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Found 27 results

  1. Here is my XL turntable, which has 11 dead-end stall tracks and one outlet track. (though it can be reconfigured to be as many or as few tracks as needed). It is spread out over a 64 x 64 XL make-shift base plate size made up of of 4 regular (32 x 32) curved road plates with quite a bit of overhang due to the outlet tracks and tower. The re-purposed signal tower is now being used to control the turn table. This control building is modular, and has a roof and second floor that come off to reveal inside details. The studs on the sides of the building are supposed to spell out the the yard's name, but I haven't decided on a good name yet. If you have any suggestions for a name with 10 letters or less, please post a comment with it below! This table can handle a 4-track long engine (around 64 studs) with a bit of overhang at the ends, such as with my Frisco 1522 4-8-2 steam locomotive as seen above. Diesel A + B unit sets would have to be separated and moved independently, but that's okay and actually accurate for some real world locations / railroads. The basic workhorse of the turntable is this four track long framework you see here. The table's modular control tower features a lower floor that's empty except for the staircase. The upper floor features a machine to control the turn table, a wall clock, and a old-fashioned rotary telephone. The table easily glides on an raised outer ring of tiles, and turns on a central 2 x 2 pivot point. This whole thing can be mechanized, much more easily than a transfer table, but it still needs fine tuning to make it work right. The outer ring of tracks is only attached to the base plates at two certain points: every other spot is held on by gravity. (plates on tiles) This is basically a very much enlarged version of this model here. I was working on a seven-stall shed in the same style as the tower to connect to the turntable, but the angles and hinge bricks weren't working out due in LDD. I guess it will have to wait until the turn table is built in real life.... if it is ever built in the real world. Comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome, as usual and thanks for stopping by!
  2. Now that my semester is mostly over, I've been thinking about some of the projects I had to put on hold to focus on my senior design project this year - specifically, the PCB I developed a couple years ago to run two three-color track signals off a centralized microcontroller: The original design called for a three-color signal: red, yellow, and green. My plan was to divide my layout into blocks, with a signal placed on each block. I wanted my signals to respond in the following manner: - If a train is detected in a block, that block's signal must be red (block is occupied). - The signals in the blocks adjacent to occupied blocks must be yellow (block ahead is occupied). - Otherwise, the block signal will be green (block is unoccupied). This would result in the signals 'following' the train around the layout, such that any trains travelling on the same track would be aware of each other, hopefully avoiding collisions. In practice, I won't be running trains on the same track, but it's still a fun effect to have! My resulting truth table then looks like the following. Inputs A and S are the signals from the adjacent blocks and block sensor, respectively, while outputs R, Y, and G are the red, yellow, and green signals, respectively. It doesn't matter which 'side' I get a signal from an adjacent block, as either way I want the signal to turn yellow. In addition, if the block sensor sees a train, I don't care what the adjacent blocks are doing - the signal must turn red. After working through this table, it occurred to me that there were two ways I could build this signal controller... Form 1: NAND Logic This truth table is simple enough that I should be able to build it with basic logic gate ICs - and if I can do that, then I can do it purely with NAND logic gates, saving cost as I only need one type of chip to make this work. However, I still need to work on converting the truth table to a set of Boolean expressions, and from there into pure NAND logic. After doing a bit of research, it looks like I'll need multiple NAND chips, as most chips I find have only four gates inside them. However, I am space and cost limited, as I can only use four NAND chips (16 NAND gates) if I want to be comparable to the cost of the ATTiny85 at 36 cents per chip. Form 2: ATTiny85 Since I only have five inputs/outputs, the ATTiny85 microcontroller is perfect for this application - there are exactly five pins left over after accounting for power, ground, and reset. However, I would need to program each microcontroller, and doing so with a surface-mount device becomes problematic. The cost is also an issue, as each one costs about $1.16-1.25. Buying in relatively small quantities, I think I can get the cost of components for each board to about $5 per board - including connectors and such. The main issue with using NAND gate chips is the amount I'll need, and thus the space they'll take up on a size-limited board. I also will need some transistors to drive the LEDs as the logic chips can't drive that much current directly. The issue with using an ATTiny85 chip for each board is how to program the much smaller surface-mount versions, as well as the relatively large fixed cost of each chip - I can't work on optimizing out some of the cost in the same way I could with the NAND version. I want to use JST connectors for running cables between the boards and sensors and such, as they're directional and I don't have to worry about plugging things in backwards this way. There is another question I have for you all: what's the most useful form factor? My original project had a board that was designed to fit in a 4x4 stud area, but for this I'm leaning more towards a 2x6 or 2x8 board, as I think I can fit that into more spaces.
