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Found 31 results

  1. From 1919 to 1962, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (known as the Milwaukee Road) had these five General Electric-made behemoths pulling trains under the wires from Chicago to Seattle. They were called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. These locos were so powerful they could out-pull modern steam locos, and what used to take two steamers took just one bipolar. However, after a disastrous 1953 rebuilding by the railroad's company shops (who had no clue how to work on a electric loco) the engines were prone to failures and even fire. And so, in 1962, four of them were scrapped with the lone survivor, numbered E-2, towed to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri, where it has sat silent even since, as seen above. The LEGO version of the locomotive was inspired by a 1999 version of the Bipolar electric locomotive built by user legosteveb. I recreated the actual orange, red and black color scheme used on the loco when it emerged from the 1953 modernization program, but it was too expensive. So, after looking around I decided to use the paint scheme the Milwaukee Road used when the engine was donated. This yellow and red scheme was inspired by the Union Pacific and was adopted very late in the engine's career (mid-50's to it's retirement in 1962). The engine pictured is E2, which is the only Bipolar left in existence as the rest were scrapped. (NOTE: The black number board on both the front and the rear should say "E2" in printed 1 x 1 tiles.) The loco frame is split in three sections as per the original engine. The front and rear section can pivot slightly to make the engine go around curves. Since the last uploading of this model, the wheels have been re-arranged into two groups of seven (they are joined near the end of the frame, with the exact middle section floating freely between the two ends) and the body of the engine has been extended for a total magnet-to-magnet length of 70 studs. This side view of the locomotive has my 4-10-4 steam engine to compare against. As you can see, it's my longest single locomotive yet designed with 14 axles total. (I'm not 100% sure my articulation attempts in all the boogies and the frame were enough to work on standard LEGO track, but I guess I'll just have to see when it's built in real bricks latter this year!) The passenger train, and the rear car in particular, were inspired by the Milwaukee Road's Olympian Hiawatha service from Tacoma, Washington to with the rearmost car being a Beaver Tail observation car, which were out of service by 1961. (you can read more about these odd-looking cars here on this Wikipedia page.) So the window of use for this train's real world counterpart is very narrow: 1955 - 1961 is the outer limit of these two elements being used together. (Actually, I'm not sure the Beaver-tails were ever used all the way to the West Coast on the Olympian, but since it's LEGO, who really cares!) Here we can see the whole train I plan on building soon with the engine being almost as long as three passenger cars! That's all I have done for now, and as usual, questions, complaints, comments and suggestions are always welcome! (real life pictures coming to this topic as soon as possible.)
  2. This bridge design was originally downloaded by me (I don't remember the name of the original designer who created the bridge) from the LEGO Factory / Design By ME page in 2010-ish and was never built in real life due to questions about it's strength. I came across it again while looking at my MOCpage account's older files and made it into the version seen above using newer parts and a longer frame. A big thank you to Wes Turngate over on Flickr for helping get the angle right to put the bridge supports in place. The LDD file is slightly different than the pictures as it is 2/3 of a brick taller to add in the proper parts to make it work. The bridge fits any of my trains, and should fit all official LEGO trains except for double stack containers such as sets 10219 (Maersk Train) and 10170 (TTX Intermodal Double-Stack Car). Side view of the bridge. The old design is on the left, new is on the right. (NOTE: The new bridge is in the LDD file, but the old one is NOT!) Here is the ldd file for the newer bridge: bridge link As usual, comment, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  3. "I've been working on the railroad, all the live-long day!" This train consists of a ALCO diesel locomotive (specifically a RSD-12 type) and four cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - caboose The model features several neat printed pieces found in several Juniors sets and six mini figures, including four generic track workers, one track boss / conductor and the locomotive engineer. This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) Here we see how the crane is hooked up to the depressed center flatcar most of the time. The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I tunrned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom door open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. The mini-figures seen above are stationed on the MOW train. As usual, Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!!
  4. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  5. RC Railroad Crane

