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Found 346 results

  1. dimka_ya

    [MOC+WIP] Modular micro castle

    Hello! I'm opening a new topic. I'm slowly running out of ideas for my microcity. Now a new direction - is the modular micro castle. The base is still the same - 16x16 plate. Thanks for attention! I will be glad to receive your comments :) Fortress wall with a main gate, a rising bridge and a traditional moat :)
  2. Hi everyone I'm happy to share my second MOC which I have been working on over the last 5 months. I build the MOC with BrickLink Studio 2.0 and used the new Eyesight Render for my images. The MoMA - Museum of Modern Art is a MOC modular building inspired by modern architecture. The MOC has several highlights like a staircase fully made of glass bricks or a full-functional elevator on the backside. The MOC includes many of advanced building techniques and has a high level of details on each floor. It’s built on two standard 32 x 32 base plate and includes 18 minifigures, 28 paintings and 8 sculptures. The dimensions of building are 10.2x20.6x18.2 inches (width x length x height) or 26 x 52.3x46.2 cm. Level 1 - Entrance – Museum Store – Art Gallery The first floor contains the main entrance of the museum with a cash desk and a small design store for gifts and souvenir. The art gallery on the ground floor contains 6 paintings and 3 sculptures. Minifigures Older couple interested in modern art Museum employee operates the cash desk Store seller serves a customer Art-hipster buys a souvenir Security guard enjoying his coffee break Art Student looks at the sculpture Tourist interested in art Level 2 – Restroom – Art Gallery On the second floor there is a toilet for visitors and a gallery with a view into the ground floor. The art gallery on the second floor contains 11 paintings and 1 sculpture. Minifigures Artist looking for new inspiration Art interested friends couple Level 3 – Security Control Room – Art Gallery – Art Terrace On the third floor there is a security control room to monitor the valuable paintings and sculptures. A highlight in the art gallery in this floor is the large flower sculpture. A small outdoor area offers further space for abstract sculptures. The art gallery on the second floor contains 5 paintings and 3 sculptures. Minifigures Security guard what happens in the museum Father inspires his daughter for art Art lecturer during his lunch break Level 4 – Viewing platform – Art Café On the fourth floor there is a small Viewing platform on the top of the building. In the cozy art café, visitors can enjoy a piece of cake and coffee while enjoying the view through the large panorama window. Minifigures Barista conjures a work of art from every coffee. Visitor enjoys her coffee after an exciting museum visit Visitor treats herself to a cool drink and a slice of pizza Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my second MOC. There are more pictures on Bricksafe and feel free to support my MOC on Rebrickable and let me know what you think about. At the moment I am building my MOC with real Lego bricks. As soon as possible I will post any photos of the real lego building.
  3. Following the events of The LEGO Movie 2, Emmet Brickowski got to work on building Lucy and himself their dreamhouse again. He made it a bit bigger, a little better, and a lot stronger... just in case of any future Duplo attacks. It also features an attic for extra storage space, on top of the already-new second story. It is a modular style building, with removable floors and connection pins. The furniture (and house colors) were partially inspired by set 70831: Emmet's Dream House/Rescue Rocket, and a few of the official modular buildings. The car was modeled after the 1957 Plymouth Fury, made famous by the Stephen King book "Christine". (It's also a 1983 horror movie of the same name.) I took the original model of the Christine car made by user @hachiroku, which I would link to but can't seem to find anymore... The rear of the house has the entry point to the Duplo Fallout shelter. Why a fallout shelter? Well, the house is from the late 1950's after all... plus, the Duplo creatures are bit rougher in their attitudes and might go about doing something drastic if they don't get their way. Upstairs is the only bedroom, which is plenty big enough for Lucy & Emmett with their respective pictures on the wall above the bed. (They are stickers, sadly) Downstairs is the living and dining rooms, plus the kitchen. It also has the connection pins to hook into the modular building standard. I don't have any real world pictures of the vehicle (yet), but it's been built in real life for some years now... I just have to photograph it. Instead, here are the screenshots I took of the model in 2017 below: The car was modeled after a certain red '57 Plymouth Fury. I made the car black instead of red and took off the parts which I thought would be unstable. This meant taking off the rear wheel covers, revising the front bumper, adding different wheels and a few other small things. The rear of the car features a very ingenious set of taillights. Kudos to Hachiroku for this simple, elegant design! I've already started parts finding for the house part of this project (and I've made quite a dent in the price), so keep your eyes peeled for more pictures coming soon! (Also, I know the parts are kind of dusty, they've been sitting on my desk a while.) As usual, thoughts, complaints, comments and questions always welcome!
  4. Simons Brick World

    Your ideas for future city buildings

    Hello there, I´m about to expand the digital city and want you to have a part in the future planing. This is the current layout: The expansion will be on the right side, continuing the big long street. For this I need 2 new building right of the pub building. The first one will be build on a 16x32 baseplate. The second building will be a fire station. I´m not sure about the size of the fire station. Maybe I will be using 2 32x32 baseplates side by side. Now I need you for some Ideas. 1.: What do you want for the first (16x32) building? It should get the same height like the pub building. In the ground floor we can add another small store or public area. You can also tell me your favourite color which we can use for this building. 2.: Do you prefer a modern shaped fire station like one of this: Or an older one like this: I would be very happy if you write me your suggestions. If you have any other ideas for expanding the city you can also tell me. Thanks for your help
  5. dimka_ya

