Lawrence, Kansas yard to where it finally services the Rust-eze factory in Moberly, Missouri. The line branches off and curves to the left in Columbia Missouri, while the main goes straight on to St. Louis. The rest of the regular freight is worked at the Columbia yard, expect for the acid tanker and the two marked generic boxcars. That tanker goes to the factory too, as it's a chemical component for Rust-eze. Rumor has it that the Rust-eze plant will be moving closer to St. Louis, or even shutting down soon, maybe by early 1934. The engine used to be a heavy-hauler out on the main, but has been relegated to branch line work, as it's 1898-vintage pistons are wearing a bit thin and she is overdue for a overhaul. Unfortunately, with the current depression, she has been reassigned to light branch work with a limit on her speed. Hopefully, they will scrape up the money to get her in the shop soon. This early 1900's-era engine model was first designed as a 2-8-2 Mikado before having the front pony truck removed and a 4 wheel bogie from set 10194 (Emerald Night) added instead, turning it into a 4-8-0 Mastodon - type. The rear pony truck was removed as well, with the 79111-style boiler shortened and cab re-arranged. Then, as of late September of this year, I completely rebuilt her from the wheels up to use the Disney engine boiler you see here. The running gear was originally a Scotnick invention from his 9F, but now comes from my MOD of the Constitution Train Chase set. So, basically, the only thing original left is the tender. Together, these several different engines from four different eras and five separate builders come together to create this one steam engine, which I have numbered 6519. The coal tender was inspired by Anthony Sava's Pacific 4-6-2 model's oil tender with the letters "BRS" added in the middle of the tender using printed 1 x 1 tiles. I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build this boxcar as seen here. They are made to haul pallets of cargo, specifically Rust-eze chrome restorer in 55-gallon drum containers for commercial packaging at this facility into smaller containers. Inspired by the green tractor trailer from CITY set 4204 (The Mine), this bathtub gondola is carrying boulders from the mine destined for the gold refinery where they will be opened up and the metal extracted to make coins and ingots. This drop side flat car was first part of set 2126 (Train Cars), but it didn't really have a purpose. It was hauling uprooted evergreen trees in the set, but that didn't look very good, so I changed it to generic freight. (My layout's resident hobo and his trusty guitar usually catch a ride on this piece of rolling stock.) The hobo is trying to get home to his family, which lives in Glenncoe, Missouri. Sadly, he picked the wrong train, as this only get's him halfway there. He's going to have to ride the blind of a steam engine tender on a passenger run to get home. (that's the area between the first car and tender, it's very dangerous because you're balancing on the coupler!) This dangerous liquid tanker was modeled after a real tanker car you can walk through in the Museum of Transportation's collection in St. Louis, Missouri. The real deal hauled hydrochloric acid for Monsanto starting in 1940 up into the late 1960's. I'm backdating the car ten years to fit into my mid-'30's freight train. I have adapted this UK inspired model of a brake van by Fireglo450 (see it here) to once again be a more American-inspired caboose. The caboose has no interior, and the red marker light can go on either end of the model to represent the end of whatever train it is being hauled behind. Here you can find other topics of interest mentioned in the text, or that are similar enough to be placed alongside time frame-wise I have this passenger train, that goes along with the freight train in this time period. (No, the hobo does not ride this one home.) and this branch-line station that is from the same late-1890's era, and on the main line from the San Francisco to New York (via St. Louis, of course!) Here we see the (100% fictional) Moberly, Missouri, Ruste-eze Factory. It seems to have made it to better times, with this picture taking place in the early 1950's. Any thoughts, comments, or complaints?