  3. The last years, we have used a NXT brick for controlling the train. For Lego World 2017, we want to use EV3 bricks only. Since the RFID sensor is not supported anymore, we needed another way to determine the train location. I have build a proof of concept of a loco: Wheels are directly connected to a EV3 medium motor Location detection based on a color sensor (the combination of yellow, red and green makes a unique pattern) And it works fine! A video of this proof of concept: Of course, the train needs a bit (... ) of restyling ;-) Enjoy, Hans
  4. You know when you build a huge MOC and your lamplight doesn't illuminate the whole thing and you have to constantly aim and re-aim the lamp? You might not know it but this adds no less than 42 minutes to your overall build time! Outrageous! Luckily, I've found the solution: The video may be left to speak for itself: Now the build is pretty simple. The base was the toughest part. Getting two independant spinning axles througha turntable while keeping the area nice and clean! The whole structure rests on four tyres to eliminate vibration and the resulting sound. the bulb is clamped by a worm and 8-tooth gear. I did not alter any bricks to fit the bulb and the bulb can be taken out at any time if anyone requires a purely LEGO lamp. And who would dare! The lampshade is how it is because the lighbulb was very mean and melted through the system bricks that formed the first prototype. It brought a respectable amount of tears to my eye. This new framy lampshade has endured over two hours of maths homework with no sign of wear! Now, the programming did require some little thought. The aim in the vertical plane is done through a load of trigonometry, while the horizontal aim works directly with the IR sensor's "beacon heading" output. One thought I'm particularly proud of is my use of squared and cubed values to slow the motor down as they approach their desired positions, thereby eliminating any shaking from hesitation or even indicision! That's all I have to say but I'll be more than happy to answer any question from a fellow moving-LEGO-lamp enthusiast, if there ever was such a thing! Please check out my Wind-up Robot on LEGO IDEAS! Thank you, for reading my words!
  5. Hi all, In January 2014 I build a small 9v LEGO train layout. I use Mindstorms nxt 2.0 to control the trains and switches. Now I’ve found this video, I’ve uploaded to my YouTube Channel. The layout works like this: 1. Both trains are running on the outer track. The nxt motor controls the big yellow button on the Speed Regulator. 2. Due to small differences in the train motor and the weight of the trains, the come closer to each other. 3. If the distance between the two trains is to small (less than 3 seconds, seen by the ultrasonic sensor), the last train drives to the inner track and stops over there for 10 seconds. A nxt motor switches the switch. 4. The train on the outer track keeps driving. 5. After 10 seconds the train on the inner track moves to the color sensor, just before the switch and stops. 6. If the train on the outer track passes the other switch (ultrasonic switch), the train on the inner track starts moving to the outer track. 7. Then it all starts over again. Let me know what you think about this layout! I’m also curious how you guys control your trains and switches. Any automation with Mindstorms?? ?
  6. Not really, but I found out that the motors in my GX EV3 peform better in IR Control mode than how they do in my program, and I believe that it is because the motor power is different. Each block in the EV3 programming software that moves the motors has a digit for how much power each motor should have. I'm wondering what this digit is in IR Control mode, because the motors act much better in this mode than how the do in the program. If anyone here knows the power of the motors when the EV3 brick is in this mode, please reply as soon as possible. It would be very appreciated.
  7. Eddie_Young

    OD-CX

    I was thinking about what I could do with the newly acquired bucket wheel excavator parts. Something that I couldn't build without these big yellow circles. That's how this strange idea came to be. The arms are motorized: they grab or drill and retract into the wheels. The compact and functional hand is my favourite part of the robot The two-wheel design makes it wobble a lot. Someone on youtube commented that it's headbanging to the music - genius!!! I might try making one with adjustable wheel angles next! Any suggestions? Check it out on LEGO Ideas!!!