    [MOC] Micro city

    Hello! A year and a half ago, I saw somewhere on Flickr a building assembled on something like that. The idea came up to assemble an entire city from such buildings. At first standart basis were used, then doubled and quadruplet, and sometimes more. During this time two cities were built. I will share renders for those who are intrested. First city Original here I will continue to add buildings in the comments. Thank you for attention :)
  6. Hi everyone. I'm new here, and I really, really wanted to show you my latest MOC... the legendary Scrooge McDuck's Moneybin. The project is also available on Lego Ideas (link at the end of the post), but first let me give you a tour, so you can check with your eyes if it's worth your vote . Be sure to scrool the pictures till the very bottom. I promise you won't regret it. LEGO SCROOGE MCDUCK'S MONEYBIN by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr This is the front, with the iconic huge dollar sign. The armored door is the first element of playability: it can be opened and closed pulling the two bars attacched at the side of each half. Also, it is not very clear from the picture, but the small stairway has two lion heads at the bottom, to give the entrance an imposing and intimidating touch IT'S HUUUUUGE by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr As you can see is quite a tall building (33,3 cm, or if you prefer 34 bricks, from the baseplate to the top of the dome). On the roof we have the famous dome, that here I adapted into an helicopter landing pad. I couldn't not include the cannon to shoot at the evil Beagle Boys and a telescope to read the newspapers for free. MONEYBIN OPEN by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Ok, now the interior. I wanted this set to be fun for adults to build and extremely fun for kids to play with, so it had to be easy to access every feature. The easiest way was to put the front wall on a separeted baseplate, so all you have to do to 'get in' is to push it away. As for the floors, they can be easily removed thanks to the trail design: they slide in the groove bricks inside the external walls, so it's easy to get into action FIRST FLOOR by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr And now the ground floor. I designed to be the most intimidating possible. Imagine: you are a business man and you have a meeting with the richest and toughest duck in the world. As soon as you enter, you don't have the time to enjoy the nice floor with dollar mosaic because you notice that a security camera is pointing at you. The frame with "TIME IS MONEY" also is not very welcoming, you wait your turn on the green sofa... and then you realize that is placed right in front of a giant anti theft protection cannon. As if it this wasn't enough, you also have a Scrooge McDuck's painting that seems look at you. AND IT IS, because that wall hides a secret passage, with an hole to spy from behind the painting... but what's so important that Scrooge wants to hide? SECRET PASSAGE by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr - Treasures, of course. What else do you expect from the richest and most adventurous duck in the world? Notice also the black lever to turn back the secret passage ;) SAY HELLO TO MY LITTLE FRIEND by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Here you can enjoy the anti-theft protecion cannon in action... "Say hello to my little friend" SECOND FLOOR by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr And now the first floor, with the private rooms of Scrooge. On the corridor, a picture of him from when he was to work as gold prospector in Klondike, but most of all, the frame that says "There is no such a thing as talent, only inspiration and ambition". But let's see better the others room... BEDROOM 1 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Have you ever tried sleeping on a canopy bed made of 100 dollar bills? Trust Scrooge, you will sleep like a baby BEDROOM 2 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Sleep well, but get up early: Scrooge knows it well, he even has a frame in front of his bed to remember it. On the bedside table, a nice family picture from great comic writer Don Rosa. SALON 1 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr And now the salon, or is it better to call it "Worry Room" ? Why do you think that carpet is threadbare that way? Scrooge's nervous walking, of course. What a shame, it was only 60 years old . We also have a library, a pendulum clock and a marble bust with laurel leaves (I can easily Scrooge get inspired by great leaders from the past). SALON 2 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr COINS BATH 1 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Here is Scrooge, literally showering in money, happy as a baby. COINS BATH 2 by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr He even has the shower curtain made of dollars SCROOGE'S OFFICE by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr And finally the second floor, with his big office. This is definitely my favorite floor, I made sure to put EVERY SINGLE DETAIL that I remember from the comics: EVERY SINGLE ONE. There is the giant vault door, the display case with his beloved number 1 dime, the earth globe, the weelbarrow full of coins, the pyramid of coins with Donald polishing them, the money bags, the graphic wih his profits skyrocketing, the gun on the wall, the desk with multiple phones and an old crank calculator... but wait, what's that lever under his desk? FUNCTIONING TRAPDOOR by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr This is my favorite feature. I didn't like the classic way to make the trapdoors work, with the stick to be removed and then manually put back. No, I wanted it to feel real, so I designed the mechanism in a way that opens the trapdoor when you push the lever forward, and automatically closes it when you pull it back. What do you think about? Please let me know THE NUMBER 1 DIME DISPLAY CASE by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr POOR DONALD by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr THE GRAPHIC OF PROFITS by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr Ok... now the moment you were all waiting for...what it would be the MoneyBin without the giant money pool with his 3 cubic acres of cash? Let me explain how it works: sure, you could open the vault hatch, but to access the money pool, we actually have to go to the back. The back wall can be removed (it's easy to pull thanks to four bricks that stick out). With the back wall removed, we