  4. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] C&O K4 2-8-4 #2716

    Hey guys! I have a new MOC to share. This was a commissioned build that will be turned into a full kit for bricktraindepot.com. Will be doing additional full kits for Nickel Plate #765 and Pere Marquette #1225 as well. Pre-orders for all three kits will open on September 1st! If you purchase the C&O kit, $100 will be donated to Kentucky Steam to help with the restoration of #2716. Anyways, about the engine. The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway's K-4 class were a group of ninety 2-8-4 steam locomotives purchased during and shortly after World War II. Unlike many other railroads in the United States, the C&O chose to nickname this class "Kanawha", after the river in West Virginia, rather than "Berkshire", after the region in New England. During the 1940s, the C&O K-4's were being built to haul heavy freight services and were used mostly for high speed freight and passenger services throughout the north-eastern regions of the United States and part of Ontario, Canada by the Pere Marquette Railway. C&O Class K-4s were one of the few recognizable 2-8-4 (Berkshires) classes in North America along with the Pere Marquette Class N (road numbers 1201-1239), and Nickel Plate Road Class S (road numbers 715-779). Both the PM Class N and NKP Class S were manufactured by the Lima Locomotive Works in Lima, Ohio. NKP 779 was the last standard-gauge Berkshire to be built in the world, and the last steam locomotive built by Lima Locomotive Works. My model features 2x L motors in the boiler with custom battery box in the tender and all specialty wire custom finished, 3D printed XL drivers, BrickTracks wheel in roller bearings, custom side rods by TrainedBricks, and decals by OkBrickWorks. I've finished the physical build and have been doing testing while waiting for OKBrickWorks to print my decals and wheels. Hope you enjoy the renders for now. More pictures will be coming soon! Left Front by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Right Front by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Getting close! by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Additionally, be on the lookout for other train cars from BTD such as the AAR 50 ton hopper in C&O livery as well as an update to our TOFC to include a C&O flat car and some Railway Express Agency trailers. Let me know that you guys think! -Jeffinslaw
  5. Designed model is based on the Ford Bronco revealed in 2020. During creation of this model, modular build concept is used to simplify the building process by splitting the overall process on three stages. Follow me on Instagram @anton.kablash Instruction you can download here: Ford Bronco InstructionDimensions: 16 x 38 x 19 studWeight: 738 gFunctions: HoG (detachable) Working steering wheel in the cab Front independent suspension Rear 3 link suspension Working engine Openable doors, hood, trunk Detailed exterior and interior Adjustable seats Modular building More photos in the Ford Bronco Album
  6. Hi ^^ I want to build 6x6 (first axle steering) trial uphill truck (outdoor fun in mountain) and i have two question. Tyres used: 107x44 (15038) Estimated weight: 2.5kg 1. Engine used I have 3x XL motor, and i think how design drive train: 2 or 3 motors drive all wheels (like normal car) 1 motor to front axle 2 motors to rear both axles 1 motor per axle Which will be the most effective? 2. Gearing I don't wanna use any gearbox, and i think about 3:1 or 5:1 (or maybee less could be too?) Thanks for help
  7. Hello everybody! This is the first MOC I present on Eurobricks. My most popular MOC yet is the 3 speed auto gearbox (https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-33711/lbrix/3-speed-auto-gearbox-overworked-version/?inventory=1#comments). But now to this gearbox: At first ask yourself this question: Which sense has a normal D-N-R gearbox in a manual technic car? It has no sense. It makes no difference if you are in the forward gear or in te reserve. But with this D-N-R gearbox it makes a difference, because if you are in the forward gear, you can not push the car backward and if you switch in the reserve gear, you can not push the car forward. If you want to build this gearbox into a technic car, you have to connect the grey connectors to the wheels and one of the black ones to the fake engine. For more information check out this MOC on rebrickable (maybe it is not approved yet): https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-47985/lbrix/alternative-d-n-r-gearbox/?inventory=1#comments No I wanted to ask you, what you think about this D-N-R gearbox? Here is an video of my gearbox:
  8. Hi! This is my first comment on this forum. I started to make real 2 stroke motor and almost everything is ready but i have problems to make ignition system. I don't have much resources to build them and i thought here i could get tips where to get easily materials like wires and tips how I should make that ignition system. If everything goes well i can put here some pictures and videos about that motor.