    Hi guys, I hope you won't mind a Technic guy playing with Trains a little. I have created something very ugly, but at the same time quite playable: More info & pics: http://sariel.pl/2017/04/railroad-crane/
  6. The model seen here is originally based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station". I have modified it enough from the original model to upload the LDD file for my version, which is available below. The following is a fictional backstory on Barretts station. (Their is a real Barretts station, but it looks nothing like this an is not as old as my model is supposed to be. That station's history is nothing like this one!) This station was built in 1912 in Barretts, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a wooden structure with a stone fireplace, indoor waiting area, and a freight storage room that was added to the station in 1928. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator, which as of 1997 the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the street side. EDIT 2/24/17: added new ADA -compliant parts to the section of the model... see below for details: The upper floor has the computer for the dispatcher. In true Lego City style, their are no stairs to the top floor. This is the lower floor, with a waiting room, and ticket seller. The freight storage room off to the right was added later, and connects the station via a hole cut into the wall. Two sliding doors allow for cargo to be loaded onto the platform side, or out the street side for loading onto a truck. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. The original model I based this off off is seen here, while my version's LDD file can be found at this link. This model should be built to replace my 7997-style train station later this year. As usual, comments questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDITED 2/20/17: Updated the screenshots into real-life pictures.
  7. CITY railroad ferry set - 60119 MOD