can admire the money pool thanks to the 9 big transparent panels . We have the trampoline, the giant meter to measure the level of cash... and not a single coin. why? Maybe the Beagle Boys stole it all? No, it's empty because you are the one going to fill the MoneyBin. The MoneyBin is in fact a giant piggy bank, that you can fill through the apposite coin slot on the back of the roof. Once filled, this is the final result IT'S A PIGGY BANK by Matteo Sperati, on Flickr AND NOW THE IMPORTANT PART... Guys, this project is available on Lego Ideas at the following link --> https://ideas.lego.com/projects/a633c276-5b5b-40fe-badd-217263dc37a8?fbclid=IwAR3W4jDpJswdFFF1hRky_HCFrREsiHsWpDzGBrUer8b2mVUHzAqcDjgqiJY Probably you all know what Lego Ideas is, but in case you don't, here is how it works: 1) users (in this case me) upload their creations 2) other users vote them clicking the yellow button support (you need to have a Lego account, it's free to create one) 3) When a project reaches 10.000 supporters, Lego's experts will take it in exham to evaluate if produce it as an official Lego Set. Very simple. WHY THIS PROJECT NEEDS SUPPORT (BADLY) I love Scrooge McDuck, but I have the bad luck of Donald Duck (which I equally love), because Lego never cared about Scrooge McDuck, they only released a minifigure many years ago...until I decided to create this Moneybin. Then Lego Group decided "Let's do a Scrooge McDuck set", and they released set 40477, the Brickheadz of Scrooge, Huey, Dewey and Louie. That they are completely different from my moneybin, but that's enough for Lego to say "We don't accept anymore Ideas with this theme". So, when I uploaded my project for the first time (it was actually themed DuckTales, not even Scrooge McDuck), they rejected it because of violation of third party IP. So, I had a choice: see two months of hard, passionate work going to the trash can, or rework it, removing all possible references to Scrooge McDuck. I went for the second, and I transformed into his arch-rival Glomgold's Moneybin. That's why on Lego Ideas you see it with the G on the front wall (as a joke, I made sure that the parts making the G are the same of the dollar: change the order and you will get the dollar sign ). Needless to say, Glomgold is waaaaay less famous of Scrooge McDuck, and the fact that I can't use name, image or minifigure of Scrooge McDuck gives me waaaay less visibility and appeal. That's why I courtesly ask you to support this project if you liked what you saw. I really believe in this project and I think deserves a chance. Afterall, they already have the licence, they should just go with the original version i proposed first. Once again, this one is the link --> https://ideas.lego.com/projects/a633c276-5b5b-40fe-badd-217263dc37a8?fbclid=IwAR3W4jDpJswdFFF1hRky_HCFrREsiHsWpDzGBrUer8b2mVUHzAqcDjgqiJY In the following days I will try to upload a video, more photos and also my CUSTOMIZED EXTENDED VERSION, with one more floor to discover, and the iconic hill on which the Moneybin sits. Thanks to all the ones who will help this project become real
  7. Villa Del Balbianello is a lakeside villa in Italy built in 1785 expanding on an existing structure from the 13th century. With later additions added throughout the years such as relics added from an explorer. It was also featured in films such as Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones (2002) and James Bond: Casino Royale (2006). Also a set on LEGO Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/85ec2902-0e20-40a8-9b18-4a79c9f560af
  8. Hey guys, I’m searching MOC instructions and LDD files for my near-future huge Lego city. I plan of course doing some MOC modulars but there are some very nice MOCs created by other people! I made a list of all the designers I found, I hope that list helps some other people who search modular instructions! Here are the MOCers with instructions that are definitely worth looking at (with no particular order): —Brick Ative (by @lookl and @Pakita) ebay Rebrickable —SteBrick (by @stef2280) Bricklink Stebrick Rebrickable —Snaillad (instructions on sale by @2013-lego) (by @snaillad) ebay Rebrickable —Sheo (by @sheo) Rebrickable —peedeejay (by @peedeejay) ebay Rebrickable —bricksandtiles (by @Giacinto Consiglio) ebay Rebrickable —Kristel (by @Kristel) Rebrickable —brickcitydepot (by @brickcitydepot) brickcitydepot ebay Amazon no starch press Barnes and Noble —Ryan Taggart (by @ryantaggart) snakebyte.dk LDD File of Construction Site –geo.gr (by @Gunman) ebay —BrickToyCo (by @Tobysan) BrickToyCo —hermez (by @hermez) Rebrickable —mestari (by @Mestari) Rebrickable —Huaojozu (by @Huaojozu) Rebrickable —2013-lego (by @2013-lego) (his own designed modulars) ebay Rebrickable —Duncaadkin0 (by @Dakar A) ebay —BrickBuildersPro (by @lgorlando) BrickBuildersPro ebay Amazon —The Brick Show Shop The Brick Show ebay —andrepsramos ebay TISMSTORE Rebrickable –Brickstruct Bricklink Brickstruct —10214 Alternative Build (by Garom) Rebrickable —The Magic House (by valgarise) Smart Bricks —Bob's Burgers (by jtam1608) ebay —Villa Maison (by @marcosbessa) (found the LDD file on LDD gallery as it’s no longer available in his own website): LDD File —Train Station (by @LegoWolf) (link to download the LDD file is on his Flickr): LDD File Here are some other ones (those which doesn't really interest me but I'm sure that will interest many others): —SkywardBrick Rebrickable —TheUniqueBrick TheUniqueBrick Rebrickable ebay —A *Deal* 4 U (by waltzking) Bricklink —Bricker and Co Bricker and Co ebay —Bjor Schoute ebay —sabriyo Sabriyo Customs ebay —Bauanleitungenmartin ebay —Berth Rebrickable —Soar Brick soarbrick ebay —gryffindorcommonroom ebay —scottcdavid ebay —sodabilly ebay —bolbuyk Rebrickable —deconstructor1 ebay —jval (Need for Brick) Bricklink Rebrickable —Fully Brick Models Bricklink —Brick Vice Bricklink Rebrickable —BrickusMaximus Bricklink —SonicSunday Rebrickable —Brickalive Rebrickable BlocK Shop —custombricks.de CUSTOMBRICKS Rebrickable —The Royal Church (by ateameric) Rebrickable —Alternative for Town Bridge (by Albertovax Corner) Bricklink —Bowling Alley (by drtyksh) ebay —Book Store (by Lair of Maedhros) Bricklink So that’s all I found. Maybe you wonder “why he’s asking for new instructions, he already found enough!” I ask it because I’m just purchasing/will just purchase the instructions in the categorie “must-have” . In LDD gallery, there are some interesting MOCs, you can download them too. I hope that list helps some people and some people helps me by recommending/finding more modular instructions/LDD files Cheers!
  9. Norton74

