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Found 819 results

  1. Hello! Here is the latest addition to my "Midiopolis" Midiscale City. Enjoy! This Modular features an Old Office Building, with the first story having been renovated and occupied by a Chain Beauty Supply Store, leaving the remaining upper two stories intact in their original state. Next to the Old Office Building is a Country Boutique & Candle Shop.
  2. The Jersey Brick Guy

    Modular Building Sets - Rumours and Discussion

    Hi all, I figured that instead of hijacking everyone's threads with similar questions about modulars, to just create one thread where people can ask questions and the like. This way we are not junking up specific topics with questions about multiple modulars. I look forward to the discussion with everyone! ------------------------- :-: For Reference :-: We have had the following: Cafe Corner Market Street Green Grocer Fire Brigade Grand Emporium Pet Shop Town Hall Palace Cinema Parisan Restaurant Detectives Office Brick Bank Assembly Square Downtown Diner Corner Garage Bookshop The unique business's that have come out of those modulars are: Apartment (MS) Apartment (GC) Apartment (PR) Apartment (DO) Apartment (AS) Apartment (CG) Art Studio (PR) Bakery (MS) Bakery (AS) Bank (BB) Barbara Shop (DO) Book Store (BS) Cafe (CC) Cafe (AS) Dance Studio (AS) Dentist (AS) Department Store (GE) Detectives Office (DO) Diner (DD) Garage (CG) Gas Station (CG) Grocery Store (GC) Gym (DD) Fire House (FB) Flower Shop (AS) Laundromat (BB) Movie Theater (PC) Music Store (AS) Pet Store (PS) Photo Studio (AS) Pool Hall (DO) Recording Studio (DD) Restaurant (PR) Town Hall (TH) Town House (PS) Town House (BS) Veterinarian (CG)
  3. dimka_ya

    [MOC] Micro city

    Hello! A year and a half ago, I saw somewhere on Flickr a building assembled on something like that. The idea came up to assemble an entire city from such buildings. At first standart basis were used, then doubled and quadruplet, and sometimes more. During this time two cities were built. I will share renders for those who are intrested. First city Original here I will continue to add buildings in the comments. Thank you for attention :)
  4. This strange, pixelated-looking ship with the cow-shaped figurehead has sailed the digital seas and plundered many a helpless Minecraft village. The NPC life was good for the three man crew of the "Seacow", but a chance encounter with a User Exit Portal (think like TRON) sent the pirate ship Seacow into the real world, albeit still in it's 8-bit form. Now, stuck in an unfamiliar world with strange logic, (Round surfaces? What is this deviltry!?!) the crew of the Seacow with it's Captain and nameless crew will have to navigate a way back to their computer paradise from the Pacific Ocean using "digitalized" mariner techniques. This ship was inspired by set 21152 (Pirate Ship) from Minecraft theme, (and the Seacow steampunk pirate ship from TLM) this pirate ship is finally done in real life! The ship's name (Seacow) is proudly placed on the stern railing. The ship breaks into three parts for storage (or for sinking scenes!), and comes with a plank for walking people into a watery grave that slides left and right that is located in the middle section. Here we see Minecraft pirate Captain Steve (also known as Peg-Leg Stevie, to differentiate himself from the famous original Steve) of the pixelated ship "Seacow". The crew are nameless and dimwitted, a curse of being former digital NPCs. They go by various nicknames the Captain gives them, but are most commonly known by the label seen above their heads: Pirate One (in middle with sash) and Pirate Two (on right in dark blue jacket). Comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints welcome! (Also, as an aside to the Moderator's, I put this is "Pirate MOCs" to hopefully get more comments on it... I don't think the "Licensed theme" is right for it, as it IS a pirate ship, after all!)
  5. simon84

    [MOC] Carpenter's Shop

    Hi everyone I'm happy to share my third MOC which I have been working on over the last 2 months. I build the MOC with BrickLink Studio and used the Eyesight Render for my images. Carpenter's shop is a MOC modular building. The MOC consists of a fully equipped carpenter’s workshop, a small organic store and a two-story apartment. The MOC has a high level of details on each floor. It’s built on one standard 32 x 32 base plate and includes 4 minifigures and one dog. Minifigures Retired customer with her little dog Saleslady of the Organic store Carpenter and owner of the Wood Art carpenter's shop Resident of the apartment and amateur gardener. Level 1 – Carpenter's shop and organic storeThe ground floor contains a full equipped Carpenter's shop with workbenches, drill press, circular saw bench and many other details.The small organic store sells various vegetables and fruits. in addition to a counter and a refrigerated shelf, the store also has a small presentation area outside.Between the two stores is the passage and stairs to the apartment above.Impressions Level 2 – Kitchen, living room and terrace of the apartment Living room and functional kitchen with small dining area and bookcases. Large terrace with raised beds, overgrown pergola and barbecue fireplace. Impressions Level 3 – Bedroom and bathroom of the apartment Small bathroom with toilet, bathtub and sink. Bedroom with bed and closet under the pitched roof. Impressions Level 4 – Roof Flat roof with small exit hatch and antenna. Impressions Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my third MOC. There are more pictures on Bricksafe and feel free to support my MOC on Rebrickable and let me know what you think about. At the moment I am building my MOC with real Lego bricks. As soon as possible I will post any photos of the real lego building.
  6. Bricked1980