  8. Already two years ago, I got inspired at defeating steep hills with the LiteJeep. That could already beat 50 degrees, but because of its high riding height (good for offroading) and relatively heavy PF L motors, I reckoned there would be more irons to put into the hill-climbing fire. Very important things for hillclimbing are sufficient grip, huge power and a low weight. Weight ultimately gives more grip, but it also causes the vehicle to flip earlier when it is located above the center of gravity. With these factors into the equation, I decided to create a vehicle with loads of grip, so with 4 rubber tracks, and with articulated steering to make a sturdy connection between right and left possible, which is essential for climbing: when any vehicle is climbing, the suspension does unexpected things, so a stiff frame and suspension setup are required. Lightweight design requires a low complexity too, so that is why articulated steering is chosen. Having a front and rear part to let the vehicle adjust its shape to the terrain is an option I used several times in my rubber-tracked vehicles. This is the first vehicle in which I used the maximum footprint instead of the triangular form, again for maximum grip. Please note that, when you choose for the sturdyness and simplicity of articulated steering ánd want to let it adjust to the terrain, the middle joint becomes very complex as it contains joints in two axes! There is always a place where pain comes back. The Law of Conservation of Pain holds here.. In this case, all the trouble was in the difficult joint, which took about 5 hours alone. Then for the power: initially an XL motor was used in the front, but having a driveshaft through the already complex dual joint proved to be impossible. And then the idea came. Why not generate the power at the place where it is needed? Why not, if there are two separate parts, have some powerplant in both front and rear? But then there was a problem: I have a very large project in which all my three L motors are used. This pushed me in the direction of using M-motors, which proved out to be a very good forced choice. Combined with the lightness of the overall model, they proved to have ample torque left with a 3:1 gear ratio, having enough torque to keep the four tracks spinning all time when grip was lost. This is amazing, and you can see why Lego has put two M motors in their latest Tracked Racer. But the limits of that thing are way lower than the Quattrack's limit. Using two PF medium motors for drive and one for steering, this one of my very few (and maybe the last) Lego Technic MOC with only 2006 components. The Sbrick will throw all range headaches away and have much less delay than the stone-age PF IR remote it is replacing. Why did I use such standard power functions components? The new PF servo is slow and quirky, a medium motor allows for much more smoothness in steering. Moreover, if you are driving at steep slopes like this, it asks all your concentration to keep it on the move. If you cannot feel where the remote control knobs are (The intrinsic problem of the Sbrick) the vehicle will fall of before you've compensated. So the old system proved to be the best system in this situation. The articulated joint actually contains 3 joints, to have a suspension force on it in both directions: up and down. That is why there are rubber bands and one shock absorber. By the way, also the steering joint is included. Now, because the front and rear part of the Quattrack are relatively conventional (no steering nor differentials), all the pain of good and accurate steering is shifted to the design of this central joint. I dare to state that the success of this vehicle relies for a big part on this 2D joint. In the video, the operation is explained. On this photo, it looks as if the ground clearance is half a stud. This is not the case; in fact, it is over 1 stud. The underside is very smooth, which helps the low superstructure to glide over obstacles. Because of the weight saving, I designed it to have very clean looks. Styling means more weight. However, I managed to squeeze in some little details like fake cabin flashing lights, front lights, rear lights, cabin seats and a steering wheel. The reason why I did this, is that I wanted it to be a possible real-life vehicle as well, not just a scientific experiment. Adding weight is bad for climbing ability, so I tested the Quattrack also with the cabin removed and say what !!? The climbing angle was the same. This front look shows all that. The Quattrack contains everything, but nothing more. You do not need a zillion pieces of Lego to break records. Only 556 grams of it is sufficient in some cases. The video is the proof of all my theories... [media] I have not put all text and photo's on Eurobricks. More is to be found on Brickshelf and MocPages. If you like my video's, you might want to take a look on my YouTube channel.
  9. I'm programming my EV3 vehicle to be operated by an IR beacon remote. I've successfully got the car to be able to move, but I'm stuck on something else. My vehicle has a 4-speed transmission, and a medium motor shifts the gears. I used the remote's topmost button (the one that turns on the green light on the remote) for shifting the gearbox. But when I press it, something goes off. It's really hard to say, but what I know is that the topmost button isn't acting like a normal button. So the motor keeps on moving until the IR sensor realizes the green light is off. I really need help with the program because I just want the topmost button to act like a normal button so I can press it to make the medium motor shift one gear with a one second wait before shifting to the next one. I would love a very helpful response from someone that knows how to program the IR remote and if there is no way to get the topmost button to get the result I want, an alternative would be nice so I can be able to shift gears with the push of a button on the remote.