    A-Frame Cabin

    A-Frame Cabin An architectural icon from 1950 to about 1975, the A-frame is one of my favourite rural homes ever, a triangle-design built for lounging on outdoor decks and staring at nature. I built this cabin inspired, in part, by Harlan Hubbard's book Payne Hollow, about living a simpler life in a hand-built home. The author is considered by many a modern-day Thoreau. Two brothers, Dan and Ethan, burned out on modern working believed that stripping away modern comforts and living more simply in nature would lead to a more spiritually an creatively fulfilling life. They looked for a cabin in the woods and finally found out this old wooden A-Frame Cabin. They fixed up it and now they live there happily. It's not my first cabin in the woods but it was very funny building the "A" structure and trying to add many weird details. I also played with the light to let the scene as deep as possible. To build the basement I ripped off the clever hammers technique by Letranger Absurde. Below few pictures Hope you like it!
  10. Brent and Halfdan

    Medieval Inn

    Hello everybody, it’s five years since my last presented MOC, so it‘s time to share the latest building for my medieval town. The layout: The village itself consists of 32x32 modules of scenes that are to be expected in such an environment, so you can find the city walls or residential buildings. The module shown here will be the inn on the market square, more or less the best house on the square. The technical details: The visible, not very nice to look at, substructure disappears when the future modules are next to each other. I didn't want to retouch this because it belongs to the building and without it cellars or shifts in height would not be possible. Both baseplates can be separated from each other by removing the middle section at the first floor. Every section is modular, but without interior. Many construction techniques are not my own, especially the small door frames or the window constructions of the ground floor level are copied. Unfortunately I don't know from whom, as it's been a long time since I built these. Minifigs: 10 Parts: about 11.500 The environment: The two connected parts of the building stand above the old Roman road, which frays into the market square. At the rear there will be a small square with the stables and a well, the front part is on the market square. The layout is medieval with fantasy elements, so that the group of minifigures in the foreground can consist of a knight, a magician, an elf and a dwarf. Have fun watching, more pictures of this MOC and other modules can be found on Flickr. Front_Cover by Tabaya, auf Flickr Corner_backside_1 by Tabaya, auf Flickr
  11. castor-troy

    [MOC] Movie set

    For this project we focused on the aesthetics and design of the facades, while making sure that the set offers a lot of possibilities and playability for the Afols : for those who like to display their LEGO set, the Movie Set will be an optimal choice, as it makes an optimal use of pieces for that purpose the set can be used to reproduce scenes from cult movies by combining the different facades, for those who like to take pictures or make brick films, the set would make a great background scenery you can make a tracking shot with your smartphone over 1 meter long, thanks to a cart specially designed for that purpose, for those who have a LEGO city, the Movie Set would make a very nice background finally, for those who like big LEGO buildings, all facades can be put together to form a single building that would fit well together with other modular buildings Details and support : https://ideas.lego.com/s/p:41b6612863004734856253c8dd78fb2c
  12. snaillad

    MOC: Theo's Tailoring

    Hello all. I've recently just completed my latest building - Theo's tailoring. It's an Art Nouveau influenced building housing a tailors. It's taken about 2 months in all to put together and I've incorporated many elements of the time. Sadly not quite as weird as some real life examples I've come across but hopefully I'll be able to recreate them too someday! Onto the pics; You can view them at my Flickr here if you wish: https://www.flickr.com/photos/52656812@N04/ Happy to answer any comments or questions on the way its been constructed! Cheers!
  13. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Apple Square Research Center

    Apple Square Research Center is a 4-story 96x96 modular building conceived as a revision to my original Apple Square University. Designed entirely in Lego Digital Designer (Stud.io needs an update before I could adapt), this iteration is also influenced by a locale in a Japanese RPG (サクラ大戦3), the Antwerpen-Centraal Station in Belgium, as well as my ongoing career as an electrophysiologist. ASRC and ASU will be on display together at the next Brickworld Chicago (June 20-21, 2020). For more, follow me on flickr or instagram.
  14. Hi everyone, I am working on a moc (speed champion scaled vehicle) and I have run into an issue. I would like to attach the black tile to the structure so there is no gap between them. I have tried a few things but they ended up being illegal or left a gap. Hopefully some is able to help as I am getting a little frustrated haha here is a picture: https://ibb.co/ZWNjXxx
  15. simon84