    [MOC] The Village Post Office

    Hi everyone It's been a while since I've posted a MOC on Eurobricks, in fact this is my first new MOC for over a year and the first building I've designed for almost 2 years. Anyway this is my latest creation "The Village Post Office". The model represents a typical British Post Office from the early 1930's and also features a vintage mail van. At first glance it may look like a modular but it is not. The model features an open back design and the different levels can't be separated. The base is also much different in size and design to a standard modular building. In total the model contains 2262 pieces. Here are some shots of the exterior... Notable features include an iconic red phone box, pillar box a bench and a tree. A series of steps at the side give the minifigs access to the first floor. INTERIOR DETAILS As mentioned earlier the building has an open back to give access to the interiors. On the ground floor is the main Post Office itself. I've tried to give this a rustic, vintage appearance with wooden floorboards and wood panelled service desk. Details include a cash register, lable dispenser, a set of weighing scales and shelves behond the desk for sorting all the mail. Opposite the desk is a parcel wrapping station. The idea for this was stolen borrowed from the Elf Clubhouse set. On the first floor above I've added an apartment which is home to the couple who run the Post Office. This is packed with everything they need including a bed, fireplace, kitchen and an antique gramophone. I didn't have space to include a toilet - but at least they have a bucket. VINTAGE MAIL VAN The mail van is a traditional red style truck as would have been used in Britain during the early 1930's. It is 6 studs wide and features opening rear doors and a removeable roof. The emblems on the van and postman are bespoke prints I created for this model. MINIFIGS AND OTHER DETAILS The model contains 4 mnifigs, a postman, customer and the husband and wife who run the post office and live in the appartment above. I've also included a bike and several animals. LEGO IDEAS My reason for designing this with an open back and with a unique style base was to try and distance it as much as possible from the modular buildings and hopefully give it a better chance of success on LEGO IDEAS. My hope is that if this was lucky enough to reach 10K then LEGO would view it as a standalone building in a similar way to The Old Fishing Store, and not something that would conflict with the modular building series. Anyway I hope you like the model. I had a lot of fun designing this one.. Feel free to let me know what you think. I'd also be massively grateful if anyone would be kind enough to support it on LEGO IDEAS as well. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/16ae1e95-cf30-41dd-ae23-36e07668df05 Thanks very much.
  7. Finished 01.01.2021 A couple of years ago I started a modular Unimog project with the hopes of having a build that would be flexible enough to support a number of different versions and options. It certainly was. However, the Unimog 437 project was intended to provide a U500 cab option, but for a couple of reasons (namely those tires), it was not a great fit for the project. So in the back of my mind I figured I would do a proper U500 version at some point. The 437 was pretty popular, and it fits within my current design language; mid-sized, manual, truck/car, feature packed. Then when I saw the first reviews of the 76139 Batmobile set, and saw the new 68.7mm tires, and I knew it was time to resurrect the project. I would keep the scale at 1:17.6 as I did with the 437, and those tires would equate roughly to a 445//65/R22.5. Off to the races! I am partial to the 1st generation (2000-2013) U500, plus @I_Igor did a great 423 series already (Eurobricks). Also, I like the 500 more than the 300 or 400. The 300 looks tiny, and the 500 SWB gives me two extra studs on the wheelbase (24st) over the 400 (22st). I guess if I have enough space I'll switch to a 400, but I (generally) never need less space. I pulled a PDF for the scaling, and I started to set my build parameters. I build my MOCs by making a first draft with all the constraints: wheelbase, length, height, width, and general bodywork ideas. I try to keep the colors correct, but if the part is not in front of me, I move on to replace later. Then I start working in features, and rebuild as needed. The first draft came together pretty quickly. While I managed to buy the first tires available on Bricklink, I was not willing to wait for their arrival before I started building. At this point, I determined the features of the truck: Front and Rear Live Axle Suspension (sans portal axles) (With dual leading/trailing links and Panhard rods) Front Steering Fake Motor Tipper Bed Tipping Cab Front PTO Rear PTO Rear Bodywork PTO Front Mounting Plate Modular Rear Bed Attachment Points Realistic Bodywork The tires arrived in time for the second night of building, and they look perfect. By now, all the functions were in place. Loosely. Below you can see the general Front Mounting Plate, and the front PTO. Currently in front of the bed is a Gear that will power features on a mounted body (al la TC9 Entry) Below you can see the rear bed system. I have found this three way tipper option to work great on my 437 and the MAN TGS truck. The control input is currently on the left side, but it will need to move. The orientation of the lift is backwards, which does not allow for good tilting leverage. Turning the mechanism around will need to move the input to the rear. This compounds the issue with the rear PTO. It is currently in place just above the hitch, but will need to move when the tipper input is placed in the rear. Few U500s have a rear PTO, so I'll have to decide if this is a feature I want to retain. More to follow... Until the next post, hope you enjoy the next Thirdwigg Motors project.