  10. When I stumbled across Paint0r's Legos Ideas page for a Lucrehulk-Class Droid Control ship, I had to build it. So I did. Please support Paint0r's build if you can. The Lucrehulk was a dream addition to my display for some time, and I don't think TLG will ever sell one. So when I saw this design I knew the wait was over - except for ordering the additional 1200 pieces I needed for the build. It took a few nights to figure out how many of the 1695 pieces I had already. These photos were taken at a point where I'd color swapped enough of the ship for display purposes. I didn't follow the .LDD instructions perfectly because there were a few points where I'd gotten lost or simply didn't have the pieces. However, the approach to the build was repetitive, so I was able to 'fill in the blanks' when needed. The Pick-a-Brick order was nearly perfect - but I'd ordered 96 of a slope 45 1x2 with plate and it came in white instead of light grey (a piece that PaB doesn't have available in light grey). I was pretty disappointed until I started building it anyway and thought a dash of white was okay. I also spashed a bit of Trade Federation blue in there, too. This now means, of course, this isn't the ship from The Phantom Menace, the Vutuun Palaa. Another ship of it's class, further along in The Clone Wars. The build: it was a lot of similar wedges. Started with the core, of which I had enough grey laying about to assemble it. It does disconnect from the base model fairly easily. I do hope that if Paint0r sees this model, they aren't disappointed with some of the many cosmetic deviations I made from the original model. I'd say I'm 90% accurate to the instructions, and the final build of the design which was shared here. Much of it was limitation of my patience and budget. It's very difficult to get the arms of the hangars to align perfectly (can see this in the top view photo below). It takes some doing to squeeze the wedges together to make a smooth curve... and sometimes results in buckling and the pieces go flying... argh. As a result, these initial photos will be updated once I can get the twin hangars more symmetrical. It takes patience. But having this beast on display is worth it... even if it isn't swooshable. I really skimped out on the engine array. Too many pieces hard to find on Pick-a-Brick and it was just easier to stick the sub-engines to the side of the hull rather than build the intricate lattice that holds the three main engines and six sub-engines together. I am satisfied with the way it looks. This build will be the centerpiece of my Trade Federation army someday. Will need a little micro-scale fleet of N1 fighters too, of course to bring it down. Front view Top view Antenna array Hangar detail Core view Engine array Ready for display Side view of the core and how it attaches to the main frame of the ship. Wedges aplenty! Most of the build was creating ten of these very tightly packed, extremely well designed wedges that comprise each of the cargo bay/arms.
  11. hi all, some months ago i made this video of lego battlebots, and now i'm posting it there because maybe you could be interested also for TC11, you'll find all the bot info in the video but i'll clone them here too, hope to bring up a brickshelf folder asap for the two bots (but i have to rebuild them due to pieces and electronics being used for witch doctor replica, cardiac two, fanmade design, killerhurts and recyclopse chassis, and other 3 500g class bot an grabber a lifer and a flipper) PULSAR weight: 700g size: 23x27x9studs weapon: 73g spinning drum with two single teeth 1900rpm strenghts: really effective wedge shape used to go under the opponent and lift them with the drum energy weaknesses: the drum isn't enough fast to launch the oppnent on the air, wheelholders may break off easily, weak wepon belt CARBIDE weight: 730g size: 32x32x9 studs weapon: 84g spinning bar 750rpm strenghts: great power and though armor, effective rear wedge weaknesses: the armor can e warped or bent and increase friction in the drivetrain, hard to control, high battery consumption here a photos from Ellis (pulsar builder) about size comparison here the video: NB it is really long, if you want, after presentation, you can skip to 11:02 to skip the fist fight (a bit long and boring) and save time without losing the most of the action! i'm keeping editing this with photos and videos from my twitter, it is hard to find them back but i'll try: CARBIDE PULSAR
  12. sunnyx

    2 AT-TE MOCs

    Hi guys I just finished my newest project: 2 AT-TE MOCs and want to show you all AT-TE Info Sheet by sunnyxi, on Flickr AT-TE 33 by sunnyxi, on Flickr I started building blue one in summer and finished the red one just a month ago. The blue one is just a simple MOC but the red one is much more complicated as it is motorized and can transform into a landing platform. AT-TE 19 by sunnyxi, on Flickr AT-TE 14 by sunnyxi, on Flickr It also has flood lights for night combat. AT-TE 1 by sunnyxi, on Flickr AT-TE 6 by sunnyxi, on Flickr The blue one has more space to carry troops and kyber crystals. AT-TE 27 by sunnyxi, on Flickr AT-TE 35 by sunnyxi, on Flickr AT-TE 5 by sunnyxi, on Flickr Thanks for viewing at my newest creations and make sure you watch the video! Comment and criticisms are welcome :D Full album and more pictures: https://www.flickr.com/photos/63137442@N05/albums/72157680455243206
  13. kostistlac

    Trump Lego Mexico Wall Stopmotion

    Lego Trump is back, bigger, better and president of USA. Let's build big Mexico Wall. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcgaQVOlMbw
  14. As a last goodbye to 2016, I present this small red car. It is not really built to be particularly good looking (I used a wire bodywork to have a low weight) or to have a particular high speed. But what it does, is put a smile on your face. Technics are kept simple, there's an RC buggy motor next to a PF lipo batterybox in the middle, a PF medium steering motor before the front axle and an IR V2 receiver to enable 1 metre of infrared range when going outside. Please Lego... Please... do something about it. The frustration and anger about this appalling range is powering companies like S-brick. And that's why my future cars are having an S-brick, leaving this model as one of my last PF IR remote controlleds MOCs... We're making a fun car, right? So there is a silly spoiler and huge rear tires. By the way, these wide tires provide excellent traction in dry conditions, which is important for low-weight cars like this. The interior had to be sacrificed to have a low position for the drive motor and battery box. Because of this measure, the handling was quite good, but made much worse by the slow PF IR remote. In the end, of course there is the video: The longer story can be read on MOCpages and better photos are on Brickshelf. Have a nice 2017!
  15. As part of my quest to control my Lego train layout with an FPGA controller, I decided that I would want some railway signals that would change as the train passed by. I then realized how much of a mess that would be with wires running to and from each LED in the signal and the control board, so I thought to myself: "I wonder if there's something I can build that will help with this problem?" I'm curious to see if there's enough interest in this gadget for me to be able to make and sell them, so that's the main point of this post. Here's the result: EDIT 8-2-2016: Board version 2.1 images In addition, here's a video of one of the first versions of the circuit, before I had even started on designing a PCB. This demonstrates the basic functionality of the controller with a single three-aspect 'signal'. Description: This board can drive up to two three-aspect (light) LED train signals with as few as two I/O pins on the chosen microcontroller. It can be run off of either 3.3V or 5V supplies* a 5V, and will interface with logic signals of the same voltage. If you'd like to drive the two signals independently, it will take four I/O pins. Dimensions: 4 studs by 4 studs, not including the male header pins. As I have yet to receive the prototype for this board, I don't know if the mounting holes fit a typical Lego stud, or if they line up with the corner studs on a 4x4 space - however, I should be able to adjust this without too many problems. The header pins are the standard 2.54 mm/.1 inch pitch popularized by Arduino microcontrollers. Technical Specifications: Supply voltage should either be 3.3V or 5V* be 5V. Absolute maximum current draw should be ~85-90mA, typically ~41mA**. Operation: The IC used to make this board work is the SN74HC139DR, a two-line to four-line decoder. There are two decoder units in each chip, and as a result this board will happily drive two signals at a time, either independently or synchronized together. The A0 and B0 connectors are the least significant bit of the two-bit signal, with A1 and B1 being the most significant bit. There is also an active-low 'Enable' pin for each decoder, which is not broken out to a header; it is permanently tied to ground so that the board is always ready to change the signal. If the value sent to Signal A is 00 (A1=0 and A0=0), all of the LEDs in the signal remain off. If the value sent to Signal A is 01 (A1=0 and A0=1), the green LED will turn on and remain on as long as the 01 signal is applied. If the value sent to Signal A is 10 (A1=1 and A0=0), the yellow LED will turn on (and remain on as above). If the value sent to Signal A is 11 (A1=1 and A0=1), the red LED will turn on (and remain on as above). Signal B works in the same manner. If you want to set both signals to the same light, simply tie A0 and B0 together, as well as A1 and B1 together. If you want to drive the signals independently, don't do that Cost: My calculations for the cost of the components, the PCB, and the time it takes for me to assemble and test each board tells me I should be selling these for $21.99 (USD) apiece. If I was to have these mass-produced, it'd likely be cheaper - however, I'd have to be buying them in quantities of 100, or 1000, and there's no guarantee I could sell them all. As such, I would prefer to take orders from anyone who's interested in buying these and essentially produce them on-demand so I don't have to keep inventory around. Sales Pitch: You should buy this device because it reduces the amount of I/O pins required to drive two three-aspect signals by 33% (four pins instead of six for independent operation) or even 66% (two pins instead of six for synchronized operation). This reduces the amount of programming work that has to be done by the user. In addition, the board is thin enough that it can fit in a single brick's height; as such, it can easily be hidden under some landscaping or even placed under the ballast for a section of track! Moreover, it comes in a lovely purple color with a gold plated finish, thanks to the company who I get my PCBs from. <~~~~~~~~~> *The only change that this would require would be different values for the resistors; I currently have resistors on hand for a 3.3V version, as that is what my FPGA operates at. Typically, Arduinos operate at 5V, so I could potentially offer either variant to suit your needs 5V supply only! More will burn out LEDs and resistors, less will cause undervoltage problems. **The LEDs I prototyped with (and will use on my layout) have a maximum current draw of 20mA apiece, with the IC drawing ~1uA. If there's a problem with floating inputs, it is possible for two LEDs on each signal to be lit at a time, resulting in double the current draw. I have yet to see all three LEDs on at the same time! Now, having read all of this above: Would you buy this gadget? If so, how many do you think would buy, and how much would you be willing to pay for each one? As sad as it is to admit, I'm not able to compete on cost with cheap PCB assemblers in China. Another question: Would you want mounting holes on the board, similar to what I've show here? If so, would you want them to fit a Lego stud? Finally, just to make this clear: I'm not ready to sell these yet. I still have to receive and assemble my prototype, which isn't even the board pictured above (it is functionally identical, just without the helpful pin labels and slightly cheaper because it's a tad smaller). I'd be thrilled to be able to sell these to people once I've verified that it works and doesn't explode, however!