  9. This is my own creation of a Mercedes-Benz G550 4x4² SUV. Check out my Rebrickable post for instructions which you can download for free: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-43865/BrickHugger171/mercedes-benz-g550-4x42/?inventory=1#comments
  10. Hello everybody, I am glad to introduce you my last big project : a pneumatic steam locomotive ! I think it's one of the firsts pneumatic locomotives, using only Lego parts. First of all, the YouTube video and some photos: The idea with this model is to replace the steam of a real Locomotive by compressed air, and this for as much functions as possible. Here are the main functions : Movement of the train : Using 4 pistons, 2 on the sides, and 2 inside, the train can move forward. It works like a classic LPE, with 2 pistons shifted 90° from the others. 4 pistons consume a lot of air, but they guarantee enough power to move the whole train. To make the rotation smooth, a free wheel is hidden inside the boiler part of the locomotive. Its rotation is 25 times faster than the wheels of the train (40t/8t x2). The train isn't moving very fast because the pneumatic elements aren't modified. However, it's fast enough to make it interesting to look at the connecting rods and wheels moving. The breaks : On a real locomotive, compressed air is produced by a compressor (powered by steam) and is used to press some brake shoes against the wheels. Here, the same technique is used : a small piston is filled with compressed air, and thanks to some rods, brakes shoes are pressed against the wheels. It's cool but...it's not enough. Plastic against plastic isn't very efficient to stop the train's movement. Therefore, another rod is connected to the brake system and press another brake shoe against the free wheel. Because its rotation is faster (and therefore, with a low torque), it's is way easier to stop it. The Whistle : A system that I love in this locomotive is the whistle. Currently there isn't any whistle produced by Lego that could be used in the locomotive, so I had to think a little for finding something working. I can give you more details if you want but I used some lego parts that are empty inside and have a small aperture. By blowing air on these parts, we can produce a noise that is a little similar to a whistle noise. This whistle is activated by a switch in the cabin. The Cabin : Nothing much to say except that in contains 3 switches for the 3 main functions (whistle, wheel movement and brakes). There is also a pressure gauge showing the pressure coming from pumps. The train moves with a minimum of 1 bar. A 2-2.5 bars, the movement is faster. The air supply : There are several possibilities for the train : we can directly pump with Lego pumps, or store the air into 6 to 8 airtanks or produce the air with Lego motors and small pumps. For instance I use 4 pumps side by side, linked to some air tanks, but I don't what the final model should work. Maybe some motors and pumps could be cool ? The design : The hard part was to make the boiler of the locomotive. It's a little hard to make cylinders with Lego technic parts but, with flex axles passing through Technic beams, I managed to make something satisfying. Some details are visible on the locomotive, I tried to make it look a little crowded like a real locomotive with fake air/sand tanks, fake compressors and mechanical elements. It's probably possible to make it look better, but for instance I am happy with it. The rails are "homemade" with Lego bricks. The locomotive is too big of course to work on Lego railtracks. The wheels aren't perfectly flat so the train is "blocked" in position inside the rails. Therefore, the train can move foward cur cannot go out of the railtracks (which is great for a train). Finally, as a bonus functions, there are some bumpers at the front and back of the locomotive to imitate the real bumpers used to absorb small chocs on a Locomotive. That's it for now, I hope the model is interesting to you and if that's the case, don't hesitate to support it on Lego Ideas ! Click Here to support :) If you have any question or comment, please reply to the post, I'll be glad to discuss with you !
  11. The mechanical detail is more aesthetic than plausible. Yet, there are elements taken from what an early steam walker should have looked like, besides the vibrant colours. Most of its inhards are shown, there are very few largue pieces of metal, structural elements take over shape design. It is somewhat outlandish, taking a mechanical shape similar to that of many tin toys. Even if it seems to be something rather decorative, there are a few tricks to make it more resistant than it seems. Legs rest directly over the axle pillar and the superstructure it hides. Feet are also anchored to the base to avoid deformation.
  12. Like many people, I regarded steam locomotives as rather dark and monstrouos machines untill I first saw their early iterations. It was a novel technology at the time, so embelishing them for the amazed crowds and potential contractors should have been appropiate. The mechanical detail is more aesthetic than plausible. Yet, there are elements taken from what an early steam walker should have looked like, besides the vibrant colours. Most of its inhards are shown, there are very few largue pieces of metal, structural elements take over shape design. It is somewhat outlandish, taking a mechanical shape similar to that of many tin toys. Even if it seems to be something rather decorative, there are a few tricks to make it more resistant than it seems. Legs rest directly over the axle pillar and the superstructure it hides. Feet are also anchored to the base to avoid deformation.
