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Found 52 results

  1. Heavily inspired by @Electricsteam's long-awaited in-the-brick Atomic Streamliner project, (as seen here in this thread) I have designed my own Atomic-Age wonder called "Nucleus". It is, as the inspirational original builder once said "a fission powered turbine loco" with 4-4-2 Atlantic wheel arrangement. The Nexus Force logo piece goes on both sides of the locomotive's tender. Nucleus is owned by the Neo Nexus Force, and is a retro-futuristic stream-liner mix of old-style 2-rail technology, but with hyper-modern safety features designed specifically for use by Nexus Force personnel as a very high-speed, high-security ground transport between the northern-most city of St. Nicklaus and north-pole-hugging outpost of Ice Station Odyssey, around 590 miles away. (this all takes places on the ice-bound planet of Beta Polaris, which orbits what we here call the North Star, far away from Earth.) Thus this makes it a space train! Unlike the slower Earth trains, the Nucleus type of space-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 160 MPH on it's special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's over hundreds of miles, all while using Positive Train Control (PTC) on the the mostly double-track mainline, where all vehicle crossings are flyovers and switches virtually non-existent once out of St. Nicklaus city limits. This train runs along with seven identical versions of the train on the route with up to five in running order on the route and at least one in the maintenance shed / in emergency backup storage at any one time. They are named / numbered Nucleus 1 through 6. The baggage car, which usually holds anything from sled dogs in crates, to core samples of millennia-old meteorites bound for labs under armed guard. All the doors on this model open up, as shown. (The rest of the passenger cars doors on the the other cars open too, but it's only here you will see it being shown!) The passenger cars come in groups of two, jointed together by a Jacobs bogie in the middle. The observation car at the rear of the train. This train will go nicely with my Nexus Force moon base, plus my other, Classic Space themed train based on the Aerotrain, called the Astrotrain. The Nucleus train probably won't be built for a while, (orange isn't a cheap color!) but it's at least on my radar. Once again, a hearty thanks to @Electricsteam for his wonderful eight-wide model, as it inspired my six-wide one. As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  2. Hi all, here is my new creation, Western Railroad. You can play some Ennio Morricone's composition in the background. Western Railroad by Nikola Đurić, on Flickr Western Railroad by Nikola Đurić, on Flickr Western Railroad by Nikola Đurić, on Flickr
  3. mark6399

    River Canyon Railroad

    Hi all, I've recently come out of my dark ages and decided to get back into Lego trains! One thing I've always found fascinating is mountain railroading. I remember looking for the old railroad grades in the mountains on family trips to Colorado, and I enjoy reading about how they were constructed through the mountains. (The Denver, Northwestern & Pacific's standard gauge line over Rollins Pass is pretty incredible). This project takes inspiration from a Denver and Rio Grande Western Line between Buena Vista and Leadville, CO as well as the Yosemite Valley railroad in California. I'm planning on creating five sections for this. The railroad will pass over the river at some point (still playing with a couple ideas!). It won't be a full loop, but I enjoy making dioramas. With the space I have available, I can add a lot more detail to a diorama display. Two questions for you guys: 1) Getting the slopes to line up is pretty tricky. What's really tough is making the supports line up to brace the upper mountainside. Has anyone made any references for these kinds of things? I was thinking of making some basic models to really figure out how to line things up. I was hoping to avoid going into calculating LDU's and such, but with all the angles, it might be necessary. 2) Has anyone made wide radius curve L-draw files (R56, R72, R88)? I searched the forum and found links for the ME-models library and R104 Bricktracks on Lgauge.org, but I found the ME models ones to be kinda finicky. Let me know what you think! I played with a couple different methods for detailing and attaching the trees and grass, etc so I'm open to feedback and to other ideas as well! I plan on updating this thread as I finish the other modules. Thanks! River_Canyon1_3 by Mark, on Flickr River_Canyon1_2 by Mark, on Flickr River_Canyon1_1 by Mark, on Flickr River_Canyon1_5 by Mark, on Flickr
  4. This modular Victorian-era train station was inspired by set 71044, Disney train and Station. It now has a chimney flue featuring two fireplaces, freight area with dual sliding doors, and a loading platform five tracks long. The large clock on the tower is gone, replaced by a double sided, smaller version above the main door to the platform, while the word GLENNCOE (a slight misspelling of a real Missouri town... the real town only has one "N" in it's name.) goes above the right hand door, as this is the name of the station and the town it serves. Also in that general area of the model, you can see I removed the second floor balcony, as I thought it looked better being replaced by a window. The street facing portion of the station should have the year 1891 on the studs above the two main doors. (This was the year the 100% fictional station was built.) The upper floor features the station master's office with desk and telephone, along with a much later addition than 1891, a computer to track train movements. The lower floor features the cargo depot with opening mailbox, and passenger waiting room with ticket desk. Six public waiting