    [MOC] Carpenter's Shop

    Hi everyone I'm happy to share my third MOC which I have been working on over the last 2 months. I build the MOC with BrickLink Studio and used the Eyesight Render for my images. Carpenter's shop is a MOC modular building. The MOC consists of a fully equipped carpenter’s workshop, a small organic store and a two-story apartment. The MOC has a high level of details on each floor. It’s built on one standard 32 x 32 base plate and includes 4 minifigures and one dog. Minifigures Retired customer with her little dog Saleslady of the Organic store Carpenter and owner of the Wood Art carpenter's shop Resident of the apartment and amateur gardener. Level 1 – Carpenter's shop and organic storeThe ground floor contains a full equipped Carpenter's shop with workbenches, drill press, circular saw bench and many other details.The small organic store sells various vegetables and fruits. in addition to a counter and a refrigerated shelf, the store also has a small presentation area outside.Between the two stores is the passage and stairs to the apartment above.Impressions Level 2 – Kitchen, living room and terrace of the apartment Living room and functional kitchen with small dining area and bookcases. Large terrace with raised beds, overgrown pergola and barbecue fireplace. Impressions Level 3 – Bedroom and bathroom of the apartment Small bathroom with toilet, bathtub and sink. Bedroom with bed and closet under the pitched roof. Impressions Level 4 – Roof Flat roof with small exit hatch and antenna. Impressions Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my third MOC. There are more pictures on Bricksafe and feel free to support my MOC on Rebrickable and let me know what you think about. At the moment I am building my MOC with real Lego bricks. As soon as possible I will post any photos of the real lego building.
  16. Brick_Builder19

    Bobcat S130

    This is a realistic version of the Bobcat S130. This LEGO TECHNIC model built for 1:14 in scale. Functions: moving piston working lift arm tipping bucket Dimensions: long: 230mm wide: 115mm high: 150mm (with bucket lowered) Bricks of the set: about 670 piece Look at the other pictures and If you like this model please support on the LEGO IDEAS side. Link: LEGO IDEAS/Bobcat S130 Thank you for watching and any support!
  17. dutchmadebricks

    [MOC] Sweet red mill

    This moc is inspired by an old typical Dutch mill called Kikkermolen (frogmill). Dated from 1747. Always when I passes the mill on my bike I thought, what a sweet tiny beautiful red mill. Let's recreate it with bricks :-).
  18. soccerkid6

    Varlyrian House

    Here is a little house set in Varlyrio that served as a prize in the 2020 Summer Joust. It was compliant with the restrictions of the Purist Parts category: "Only 1x1 brick with stud on one side, 1x2 brick with two studs on one side, and 1x4 brick with four studs on one side are allowed outside of traditional square plates and bricks. All other elements are not allowed to be used visibly, or inside your model." Which was a real challenge, especially at this scale. Thanks for looking, feedback welcome
  19. I am trying to make the following shape in a relatively sturdy fashion? the size would be approx 20 cm diameter. Any ideas what techniques I could try?
  20. Happy New Year all! I have started this as a new topic as I hope to post video and photo updates on my latest MOC, my Hogwarts Castle. Here is the first video I have created about it which is a general overview - any comments or suggestions are much appreciated and I will try and get back to everyone. Thank you!
  21. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

    My latest creation, Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse, reflects a desire to create an autobiographical MOC to share joy and pain non-verbally. It was inspired aesthetically by Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior, thematically by Voyage of Life (1842) by Thomas Cole, and structurally by Obelisk Overpass, Boulder Dam, plus an early draft of River Wheel (featuring pirate ship gondolas rather than lumber). In fact, the 96 x 96-stud plot vacated by the dismantled River Wheel fed my drive to combine structures absent from my Lego city—a bridge, dam, and Ferris wheel. As you may imagine from the photos, a hilltop lighthouse teeters over an ocean, beneath a collection of galaxies spiraling through the nighttime sky, while a shooting star passes overhead. The light and dark figurative sailboats represent positive and negative memories, while the logarithmic spiral of galaxies in the sky is reflected in the earth below by the failed attempt of humankind to overcome the nature of life itself. Stats 26400 pieces 75 lbs (34 kg) Footprint: 96 or 128 square studs Volume: 156 x 156 x 176 studs Timeline Phase 1 Idea conceived: January 2020 Digital design: 8 weeks total Wheel: 2 weeks Lighthouse: 2 weeks Bridge: 2 days Cliff: 4 weeks Shipping: 13 weeks Building: 2 weeks Phase 2 Digital design revision: 1 week Shipping: 4* weeks Building: ongoing *Multiple international part orders in October never did arrive and had to be repurchased domestically. For more, follow me on flickr, instagram, or ideas.
  22. *Your entry has earned 12 XP* Word has spread that the Imperial Pyerce maybe on our home planet of Mandalore. Nabare sent me out to see what info I can find. I walked through the city streets of Mandalore. The informant was supposed to be at a cantina just around the corner. I sat in one of the stools and waited for him. Turned out he ran the joint. He came to the bar and started conversation. A shot blasted out. I turned to see an imperial not far away. This had been an ambush. The blast should have killed me at point blank range- good thing I had beskar. I pulled out her blasters, shooting both the imperial as she ran and the informant. Searching the imp scum, I found a data chip. Turns out that doshing informant got her the intel she needed. We were going to find Pyerce- at least I hoped.
  23. hoiharry

    [MOC] Small Art Gallery - Modular

    Hi everyone, I present to you my very first modular moc . For this little project I mainly focused on the outside as that is where most of the appeal of a modular building is (for me at least ). For the outside I wanted to try and make someting that you could see here in The Netherlands and my main inspirations where the buildings in Amsterdam. I did want the outside to be colourful tho, as to make it fit with the official modular sets. As the inside so small I didn't know what to with it for a long time. As an art gallery is mostly decorated on the walls, I thought it would fit well. Also because it's an art gallery, I wanted to make it look like the building has been expanded on the backside and thus make it feel more "modern". You can see the full album on my Flickr. Hope you all like it!
  24. Dakar A

    The Essence of Modular Building

    Waaayyy back in 2007, the Lego Group started one of their arguably most successful ventures in recent history- the Modular Building series. There have been 12 sets to date, and with such a large source material, patterns, themes, and styles can be picked out and analyzed. This post is for anyone with an appreciation for the Modular Buildings, and particularly for those who plan to or have built one in the past. I hope you come away with a deeper understanding of what makes these buildings so lovely, and an eye for detail that others may overlook. The Cafe Corner was the progenitor of the modular series, and played a large hand in establishing trends and guidelines for the series. The building has a bottom floor done in a contrasting color to the upper levels, horizontal color striping, strong focus on texture, accent colors, and color blocking, as well as an asymmetrical design. All of these concepts will be discussed in further detail. The Green Grocer is the truest 'successor' to the Cafe Corner, in that carries over the big ideas of the set much better (in my opinion) than Market Street, and thus takes the #2 spot on the list. Note that the build uses Sand green and tan as its primary and secondary color, with blue and brown accents, as well as the requisite modular color palette of light & dark grey, black, and white. It also solidified the modular pattern of a tall first floor. The modulars frequently look good because the adhere well to the golden ratio. This is executed by having the first floor of the building be much taller than the subsequent floors. Here I begin a deconstruction of what makes a modular building a modular building. In this render, can you tell at first what is different about the build? The sand green 'texture' bricks have been changed to flat faced bricks. Texture bricks, including but not limited to 'brick' bricks, grille bricks, garage door bricks, and those odd little poofy bricks have all been used in Modular buildings to give an extra layer of visual 'crunchiness' to a build and can cause a MOC to seem off without careful inclusion. Striping is another key component of the modulars. Lego is a naturally stripe-forming medium, given the need to have each floor divided by a 2 plate tall difference, at minimum. But the modular buildings lean fully into this identity, making liberal use of striping throughout their builds. The Green Grocer has tan striping on the upper floors and dark green on the base floor, along with light/dark grey between the floors. Finally, color blocking is important not only in a modular building, but in ANY Lego MOC. A solid slab of color with nothing to contrast against it is boring to the human eye. Even in the most minimalist abstract compositions (Like Piet Mondrian's Red, Blue, and Yellow or Mark Rothko's Orange, Red, Yellow, there are implementations of color blocking in order to give the piece visual interest). Here, the light grey 'gutters' have been removed from the building, as well as the 2x2 inverted slopes that signal the shift from building front to the roof. There is further reduction that could be done here, but the removals as they stand give such a different impression from the final set that the point should be obvious. The Fire Brigade is a masterpiece of color blocking, texture, and depth. The build is indisputably based on an American firehouse (that flag doesn't lie!), and a great many lackluster MOCs draw on a similar brownstone/terrace house façade. One of the more notable things that sets the Fire Brigade apart is its depth. The central 'column' of the façade is set forward one brick from the rest of the façade, and its line continues upward, bringing the eye to the belltower atop the building. The left and right flanks of this column are recessed, not only by being 1 stud behind the center column, but also being bookended by SNOT texturing on the far left and right of the building, giving the facade a sort of W shape, if viewed from a bird's eye view. This serves to break up what could very well be a boring façade. Additional elements that balance the 'whitespace' of the building against visual interest are the flag, fire helmet displays, and date. Many a builder has incorporated similar elements into their builds without understanding what purpose they serve. These elements were not added to the build simply because the builder wanted to put a SNOT date in a build, but rather because they serve to add visual interest to sections of the build that would otherwise be bland, while still being balanced against the rest of the façade. The Grand Emporium is an exercise in how to successfully use repetitive structures in a build without it becoming bland. Take a moment to absorb the build and try to figure out how exactly the designers differentiated sections of the build. Firstly, the sections of the build themselves are visually interesting, incorporating texture bricks, varying depths, and striping to give a strong base level of enjoyable design that is built on in some surprisingly simple ways. This building makes liberal use of simple decorations to balance the build and prevent it from drowning the viewer in symmetry. The mailbox, ice cream stand, window washer, and billboard all stand to work as enjoyable elements that draw the eye around the build, preventing the viewer's mind from simply noting the pattern of the build and passing along. They also help to weight the build's center of focus down towards the first floor, something that the differently colored floors help to do in the modular building series. Though this analysis is focused on what the modular buildings share, each one exercises a different muscle in bucking convention. Not only does the Pet Shop throw the standard of one building per set out the window, it also challenges the pattern of differentiated bottom floors in the red building. Instead of using a contrasting first floor to draw visual interest, the red building focuses attention vertically on the bay window, similar to how the Green Grocer had its bay window highlighted by its own 'frame'. In order to compensate for this, the red building leans more heavily on texture and depth to lend visual interest to the rest of its bottom floors, along with a 2nd, weaker vertical line through the windows and door. The Pet Shop itself, on the other hand draws more from the past buildings, with a contrasting bottom floor, lots of striping and garage bricks, and a more symmetrical build. It's also notable for introducing the now-common technique of adding planters around windows to give them greater visual interest. The Town Hall set is similar to the Fire Brigade in that both are based on American architecture from the 1900's, in line with the rest of the modular building series. The Town Hall again uses a protruding center section to give visual interest and carry the eye towards the top and the clock tower. Whereas the Fire Brigade used the garage door to do this on the ground floor, the Town Hall uses the greek columns and a tympanum to concentrate the lines of the structure upwards. Another notable feature is the use of 'puffy' bricks to separate the windows and give visual interest. The Palace Cinema is unique in that it is both an homage to