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Found 219 results

  1. Hi everyone, I'm Shah, and I like making models using just one Mindstorms kit. As I create new builds I'll add them to this post. Would like to share my latest MOC, a steamboat loosely based on Steamboat Willie. STEAMBOAT WILLI3 by Ahmad Sahar, on Flickr STEAMBOAT WILLI3 by Ahmad Sahar, on Flickr STEAMBOAT WILLI3 by Ahmad Sahar, on Flickr Short video clip and building instructions here. Hope you like it.
  2. The silicone buttons piece on my MicroScout from 9478 Droid Developer Kit has suffered tearing on two of the buttons, making it so pushing them takes poking a toothpick or similar inside. Does anyone have advice on repairing the piece, or where I might get a replacement? I tried calling Lego, no luck there.
  3. im finally done with my tank moc! i hope you like it if possible like and share it on insta & facebook (links below) it comes with a detachable trailer and a 3DOF arm thanks @thealvacado for the arm I've improved the bracing of the 8 tooth to the 40 tooth gears as they were constantly popping out also changed positioning of some things there is a 4 pin connector on the end so that its much easier to change the attachment on the end I hope you like it :) spent quite a while making this https://www.instagram.com/p/CdnoQmspEut/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet https://www.facebook.com/544771685/posts/pfbid032Jr1QQfEXsTZbEqxBUDAR7LWMGfGzE9wpor93kkCivLbZfqt3ujtvHVqyUvEDkpzl/?d=n https://youtu.be/5j2kXYvjlAM https://youtube.com/shorts/PzlFRePGSP4?feature=share https://youtu.be/X7KmZLrbvlw https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjzQeX3
  4. Connection Lego and Fischertechnik. By combining both systems we can enjoy their advantages. The data and command exchange occurs on 2 levels. There is a serial duplex connection via the hubE and the DE0-Nano_Soc board. On the other hand, the data lines of the other hubs are also read by the board. The latter can thereby process data in real time and without interaction of the running software. This data can mainly be used by the TXT Controller to display the results on the PC screen. Motor speed, position, sensor color information, distance information and pressure can all be read out. From the Lego side there is no need to write a program. The DE0 board simply listens in real time. The DE0 board responds very quickly ( only a few usec). The connection is via 115200 baud but can be much faster if needed. I now need to work out some protocols to build a large application. Lego-Fischertechnik by Frans, on Flickr With the DE0 board, I have up to 120 inputs available. I can now use those to send to the lego hub and process them there. Commands can also be sent from the lego hub to the DE0 board and so on to the FT Controller. The possibilities are immense. I hope to present a larger project a little later. On the Fischertechnik side, I have a lot of outputs. Now I can already connect 16 motors, 16 servos, various digital outputs, etc. Frans
  5. Very Excited about getting one of these, have been holding off for about 6 months to see when the next generation might come out. Snake robot sounds cool, depth perception will make for some interesting robots. EV3 Retail version EV3 Educational version Check out the Mindstorms Index here on Eurobricks for useful information: Eurobricks Mindstorms Index
  6. Hi all, Just want to share with you a RI5 creation that I have been working on for a few weeks. It is a biped robot built with 5 control+ motor and the Robot Inventor hub. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfAfLVE8jtw The next step is to build the same bot using Control+ and hopefully by the time the build is done I will be able to program it using the new PoweredUp App. Enjoy!
