Phoxtane

Eurobricks Knights
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About Phoxtane

  • Birthday 05/06/1996

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    Male
  • Location
    Maryland

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    USA

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  1. Phoxtane

    Help with identifying parts/sets!

    I can't tell if these 1x1 cheese slopes are real Lego or not. They don't have Lego molded into the underside, but I think all cheese slopes are like that - too small for it I guess. I can't really check because I'm packing the apartment up for a move. The tell-tale here that made me suspicious is the texture - I'm not aware of any cheese slopes that have the slightly rough texture you'd see (for example) on a 2x2x1 45 degree slope! It's tough to get a shot of this texture and my best result is below:
  2. Phoxtane

    Help with identifying parts/sets!

    Neither part has LEGO written on it anywhere, but I do know that smaller parts don’t have a part number. Though, these parts are much bigger than the typical unmarked LEGO piece. I agree that they’re almost certainly not LEGO!
  3. Phoxtane

    Help with identifying parts/sets!

    Found this in my cousin's collection that he didn't want anymore after going off to college. Is it actually a Lego part? Plastic feels a bit "softer" than Lego, but is still quite hard. Color is close to a pale yellow with a hint of green, not lime green like the pictures suggest. EDIT: Here's another weird one - found this in the "yellow" bag: It's a pretty solid match for the Lego yellow, but I haven't been able to find anything that looks like that in a quick search on Rebrickable and Bricklink.
  4. One of my Lego traditions is that I save the instructions from every set I get (if I get multiples, I keep one copy). I've been keeping them in a large red plastic tub from the old set #5482 Ultimate House Building Set. Unfortunately, that tub is very full and very heavy. I spend little to no time what amounts to the opposite end of the Lego product spectrum from modular buildings and such, so if I want to get my hands on another similarly-sized plastic tub, what set should I buy? Thanks for the help.
  5. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    My reasoning for not doing this - at least not immediately - is that I don’t have a PU L-motor. I did take delivery of the green PU cargo train last week though, so I do have the hub. Also, it seems you’ve already built some of the functionality I had planned for a project of my own that keeps getting pushed back - a sensor package built into a LEGO train to do, among other interesting things, exactly that (except using accelerometer data).
  6. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    Mine finally arrived today! I love the look and the size, it feels just right. I’m thinking that it would be awesome to build one in dark green, or even dark blue or dark red if the parts availability exists. I’m probably going to end up doing the gap-closing mods as well as converting it to Power Functions.
  7. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    My Crocodile locomotive showed up today, I'm so excited to have it built and on display! I took advantage of a seller briefly dropping the price on a copy of 60198 to dip my toes into the water of Powered Up. I'm planning on stocking up on Power Functions equipment because I'm not convinced that PU is a full replacement for PF yet (and the prices just get more ridiculous...), but I've got some interesting ideas about what I can do with custom circuit boards and Bluetooth. I figure I stand a better chance at making something usable than the last time I looked at custom electronics and Lego three years ago. The Crocodile locomotive was designed with PU in mind, so it'll be a good testbed for playing with PU.
  8. If there were more details they've been lost to time. I've graduated and gotten a job since this post was made. You're looking for 9-gram servos - for this job, literally any cheap servos will do, since all they have to do is move a little bit and not fight against the airflow on a model airplane wing (their original intended application). In addition to the color improvements I (apparently) suggested in the original post, it may be possible to dye the insulation black on the servo cable so as to get rid of the yellow-red-brown colors. If you're going to use an Arduino, I would recommend getting some sort of servo breakout board with a separate power supply. Anything more than a few LEDs being powered directly by the microcontroller is likely to cause brownouts and resets, both of which mean your project won't work as intended. I didn't bring this project any further along because I didn't (and still don't) have a space for a permanent layout. Check back in another three years, I might own my own place with a dedicated Lego room by then. Were I to do it again today, I'd build up my own custom control board dedicated to controlling the servos and allow for serial communications to the outside world for integration with any other automation I would want to add. I'm not immediately sure how I'd handle the overall architecture, but it'd probably have to be a (relatively) low gauge wire running in a power bus around the layout with each servo tapping power from the bus, while the PWM signals travel to and from the controller directly. This prevents any issue with a high-current device (servo) trying to draw too much power through a tiny wire and yanking the voltage too low by accident.
  9. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    Mine is also on the 60-day backorder. It'll be a nice treat in August when I've forgotten about it. One down, four to go!
  10. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    Is it known what, if any, unique parts there are to this set? I guess we could argue that the sticker sheet (if there's more than just the one for the display plaque) could be considered "a part". Also, we have printed parts unique to that set... I guess what I mean is: aside from parts with printed designs on them, and stickers, are there new parts, or parts in new colors? I'm curious about how feasible it would be to build one of these out of an existing collection or through Bricklink (again, ignoring stickers and printed pieces).
  11. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    Oof. I don't know that I would have the space to store all those. I'd like a new locomotive every other year, with rail car packs released on the off years. It's entirely possible to end up with too many locomotives and nothing to pull with them.
  12. Phoxtane

    My Own Lego World

    How do you tell your dogs apart?
  13. Phoxtane

    Alternative train wheel set with ball bearings

    A source I like for ball bearings in the US is Fast Eddy Bearings (unaffiliated). $.99 per piece but they're sold by a "real" company, not off Ebay. The site is aimed at RC hobbyists but they'll happily sell bearings to anybody with a valid credit card. https://www.fasteddybearings.com/2x5x2-5-bearings/
  14. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    Somebody else mentioned earlier in the thread that sets can begin life up to three years before going on sale. If we're only a handful of months out from this set going on sale, they'll have already committed to getting boxes and manuals printed, marketing materials made up, etc. - they'd have to rework all of that, which costs $$$!
  15. Phoxtane

    Lego 10277 - Crocodile Locomotive

    I want two. Actually, I want four: two to run, one for display, and one to sell at exorbitant prices on the second-hand market in ten year's time. (I kid, it won't be exorbitant, just scandalous.)