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Found 3 results

  1. So this was a quick, fun project. I gave myself the weekend to build the smallest RC car I could. My goal was 4 studs. This seemed reasonable since a battery box and SBrick are both 4 studs wide. With the width set in place, I quickly realized that making two connected parts would be the way to go so the model naturally became a camper van/RV with a trailer. The main car holds 2 micromotors and the trailer has 1 old-style battery box with the SBrick directly on top. More photo's here. Assembly photos are here. PS: I must also thank Mbmc as some of his micro RC MOCs were a good inspiration for this project.
  2. Greetings, Train Tech. It's been about a year since CommanderWolf and I built the GE boxcabs, so here's another "boxcab": ... "glass box", that is. These locomotives were originally built for the Royal Bavarian State Railways with the designation "PtL 2/2". The unusual design featured a semi-automatic coal feed system, which did away with the fireman and allowed single-person operation. The boiler was surrounded by a cab with many windows, leading to the nickname of Glaskasten ("glass box"). During nationalization they were lumped into class 98 ("branch line locomotives"). Some survived the war to join the Deutsche Bundesbahn, which is the livery I've chosen to model here. This is another model with a large amount of SNOT-work; there are studs pointing in all directions. The frame is built studs-forward, the body features studs facing left/right for the doors and sides, and the side windows are upside down. Did I mention it's powered? The entire thing is powered by a micromotor driving the front axle: Note that the jackshaft doesn't actually extend through the locomotive; the 2x2 round plates on either side are carried along by the connecting rod between the front and rear axle. I used this technique to try to give extra grip to the BBB medium wheels. The battery box is in the cab. The smokebox comes off for access to the power switch: Here it is with the two-axle passenger car I posted a couple months ago. This loco struggles a lot more in turns than the 23-ton boxcabs did... Brickshelf gallery here (pending moderation). Thanks for reading!
  3. After the last boxcab, Commander Wolf and I figured we had to go smaller. And slower. So we decided that both of us should build a motorized model of a GE 23-ton boxcab. We agreed to build them models independently, then meet up and compare approaches. We started with the same scaling image: Since there was some variation among the prototypes, choice of details was a matter of taste. I took most of my references from here. Here's my finished model: The original locomotive is really tiny, so I tried to keep the model about 7 studs wide. There's a lot of SNOT in this model: The main chassis is upside-down, the deckplate and frames are held against that using Technic pins, and the body attaches to some jumpers on the deckplate: The battery box is mounted sideways in the body and the power switch is reached by jabbing an antenna through the window. The roof is actually only held on by gravity: Originally I wasn't sure if I was going to put the caution-stripe tiles on the frames, but codefox421 vouched for them. You can see the full Brickshelf gallery here. So, what did Commander Wolf do? Read on...