  7. Allow me to finally introduce a project that has been a source of many sleepless nights, frighteningly advanced hair loss, and multiple failures since 2016: Moving Minifig Machine Like GBC, "MMM" consists of modules. The module in this thread is a Mindstorms-powered fun fair ride where the minifigs move in, jump, and then leave. See the short introduction here: The idea was born at a LEGO event. The audience always loves GBC, but most builders prefer to build city layouts. MMM is an attempt at combining the movement from GBC with minifig-scaled buildings. Modules are based on raised base plates. This allows for the conveyors and mechanical components (such as a Mindstorms NXT as seen in this module). The front wall allows the builder to showcase the name of the module. It can also be left blank as seen in the adjacent modules, or you can tape printouts onto them with some interesting information of the modules. See building instructions for standard modules here: https://brickhub.org/i/themes.php?theme=MMM The design of this module is based on the classic game Theme Park by Bullfrog which was released in 1994. The "graphics" of the modules I have built are form the 1995 port to the Playstation. This screenshot is from the DOS version: You can see a very fancy version of the in-game model in the cut scene at 8:17 of this video: The module uses a single L-motor for the two tracks. It uses a mechanical "diode" to make the outer track go in a single direction, while the other can change direction. I show it in detail in this update: An NXT motor is used to raise and lower the jumping pillow, while the walls move in and out. Finally, an M-motor is hidden in the "pillow" to move the tracks on it that connect with the outer track at an angle which allows for entry and exit that works fairly reliably. You can see me testing it in this video: I have tried a variety of designs for the pillow which would allow it to be built in red. Designs include rolling cylinders and free-spinning wheels. All of these attempts failed horribly, and I decided on compromising with a gray pillow. I know it is not much, but I hope that you can see the idea behind this. The project might fail - it has done so many times - but I also think it has potential. I have more modules planned and hope that you will enjoy the presentation of them. And if you think that I'm exaggerating when I say 2016, I must begrudgingly say that it is true. Here is an unlisted video of the layout as it were in 2016. The modules have since then been redesigned:
  8. The last years, we have used a NXT brick for controlling the train. For Lego World 2017, we want to use EV3 bricks only. Since the RFID sensor is not supported anymore, we needed another way to determine the train location. I have build a proof of concept of a loco: Wheels are directly connected to a EV3 medium motor Location detection based on a color sensor (the combination of yellow, red and green makes a unique pattern) And it works fine! A video of this proof of concept: Of course, the train needs a bit (... ) of restyling ;-) Enjoy, Hans
  9. So I was working on a simple rc program on my computer today with my new 51515 set and was trying to make it rc using the keyboard (up arrow=forward down arrow=reverse left arrow=left right arrow=right) But it is hard because there is no "when no key pressed" block to my knowledge. The robot I am using is THIS. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  10. Hi all, My first post here. Just in case anyone wants to have a game of air hockey with their brick you can find a demo and build instruction at the following link. Have fun and looking forward to your feedback (build instruction and code is at the end of the video). /CheungsLegoCreation
  11. Does anyone know of an app or application that works with the old ev3 Mindstorms and technic power functions?
  12. One of my NXT servos is exhibiting some odd behavior. I had to replace a servo for a different reason and this might be the replacement, but I'm not entirely sure as I didn't mark it as such. In any case, I'm curious if anyone else has seen this and knows the cause. With two servos that act as expected, I can place a single Move block in the program and use any of the duration settings and both servos will run and stop when programmed or run continuously if "Unlimited" is selected. However, when one servo is replaced with the misbehaving one, regardless of the duration setting, the latter servo will run continuously and the good servo will twitch as if it's about to run, but stops immediately. I have to end the program to get the "bad" servo to stop. If I place the Move block inside a Loop set to "Forever," the above behavior will be identical except for one scenario. If I set the Move block duration to "Unlimited," both servos will run and can be controlled by the Loop's "Control" setting, i.e. they will either run continuously or run and stop as set by the loop control setting. Simply using individual "Motor" blocks to control the servos does not solve the problem. There are good and bad programming scenarios with those as well with regard to the bad servo. The best guess I can come up with is that the bad servo is either not sending or not receiving a feedback signal, maybe both. I did wonder, though, if these servos have any firmware in them that might behave differently depending on when they were made. This isn't a fatal flaw as I can use the servo, but I am curious what might be going on. Thanks, Paul
  13. A small project has been to try to use the Spike Prime acceleration data and Newton’s Laws of Motion to calculate distance moved by a vehicle. The upshot of working through this has been: . that the Lego documentation is woefully lacking. ..it is not at all clear what the units are although given the the z acceleration is of the order of 989 I imagine that to be gravity in cm/s/s. . even though the hub is at rest it reports small accelerations on x and y. . applying the code ... integrating acceleration over time... the results are inconsistent even at standstill.... more so under movement. It is possible that there is a coding error but unlikely (famous last words!) So.... any ideas gratefully received! Thanks
  14. So I bought an rcx 2.0 and have some power functions extension cables that can also convert between PF and 9v. If I would connect PF to an rcx would it work?