  16. So this was a quick, fun project. I gave myself the weekend to build the smallest RC car I could. My goal was 4 studs. This seemed reasonable since a battery box and SBrick are both 4 studs wide. With the width set in place, I quickly realized that making two connected parts would be the way to go so the model naturally became a camper van/RV with a trailer. The main car holds 2 micromotors and the trailer has 1 old-style battery box with the SBrick directly on top. More photo's here. Assembly photos are here. PS: I must also thank Mbmc as some of his micro RC MOCs were a good inspiration for this project.
  17. Four wheel drive on Lego Technic cars with small wheels is hard to realize, as they become relatively too wide (which is ugly) and the ground clearance is also compromised. The problem then is: how to get the same grip back with only rear wheel drive? Then you need to push something 'extra' in the back of your already crammed, small nice-looking vehicle... This concept is an approach to keep this 'something extra' as small as possible while giving awesome and unexpected grip to the car. (At least, I was astonished by what it achieved!) Instead of typing a lot, I've put it all into a video with the theory of how it all works at the back of the video to let the 7 billion minus 1000 viewers that are not interested into more advanced Technic stuff experience how it works in practice on a 2 cm (that is: inchy) thick ice floor. As for the car, it is built from Power Functions spares as all my L-motors (which have quickly become the main workhorse for every Technic builder) are ehm... in use. That is why you find me using a geared up XL motor, which gave me memories of the good old times when the poor knob wheel parts splattered around. Sharp images of the car and mechanism explanation can be found on: http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=564319. On MocPages (beware, there is a piece of code there that simply destroys anything such as image resolution on .png files...) http://www.moc-pages.../moc.php/428881 Video: I finally have found PovRay so (with many thanks to all those who make that software) I can present a high-quality render:
  18. Link to MOCPages: http://www.moc-pages.../moc.php/426649 VIDEO FOUND HERE: Hello, this is my first post on Eurobricks. Anyway, here I present my custom supercar RHM (Rage Hobbit Motors) Wutzwerg. Note: this model is on Lego Ideas, the link for which is here: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/136011. I'm not really expecting the model to get either the necessary votes or to get turned into a set, but hey, I like to be surprised. Propulsion: 1 x L motor Steering: Front wheel with 1 x Servo motor and working steering wheel Drive Type: RWD Transmission: 4-speed sequential synchronized V2 Weight: 1.3 kg (2.87 lbs) Length: 41.5 cm (16.3 in, 52 studs) Width: 18 cm (7 in, 22.5 studs) Height: 10 cm (3.9 in, 12.5 studs) Power source: 7.4v 8878 Li-Po rechargeable battery box Estimated part count: 1800 pieces Suspension: All-wheel dual-wishbone independent Opening hood, doors, and engine V10 piston engine connected to drivetrain through transmission Build time: ~60 days Short Description This is my first vehicle to be built without a real subject vehicle in mind. It has less of a focus on performance than my other vehicles, with only a single L motor for propulsion. It also has front-wheel steering with a working steering wheel, a new version of my 4-speed sequential synchronized transmission (link here: http://www.moc-pages.../moc.php/422999), and a motorized rear wing. Introduction For this car I was trying something a little bit different. I had just designed a new version of my 4-speed sequential synchronized transmission (link here: http://www.moc-pages.../moc.php/422999) and I wanted to use it in a car, but I also wanted to build something a little less performance-oriented than usual and thus fit in more functions. This time, there is no original vehicle; make what comparisons you will, this car is entirely a product of my imagination. I think. Drive Train Part of my plan for this vehicle was to eliminate one of my customary 2 drive motors, leaving only a single L motor for propulsion. This freed up space for another M motor, as well as allowing room for the V10 piston engine. The V10 piston engine located behind the front seats, and was connected to the drive system through the transmission; as such, it varied with whatever gear the transmission was engaged into. Because of space restrictions, I had to replace the usual cylinder brackets with a custom rig, after spending a solid hour determining the exact geometry of the original brackets. The transmission used in this vehicle works off of the same principle as my previous 4-speed sequential synchronized transmission; this transmission is also a dual-sequential transmission. What this means is that the transmission actually contains TWO separate transmissions which are shifted in such a way as to produce 4 distinct speeds. What differentiated this transmission from the previous versions is that the switches were not hinged: instead, they moved back and forth in a straight line. This can be seen and understood better from the video above, and you can expect instructions sometime sort of soon-ish. The transmission itself