  13. The prime method of transportation to and from the North Pole for children is now arriving at your front door! So, grab your robe (but don't rip the pocket in your haste to get outside!) and head on the adventure of your life... "Well, aren't you coming!? This here is the Polar Express!" This engine began life based on my design of the Frisco 1522, a 4-8-2 Mountain type. I copied-pasted it and switched the front and rear bogies, (making it into a 2-8-4 Berkshire) and replaced the tender with a coal burner type. This is more accurate to the Pere Marquette 1225, on which the book - and movie - engine was based. NOTE: I just realized the front wheel is hidden behind my photography sheet. (Sorry about that, was in a rush and didn't notice while taking them!) Let's just pretend it's plowing through a small snowbank... Being almost all black, the engine requires few other parts in other colors with makes it difficult to see the details, but they are there - such as the front end railing for the conductor and his two young passengers to hold on to during the Glacier Gulch sequence.... or just for the mini-figures to be placed there. (Also, I just dusted this engine before the shot, and it's dusty again in the close-up photos. Now you know why all my steam loco's are different colors - not black!) The inside of the locomotive's cab, with the firebox door clearly visible. This is the saddest car in the film: the recycled toys baggage car, which thankfully is empty here, but in the movie was full of tangled marionettes and broken toys galore. This car features a sliding baggage door in addition to the usual opening regular doors. (which in turn were styled after the Emerald Night's coach's doors) These two coaches feature opening doors on each end. The color scheme chosen for the cars was inspired by @SavaTheAggie's Polar Express, and not the movie. (Dark red windows and medium blue train cars are accurate, but way too expensive!) This is the observation lounge car, and features a viewing balcony on the end of the car. From left to right these people are: - Narrator child - Engineer (I'm calling him Max) - Fireman (now named Joe) - Conductor (named Charlie, as far as I'm concerned) - The mysterious ghost hobo (who I'm trying to write a story linking him between the movies Emperor of the North and Polar Express. It will explain how he got onto the Express, and how he died at Flattop Tunnel. Based on a deleted scene from the Polar Express.) Any comments, questions or complaints are welcome. I've been working on this one since December of last year, finding parts, tweaking the model and, more recently, - forgetting to take pictures - until today. Oh well, there is only 243 days until Christmas, and then this train becomes relevant again!
  14. Topher

    [MOC] CFD Engine 51

    First post so hello there! Over the years, LEGO has created a mass of various, more or less successful sets. Some of them should be refreshed or something similar to the UCS series. Below is my variation of the fire city sets. Ladies and gentlemen, from NBC tv Show Chicago Fire, Engine 51 on scene. This is just one of several well-known CFD fire trucks that I build for my own city. Enjoy ENGINE 51 by Topher, on Flickr Engine 51 by Topher, on Flickr Engine 51 by Topher, on Flickr
  15. legomanijak

    [MOC] Messerschmitt Me 262

    The Messerschmitt Me 262 was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft. A historical documentary I saw on TV inspired me to build this aircraft in particular. It features retractable landing gear and just enough space to fit a minifig head inside the cockpit. The main colour of the fighter is Dark bluish gray while the underside of the plane is mostly done in Light bluish gray. by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr In order to retract the landing gear a small hatch has to be removed first and afterwards the landing gear has been retracted the hatch can be returned to it's position. by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr by legomanijak, on Flickr
  16. To show off engine I've built for TC18 entry constructed this mini-MOC - an engine trolley. Moves like a real one where paired wheels have 360 degree rotation, so it is easy to steer and place an assembly.
  17. Dear fellow LEGO enthusiasts, I am in dire need of some help from you folks who are definitely more knowledgeable than I. In this case, I am needing help with the replication of the RMS Titanic's Reciprocating Engines and Turbine. I am in the midst at the moment of working on the project below, though I have not updated it in a great while due to university work. See this link here for the project thread. But this is a minifig scale project, with every door, every window accounted for. This means that in regards to the engines, I am also seeking to make them at least somewhat true to scale and able to work as intended. Obviously this is a big job of some top notch Edwardian-era engineering, but I am hoping that there might be some out there not as technically-challenged (pun totally intended) as I am, willing to help me get this part of the project off the ground. Some of the features I I am looking for include a fully air-powered system, where the air supply would come from tanks hidden in the mock-boilers, that are then funneled at somewhat high pressure to the Triple Recip. Engines, which means that the pressure would go down as it goes through each cylinder (HP, IP, then two LPs). The leftover air at a much lower pressure then goes to a junction that can either go to the Parson's Turbine at what was historically 4 psi, or can go directly to the condensers. With the latter I intend just to make the outside of it and hide inside some custom compressors like this. That would then return to the original air supply. With this I am hoping that I will have a self-supplying system with ideally no more than 5% leakage, or enough compressors that leaks are compensated for. WIth the Parson's Turbine, that can be an accurate shell with whatever is needed inside to include a working turbine, and probably with an gearbox and ascending set of gear ratios to give it the necessary torque. These engines and turbine are meant to actually turn the propellers, perhaps even in water! Some other features would include a replica of the Brown-type reversing engine on the side of each of the Recip engines, making it so that the Stevenson-type eccentrics can change the direction of rotation. Considering the scale, the reversing engine doesn't technically have to be much more than a slightly-hidden piston that does the required job, but any more realism doesn't hurt. If something like this is possible, please let me know. I am really wanting to continue with this project, and this is a central part of it. But without the pieces in front of me instead of on a computer screen, what little I know of engineering definitely doesn't help without that tactile interaction. Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your replies! If it is possible, then I can follow up with the intended dimensions. Here are some references for any that wants some: View of turbine and condensers through wall from main engines rotor shaft model of port-side recip. engine overall basic view path of the steam of original, pressurized air for mine
  18. Hi all, I recently went on a bit of a designing spree during my holidays and thought I'd share the results. I've been developing these models at a slightly smaller scale than usual (Hence 6-wide), but it's been a fun challenge and one I would like to develop into more actual models if I have the time. I thought i'd share them all at once as I didn't want to clog the forum xD MALLARD (LNER A4 Class) The first design I did of this scale and the only model I have physically made. You'll notice that the boiler is different from the render as those arch blue pieces are horrendously expensive. If you are interested I go into more detail about it in this MOC video on my Youtube channel. FLYING SCOTSMAN (LNER A3 Class) Classic design to follow on from. The wheelbase is copied from my Mallard build, which forms the base for all my pacific class designs. TORNADO (BR Peppercorn A1 Class) Developed this by tweaking the Flying Scotsman build. I know of better ways to do the smoke deflectors, but unfortunately the parts weren't available on LDraw. GWR HALL CLASS I developed this for a friend's Hogwarts Express build, but also as a bit of fun. With a couple of tweaks this could always pass for a King or a Castle. LMS ROYAL SCOT CLASS I think the front of this engine could be different if the parts were available, and I wasn't able to do the wheel arches, but I'm happy with the tender and the shaping of the cab. SR KING ARTHUR CLASS I thought i'd try and to an engine from each of the major British steam companies. The obvious one for Southern was a Merchant Navy or West Country, but I've already done a lot of Pacific engines. BR STANDARD 4MT TANK The one major drawback is that it isn't motorised. I've been considering making a motorised carriage that would not only move un-motorised engines, but help the bigger motorised ones around the corners better. That, of course, comes with its own set of drawbacks. THE FLYING SAUSAGE (LNER 10000 - 'HUSH HUSH') I wasn't lying in the title, this is such a wonderfully absurd engine that I had to try it. my only major niggle is the colour scheme, but I suppose experimental engines are hardly worth sprucing up. I hope you've found these MOCs interesting, I'd love to hear any tips, comments or suggestions for future builds! I'm planning on building the Flying Scotsman before long, then maybe a set of coaches. -Isaac