  15. Hello, First topic post here. =) So I've built a 6DoF robot arm with a motorized end effector and have so far only done the basic programming of the joint movements using python (ev3dev). I have looked at implementations of reverse kinematics and RRT path planning on other robot platforms and would like to implement it for my arm. Anyone on here has done it before and would like to share how they've done it? Looking for collaborators on the programming side if there is any interest. Here's the link to my very basic code so far: https://github.com/ninoguba/ev3-robotic-arm Thanks, Nino
  16. I have for a while wondered about using robotic components to automate/control the Lego Rough Terrain Crane ... this has now happened using the Mindstorms Robot Inventor hub with 5 medium stepper motors and a distance sensor ....while keeping the original power functions large motor to avoid further destruction of the original model. One motor switches turntable rotation, another switches the drive from turntable to jib while a third switches power to the original motor. Two further motors switch the six way gear selector for hook and jib. the distance sensor is used to limit turntable rotation to accommodate the relatively short cable lengths. The resulting construction works well.... the crane can both remote controlled and programmed. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/82vqyjvd2zledp0/AAA736uPmlzo9hL-sIWdGS8la?dl=0
  17. I have read all sorts of complaints about Robot Inventor and by inference Spike Prime. Some are valid (eg poor documentation)... some are less so (eg colour scheme). One thing seems clear is that the hardware is well thought out (yes there are issues with cables). Now in robotics three elements stand out as being super important: being able to use multiple motors (motors are basic building blocks), multiple sensors plus having the computational brain (and software) to hold it all together. Unfortunately Lego only provide 6 ports on each hub and have 2 versions of software both of which initially appear limiting. Whereas wireless Inter-hub communication could be very helpful enabling models to use multiple hubs and access both software platforms this is not something that Lego have explicitly provided at the moment. There is however a very simple and seemingly reliable work around available immediately that could help in cases where high speed comms and high data volumes are less important. This is to use optical communication. The idea which I have tested is to use the distance sensor to signal light flashes to the colour sensor. The number of flashes in a fixed time frame thus delivers information from Transmitter to Receiver. As expected using downloaded compiled code speeds the process up though not massively. This process could be 2 way, could enable daisy chaining of hubs and could be expanded to longer instructions (again high speed not being a limitation). On the downside the process sacrifices at least one port on each of a pair of hubs (if the requirement is for one way communication between the pair). The sensors need to be carefully and firmly positioned for reliability although there is no other requirement for any connection between them. In this context a model containing the one hub could “launch” the second. As SP and RI software can be easily swapped on any hub the user has the choice of using SP/SP or SP/RI or RI/RI platforms. Unfortunately size limitations prevent me from uploading images of the set up and demo code at the moment.
  18. This is my first creation with the Robot Inventor set, 51515-1 , created in stud.io using LDraw parts as custom parts. I hope you like it and it inspires you to build. The PDF building instructions and part list are available at Rebrickable for free. I haven't build it myself because I do not own the set, but greg10 did and posted a photo. In LEGO Studio the motor cables are not available so; I recommend to use the 49283 Wire Clip with Axle Hole (also available in the set) to manage them so that they will not end up in the wheels.