    This mod is provided with opening (and locking!) doors, removable roof for the Captain / crew, and space for the number of the ship featured on the doors' exposed studs. (Unfortunately the printed tiles required are not available in LDD) I also added some height to the walls to keep the imaginary water (as the boat does NOT really float) out. ,and I extended the bridge's length by about double it's original amount of studs to make it a little less cramped. This ferry allows for three and 1/2 space of track, which isn't much, but is more than my original inspiration for this MOD, set 343 from 1968's blue track 4.5v era. Also, it uses up two of the annoying flex tracks! The doors open and shut, and with the included Technic pins (hidden in the pictures) allows for it to stay shut. The roof of the cabin comes off, allowing for access to the inside of the bridge. The loco seen is NOT included in the LDD file, but is merely to show off the 3 1/2 tracks worth of space for the placement of rail cars / engines. The LDD file is available here, if you want it. As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  8. Originally built by my father in 2004-ish, this building is one of my dad's biggest creations. I modified it and brought it up to my specifications... okay, I whinged it from looking at the model about two years ago. I took some liberties, (and made some mistakes) with the original model. For example: the first version had a smaller smokestack, (diameter wise) and a different Railroad loading dock. I also changed the roof to be removable to allow access to the inside. The factory was originally built in sand red, not regular red. Since this color is extremely expensive and hard to find, I used regular red with modern white window frames plus light blue glass. This end of the factory has a ladder to the top of the smokestack. Inside view with the removable roof taken off. I never finished this part (neither did my Dad), and probably never will. As to what it is supposed to produce... that's up to your imagination. The boxcars were inspired by this red 2014 design by Flickr user lets_play_lego. The doors open about four studs to let freight (or hobos) inside. The grille parts on the sides of the car are supposed to be ladders to access the roof walkway. The freight cars are already built in real life, but the factory is too expensive to build right now by me... maybe someday! The LDD file for both factory and boxcars is available here. Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!
  9. I built this station with set the 2007 CITY set 7997 in mind. I got the original set in 2007, along with a double rail crossover for my Birthday that year. I wanted to make it a full building but didn't have the parts. By 2008, I had discovered Bricklink, but the station was in pieces by then and was not re-created until early 2012. The station was a stock set, while I searched for ideas. Eventually, I came across a build by a fellow Eurobricks user named Lazarus that incorporated a modular basis, a full building (street & track-sides) & a appealing design. I saved a picture of it and made my own design based on his. I included really neat features, (such as the arched lattice windows made with a fence) but I went too far and made it impossible to transport to train shows and LUG meetings. The platforms were very flimsy om the XL baseplates, and during the move to my families current house, it shattered into small chunks. So, I went back to the drawing board, scrapping everything but the building itself. Here is the end result, which is strangely near where I started with set 7997. It has one platform, plentiful outside seating on the platform, and is red instead of yellow. There are many changes from the set, (no stairs on the platform, for example.) but the heart and soul of that 2007 set is still there. The row of studs on both track and street sides should say the station name in printed 1 x 1 tiles. This sign currently says "IRONWOOD", as that's the name of my city layout. The model is now 8 studs deeper, allowing for more room for my hands when being worked on. Here we can see the street side of the station with it's new wheelchair access ramp. Here we can see the interior of the station, with blue ticket machines, seating, and snack bar on the first floor. The train tracking / switching controls are located on the second floor along with the employees - only coffee machine with paper cups.. This printed part here provides the computer display screen. Here you can see the modular breakdown of the model, which includes the following: -Station building (lower floor) -Station roof and Tower control room (upper floor) -Tower roof -left platform section -right platform section The LDD file is here, in case anyone wants to built their own version. (I will be building this version soon, most likely before Christmas.) Comments, Questions & Complaints welcome!
  10. I took two bridge designs (lattice girder and truss) and combined them. I know it isn't realistic, but the design is the best I could come up with. However, the truss part is removable via Technic pins, so it can become more viable for display at shows or home layout use. Here is the bridge with the top trusses on. The bridge with the top trusses removed. The 18 Technic holes could be used for decoration of some sort. The two ramps (which are included in the LDD file) use two-thirds of a brick every 16 studs over three track-lengths to make the gap from base-plate level to full bridge height. PLEASE NOTE: Their is a height restriction for the bridge with the top attached if you use the Maersk double-stack train cars or anything taller than set 10014 (My Own Train - Caboose). The bridge will simply not fit anything taller without modifications. (The train car is NOT included in the LDD file!) Here is my original inspiration for the bridge, courtesy of Flickr user Fireglo450: lattice girder bridge on Flickr The Lego Digital Designer file for my model is here: LDD file This bridge will be built in real life sometime around January 2017. Comments, Questions, & complaints are welcome!
  11. This is a set 76057 (Spider-Man: Web Warriors Ultimate Bridge Battle) inspired model in single track train bridge form. It can be easily extended to make a higher or shorter / longer bridge, depending on your needs, but as it stands now it's 10 tracks long with two 6 track long ramps. The connector clips between the roadway and tower are not connected because they were crashing LDD with it's many rotation issues, though it works in real life the same way as in set 76057. Without the ramps attached. The deck has been lowered and the tower added some height to let a double stacked container train of 10219 style cars through, (those are the tallest cars Lego has made) The model has two towers, four deck sections, and four deck with connector modules, plus two ramps. (one left and one right) The (UPDATED) LDD file is available here: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1472311962m.lxf As usual, Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome! NOTE: quote edited to remove my name and substitute it with my username "Murdoch17".
  12. The shed is based off set 60103 (Airport Air Show) and has now been updated (3/4/16) to have a bigger, stronger roof with less gaps. I also removed the inner platform as it wasn't my best work and didn't look right. This construct is a 74 studs long x 32 studs wide locomotive shed. (that's the actual shed coverage, not the track itself: the track is 80 studs long alone) For those of you who like math, or would want to build this yourself, the size of the shed + track in more conventional measurements is 25 inches or 63.5 centimeters long and 10 inches / 25.4 centimeters wide. I don't know the height, but it is the same height as my new black-and-red shed design and my older World City building. By the way: baseplates were not added for two reasons: 1) the model is slightly off at some point and does fit in real life, but not digitally. (you will either need a 32 x 80 stud baseplate, or a combination of smaller baseplates.) 2) Baseplates keep crashing the model file for some reason. The shed is 11 bricks tall at it's lowest point, and 15 bricks tall in the center. The side view of the model. The shed can accommodate 8 wide trains with ease and is extendable to be as long or as short as you need it. Here we see my Southern Pacific GS-6 "Daylight" 4460 and a 4-8-2 mountain type locos with the shed to give you a sense of scale. These are the longest locomotives (not including two unit diesels) I own, and they fit with room to spare. Please note: The engine's are NOT included in the shed's digital file! And here it is in real life to help you figure the size of the shed. LDD file for the shed ONLY: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1457118933m.lxf (If you are interested in the steam loco and want to know more / have the LDD file, please look here: http://www.eurobrick...topic=118894 ) Comments, questions, and complaints welcome!
  13. This slimmed down 6 wide Birney Safety Trolley was first built in 2011 and based on the work of Brickshelf user J-2 and his vintage 2003 model of the Mister Rodgers' Neighborhood. (link to it here: http://www.brickshel...ery.cgi?f=37552 ) I have modified that users' model to have enclosed sides and now have reduced the width from 8 studs to 6, plus I added real seats, trolley poles, and magnets for pulling freight or a second streetcar. These magnets are at the correct height for use with official sets and most, if not all, of my MOCs. This car is numbered 37, and I have another one numbered 32 that isn't finished yet. (I only ordered four black macaroni bricks when I should have ordered eight, thus delaying completion of the other streetcar.) This is the former state of the real cars, which have since been destroyed to make the newer version seen above. This is the fictional electric line that runs the streetcars on my town. It is also called the IG&WER for short, as Ironwood Glencoe & Western Electric Railway is a bit of a mouth full... (Updated as of 5/12/16) LDD file for the Birney Safety Trolley(6 wide): http://www.moc-pages...1463073264m.lxf (Update 7/6/16: added real life pictures to this post!) (Update 7/7/16: car 32 finished, but since it's the same as 37, I will not be uploading separate photos of it, besides this one of them both on my layout.) comments, questions, and complaints welcome!
  14. I started designing this station model back in early December of last year, basing it off of set 60050, Train Station from Summer 2014. I got stuck with the set's roof, and put it aside. Then, earlier this week, I got inspiration to remove the roof and start afresh. I eventually removed the big 2 x 12 x 4 windscreens and replace them with two rows of 1 x 2 x 3 windows. I removed the hanging station clock and added the tower, which has unprinted faces in LDD but it should use this print In real llfe: http://alpha.bricklink.com/pages/clone/catalogitem.page?P=3960pb024#T=C&C=11 Anyway, the station has four ticket machines outside, 12 seats on the platform, with eight more seats inside (four of those are for seating in the pizzeria / dining area). Their is even a coffee machine to quench the thirst of the caffeine addicted passengers, station master and / or train crew! The street and track sides both feature eight letters each to name your station. You could even name it Legocity, just like in the original set, or maybe something simple like Bricktown, Duplobay, Ogelvill, or the ever popular name of Galidor. The inside features the dining area for customers of the pizza restaurant, seating for weary travelers and a ticket kiosk for the lone station employee. The station's right and left platform can be extended or removed. Here is the LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1449269932m.lxf Please note: I won't be getting this model as it was originally designed for my brother when I started last year, but now I'm trying to get my dad to get it for his railroad: he wants a station, but the LEGO Shop near us stopped stocking the original 60050 set. This might be the next best thing, and besides, the original set looks too modern for his railroad, plus it doesn't go well with the 9V era stuff anyway...
  15. My Microscale MOC Collection