  19. Since the 2018 Hogwarts Express (set 75955) is lacking in realism, (with the engine and tender in particular!) I decided to revise my custom version with ideas from the set, including printed 1x4 curve tiles with Hogwarts Castle printed on them. The locomotive is a heavily modified version of LDDModelmaker's Black 5 model with some parts from set 79111, Constitution Train Chase. The tender features a three wheeled bogie design modified from the one in Anthony Sava's ALCO MRS-1. The middle axle moves side to side, as to allow going through switches and curves without issue. The inside of the cab features two gauges and the firebox. In this false-color image, the red parts slide, the blue ones stay put to allow for the loco to go around curves and switches. (BTW: There are parts underneath that keep the sliding bogie from falling out.) The roof and side wall of each coach come off independently from each other, to reveal four seats for students and / or the occasional teacher. The Hogwarts Express is usually made up of four corridor BR MK I passenger coaches, although sometimes a special fifth coach is attached with an open floor plan. (however, in this Lego design, they are all open floor plan!) Also, the end car is not accurate to the films, but is what I prefer to the alternative: a gangway leading nowhere with no red light on the end. In-universe / Film History for the Hogwarts Express: Leaving from Kings Cross' Platform 9 & 3/4 to Hogsmeade Station at exactly 9 AM, the Hogwarts Express carries students (and sometimes faculty) to and from Hogwarts' School of Witchcraft & Wizardry in the Harry Potter series of books and movies. It has been seen in every Harry Potter film, from it's first appearance in the beginning of Philosophers Stone to it's (so far) last at the end of Deathly Hallows. (part two) The Hogwarts Express is usually only in the film for a short while, and it is generally a pleasant journey from Kings Cross to Hogsmeade, although Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and a certain Flying Ford Anglia might beg to differ! Hogsmeade station is the terminus for the Hogwarts Express on it's school-ward journey. This 100% fictional version of Hogsmeade station (as in, not based on any of the Harry Potter films) was inspired by several sets, chiefly sets 4554 (Metro Station) 41167, (Arendelle Castle) and 71044 (Disney Train and Station) from which I took the tower roof design, main floor general "look", and attic windows, respectively. (I was originally going to make this a generic European station, but then realized the Hogwarts crest 2 x 2 printed tile can fit just above what became the 1 x 4 Hogsmeade station sign on both the street and tracks sides.) The model is modular, and features a track side platform, ground floor, second floor, and tower roof. The street side features the same basic look as the other side, but in this case their is a staircase.... which could cause a problem for luggage trolleys as their is no ramp! Top floor features the Station master's office, which includes fixtures such as a desk, telephone, and some filing cabinets. This floor features the two ticket counters, indoor seating, and fireplace. Every floor & platform is grouped separately in LDD, as seen above. As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 10/5/19: Hogsmeade station LDD model added. Real bricks coming eventually. (Hopefully soon!)
  20. Hello everyone, I have built a model of one of Britains classic race cars, the Bentley 4.5l ‘Blower’, a project that was never actually approved by W.O Bentley (company founder) but nonetheless took part in the 1930 Le Mans 24hr race and French Grand Prix where it finished second behind a much more agile Bugatti type 35. Its claim to fame was not through racing victory but through its racing stories. The model has working ‘worm and wheel’ steering and a removable bonnet to expose the 4.5 litre, 4-cylinder supercharged engine. Accuracy and realism was key right from the chassis frame and the parts were spray painted to give two new green colours. For more info and images please Click here to take a look at the project on Lego Ideas. Many thanks...
  21. I wanted to build a Mazda RX 7 FD ever since I finished the NSX...but a RX 7 needs a rotary engine... So I was forced to make one :) I have been working on this little guy way too long, and when I finally got it working today, I literally had tears in my eyes Its still WIP, but I am so happy right now. Hope you enjoy. Gray Gear
  22. lego engine 2 by michael waterfield, on Flickr lego engine 1 by michael waterfield, on Flickr lego piston head by michael waterfield, on Flickr About 2 months ago I started building said engine, single cylinder 4x4 bore 5 stud stroke (no glue), for the ignition I used a system made for model engines with magnetic based timing and powered it via the Lego rechargeable battery / wire from a dead motor. The first incarnation used gate style valves but they where sticky and lost a lot of pressure, so I switched to using technic caped axles through lego system which is amazingly air tight and looks/works like a real engine (4 valve total arranged in a flat head configuration). The valves originally had variable timing via two diffs but I later removed it not due to the resistance but retiming the engine every time got tedious fast (the ignition magnet was driven by the same gear train as the valves (1/2 from the crank, 12 tooth too 24). Now for interesting part the running, the area behind the valves is in a open top box and its