  19. I did program something with two "own Blocks" wich work together, but for that I need to check if the text entered in the text parameter of the first block matches the one of the second block. Basically I need to know how to check if "Text variable one" matches "Text variable two". Please comment if you know how to do that, or if you have any good alternatives, currently I use numbers, but that's hard to keep track off. Edit: I program in Mindstorms Ev3 with the Ev3 brick
  20. For delivering the candies to the visitors, we use four lockers. The ticket you have received at the beginning, is used to open the locker containing your own candy. The current version uses an iris-like mechanism, you can see it in the picture (click on it to see it on Youtube in action): I am planning to upgrade the lockers to a new door mechanism, the so called torggler doors. It is named after its inventor Klemens Torggler. Below you find a Youtube video containing the first proof of concept. The mechanism will be improved in the coming weeks. Stay tuned! Enjoy, Hans
  21. Dear All, LEGO lasts forever – assuming “forever” is exceeding 6 decades – which surely will happen (or has happened already?). I still have bricks from 1965 (my first LEGO set was #323 – a push along steam train running on rubber tires …) – that still have very good clutch, colors only very little faded – and seamlessly fit into 2017 sets. Almost as long as I live, LEGO has been part of my life. True, there were dark ages from the late 1970’s to 1996 – but then it instantly came back – everything: The excitement about a new model, just another LEGO box, new bricks, colors … and it never disappeared since then, in contrast. 1998 was the ultimate rush back into the LEGO world: The Mindstorms RIS system – the RCX (at that time without the “1.0” extension) – it blew my mind. And since then a somewhat larger collection of all themes has assembled over the past 20 years. Building over multiple themes is my brick-philosophy. During my dark ages computer technology became my favorite hobby. The “IBM PC” was lightyears out of reach but other miracle machines came up: The C64, the Sinclair ZX81 – and that one was within reach of my limited budget! 1 kByte of memory and a 16 kByte dynamic RAM extension I built myself. “Tri state TTL bidirectional bus drivers”, the 74LS243 – and no internet, that remained to be invented. And it went on – the ZX Spectrum with 16 kByte of on-board memory got a 64 kByte memory “upgrade” – switchable in two banks. It was fun. Today, TTL chips are fading out and 64 kByte would result in the worst digital “photo” ever … I am not whining – so many wonderful new things have emerged! What really shocked me though was when TLG did not even think about making a 64 bit driver for the “perfect” Mindstorms USB IR/VLL tower. That beautiful communication hub for all RCX1.0, 1.5, 2.0, Scout, Spybotics, MicroScout, CodePilot bricks one is truly dead since 64 bit operating systems have taken over. At least this is what I have learned from the internet after years of searching. The next shock came around 2002, when .NET came up and Microsoft said “no more VB6 development at all”. VB.NET was so different from what I knew. In the following years I stuck to VB6 … my fault, sure. But I am moving slowly as time for LEGO is rather limited. XP vanished, 32 bit OS came out of fashion – and all that cool stuff – the Mindstorms software, the NXT software, NQC for RCX, RobotC for RCX … and all my VB6 programs – almost “gone”. Well, I kept of course my Dell Latitude E6500 laptop running WinXP SP3 with all that stuff installed and I still have it! Carefully backed-up everything and there it is, slowly aging. I hardly like to play with that thing – I don’t want that it gives up, which will eventually happen of course. Yes I know: “Install XP within a virtual machine” – but that did not work to the extent I would like to use a “LEGO programming and playing workspace”. The one thing that changed everything were internet rumors about the old Mindstorms RS232 tower working well with NQC/BricxCC on a 64 bit Win7 machine. So for the past couple of days between Christmas and New Year’s I was browsing the net, installing this and that, copying stuff from my old XP machine … and: BINGO. It all works! Everything works on my rather new DELL Precision 7510 with Win10 Professional as OS. All the old-back-from-the-late-1990’s stuff! OK, I know, not everybody will be as excited as I am. But I believe LEGO lasts forever – and now all the software I love so much, as well as all my old-fashioned programmable bricks (there are currently 9 RCX1.0, 6 Scouts, 10 MicroScouts, and 1 NXT PBricks doing work on my train layout) are directly accessible from this laptop, and they are programmed/operated using NQC/BricxCC, NXC, NXT-G, RobotC, the Mindstorms SDK 2.5, and most importantly VB6 SP6 programs – all natively running on a Win10 64 bit platform. A dream came true. And for all old or old-fashioned Mindstorms PBrick heads, for all who never managed to get their head around .NET stuff, for all who still believe that