    An overall shot Close Ups A city scene James River Crossing Metra Train BNSF Freight TGV and one I found an image of that I recreated here.
  16. MOC Bridge signal box

    The goal was to made a Bridge signal box like company Kibri has it for model railways. Here is my version.
  17. MOC Railroad warehouse

    Nothing special. Just an old railroad warehouse.
  18. Microscale Railroad Scenes

    Here we have a few microscale locomotives. They include the iconic Thomas The Tank Engine and his friend Percy. Also included is a BNSF locomotive with freight train and a Santa Fe Passenger. BNSF freight Subway and City Thomas and Percy Random Train Santa Fe Train An overview of all of the models
  19. I was inspired by a Facebook post to the Modular LEGO Buildings group by a person named Kade Rodgers to create this railway station. Here is the original version that comes from 2011 and was later demolished: This model was inspired by set 10199, Winter Village toy Shop. The building is open backed, and features a desk on the top floor and ticket counter with cash register on the first floor. ...and here is the newer version the above model was turned into. This newer model is modular, and as such has five removable sections that combine into one medium size station. Here you can see the track side of the station which has plenty of seats (16 chairs, to be precise) for waiting passengers to sit on. Here you can see the street side, where the public enters the station from the parking lot or can directly access the platform via the ramp. You can also see the stairs to the upper floor which is where the station master's office is. This is the inside of the station, with two ticket machines and six seats for the indoor passenger waiting area. The coal burning fireplace is still used on really cold winter nights, but since the last few winters have been mild in Ironwood, it hasn't been used in a good long while. Here is the old station master's office on the upper floor, which is off limits the the public. In more recent years it has been made to function as the employee break room / switch control tower for the tracks in the immediate vicinity of the station. The entire model is made up of five sections that come apart. They are as follows: first floor, second floor, second floor roof, left platform and right platform. Sadly, their is no LDD file available for thew new station. However, comments, questions & complaints are always welcome! (EDIT 7/13/16: After hearing some good suggestions about adding a ramp back onto one of my railroad stations, I have finally finished finding the parts for it and gotten some pictures taken of the updated model. Enjoy!)
  20. Railroad storage shelf