chairs are also included on this level. The station comes in several large, easy-to-take-apart sections: -tower roof -second floor hallway roof -second floor -first floor NOTES: There probably was a station in Glencoe (the real Missouri town, not my idealistic version of it) at one point for the Missouri Pacific RR, though I doubt it was this fancy if it was there. The rail line passed through there from the mid-1850's to the mid-1940's, when it was moved to it's current alignment, and the old one abandoned to nature. However, a little 12-inch gauge ride on railway now calls Glencoe home, as it has since the late 1950's. This station (and any of my LEGO trains lettered for the Wabash Frisco and Pacific, the name of the small 12-inch gauge line) are a tongue-in-cheek tribute to the rail line that has had such an impact on me growing up.. and still inspires me today! EDIT 5/17/2020: Added real world pictures! As usual, comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  5. Greenstar

    Road tiles with train tracks

    What if Lego created a line of road baseplates with train tracks embedded in them? What type of sections would everyone like to see? the ones I can think of now are: single track: straight segments curve segments Junctions crossings slopes. Double track: straight segments curve segments junction segments crossover segments crossings slopes. general: sections where track is are either red or green in color for public transport only sections where track is are same as rest of street for mixed traffic Sections where there is interlaced track should be included such as special points and other areas for such track there should also be areas where the tracks transition to normal LEGO rails as well
  6. Does anyone ever combine their LEGO bricks with scale electric trains? I’ve found them to be compatible for track structures for 1/87th scale systems as well as structures such as elevated rail stations and bridges I’ve also used Legos as the base for a moc up of a section of track in Columbus, Ohio where a derailment occurred back In 2012 for something I was doing
  7. While I was at my dad's house yesterday, I took some pictures of his just-finished grain elevator model with a rake of four set 4536's (Blue Hopper Car) and my Bluebonnet Santa Fe F7 diesel A & B units. (Full disclosure: He originally was inspired by these instructions I suggested to him for the grain elevator not long after creating this topic.) He just took the basic concept / look and RAN with it, making it much stronger and more modular than before. This modular format makes it easier to store in a custom wooden box like the ones behind the Grain Elevator. Inside these boxes is where he stores his modular buildings / train tunnel. The American flag addition to the building's design was my @Roadmonkeytj's idea, and was relayed by me to my dad for building. It is seen on both sides of the building. My dad revised majorly the shed where the hopper cars dump their grain load, making it much stronger in the process. This was entirely of my dad's idea: this four-point joint makes transportation easier, leaving the elevator building section on a 32 x 32, and most of the grain storage blocks on a 16 x 32 size base-plate. Pretty cool, huh? The model was inspired to-be-built by the Alton, Illinois, riverfront grain elevator, as seen above. Unfortunately, the letters were not a possibility due to not having enough silos / base-plate space to spell it all out. As usual, comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  8. This model was inspired from this set-733 like MOC by @AFOL7777. I turned it into a railroad-served industrial track ballast loading facility to have the crane load dark bluish gray 1 x 1 round bricks into the crane's bucket. Then you can drop them into train hopper's when they arrive with the pull of a sliding plate. You may have noticed I had to extend the height of the model 1 brick, to allow for Diesel 10 to fit underneath, as he is the primary engine to work the ballast facility. (His claw made him too tall, but it's okay now.) The tan tile parts under the crane are the pull pins to make the coal fall into the hopper cars. Inside of the crane with "controls" for the bucket motors and the crane itself, which travels along some narrow-gauge tracks and can swing from side to side. In reality, the "hand of god" method is used to make the crane move, with a rope extending to the roof of the crane cabin which I can wind and unwind to load and unload the ballast into the train cars. The office of the owner of the ballast operations. The reason for the odd footprint is the factory MOC I made earlier this year resulted in a base-plate piece (dimensions 16 x 48 studs) that I was looking to use somewhere.... enter into the picture this model, and now I've nearly solved that little issue. This 6 wide BR "Warship"class with hydraulic claw (AKA Diesel 10) model has been heavily modified by me from a old Class 37 file by LazarusBricks to have new removable roof sections for the cabs with seats for figures and cab controls. As you can see, I chose to leave off the face to keep the engine more in line with the rest of my locomotives. Diesel 10 works the ballast facility most of the time, so I included him here. I'm going to have my Diesel 10 model pull 6 of these coal cars plus a brake van inspired by the 1980's 12v era red/ yellow sets to my gravel facility. The 12v era model and Diesel 10 are already built, and the plank wagons are on order as of 1/11/2020. NOTE: All credit for the six dark grey wagon models seen in the picture above goes to @Pdaitabird, who designed them. See here on Flickr for the awesome tutorial by him for the construction of the BR plank wagon. BUILDERS NOTES: The ballast facility is now done, but the trucks to be filled with the crushed rocks are not (yet). More pictures to come soon!