RCX’ and Scouts are miracle thing: Here is how I got it to work: Assemble some software from the internet: BricxCC (free, latest version from 2011) The Mindstorms Software Developers Kit (SDK) 2.5 (free on Philo’s homepage) RobotC for RCX 2.03 (which is free as well). Don’t download the 32 bit tower driver. It won’t work. The NXT 64 bit driver from TLG VB6 SP6 from Microsoft VB6 cumulative update for SP6 from Microsoft Get out the original CDs for: VB6 (SP5 or higher) The NXT-G 2.0 software suite – if that is not at hand, TLG’s Mindstorms website has it Assemble some required hardware The Mindstorms RS232 tower. They came in 1998 with the original RIS system – and they are widely available at BrickLink for about $5. Don’t forget to put a fresh 9V battery into the battery compartment on the back. Slide the range knob on the front to the left (short range). An USB2RS232 converter – I tried a (randomly picked) LogiLink converter, which works just fine. A PBrick of type RCX, RCX1.5, RCX2.0, Scout, or Spybotics. The next steps are for proper tower access: Plugin the USB2RS232 converter into the computer and let it find and install the driver (either shipped with the converter or on the internet). Open device manager (Windows key + X, select “Device Manager”), expand the “Ports (COM and LPT)” section, find the “USB Serial Port (COM X)” entry, double click it, choose “Port settings” then “Advanced” and make sure the COM port for this device is in the range between 1 and 8. Otherwise BricxCC and other old programs will not find the USB/RS232 converter = IR tower! It cost me some time to figure that out. When all COM ports in this range are taken by other devices, move one of them to the next free COM port far up and then manually (modern hard/software has no issue using COM ports in the range exceeding COM 8!) assign the converter to the now free COM port in the 1 – 8 range. Plugin the IR tower cable into the USB2RS232 converter. Next is getting access to RCX, RCX2, Scout, and Spybotics PBricks via BricxCC – this will also let you download the latest RCX firmware is case it is “gone”: Install BricxCC (full install) – this comes with NQC and many more things, e.g., the RCX firmware downloader. Put a PBrick from the list above into the IR tower range, a couple of inches away. Start-up BricxCC – it will try to connect to an RCX PBrick and most probably fail (“Cannot find brick. Switch it on or move it closer and press OK”). Press “Cancel”. Select “Tools” in the menu, go to “Find brick” and in the window that opens, select the correct COM port manually. Also select the correct PBrick. An RCX, RCX1.5, or RCX2 without firmware will correctly reply to the “RCX-type” in this window. The LED in the tower should come on and the program should connect to the PBrick, which is shown by many of the menu icons now being enabled. Download firmware to the PBrick (RCX, RCX1.5, RCX2) and that is done. Next is RobotC – this very straight forward: Install the software and run it. Select menu entry “Robot” and then “Platform type”. This should be “LEGO Mindstorms RCX”. Select menu entry “View”, then “Preferences”, then “RCX communications port” and select the COM port you have the USB to serial converter on. Download the required RobotC RCX firmware – and done. Next ist NXT-G – again very straight forward: Install the NXT-G software. Install the 64 bit NXT driver – done. Finally VB 6 – this is a little more elaborate: Install the Mindstorms SDK 2.5 – this will register one essential DLL correctly (vpbcom.dll). I don’t know how many times I tried that manually – I am too old I guess. Don’t install any USB tower software – it won’t work. You can test a PBrick connection using the “ScriptEd” program – upon starting it, the IR Tower LED should come on. This program also lets you download firmware or monitor the IR tower. Very handy for checking things. Install VB 6 from the CD. Now the trick here is that a full default install won’t work. Follow the instructions of this youtube video. There are many others, but this worked for me. I did the install directly from the “VB6 Professional CD” I still had (the video assumes you have an enterprise version but that makes no difference). The single most important point is to uncheck either the entire “Data Access” check box during the preparation steps for the installation or select “Data Access”, click “Change Options” and uncheck the “ADO, RDS, OLE DB Data providers” entry. The let the install program do what it has to do and be patient at the end, when it attempts to register all sorts of things. That may take several minutes, at least on my machine. I had a cup of coffee, did some other things and when I came back, it successfully finished the install. Install VB6 SP6 in case it is not already on the CD. Install the cumulative patch for VB6 SP6 in case it is not already on the CD. Right click on the new VB6 icon in the start menu, go to “Properties” and select “Run in XP SP3 compatibility mode”. Run VB6. Open or start a new project, then select “Project”, “References” and then tick the “LEGO VPBrick 2.1 Type Library” – and access to the above PBricks is established! The Mindstorms SDK has a PDF explaining the calls to the routines you need for that (e.g. ”FindPort” or “OpenPort”. This is it. At least on my computer. There may some other things to do on other machines, but it really appears to be doable. Just in case you want to program with VB6 “forever” or more importantly run all of TLG’s miracle PBricks from the latest Microsoft OS … as I do. And Yes I know, neither Microsoft nor any decent programmer will endorse this, in contrast. But then: It wasn’t my fault that TLG never published a 64bit driver for the Mindstorms USB tower. Nor did Microsoft ask me whether or not it would be OK to abandon VB6. All the best Thorsten