    This shelf is designed for use with HO scale trains but can easily be widened for use with Lego Trains Sorry about the fact that the images are in drive again I do this at school and Brickshelf is blocked. links---- it takes you to a folder. https://docs.google.com/folderview?id=0B0LIffC6GUIYVXdSX0xlcThjWWc&usp=docslist_api
  21. Hello My name is Keegan

    I am into building realistic builds but have a low budget below is a basic model I made with random spare pieces Links here----- https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B0LIffC6GUIYQ0cwQjYxLU9JRjg/edit?usp=docslist_api And here------ https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B0LIffC6GUIYZkd1V0N2RGkyNEk/edit?usp=docslist_api
  22. I'd like your input on this set I made recently: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/95531 It's based on a very famous event in US history in 1869, when the rail networks of the East and West coasts were symbolically connected for the first time with the driving of a final golden railroad spike with a silver hammer. To the best of my knowledge, this would be the first non-fictional Wild West Lego train set. The 150th anniversary of this event is only a few years away, so I figure now is as good a time as ever for Lego to release something like this.
  23. This model was inspired by Scotnick1 and his Maithwaite Station model from "The Railway Series", also known as "Thomas and Friends". Here is a album of his with the original station in it: https://www.flickr.c...157639900227095 The station features a five track long platform, which can be retracted to a minimum of three tracks by removing the two side segments. More sections can be added to increase the length to whatever you need, with removable end-caps at either left / right side. All of these platforms are held together by Technic pins. Inside the station proper is a help / ticket desk with cash register, and off to the left side is a employees-only area with stairs to the second floor office. This office features a desk with chair and fireplace. The second floor roof, the second floor proper and first floor roof are removable. Also, the two clocks on the second floor roof are supposed to have this print: http://www.bricklink...asp?P=3960pb024 (This print is not currently available in LDD.) The street side features a short staircase to the front entryway. The studs above these doors and the same on the opposite side are supposed to spell out the station name. I haven't decided on a name for this one yet, but am leaning towards the name "Imperial". Here we see the individual components of the station. This includes: - first floor / main platform (1) - second floor (1) - roof of first floor (1) - roof of second floor / clock tower (1) - end-caps for platform (1 left and 1 right version) - identical platform extenders (2) Here is the LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1430322575m.lxf This station will replace Barretts station on my layout (some parts of Barretts will be reused on this model), as this station is larger that the other, and has a street side, whereas Barretts does not. Comments are always welcome!
  24. This station was built in 1912 in Glencoe, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands just a stones throw from the Meramec River on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a stone structure with a fireplace plus indoor and outdoor waiting areas. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator. As of 1997, the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using Global Positioning Satellites. (also known as GPS) Here is the track side of the station, featuring a five track long platform. Here is the street side. Their will be printed 1 x 1 tiles spell out the town name of GLENCOE on both of the signs when built in real life. Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. In reality, the town of Glencoe really exists, but this station does not. There really was a Pacific Railway of Missouri, which bored the first two railway tunnels west of the Mississippi River in the mid 1850's at Barrets, Missouri. Barrets is where the Museum of Transport is located and Glenoce has the Wabash Frisco & Pacific Railway (a 12 inch gauge steam railway) which runs for two mile round trip on the old right of way. The original model seen here is based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station" instructions. I think I have modified it enough to upload the LDD file, which is available here: http://www.mocpages....1421346826m.lxf I have calculated the cost of this model at around a $110 USD (give or take), and am currently raising funds to create it in real life. Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  25. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/