  9. I originally got this basic model from a page on Bricksafe by user @sed6 as seen here. I revised the freight door to be movable, changed the roof color to dark red from black, building color to sand green from tan, plus I added a "cast iron" heating stove and it's chimney flue to the model for late-1800's period look. This station will go along with my western stuff on my layout as seen in this topic here. The platform side of the station. There is plenty of outside seating on both the left and right sides, yet they are still under the roof awning to be protected from rain. (three seats per side) The model features the separate entry doors to the station premises for cargo and people on the both the street and track sides. Inside we have the freight area (on the left) and the passenger area (on the right) with a connecting door between the two. The passenger section also has the heating stove which currently is keeping the coffee hot. (or is it boiling the water for tea?) This part of the station also has three inside seats for weary passengers and a cash register for ticket dispensing. The station is modular, and comes apart in four sections: - Left platform end - Right platform end - Station roof - Station building I was originally going to build the Disney station in blue, but the projected price was out of my budget, so I settled for this one. This is is just as good, if not better, because everybody's got a Disney station now, but nobody but @sed6 has one of these custom depots. (and mine is different from his to boot!) - Real life pictures to come: December 25th, 2019.- Real life pictures added, 12-16-19! Thanks for stopping by, and if anyone needs bigger versions of these pictures, they are view-able at my flickr feed. Comments, questions, and suggestions welcome!
  10. "I've been working on the railroad, all the live-long day!" This train consists of a ALCO diesel locomotive (specifically a RSD-12 type) and six cars: - a (working!) crane car - depressed-center rail wagon - a (working!) ballast hopper - tool / worker bunk car - weed killer tanker - wide-vision bay-window caboose. The train model features several neat printed pieces found in several Juniors sets and and seven generic track workers. (as seen below) ...while the roadbed crew consists of: -Bucket-lift truck from set 3179 (Repair truck) -Dump Truck from set 7789 (Lotso's dump truck) Drill vehicle MOD from 7936 (level crossing) Front end-loader from set 7630 (front end-loader) ...and a official's inspection car MOC - not yet built This model was originally a ALCO MRS-1 built by Anthony Sava, but has been so severely modified that it no longer looks like the prototype loco. So I went searching And found another ALCO locomotive, a RSD-12 that looks like my loco. Both my model and the prototype have the six wheels, and the same basic hood and cab design. The long hood of the loco has been designated the rear with a double red light. (no picture taken yet of this car) This car is not your ordinary tanker car - it contains weed killer for use on the ballast the train lays down. This stream crane model was heavily inspired by Whoward69's instructions for a set of crane and match truck train cars. I modified the original model seen here. I originally meant for the crane to have ropes to move the boom, but it got confusing on which rope went where so for now it's moved by the H.O.G. (Hand Of God) method. The crane can spin around in 360 degrees and lift anywhere up to 90 degrees straight up. (Their is a double set of pins keeping the boom from going too low, as well.) Here we see how the crane is hooked up to the depressed center flatcar most of the time. The heavy-duty depressed-center wagon has brick-built arms to secure the cargo of railroad track in place. This model was inspired by a coal hopper on an older website called LGauge .com. I tunrned the old finger hinges into new pin-orientated ones and colored the car yellow to match the MOW paint scheme. The hopper's bottom door open and can dump 1 x 1 round plates / bricks onto the tracks for ballast. (no picture taken yet of this car) This is the workers tool car. In reality it's empty, but it's supposed to have rows of racks for tools, and a special box for broken tools to be fixed when they get back to the division HQ. The caboose features two ladders (one per side) and more of those fancy printed 2 x 4 tiles. This is where the job site foreman has a little office. The med kit is also located here. This is the headquarters for my Maintenance of Way operations for Brick Railway Systems. I was inspired by set 60009 (Helicopter Arrest) from 2013 for most of the building, while most of the inside details came from set 10027 (Train Engine Shed) in 2003 a whole ten years before the other set was even produced. As for the billboard on the roof, I borrowed the letter's design from my brother's model (with his permission), and put them on a billboard to spell out OCTAN. The tracks on the side of the building are for my ALCO RSD-12 and it's accompanying six car work train to sit and await their next task. The inside on the lower floor is furnished with a lathe, drill press, fire extinguisher, oil drum, and a vise. The upper floor (the break room) has a table, a few chairs, coffee machine (with paper cups!), fireplace, and a recycle bin. I will be updating this with the two missing pictures soon. As for the digital items, I will built them as funding allows. As usual, Comments, Questions and Complaints are always welcome!!
  11. Good evening, everyone, Since I promised you in the last topic to design more international models besides german models, today I would like to present you the model of the "Hall-Class 4900" of the "Great Western Railway" from Great Britain. The "Hall class 4900" were tender locomotives, which were built between 1924 and 1943. A total of 259 units were built and the locomotives were used for passenger and freight traffic. The locomotive with the railway number 5972 "Olton Hall" achieved special fame. It is the locomotive shown in the Harry Potter movies, which was specially repainted for this in the well-known red coloring. The model consists of approx. 1090 parts, is approx. 66 studs long and about 10 studs wide. A Power-Functions L-motor can be installed in the boiler. The IR-receiver and the battery box find comfortably place in the large tender. Most of the decals or printed components correspond to the original LEGO parts. Furthermore, the model is equipped with numerous striking details, such as the piping, the chassis or the detailed cabin. This model is also a little bit of a premiere, because for the first time not only LEGO standard components are used, but also railway wheels in XL and M by Big Ben Bricks. I also tried the Bricklink Part-Designer for the first time. Currently the manual is available in two different versions. One as GWR "Hall-Class 4900" in dark green and one as "Hogwarts Express" in known red. I hope that you like this version in particular, because there are already some versions, even directly from LEGO. Praise and criticism are very welcome. Kind regards Martin Further pictures in the flickr-folder or on our homepage
  12. This through-truss bridge design was originally downloaded by me (I don't remember the name of the original designer who created the bridge) from the LEGO Factory / Design By ME page in 2010-ish and was never built in real life due to questions about it's strength. I came across it again while looking at my MOCpage account's older files and made it into the version seen above using newer parts and a longer frame quite a while ago. (and as to those original questions about it's strength: It's built like a safe, yet I can pick it up with a single finger by the top..... just don't drop it, because the reddish brown parts won't survive the landing!) More recently, I revised the deck where the track goes to be able to take the RC track up and be able to put down 9V down more easily. (We run 9V trains at shows in Gateway LUG.) In short, the track is now more easily removable to become 9V, 12V, or even a road bridge. The bridge fits any of my trains, and should fit all official LEGO trains except for double stack containers such as sets 10219 (Maersk Train) and 10170 (TTX Intermodal Double-Stack Car). Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! Many more Wild West items can be seen in my Historic sub-forum topic here.
  13. Hi! I haven't been very active here for a while, but I was busy "working" on some LDD models and revising them. Some of you might have seen them already on my flickr photostream. I also got to render my models for the first time Ok, I'll show you the pics My revised BR Standard Class 9F "Evening Star" I borrowed codefox421's coaches to try on the 9F (all credit for the coaches goes to him, here is the link to his topic: http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=97927 ) I also revised my GWR 14xx, but that'll be part of another topic soon Then I also rendered and (re) designed some rolling stock: From top left to bottom right: Cattle Wagon Tank Wagon Well Wagon Vent Van GWR 16 Ton Toad Brake Van BR 20 Ton Brake Van (brown livery) BR 20 Ton Brake Van (grey and yellow livery) I also designed a water tower: and a modular train station. This is one section: You can make it bigger: and build a pretty decent station: The station has too many parts to be rendered And another station building: I hope you enjoyed it Comments and criticisms are welcome! Greetings, Nick P.S.: You can see higher resolution pics on my flickr: http://www.flickr.co...s/94645638@N07/
  14. Dear Community, The week has passed very fast once again and like promised I would like to present a model for the start of the weekend. But first a little text. Some of you may have already seen it while browsing through my Flickr channel. It's the "German Crocodile", the DR E 94. It was built from 1940 and was mainly used in heavy goods traffic in Germany and Austria. 200 units were built. The nickname "German crocodile" was given to the locomotive because of the optical similarity to the "Swiss crocodile, the SBB Ce 6/8", which comes much closer to a crocodile. But the real nickname is not "crocodile" but "iron pig". They were designed for freight trains with up to 2000 tons. This heavy electric locomotive fascinated me already as a child on our domestic model railway layout. Apparently effortlessly she pulled the at that time seemingly endless coal train over our 4m² plate. The model is approx. 43cm long, 8.5cm wide and approx. 12.5cm high, with extended pantographs even higher. The locomotive can be motorized with two Power-Functions M motors, one of which is housed in each "crocodile snout". The IR receiver and battery box fit easily into the spacious cab. Inside, it was even possible to design both cabs. The detailed roof can be removed for easy access to the interior details and electronics. The two chassis, each with three axles (all driven) are pivoted and also very detailed. Here were not the "standard railway wheels" used, but the large spoke wheels of the Emerald Night, as these fit much better to the scale. By the way, the size of the model fits perfectly to the already introduced "SBB De 4/4". What has always bothered me with this locomotive, as well as with the "sister" from Switzerland and other locomotives of similar design, is the relatively large gap, which is between the driver's cab and the two " mouths " (also to be seen with the crocodile from LEGO set 10183). This gap is usually quite large with LEGO models, as the available curve radius is very small compared to the scale. In the real model, however, the gap is hardly noticeable. My goal was to "develop" a system that allows cornering but keeps the gap as small as possible. The solution is relatively simple. Below the cab there is a kind of rail system which is attached to both " mouths " and thus enables the three elements to be pulled apart if necessary, e.g. in curves. On a straight line, the elements are pulled together again by means of an attached rubber band. The assembly attempts have left a good impression on me. Unfortunately also a long, heavy train causes, that the elements can pull each other a little bit apart when driving straight out. As with the "SBB De 4/4" it is possible to build the locomotive in three different colours: - dark green (still my favourite) - grey - blue (DB colouring) And now have fun looking at the pictures. Criticism welcome. The example (Source: Wikipedia) More pictures in the flickr album With kind regards Martin | Bricks-on-Rails
  15. Introducing the Rust-eze factory, which is where they make the rust remover / chrome restorer product Inspired by / not quite the same as the one seen in the CARS & PLANES shared universe from Disney / Pixar . I have set this building in my transition-era layout, which means the 40's through the mid-1980's, as the steam / diesel mix era continued longer on my alt-timeline. Their is a small 0-6-0ST switcher that services the factory as seen above and here in it's own topic. The factory without the train in front. The rear of the factory, with the ladder to the top of the chimney flue. The detachable roof can be removed, however I never really finished the inside part, and probably never will as I haven't a clue what to put in there machinery-wise. The loading doors do open, and were modified from the original arched doors as they couldn't fit a forklift... then again, these doors might not either! I was inspired by this photo by JB Lego to build these boxcars as seen here. They are made to haul pallets of cargo, specifically Rust-eze chrome restorer in 55-gallon drum containers for commercial packaging at another facility into smaller containers. This model was heavily inspired by set 8486, (Mack's Team Truck) from 2011. I changed the model to seat one mini figure at the wheel, added new headlights and license plate plus revised the fenders and enlarged the cab. The rear of the semi features a opening door and fold-down trailer stand, while the cab has two moving driver's doors. The trailer no longer has opening sides, but it does have two opening rear doors and folding stand for when the cab pulls away. Speaking of the cab, the roof of the driver's compartment comes off and both doors open. I hoped this factory would be of some use for some people, as the original always has been gathering dust in the basement since it was built, as seen below: This is the original factory that was by my Dad around the years 2000 - 2004. it was built with parts from several Sand Red supplemental packs available at that time. It does not feature any interior, nor does it have a removable roof. But this thing is built STRONG: you have to really put your weight on it to press the roof together. Here is the rear of his model. Comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 4/9/19: added real life photos of the factory.
  16. Feuer Zug

    German style Bahnhof

    This bahnhof (train station) is based on a number of hauptbahnhof (main stations) throughout Germany. It also uses parts from 60050, but not much. The major inspirations are Bremen and Frankfurt am Main. It has three tracks for trains with an overhead bridge to gain access to 2 & 3. Signals are at the ends of the platforms for tracks 1 & 2. As seen from the internal view, the shopkeeper and the bäckerei are present, but additional areas have been added. A ticket agent, locker area, and WC are new. The station has plenty of windows, allowing for good lighting as seen when illuminated from inside.
  17. Feuer Zug

    DOT-111 tank cars

    In rail transport, the U.S. DOT-111 tank car, also known as the TC-111 in Canada, is a type of unpressurized general service tank car in common use in North America. Tank cars built to this specification must be circular in cross section, with elliptical, formed heads set convex outward. They have a minimum plate thickness of 7⁄16 inch (11.1 mm) and a maximum capacity of 34,500 US gallons (131,000 L; 28,700 imp gal). Tanks may be constructed from carbon steel, aluminum alloy, high alloy steel or nickel plate steel by fusion welding. The black car carries petroleum products and has a capacity of 30,110 US gallons (113,979 L; 25,071.8 imp gal), a tare weight of 65,000 pounds (29,500 kg) and a load limit of 198,000 pounds (89,800 kg). And the internals:
  18. Welcome aboard the Astro-train! This stream-liner was a mix of the 1910's Earth train called the "Bipolar" built specifically for use by Classic Space forces as high-speed, high-security ground transports for senior level officers such as Benny. Unlike the Earth version, the Astro-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 400 MPH on special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's of tens of miles.\ BUILDER'S NOTES: In reality, I liked my original take on the Classic Space Aerotrain, but it can't be built due to design and motorization issues. thus, I stretched the design into the model you see here but with my Super Bipolar at the head. This will be able to allow the engine to pull freight cars, (such as Benny's road car on a flat car) too. This model was inspired by both a 1999 version of the original, real-world Bipolar engine built by user Legosteveb and by a digital-only design by @Sunder to create the Super Bipolar you see in my picture above. Note, the two 4 x 2 slopes should have this CS print while the four white 1 x 1 tiles should have this "60" print. Also, a bonus for this engine model is if I ever show off this train at a LEGO show, I can replace the middle wheel-set on the loco with another person's 9V motor swapped in to power the train. This is the baggage car, and like the rest of the train, all the doors open. (Although there are no interior details, so it can be whatever you want it to be inside!) These are the two passenger cars. The observation car. This is the complete train. I'm planning on building this in 2019 in real bricks, at some point, hopefully. Anyway, comments, questions, complaints, and suggestions are always welcome!
  19. Ever since I've finally managed to get a pile of the small train wheels, I've been building, or at least designing not only new narrow-gauge locomotives, but also narrow-gauge rolling stock, and I figured I'd just make a single thread for all of it (both completed & LDD images of planned builds), and update it whenever I get new designs finished or complete actual builds & post pics of them in the original post. EDIT: I have decided to just start new threads for additional narrow-gauge train stuff, and then link those topics in this thread, which will be linked in my signature, rather than bumping this thread every time I finish a new narrow-gauge MOC. Therefore, from here on out, this is basically a library of all my narrow-gauge stuff, including locomotives, so enjoy! So without further ado, first up is the Balin & Sons Mining Co Heisler locomotive & ore carts I made back in 2011 & posted about early 2012: NG Loco by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr Next on the locomotive roster is the Balin & Sons Mining Co RR 8-ton Plymouth biofuel switcher: Plymouth 8-Ton Right-Side by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr Next up is an Inter-Modal/Flatcar (it's used as a flatcar when it's not hauling shipping containers). I've included a pic of the Inter-Modal Car with one of my "standard" shipping containers & an updated version of the Heisler Locomotive I made almost 7 years ago to show how it compares with the more or less standard sized locomotives I use for my narrow-gauge stuff: Empty Intermodal Front Quarter View by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr Here's a design for a narrow-gauge hopper car, which is a 6-wide modification of a 4-wide version I had designed in LDD 6 years ago, then just kinda shelved. It's based on the narrow-gauge coal hoppers that are on the East Broad Top Railroad, although I could only make these 2-bay hoppers instead of 3-bay due to space constraints. EDIT: Thanks to discovering that LEGO made 1x1 black letter & number tiles with white print, my 2-bay hopper is no longer inspired by the East Broad Top Railroad's 2-bay hoppers, but it now IS an East Broad Top RR 2-bay hopper, complete with EBT reporting mark & typical hopper car numbering scheme: EBT Narrow Gauge Hopper Side by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr This is a narrow-gauge tank car I came up with last night (after pulling my hair out repeatedly trying to come up with something that looked reasonably decent & wasn't too flimsy). While the ladder attachments on the current build are pretty flimsy, I'm planning to use BrickArms U-Clips to clip the 3rd rung up from the bottom to the railing in order to stabilize it. Of course the nice thing about this here design is that the main tank body is made entirely from really common parts which are available in many different colors, so I could easily make a small train entirely of white, black, yellow, green, etc tank cars: Narrow Gauge Tank Car WIP by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr And Last for now (but not least) is a workable narrow-gauge train car I came up with earlier this week (and modified 2 times since then) in the Balin & Sons Mining Co RR livery (of course it is entirely possible to make this in different colors, but part of the reason I went with mostly black with red highlights is that black train doors are the easiest type to acquire on BrickLink, especially thanks to the new Grindlewald's Escape set having a matched pair in it). The slightly elongated bogie is one I'll be using for all my narrow-gauge passenger stock & I'm planning on using a variation of it for when I try to model the East Broad Top RR's 55-ton GE Center-Cab Diesel that they got about 15 years ago from the Algoma Steel Works in Saul Ste Marie. Also of an interesting side note is that for standard gauge trains, for the most part, I use the 26L train base plates for passenger cars/coaches, and the 24L train base plates for freight cars & medium diesel locomotives. EDIT: After messing around a bit, I found a way to make some workable 6-L narrow-gauge bogies that work with a standard 6x24 LEGO train car base plate & are held on by 2x2 turntable plates. I already tested it & it can handle any standard LEGO narrow-gauge curved track configuration, so here's the improved version: Narrow Gauge Coach WIP v2 by Ben/Laura Bonebrake, on Flickr Anyways, I hope you all like these narrow-gauge cars & are inspired by them. Like I said at the beginning, I'll update this post whenever I come up with or build more narrow-gauge rolling stock.
  20. Here is my XL turntable, which has 11 dead-end stall tracks and one outlet track. (though it can be reconfigured to be as many or as few tracks as needed). It is spread out over a 64 x 64 XL make-shift base plate size made up of of 4 regular (32 x 32) curved road plates with quite a bit of overhang due to the outlet tracks and tower. The re-purposed signal tower is now being used to control the turn table. This control building is modular, and has a roof and second floor that come off to reveal inside details. The studs on the sides of the building are supposed to spell out the the yard's name, but I haven't decided on a good name yet. If you have any suggestions for a name with 10 letters or less, please post a comment with it below! This table can handle a 4-track long engine (around 64 studs) with a bit of overhang at the ends, such as with my Frisco 1522 4-8-2 steam locomotive as seen above. Diesel A + B unit sets would have to be separated and moved independently, but that's okay and actually accurate for some real world locations / railroads. The basic workhorse of the turntable is this four track long framework you see here. The table's modular control tower features a lower floor that's empty except for the staircase. The upper floor features a machine to control the turn table, a wall clock, and a old-fashioned rotary telephone. The table easily glides on an raised outer ring of tiles, and turns on a central 2 x 2 pivot point. This whole thing can be mechanized, much more easily than a transfer table, but it still needs fine tuning to make it work right. The outer ring of tracks is only attached to the base plates at two certain points: every other spot is held on by gravity. (plates on tiles) This is basically a very much enlarged version of this model here. I was working on a seven-stall shed in the same style as the tower to connect to the turntable, but the angles and hinge bricks weren't working out due in LDD. I guess it will have to wait until the turn table is built in real life.... if it is ever built in the real world. Comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome, as usual and thanks for stopping by!
  21. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  22. The model seen here is originally based upon the Brick City Depot "Winter Village Train Station", which can be seen here. I recently (2018) updated windows and doors to be white to give better contrast to the other chosen colors, and I extended the platform clock away from the wall and double-sided it so both ends of the station can see it. The following is a fictional backstory on Barretts station that I have written. (Their is a real Barretts station in Missouri, but it looks nothing like this an is not as old as my model is supposed to be. That station's history is nothing like this one!) This station was built in 1901 in Barretts, Missouri for use by Brick Railway Systems. It stands on the old Pacific Railway of Missouri right-of-way, which first ran through the area in the mid-1850's. The station is a wooden structure with a stone fireplace, indoor waiting area, and a freight storage room that was added to the station in 1928. The upper floor is for the telegraph operator, which as of 1977 the telegraph has been replaced with a computer for the dispatcher to locate any train in his sector at any time using advanced software. Here is the street side, with the date the depot was built proudly displayed. The upper floor has the computer for the dispatcher. In true Lego City style, their are no stairs to the top floor. (Though I still need to add the coffee machine up here.....) This is the lower floor, with a waiting room and ticket seller. The freight storage room off to the right was added later in the 1920's, and connects to the station via a door cut into the wall. Two sliding doors allow for cargo to be loaded onto the platform side, or out the street side for loading onto a truck. (This freight room also conveniently features a ramp for wheelchair-bound passengers to ascend into the building.) Here is the modular side of things: One left and one right platform, the station proper, the control room and it's roof are all connected by either pins or a very few studs. As usual, comments questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDITED 2/20/17: Updated the screenshots into real-life pictures. EDITED 7/24/18: Updated the model's real-world pictures and associated text.
  23. I really liked the Winter Village train station when it came out, but it it is so small, with no back wall / roof. I tried for many months and multiple design changes to get it to work, and then I recently stripped away most of the basic framework underneath to give it a cleaner foundation. This last attempt finally gave me the needed inspiration for the model as shown below. This is the result, with the LDD file available here at Bricksafe. I added a freight office, a bathroom (the toilet design was stolen from the Modular Pet Shop set but the sink is my idea) and a "stone" fireplace. Their is a loading dock for the freight section, and two detachable platforms for added track-side length. Most of the rear wall opens up 90 degrees to allow access to the inside, and the roof comes off for viewing the passenger section. The tower should have three of this clock print, while the reddish brown 1 x 4 tile on the rooftop-sign should have this "Mount Clutchmore" print. The rear features a small truck loading platform with sliding door for the freight depot, plus the fireplace. (By the way: the window closest to the staircase is the ticket seller's window.) Here you can see all the many details of this model, including the removable roof, left and right sections of platform, swing open wall and the station itself. This new station might be built at some point in the future to replace my other rural station, of which about 60% of the older one's parts will be use to built this newer model. Fun Fact: This is my first building designed for my own personal LEGO town to include a bathroom! As usual, comments, questions, suggestions and complaints are always welcome!
  24. I was inspired by a failed Ideas project railroad round house and shed from this builder to make this Wild West armstrong turn table in LDD. I'm thinking of doing this model instead of the the two track shed, as it is a bit smaller than the twice-as-tall shed. As this a mechanical table powered by brute force and not steam, electric, or pneumatic means, the table has four angled "iron" bars for mini-figures to grip to pretend-turn the table manually. (This type of table is called an armstrong turn table.) The two sets of tiles on the middle of the table should have this GREAT and this WEST prints from the Toy Story 3 line. NOTE: The flex tracks are supposed to be taken apart into two halves for them to fit on the table ends. You should only need one flex track instead of two as shown, as one whole equals two half units. The 3 and 1/2 track long table has eight tracks radiating outwards on it, with the possibility of more or less tracks if needed being an option in the future. If this was built in real life, the four main locomotives will enter on the bottom-most track and proceed to be rotated to the correct stub-end track for storage. However, the BTTF Time Train cannot fit on the rotating table, (it's just a bit too long) so it will sit on the straight-through track and just run across the table to get off at the other side. (All the items but the blue steam engine and table itself have been bought and built in real life.) As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome!
  25. This railway shed was inspired by Shaun Baseby (or @lightningtiger here on Eurobricks) and his smaller farm shed from 2014. He designed the basic Technic frame on this shed, and I ran with it to create this wooden western-style steam locomotive shed. This shed is 4 1/4 tracks long with a total of 68 studs from back wall to entrance to the building, along with a 10 stud wide entrance for stream locomotives. The shed features a cow skull on the front above the entrance, just to give it that wild west flair. The rear wall of the shed. The roof of the shed is not removable, but it can fold open a bit on clips. With this view you can see how the Technic frame supports the roof. Here is the scene with the three steam locos stationed at the Fort Legoredo area depot The shed will normally hold my 4-6-0 and 4-4-0 steam locomotives, with the smaller 4-2-4 sitting on a third track outside the shed as shown. That's the BTTF time train on the fourth track, in the way back. Comments, Suggestions and Complaints are always welcome!