  22. Did you know that any standard EV3 brick is capable of controlling the LEDS separately? And that the display is capable of displaying 4 shades of gray? No, this extra functionality is not available via the standard programming environment that Lego provides. But if you use low level programming (I used EV3DEV in combination with C++), you have. See the example below. You can read my article at our blog here: https://siouxnetontrack.wordpress.com/2020/04/25/lego-mindstorms-ev3-with-an-image-with-4-different-shades-of-gray/ Or have a look at the Youtube videos. Enjoy. Hans
  23. This lego GBC module uses the lego Mindstorms EV3 to power the module. It uses a robot arm style mechanism to lift the balls from the previous GBC module to the next one. It is quite reliable and has had almost no issues while I have been testing it. It is quite simple and small for a mindstorms GBC module but it is the first thing that I have ever made and programmed with it. (Do you recommend using the EV3 programming app or Python? I know Python quite well but have not tried using it for mindstorms before) I think it turned out ok for my first MOC using mindstorms, hope to make the next one much more interesting :) Instructions. Photos on Flicker.
  24. Motorized model of a crawler crane with Mindstorms EV3. Features driven tracks, and superstructure functions controlled by an automated distribution gearbox. Functions/features: Driven tracks Boom elevation Boom extension Winch Superstructure rotation Ever since TLG released the rotary catch pieces from the Bugatti set I sought to incorporate it in a distribution gearbox so that I could control 4 functions with 2 motors. However, I did not want the play experience to be constantly interrupted by shifting the gearbox. For instance, if I used PF and installed a stepper mechanism to control the gearbox, I'd constantly have to count how many "shifts" I've done to ensure the right function is engaged. With that in mind, I realized Mindstorms EV3 is the perfect solution to this - by simply utilizing a touch sensor, the mechanism can detect how far the shifting motor has rotated thus automatically selecting the right function. The gearbox, which sits at the heart of the superstructure, features a cam attached to the shifting motor to hit a touch sensor. When a command is received from the remote, the shifting motor rotates until the touch sensor is pressed, then the EV3 tells the shifting motor to rotate a certain number of degrees to select the corresponding function. This utilizes a switch/case for the remote, and because it features up to 11 button combinations all superstructure functions are controlled from the same channel (channel 2 on the remote). This gives controlling the model a very natural feel, and sometimes I even forgot that I was controlling a distribution gearbox because the EV3 shifts it so seamlessly. As for driving, it too uses a switch/case for the remote. Because it's just a simple tank drive, the commands for this are much more straightforward compared to the gearbox functions. Driving is controlled from channel 1 on the remote. Additionally, there are sound effects that play while operating the crane. Pressing the left two buttons together in the 1st channel starts the engine (thus starting the program), and pressing the right two together stops it (thus ending the program). Because the PF IR remote uses levers instead of buttons, this effectively makes the model inoperable with only a PF remote. The EV3 remote feels more natural for controlling this model too, as some superstructure functions (boom elevation and superstructure rotation) involves pressing two buttons simultaneously. In the end, I'm pretty satisfied with how this model turned out. I was initially worried that this gearbox I had in mind won't work as smoothly as I imagined, but it turned out to work flawlessly. It often made me forget that I was even controlling a gearbox as the EV3 does the shifting for me. Of course, there's still areas that could be improved - for instance, the boom extension and winch operate pretty slowly. Not using a worm gear in those mechanisms probably would've helped, but that would mean the mechanism becomes "unlocked" as soon as the gearbox disengages it. Occasionally the gearbox would jam, making me restart the program, but overall the finished model met my expectations. Video: Photos: