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Found 120 results

  1. This is my new creation! I tried to build beside the windmill a 3 fields economy with many operational steps the farmers in the middle age worked on. Hope you enjoy! medieval windmill by kofi, auf Flickr
  2. Here is the problem, we have already tried something and it didn’t work. Thanks
  3. Hello I'd like to share with you my last model, the colour ball tracker. This robot is able to track and catch a colour ball in a room without any border. The choice of the colour is made at the beginning and you can choose several colours. All the problems are managed, like mistakes, wrong things and so on technologies used are lego mindstorm and pixy cam thanks for you comments and requests !!!
  4. Lexus GX EV3

    (For original post) Hey guys. I just got done posting the video for my Lexus GX EV3 on YouTube. Check it out! The entire video was made about a month ago and I just posted it now. Now it's time to take this apart and head to my next build, which is finally putting together the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set I got for my birthday (I used some of its pieces in this). Be well, StudRobotics
  5. Hi! I will show you two photos of my new project: The EV3MathBuggy with the following functions: controlled via iPad or iPhone (Using the Gyroscope). Integrated web service. selecting some defaults or typing any kind of mathematical functions. The EV3 MathBot will drive the function. Using mecanum wheels. A video is coming soon. Andreas
  6. Quandary. First I apologize for the long post. I have finished the first stage of a large industrial MOC. So far it has 4 motors for several models AND 4 channels on an sbrick for an overhead crane. ( with more to come) I'd like some suggestions as to how to proceed with the animation/automation. I'd like to use a laptop as a central control point. I understand that sbrick is working with scratch on a pc interface. I have read that a pc running windows can communicate with an EV3 with Bluetooth protocol. Has anyone done any work with any kind of an integrated environment. Ideally I would like to make the EV3 sensor readings available to the pc and then issue commands to either EV3 motors or sbrick motors. The sensor capability of the sbrick is not versatile (at this time) to use a full range of EV3 sensors. Am I "beating a dead horse" with trying to keep the Ev3 + sbrick + pc in the loop or should I do a switch to Ardunio / Raspberry Pi / NanoPC etc? I 'was' an experienced programmer before retiring and am leaning towards a micro solution to get in a single language environment. Any help/comments would be appreciated. If you would rather continue this topic privately, drop me a message. Thanx
  7. "The Pursuit of Perfection" - slogan of the Lexus brand. I'm now back with my greatest Lego creation ever. A 2010 Lexus GX 460 with EV3. It's a replica of my Dad's car, but this one's in gray with black interior. I made it as much as I could to the real car, thanks to pieces from the Arocs and Porsche set. Features Sariel's 4-speed sequential gearbox controlled by a medium motor All-wheel-drive Independent suspension Rack-and-pinion steering Fake V8 engine Six seats (could not fit a seventh one) with the rear four being foldable Opening side doors, trunk door, and hood. Detailed interior The gearbox and the two differentials in the car like to click while moving (especially on rough terrain) around, but the result was a car that was heavy, slow, but also makes lots of torque. I'm very happy with how this car came out and I couldn't have done it without all of the helpful people on the Lego community and EuroBricks. Thanks especially to my good friend TheMindGarage for never making me give up. Now I can officially call myself a true master builder. Check out this build on my EV3 community account too for more photos and information about it. I would love to make a YouTube video soon about the features of the GX EV3 and footage of me taking this build on some dirt trails in a park. I also want to take a picture of this right next to my Dad's actual car. So please follow this post to check out some stuff I might upload in the future! To finish this post, here's some collages with photos of the GX EV3.
  8. Hey Guys! I have been building with Mindstorms for just about 4 years now. To think of that is pretty mind-blowing! So I decided to re-create a video on a creation I built almost 3 years ago: My Lego Mindstorms CUB3. Description: "Built with LEGO MINDSTORMS and Technic components, this creation includes: 2 EV3 Large Motors, 1 EV3 Medium Motor, 1 EV3 InfraRed Sensor, 2 small linear-actuators, a pair of hidden caterpillar tracks, and more! With its insignificantly-looking cubic structure, CUB3 is engineered to look like your ordinary box just lying around. Decoration, anyone? Your neighbors will find out soon enough. Just watch!" Hope you guys enjoy! P.S. - Some of you EB users gave suggestions on my video editing of a previous video. I tried to follow that advice when editing this video. What do you think? Thanks!