the Cafe Corner AND Grauman's Chinese Theatre. You can see the dark red roofing and brown windows with round tops, as well as the parallelogram top as the homage to Cafe Corner, and the general asian design and theatre aspect. Much like Cafe Corner, the façade is separated into 3 sub-structures- the left and right walls and the central column. The left and right walls use varied depth and dark tan elements to carry the eye upwards and accentuate the border between the 2nd floor and the roofline. The Parisian Restaurant again bucks modular convention in that the bottom floor is mostly the same color as the second floor. However, the use of brown windows and white accent pieces give it a different feel. Throughout the build, the designers use a concert of olive green bricks and white bricks as contrast, with a similar grey border scheme to the Green Grocer. The Detective's Office is another American styled building, but it is very different from the previous Fire Brigade and Town Hall. It uses separate color palettes to differentiate the 'separate' buildings, though they are truly just one large building built together. The barbershop makes heavy use of striping, both vertical and horizontal, to give the build more visual interest. Without the contrasting blues, the right façade could be visually boring, but because they are varied, the structure is interesting. Note as well the building's use of dark blue and tan instead of the normal light grey or black to differentiate the bottom floor. What truly makes this building stand out is the harmony of the striping, depth, and color used. The windows are recessed 1/2 a brick, the horizontal stripe continues their visual narrative around the side of the building, and the color focuses the eye inwards on the windows. The Brick Bank is a good example of how a build with a muted color palette can be made to stand out. The main colors are the monochrome spectrum of white, light and dark grey, and black, but the critical accents of dark tan and sand green stand out so much more because of this. By smartly using color, you can accent your builds and take them up a level. Assembly Square, while being an homage to ALL the past modular buildings, is also a great keystone to hold together all the techniques and ideas so far. The bakery building is primarily tan, but uses the dark orange tiles as texture and also to give the front a color that has a limited number of pieces in production. The florist uses varying depth on its second floor to break up an otherwise simple façade. The cafe uses white tiles to carry the eye up the façade, as well as grill bricks to give the wall visual interest. The bottom floor of all three buildings uses more basic colors and a large number of windows in order to differentiate the upper floors. The color is blocked together on all 3 buildings into sections to give the accent colors more power. Additionally, the rooflines of each building are textured across to, again, give visual interest. One more feature that I've neglected to point out is that the upper floors of a large number of the modulars use a lower line that is different from the upper parts. Here you can see it in the bakery with the grey jumper plates, in the florist with the flowers, and the cafe as the tan/dark tans. So after analyzing the modulars themselves, I will try to deconstruct MOC modulars and what they do wrong and right. First is a build by /u/Vinklem (on Reddit) that attempts to scale up the Corner Deli set. They get the first floor right in that there is good use of windows and differentiated colors, as well as striping between the upper floors. However, the upper floors do not have a cohesive visual line, and there is no depth variation, leading the build to appear as one large, flat plane instead of a visually separated building. The builder could have improved on this by carrying the line between the Lego store and the deli up the building. This building by /u/SeargentSasquatch gets the texture elements and use of light grey correct, but it fails in carrying a cohesive line up the façade and in differentiating the upper floors from the base. The building has more color around the back, but by not letting that shine through the front the builder has given their building an almost brutalist aesthetic. The build could be fixed by carrying other colors around to the front, and varying the depth of the windows on the center of the building to make a more cohesive line. I picked this building by /u/dm86 because while it mimics many of the aspects of the Pet Shop builds, it loses something in the execution. The most obvious issue is the failure to differ the bottom floor from the upper two. By having a short base floor with a tan color that continues up the build, the builder sacrifices the golden ratio proportions that both the Pet Shop buildings have. The build could be fixed by heightening the bottom floor, sticking to light grey and dark green on the upper floors, and adding texture around the windows in order to have a good looking build. This build by /u/whit123 captures the Modular aesthetic the best of the builds we've looked at so far, but still has some flaws to be addressed. The building does a good job of color blocking and texture. The ground floor is too short, however, and there is no differentiation between the 2nd and 3rd floors. Additionally, the white color blocks are somewhat overbearing- the builder could have used a different color, possibly tan, for the texturing above the windows and the flower beds below. This build, by /u/shdon, is our closest yet! It captures the first floor at an appropriate height, has cohesive lines and color blocking, and even depth in the windows! But it fails in the avenue of depth. This could allow it to truly come into its own. As it stands, the build is solid, but it lacks the character that depth variation in the façade could give it. This build from /u/Skaare42 again comes close to the ideal, but the upper floors lack much depth variation. However, some builders do not build specifically to fit with the standard modular aesthetic, and this is one of those. This Simpsons house mod by /u/droomangroup was chosen because it illustrates some of our concepts well. The builder did a good job of working with the parts they had and converting the Simpsons set into the modular format. However, it does not match the modular 'aesthetic' very well, in that it looks out of place amongst the sets it is placed next to. The building has texturing and reasonable vertical lines, but a big part of what defines the modulars is their color usage and variation. The Simpson's house set only contains a few colors of exterior bricks, and so the builder was limited to a brown, tan, and flesh colored building, which does not fit well with the multi-colored modular buildings. Even the arguably most color-centric set, the Green Grocer, uses tan, white, light grey, brown, black, and blue as accent colors. This is the closest build we have seen so far to capturing the modular aesthetic. Everything is done right, save for the dark green and white section at the roofline. This illustrates a pitfall that many builders succumb to- overdecoration. While the designers over in Billund have essentially free reign on what pieces