was shifted by an M motor geared 10:1. Because of the lessened power from using a lone L motor, the motor had a gear reduction of 1.25:1 before being fed into the transmission, and then another reduction of 2:1 before the differential at the rear wheels. The car wasn’t fast, but it did pretty well for a single motor. Steering and Other Motorized Functions Steering was simple as usual - with a Servo motor and rack-and-pinion system - but this time I added a working steering wheel. That’s just about all there is to say for the steering system. The final M motor was for the rear wing. This was no fancy job, just a linear clutch and lever mechanism to raise the rear wing, but again space restrictions made the implementation of this system difficult. The rear aesthetics were somewhat compromised to make room for the rear wing & mechanism. Aesthetics With this being the first time I’ve ever come up with my own large-scale car, I didn’t really know where to start, and all the online comments saying “Making your own car is SO hard!” were not particularly encouraging. The front was actually the first area to be built (because of the awkward and inconvenient position of the battery box) and the rest of the car was built using the front as a reference point. Obviously, I can’t give my own unbiased opinion on the car’s aesthetics - many hours spent designing it have probably compromised my opinion as well - but I think the aesthetics turned out pretty well. Please, give me your honest opinions in the comments section! Reflections Not bad, I think, for a first attempt at making my own vehicle. Space was a little bit cramped because of the scale I chose to build it in, but everything mostly fit together in the end. It functioned really quite well: the transmission, rear wing, steering, and propulsion systems all worked without malfunctioning even once in the final vehicle, despite considerable use. That may be a first for me. Despite having fun crafting my own vehicle, I can’t see this as being something I’ll repeat frequently. That’s not to say I’ll never do it again, but I do enjoy recreating existing cars, and of course brand familiarity with my viewers gives people something to compare to. Enjoy the pictures!
  19. I'm not really a regular truck builder, but I like to think of new systems that do not exist in real life yet but that do improve the life of, for example, truck drivers. When something like a big tarmac machine has to drive onto a trailer to go to the next building site, the slope of the trailer should be very small. That small slope is nowadays achieved by making very large ramps that fold up vertically for transport, causing massive air resistance and therefore unnecessary fuel consumption. A way to make these ramps shorter is to decrease the bed height, because that asks for smaller vertical ramps. The second option is making the wheels below the bed smaller. But decreasing the wheel diameter increases the rolling resistance. Another way to solve the problem is placing the bed betweeen the wheels, so that it can be much lower, but that limits the cargo width: the tarmac machine can never be wider than the bed width, which is not handy if truckdriver x has to transport many different tarmac machines. Read the rest of the story and how I solved these problems with my my DAF CF with 3-axle trailer on http://mocpages.com/moc.php/421622 Or watch the video here: To give an idea of the model, I have posted one photo below, the others can be found on http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=560197 in a better resolution.[/font][/size]
  20. Hi, I have a very special problem: For an exhibition (the day after tomorrow) I will use 12V-lights at my train station. I tried this function with a gray 12V transformator and the switch with the train crossing pattern: (set 5083). Everythings worked and I was happy. Right button turn the lights on, left button turn the lights off. Everything is fine. But: Now I need this remote Control switch to use the train crossing, but I had another set 5081 - remote control witch SIGNAL pattern. I opened (because it was sealed (ovp)) and I tried to use ist. But it doesn't works. I think, it isn't broken. I think the reason is to find into the different between these both switch. The signal one stayed "down", after I pressed the button, and when I press the other button (red or green), the first button comes up. The switch witch train crossing pattern works so: If I pressed any button, the button comes up immediately. Also the train crossing has 2x three holes and the backside, the signal switch has 1x five holes and 1x three holes. Could someone help me to understand the function. And: Why I couldn't connect normal light bricks with the signal switch. Does set 5080 works (Remote control for switch). Or does the switch in set 7862 works? Please help me. Michael
  21. The Luctor is back! And it's back with a bang hitched to it. A €600, 2.5kg, 2500pcs, one year build-time bang. And the video is on YouTube. Check out a more elaborate review on http://www.mocpages....moc.php/414168. To give you a hint: this is the first ever forage wagon made out of Lego bricks that can actually pick up grass and dispose it when the cargo is full. It took over one year to build, the pickup system for the grass alone cost me a full-time week! A picture says more than a thousand words, click here to see them all on brickshelf: http://www.brickshel...ry.cgi?f=556822 Watch the video here: More about the Luctor itself (this video has already sometime ago been posted here)