  9. Not really, but I found out that the motors in my GX EV3 peform better in IR Control mode than how they do in my program, and I believe that it is because the motor power is different. Each block in the EV3 programming software that moves the motors has a digit for how much power each motor should have. I'm wondering what this digit is in IR Control mode, because the motors act much better in this mode than how the do in the program. If anyone here knows the power of the motors when the EV3 brick is in this mode, please reply as soon as possible. It would be very appreciated.
  10. I'm back with one last issue in my GX EV3 build. I just got done finishing the doors, side panels, rear trunk door, hood, and some part of the roof. But the vehicle was so heavy that when I drove it around, it kept on doing the same thing. The diffs were clicking and the car had very much difficulty moving. Here is a picture of the bottom of the vehicle. Most of the clicking seems to be coming from the rear diff when I move the wheels by hand. I can either do two things. 1. Reinforce the rear diff somehow. 2. Improve it's off-road performance and stop the clicking somewhat by replacing the diffs with knob gears. But this will come at the cost of independent moving between the wheels. What should I do? Please give me the best response you can so the clicking will stop and I could finally take this AWD machine through some rough terrain like a real SUV. I really appreciate any advice.
  11. I looked at the R2D2 instructions on my EV3 home edition software but I don't have all the parts necessary. 2 of the parts I don't have are the infrared sensor and remote infrared beacon. Now I figured that if I am to program a robot that will follow me without these 2 components, I would use the ultrasonic sensor, which I do have as a substitute. But then I would probably also need to use the color sensor and I have no idea how my pale skin color would show up when programming the color sensor(probably black because it doesn't recognize it but I don't know). And how could I get it to climb stairs? I guess I could use the 2 large motors as a source of a pulling force that will pull the whole robot upwards but is there a better way?
  12. For the large candy container warehouse that I am building (click here to read more details), I need three more builds: A candy feeding mechanism. I need a mechanism that feeds one candy at a time to a conveyor belt. Color detection. The color of the candy needs to be determined. Systems that puts the candy into a container. The container can then be conveyed to the warehouse where it can be stored sorted by color. The color as determined in step 2, needs to be passed to the warehouse brick so it can store the container on the right level. Color detection (step 2) I started with step 2. To realize the candy sorter, I needed to know if a Pixycam (see www.charmedlabs.com/default/pixy-lego/) can distinguish the colors of the candy. The colors are not bright (like the Lego bricks), so I wasn't sure if it was possible. I created a quick setup to test the color detection: Next, I placed the four different candies (Fruit-tella) on the conveyor belt and programmed the camera for the four colors. This is the image of the camera, from left to right: (1) raw video, (2) cooked video (= mix of raw video + color detection) and (3) detection only video. Finally, I made a simple test EV3 program. With the addition that the detected block should be more than 20 pixels in width, it detects the candies in the correct color. Candy feeding mechanism Ok, so I have a conveyor belt with a candy on it. But how do I get the candy, one by one, on the conveyor belt. This is where the feeder comes in. I searched the internet for 'real life' solutions. I found out that a rotary feeder or bowl feeder would do best. I tried to make a vibratory bowl feeder (out of 16 circle gear rack elements 24121), but that didn't work. However, rotating the bowl seemed to work so I made a prototype based on rotation and gravity. The bowl is placed at an angle of +/- 20 degrees and then it just rotates in a steady pace. The result was good: it never happened that two candies were fed to the conveyor at the same time. The next step is to make a more solid version and add the color detection unit to it. I'll keep you posted. Enjoy, Hans
  13. Here's something a little different, I needed a sorting machine using Tensorflow, Raspberry Pi and EV3 (with RPyc), so 45544 fit the bill pretty nicely. The project took a couple of weeks to get up and running mostly due to having no exposure to either EV3, Tensorflow or RPyC, but it is definitely achievable with some shoe-horning here and there. Don't hate my LEGO extension to the 45544 sorter too much, it was quick and nasty, the project isn't about the elegance of that side of things, it is more about making an end result that works doing something the EV3 can't on its own. And work it does, it is able to reliably discern 4 image types stuck onto 3D printed tiles (in place of the technics bricks). In the shorter term I will design and 3D print a support structure to hold the Raspberry Pi + camera. That part will be done using driven design workflow in Autodesk Inventor, feeding in known LEGO brick dimensions for quick & easy parts alignment. In the longer term I can see the addition of a vibratory bowl feeder with tiles being recycled after sorting for continuous operation. Right now it is a technology demonstrator that will be used to introduce school children to some modern technology, I should be able to complete a design manual for them to replicate my working design. Check it out if you're at all interested in controlling the EV3 externally to greatly expand its functionality: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSSh9iV70ng
  14. Hello, actually i am working on an small robot, who is able to climb about obstacles.This is the current version.
  15. Yes, this is a giant F1 car. It's around 1.2 metres long and large enough to sit in. The main features: Pedal-driven rear wheels 8-speed sequential transmission shifted via paddles on steering wheel Rear disk brakes activated by button on steering wheel Electronically-controlled limited-slip differential Rack and pinion steering connected to steering wheel Display showing pedal RPM, gear and wheel speed The car uses MINDSTORMS EV3 to operate the functions. It uses one standard EV3 set's worth of electronics plus an additional Large motor. The gearbox is a 4-speed design expanded with a close-ratio 2-speed (ratios 1:1 and 1:1.2) giving 8 speeds in total. A single motor controls it - each gear requires 180 degrees of rotation. Rotating by 90 degrees puts the gearbox in neutral. A Geneva mechanism is used to control the 4-speed - when the 2-speed goes from the high gear to the low gear, the 4-speed is advanced one gear. This is how it shifts from gear 2 to gear 3. In order to reduce the amount of torque handled by the gearbox, it is geared up very highly. This increases friction and reduces efficiency, but there is no shortage of power (I calculated a human’s power output at over 100 EV3 Large motors!). The limiting factor here is how much torque the parts can handle. The disk brakes use a 49mm tyre as the disk and red rubber pads from the EV3 Expansion set. There are two sets of callipers on each wheel (4 pads per wheel in total) giving huge stopping power. A rather complex linkage allows a single input to control both sets of callipers at the same time. An EV3 Large motor pulls on the beam which activates the brakes via a bell-crank linkage. There are two brake motors so the EV3 can operate them independently - this is important for the next step. The differential is very ruggedly-built to prevent gear slippage or parts breaking. An extra small differential measures the speed difference between the two outputs - this goes to a Medium motor used as a rotation sensor. This allows the percentage differential slip to be calculated - if it exceeds a certain limit, the faster wheel is braked slightly (via the disk brakes) to give more torque to the slower one. The clutch ring is manually operated by a switch under the steering wheel- when engaged, it locks the output to zero, making the differential operate as a solid axle. This is a very similar system to the one used on the million-dollar McLaren P1 hypercar. The wheels are made from tank tread links bent backwards into a tight loop. Not sure if this is considered a "legal" solution, but it works very well. The front wheels have 42 links and the rears have 48. The rear wheels have very tight spokes in order to allow them to take the massive weight of the driver. The wheels started gaining camber (tilting) and falling off under load, so I added extra support on the other side of the wheel. The beams are set up to be under tension to push the wheel towards the axle and prevent it from falling off. The rear section uses many layers of beams and frames to make it strong enough to withstand the weight of the driver. Extra diagonal beams (the white ones) are added - they are positioned in a perfect 3:4:5 Pythagorean triple to avoid having them under compression or tension. I used a Warren truss for the central structure - that bit is virtually indestructible. The front section doesn’t look very strong, but the extra vertical beams allow it to withstand plenty of load. The chassis is very sturdy, but with a driver on board, it tends to bend quite a bit and suffers from some serious body roll issues. The steering uses a rack-and-pinion system with just over half a turn from lock-to-lock. This is similar to the steering ratio used on F1 cars. Two large custom-built universal joints are used for the steering shaft. The shaft is reinforced to prevent torsion - even a little twisting would result in inaccurate, floppy steering. The steering wheel is made to look like an F1 wheel. The two rear paddles are for the gears - right for shifting up, left for down. The front left paddle activates neutral gear when held - as soon as it is released, the transmission returns to the last gear selected. The front right paddle activates both brakes simultaneously. Each paddle presses a button on the EV3 infrared remote which is in the middle of the steering wheel. Its signal shines through the turntable and is captured by the IR receiver on the other side. This allows signals from the steering wheel to reach the EV3 brick wirelessly. The paddles have a very short throw and a crisp feel - they’re one of my favourite parts of the car. The car has a full display with features like an RPM bar and wheel speed shown (since the wheels have very little grip and are liable to doing burnouts, actual speed will be quite different). The gear number is also shown. The RPM is measured by a touch sensor and a cam connected to the pedals. The cam bumps the touch sensor every 1/7th turn of the pedals. I initially tried to use a Colour sensor to detect the black chain links against the greys but the difference in reflected light was insufficient for it to be reliable. Strength-wise, the chassis can easily deal with 20kg on the seat. Perhaps it would be ideal for a 6-year-old gearhead. Unfortunately, I'm a lot more than 20kg, so I kind of broke it. Here's the aftermath: Here's a video of me explaining and demonstrating the features of the car. You can also skip to 10:56 to see me try out the car... [All music is composed by me. My F1 V10 impression is not edited in any way!] In the end, I think it was a successful experiment. I intended this MOC to be a testbed for various ideas I had, and you might possibly see a scaled-down version of some of the mechanisms (such as the differential) in a normal-sized car of mine in the future. After all, that's why real-life car manufacturers build concepts and sell low-volume cars at a loss. If it wasn't for that, we wouldn't have the Bugatti Veyron, Pagani Zonda R, Lexus LFA and other amazing machines.
  16. Hello All Sorry if this question was already raised! As you all know Lego Rechargeable Battery for ev3 is expensive. May I ask you if anyone tried to use 6 Li-Po 1.5v rechargeable batteries there instead of regular lithium Batteries? Ni-MH are all 1.2v , and will not work as needed but maybe 1.5 li-po would be Ok ? Brand, let say : ZNTER They can be found on ebay for $40 for 6 batteries ... http://www.ebay.com/itm/6pcs-ZNTER-1-5V-AAA-400mAh-LiPo-rechargeable-lithium-battery-USB-charging-line-/272099707530?hash=item3f5a680a8a:g:RQ8AAOSwX~dWkQt- or http://www.bestbuy.com/site/eco-cell-usb-cell-rechargeable-aa-batteries-4-pack-white-green/4471800.p?skuId=4471800 Thank you !!!
  17. Hi, I am trying to model a leg, with a knee and ankle joint, as can be seen in the image with the two motors at the joints. I intend for it to stand up by itself based on the accelerometer reading. However, I don't think the design is very good and would put too much exertion on the motors. I believe a better alternative would be to use worm gears, which I do actually have at the top of the picture to manually change the angle of the accelerometer. So I would like to replace the motor system with a worm gear turned by the motor. However, this is also going to require gears to turn the direction of rotation by 90 degrees. Can anyone suggest the best and most robust way to do this? It would be great if you could let me know what parts would be required for the perpendicular gearage, and the work gearage. I have three Lego EV3 Mindstorms sets.
  18. As part of our fully automated train layout (see more at our blog here: siouxnetontrack.wordpress.com), I have started to build a fully automated container warehouse. The warehouse should be able to store a large number of candy containers. I want to build four rows with shelves to store the containers, served by two robots that can store and retrieve the containers. The first thing I needed is to build the vertical lift for the stacker crane. I looked at other builds and found out that there are three possible mechanisms to create the vertical movement: Gears climbing a toothed bar (element 3743), a nice example can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GToA2tOVyHg Cables pulling the lift up, an example can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCNwQVjXz60 Chain links, an example that uses the small elements 3711 can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQIAAb8x8MI And as you may have guessed, I have tried something different. I use the worm gears (element 4716) to get the vertical movement, this is the first test setup: If you stack the elements 4716 on top of each other, they should be aligned correctly to create one, long worm gear. I just finished a first prototype of the stacker crane. The crane has two forks, in order to store or retrieve a container from either the left row or the right row. The lift can move up and down, the (horizontal) movement along the row needs to be build. One EV3 M motor is used to move the forks either to the left or to the right. It uses a color sensor to determine the middle position. One EV3 L motor is used for the vertical movement. A touch sensor is used to detect the bottom position. Watch the video to see a demo: More details will be added later. Enjoy watching and please let me know what you think. Hans
  19. Play TicTacToe against this LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot. It uses three motors to drop its balls into the right field and a NXTCam to view the board. It then calculates the best move using a MiniMax Algorithm. All future moves are explored and rated according to their winning chances. An IR sensor detects your hand when you drop your ball. The robot is using red balls and the human player uses blue balls. The java code is available at Github and the building instructions are available for LEGO Digital Designer on my website show in the description. I used the MinuteBot baseplate, which is useful for building static Mindstorms models. I also used a LED lamp to provide consistent lighting that is powered through the USB port of the EV3. The position of the camera can be centered on the board using the wrench and through sliding along the axles. I hope you enjoy this robot. More information at http://www.bartneck.de/2017/07/17/tictactoe-playing-lego-mindstorms-robot-using-computer-vision/
  20. The last nights were short but here is the result: The second prototype for a sand table. A sand sculpture based on #LEGO #MindstormsI will keep you up-to-date on the further development :-)#Mindstormsmagic
  21. I'm programming my EV3 vehicle to be operated by an IR beacon remote. I've successfully got the car to be able to move, but I'm stuck on something else. My vehicle has a 4-speed transmission, and a medium motor shifts the gears. I used the remote's topmost button (the one that turns on the green light on the remote) for shifting the gearbox. But when I press it, something goes off. It's really hard to say, but what I know is that the topmost button isn't acting like a normal button. So the motor keeps on moving until the IR sensor realizes the green light is off. I really need help with the program because I just want the topmost button to act like a normal button so I can press it to make the medium motor shift one gear with a one second wait before shifting to the next one. I would love a very helpful response from someone that knows how to program the IR remote and if there is no way to get the topmost button to get the result I want, an alternative would be nice so I can be able to shift gears with the push of a button on the remote.
  22. I wanted to tell you about this new (and cool if I may say) program that is being developed by a company with more than 30 years of experience in robotics for education called Intelitek. This program, called CoderZ, is all about teaching kids STEM through robotics and programming. This program enables an entire team to have a robot for each participant/member. How? Well, CoderZ is a fully operational robot simulator. Right now, Intelitek is giving FLL teams a free trial that lasts until the end of June, this is a great opportunity for all teams to hone their developing skills for next year’s challenge. You can easily register and start using CoderZ by clicking here: bit.ly/2pq0LnA Feel free to share your thoughts with the CoderZ team after registering and trying it out at http://gocoderz.com/.
  23. When I was building the Robot Arm (see my mail thread here), I stumbled upon the ABB robot flex picker (also known as a delta robot). I was amazed about the simple construction and how fast it can work. Although I am definitely not making the first one of Lego, I wanted to build my own version of it. In this thread you can follow the work in progress. I have now build the base and the three arms that will support the grabber. The grabber will be able to pick up the candy containers and move them to a different location. Don't know yet what its place will be on the layout, but I am confident that it will have its use. Photos can be found at Flickr, click on the picture below to see some more pics and an animated gif. Please let me know that you think of it. Enjoy, Hans
  24. Hi! Meet our new fully automated, themed roller coaster
  25. I said before in my previous post that I had some problems with my GX EV3 4x4 chassis that I needed to fix. Once again, it's more gear grinding/clicking, but this time it's only in the front and rear differential gears. The grinding occurs whenever the chassis tries to drive into a wall or when it tries to drive in different conditions (because as an SUV it should drive smoothly in dirt or uneven terrain). What also annoys me is that when I push the car, instead of letting the motors move, the differentials make clicking noises that, like I said before, sound like a machine gun. I really need help so I can stop the differentials from clicking so when the car tries to drive into the walls, the motors won't still move while the differentials click, and so the car can be a lot more versatile on uneven terrain (such as what I used for testing, blankets) without the differentials causing a problem when the car moves. Here's some pictures of the bottom of the chassis.