this I spray the fuel into. O don't use solvent of any kind, with gas type lighter fluid lego holds up with no sigh of damage after a few minutes of inconsistent firing, but I ran out and due to crippling stupidity/laziness I just grabbed the next most flammable thing I had - a solvent spay. After less than 10 seconds firing on the starter motor (two xl gear up x5 about, 42 8) the engine slowed and when I opened it up both the exit valves had their caps melted and there was some waviness to the piston top. After replacing the axles and getting some more lighter spray I changed the flywheel from a geared up Unimog wheel to a aluminium pully about 8 cm across and 2cm deep. With this configuration the engine runs for a few seconds (yes without the starter connected) a few seconds after fuel is added no matter what I try I cant get the engine to run without these gaps in ignition, It seams like there is too much fuel and after a few cycles the fuels concentration becomes low enough for combustion, this is where I believe the most improvement can be made and yes I mean a working lego carburettor, or at least something better that my box method. While running the engine sounds like some of the first ic engines made, probably due to the bad burn and merely non zero compression. . Now I imagine most of you are curious how I got useable pressure containment and no hang-ups with a lego cylinder/piston without glue, gaskets or any modification to the lego , well unfortunately that is hard to explain even though it is ldr friendly its a bit unorthodox, but you can see in the pics. But during building the cylinder I put the piston in and blew in the other end and the piston went 4 feet across the room consistently. I plan to make a video as soon as I get more than a few seconds of ignition out of it (first running lego engine hello youtube gold). O and finally I made it four stoke due to it being easier to run at low rpms and my ptsd from nitro cars has yet to leave me. Any advice/interest? (hopefully I added pics correctly)
  23. Hello there! Even though TLC finally stepped out of using big blocky engines, the newest rendition of fake engines isn't very good. Mostly due to the ugly long brown axles and big "crankshaft". Now, it is possible to use the ovaloid-shaped liftarms as the crankshaft with 2l axles and half-bushes, but the entire assembly still occupies a lot of vertical space, specially the Ø3L crankshaft. Now, making something smaller with Technic pieces wasn't possible, so I resorted to System parts. 1x1 plates with 1x1 round plates were the solution looked for. Even though the "pistons" don't have much vertical movement, the engine still sounds great and both inline and v-shape setups can be made, theorically with infinite cylinders as the crankshaft isn't limited by maximum Technic axle length but by how many 1x1 plates can be stacked together. Advantages: Small volume - 3 studs vertical by 2 studs width Little extra space required - approximately quarter of a stud around the crankshaft (Technic axles can be placed alongside it) Produces sound as well as other fake engines V-shape or Inline engines possible Disadvantages: small vertical piston travel Crankshaft doesn't use Technic pieces so can be difficult to correctly space (stacked plates height vs Technic stud width) and might break if too long or abused too much Here's a video showing both setups and sound (e-motor is very quiet so the engine can be heard)
  24. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] Southern Pacific 4-10-2

    The 4-10-2 wheel arrangement, often referred to as the Southern Pacific for the railroad which put it to use most successfully, was a unique design that utilized three-cylinders instead of the traditional two. In terms of steam locomotive evolution, it followed the 2-10-2 Santa Fe but the American Locomotive Company's (Alco) desire to advance three-cylinder technology proved somewhat problematic, at least for the Union Pacific (which referred to its roster as "Overlands" for its Overland Route main line). The SP on the other hand found their fleet quite useful and reliable in regular service and continued to use them for nearly 30 years until diesels finally took over. Hey guys! I wanted to share my completed model of Southern Pacific's 4-10-2 steam engine. I designed this model myself taking inspiration from brass models of the engine and techniques from various builders here on EB and Flickr. This model took me several months to design, build, and test but it is finally completed! The best part? You can purchase your own set of instructions to build the same model! Yes, that's right. Have all of those amazing BMR rolling stock and maybe one or two of my SP & UP PFE cars but no engine to pull it? Well now you can build an expertly modeled steam engine that will fit in with your rolling stock perfectly. Instructions can be purchased here: https://www.bricktraindepot.com/product-page/southern-pacific-4-10-2 The model is powered by two XL PF motors, and a AAA battery box in the tender. An SBrick is housed in the tender as well. Features side rods by @zephyr1934. This engine can haul a LOT of rolling stock. Was going to test with all 45 of my train cars here soon but I am positive it will work exceptionally well. Let's get on to some pictures! Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Hope you guys like it! Let me know what you think. -Jeffinslaw
  25. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/