and colors to use, we peons do not have that luxury, and as a result often have to make part substitutions or adjustments to our ideal designs. One thing that many builders immediately jump to is creating large 'decorations' in order to cover a lack of pieces in the right color, style, or amount. DO NOT DO THIS. Go for subtlety in your modular MOCs. The Green Grocer does not have a large sign outside saying 'GROCER', the Brick Bank does not have a large brick-built dollar sign outside. Try to show what the building is through your architecture, not through explicit decorations. And if you feel the need to add some visual flavor through decoration, go the Assembly Square route and keep it small; minifig scale if you can. This build is again near perfect, but has one key flaw- the builder did not go far enough with separating the tower section on the right side of the building from the rest. It is obvious that it is supposed to be a separate visual line from the rest of the build, but by keeping to the pattern of the rest of the upper floor façade the builder prevents the section from sticking out and speaking for itself. Finally, we get to great examples of Modular MOCs. These all demonstrate an especially solid grasp on the tenants and patterns that make the Modular series distinct and implement them, while exercising their own artistic vision to create unique buildings. This first building by Tobias T. on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/131278188@N08/29112270563/in/faves-75784937@N07/) employs excellent color blocking, making great use of only white and dark orange to create the requisite separation between floors and the building's striping. The black windows provide a consistent contrast to the colors used throughout the build, and the sand green on the first floor and old aqua on the roof provide an extra splash of color. The depth of the build is notable in the dual vertical visual columns that note the different central section. This record store by Sebastian Z (https://www.flickr.com/photos/15902478@N02/12760729075/in/faves-75784937@N07/) is another great example of using only vertical visual columns to give a build weight and detail lines. The eye is immediately drawn to the rounded structure and the rest of the building is observed in relation to that anchor. Like the Fire Brigade, though this building is only 2 floors tall, it manages to fit the aesthetic handily. This build is a great example of great variation within the bounds of the Modular system. The building hardly fits in with the 'standard' of mostly rectangular modular buildings, while still seeming like it could be an official set. This is because the build has a differentiated bottom floor, strong texturing throughout, a careful use of striping, and fantastic color blocking. (It's also the winner of the Modular Madness contest on here!) This Bike Shop build by Lukasz Libuszewski (https://www.flickr.com/photos/137778552@N08/30263533053/in/faves-75784937@N07/) is one of the closest I have seen to capturing the polish of the official sets. It has the color blocking, texture, depth, and striping to fit in, but excels in creating a scene that feels imbued with real life; creating a build that feels 'lived in'. One thing that helps this is the photography- taking well-lit photos of your builds with non-obstructive backgrounds can drastically alter the perception of others when viewing them. This build, Bootblack Street, by patika (https://www.flickr.com/photos/138380948@N04/33681797771/in/faves-75784937@N07/) also has the je ne sais quoi of livelihood that the official Modular sets encapsulate. Note how greatly the depth of the build varies; do not be afraid to have a section of your building jut out many studs from the rest of it! Another MOC by Lukasz, this one is notable for its use of color. The build uses flame yellow, yellow, and tan, 3 colors in the same color family that are usually not put next to each other in Lego buildings, with builders opting for more 'realistic' colors. Do not be afraid to experiment with rare or odd colors in your builds. Purples, mint greens, aquas, and even bright reds can have a place in Modular MOCs; it is up to you to put them there! This is the first in a number of MOCs by Pete Streege/RedCoKid (https://www.flickr.com/photos/redcokid/). This build is titled 'Apple Square University'. Note his use of vertical visual columns in the bay window sections running up the upper floors. Tan is again used as a base color here, added on to with dark blue, medium nougat, dark red, and black sharing an equal stage. Also note the use of vertical striping to break up the large sections of tan between floors. This build is titled Natural History Museum. It is a fantastic example of showing a building's function through its architecture, as opposed to large signs. The only explicit clues to the building's purpose on the outside are the two dinosaur statues. However, as the viewers we can tell what the building's purpose is through the white columns, the bone shaped railings, and the green banners at the top. This building is the Pumpkin Factory and is a good example of depth and line. Notice how the lines created by the windows carry up to the roof of the building, but the lines created by the recessed sections with 'puffy' bricks do not. The depth of the sections with the 'puffy' bricks bears pointing out as well- in order to create a contrast with the rest of the build they are set back half a brick, instead of simply including them in the wall. This gives the building an extra level of visual 'crunch'. Finally, we come upon his Lawyer Laundromat. This build is a tour de force of color, texture, and line. The build employs a multitude of colors, from the common dark tan, black, and dark grey, to the exotic sand red, sand green, and pearl gold. The colors are used intelligently so as not to overwhelm the viewer. Instead they create a pleasing palette. The building's texture is mainly created by alternating SNOT rows of plates and cheese slopes. These provide a great contrast to the solid vertical lines that encapsulate them, while not being overtly obtrusive. And the line of the building are carried through masterfully- notice how the olive green columns surrounding the cheese slope textures are carried through into the brick brick stripes around each floor via tan bricks. Hopefully this guide helped you understand the complexities of the Modular building series and what to strive for when making one of your own. If not, I hope that the numerous examples I provided gave you some inspiration. Leg godt!
  25. First of all Merry Xmas and in second place for me every MOC over 1000 pieces it is big but just in my case, because I like to use the less pieces I can. Leaving aside the part of choice and scalling of the MOC I am referring to the first steps with pieces. I usually go to the small part to the whole but I try to change it because I think it could be better to do the opposite, I know it from ages because in drawing is the same and I still start my drawings from the eyes... I just want to know how do you start your MOCs?, from the outside, inside, difficult mechanisms, easy parts, wheels I do not know just tell me... and we will see if my thread title remains intact .