  22. James Wellington

    [SoNE Freebuild] "Transmissions"

    [soNE Freebuild] "Transmissions" Please comment, tell me what you think, it helps me to better perform next time. This is my second Episode. INTRODUCTION: After a few days of being on the Star Destroyer "Tyrant", there was little talk of the mission. B-Squad spread throughout the cruiser, and started to explore the ship and get some rest. Here they wait for news of their important mission. But will that mission get delayed? Star Destroyer "Tyrant", Brick System, 2 ABY. SONEe2s1 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr Captain Vars: Continue to look for any Imperial Transmissions. SONEe2s2 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr *Meanwhile, James walks in the hallways not far from the communications room. SONEe2s3 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr Captain Vars: Ah, James, I've been looking for you. Seeing you're not doing anything, can you take control of the communications room for a short time? The officers and I have a meeting to attend. SONEe2s4 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr James: Oh...uh, me Sir? Well, I guess I could, bu- Captain Vars: Excellent! Come in, come in. SONEe2s5 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr SONEe2s6 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr Captain Vars: Please monitor the controls and transmissions. It is important you catch any incoming Imperial hologram transmissions. If one comes in, contact me or a nearby officer, and we will handle it. Do that and you should be fine. My officers and I will be back shortly after the meeting. I thank you for your help. James: Always happy to help, I guess. Captain Vars: Excellent! I'm getting to like you already. Well, I guess we should be on our way then. Best of luck, Corporal! SONEe2s7 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr SONEe2s8 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr James: Huh... Well, this will be boring... *Sigh* Why couldn't I of just become a TIE Fighter Pilot? I bet they don't have to do this! Hmff. SONEe2s9 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr *Boom-Beep Boom-Beep* Mysterious Transmission Voice: *Krrrrrrr* This is *krrrrr* Captain Leh *krrrr* of the *krr* Imperial Base on Coreillia *krr* we've been pushed out by rebels, we need urgent help *krrr*. They are *krrr* chasing us down! We need reinforcements! *krr* James: This is Stormtrooper Corporal James of the Star Destroyer Tyrant, I will try to get the captain to bring reinforcements! Stay strong, Captain, help is on the way! SONEe2s10 by BrickJamesWells, on Flickr See what happens next in Episode 3! Please comment, and tell me what you thought!
  23. Hi guys! My latest creation is this mud racer. It was not designed to be art, but to have fun. Therefore the frame and bodywork was kept very light and it has the light 8878 accu. This added up to a weight of just 600 grams! The steering happens by an PF m-motor because the servo motor was too slow for the speed this racer evolved. The front axle is pendular to keep the rear wheels always on the ground, this was vital for driving in grass, stones and mud. The rear axle has a differential - but not always. Watch the video for details. Read the full review on: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/398114 to see photos of the drivetrain or watch the video below. I have personally learnt much from this great little car, you can expect more soon.
  24. Hello, I am 896gerard, a passionate Technic builder. I would like to extend my activities to Eurobricks. Youtube channel: https://www.youtube....X_uErOTcGpZg8Ug MocPage: http://mocpages.com/home.php/52513. One of my new creations is the Ultra low cargo bed truck. I have not found this model in reality, so I built it. The complete review is on http://mocpages.com/moc.php/396635 and the video is below. Another creation is The Easiest Parking Car In The World: this is my own genuine idea, maybe some others have had the same idea right now... The review can be found on the given Mocpages address. You may always reply if you don't like it, my MOCs will probably get better of it.
  25. Hi all, Below is my first build of a flow control device to operate a bank of single acting cylinders. It's built on top of Sariel's dual output worm drive gearbox. In this application when the motor runs forward, air is delivered through the near set of valves and black loop to the cylinders on the right. Running in reverse drives the other pair of valves to drain air through the grey loop. Each pair of valves are offset 180deg so they can never be open at the same time. This way it doesn't matter when you start, stop or change direction nothing can get stuck open. The shaft turns counter clockwise and the valves are on a spring return. I've seen mechanisms that drive double acting cylinders but not single acting. Any suggestions for other examples I might be able to learn from? (Ideally it would be a lot smaller but this was as compact as I could make it). Many thanks, OzShan.