  8. My employment can often be intense during the fall, and this past fall was no exception. After an intense period, I turned to LEGO to rest well over the holidays. I wanted to start a comprehensive project during this time to let my mind wander down a creative outlet. I seem to cycle through tractors, cars, and Unimogs, so this time I was ready to try another car. I am a proponent of the sports sedan, in life and in builds, so that was an easy decision. It has been some time since I have built a 1:10 car, and since then the new 42110 wheels are now available. This would be a center feature of the build to see if I could take advantage of the new offset in both suspension and steering. I hope the blue sports sedan will look somewhat sporty, but not like the current BMW faux sporty. When I build I always set the dimensions first, based on the wanted features. The car will be 50-52 studs long with a 33 stud wheelbase. Body width is 23 studs, with a fender width of 25 at the front and 27 studs at the rear. "System Builds" have become a recent theme of my builds in that a center build can easily accommodate changes or additions easily. I wanted this to be the central theme of the sedan; more than a modular build the system will allow for flexibility and interchangeability. Thus, there are two categories of features to the sedan. System Modules Transmission/Rear Suspension Front Suspension/Steering Engines Floorpan Unibody Seats Doors/Hood/Trunk Features (Options) Independent Suspension Steering: HOG/Wheel Working Fake Motor (V8, I6, F6, Hybrid) Working Transmission (4S Manual, 4S Sequential) (RWD/AWD) Removable Body Seating for Four Opening Hood, Trunk, Doors After setting some hard points, I had a general idea. I had hoped that I could have a front suspension module and a rear suspension module, but already at the above stage, it was becoming clear that separating the transmission from the rear suspension would result in too many structural compromises. Above you can see the general idea for the front suspension "bathtub" that will connect to the rear suspension/transmission module. The engine will drop in, and the lock in between the two modules. The HOG is placed above the dashboard with steering controls traveling under the engine. This bathtub will hold a V-8, an I-4, and an I-6. I very much want to have the I-6 engine be part of the final build, but it is causing a lot of problems. It's just soooooo long. In fact it and the supporting structure come within 2 studs of the front of the car. I may have to go all Audi, and change it to a I-5 which may be just the right amount of weird. Above you can see, generally, how it will come together. This version includes the sequential transmission module, and the AWD front module. The AWD module is the hybrid version. This "bathtub" is locked in that the engine is chosen for you: you get the Flat 6 engine with two fake electric motors, one for each side of the front axle, that function as an electric assist. More is coming... Next I'll work on the structural floorpan, and a unibody that will drop on to all modules and give additional structural support. My builds are taking too long these days, so I am going to put a due day of May 22, 2021 for this project. Maybe that will incentivize it's timely completion.
  9. Some pics of my almost square modular city. The layout consists of a lot of SNOT road and nine 32x32 plates. All modulars are placed on baseplates with plates under the modular baseplate. Sorry for my bad photoshopping skills. Most vehicles are mods or Mocs.
  10. Howdy all! I’d like to show this expansive modular MOC that I’ve worked on and tinkered with for the past couple of months. It’s called BIONICLE Legacy: Storytelling with LEGO Bricks because I aimed to build something that conveyed what the theme represented to many fans, and the impact it had upon release 20 years ago. Even if you haven’t been overly fond of or familiar with the BIONICLE theme, I hope you’ll still take a few moments to check out this project! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/b5456207-ed0d-4f44-a02b-b0dae424158e I’m very hopeful and proud of this project, but it has been struggling to gain the needed attention to progress, and it clearly won’t get very far without your help and support. I greatly appreciate all support, comments, and shares. Fingers crossed! :) Uploading images proved to be a bit tricky, but you can also find higher-res images at Flickr:
  11. BrickDesignerNL

    [IDEAS] [MOC] multi sports set

    This is my first LEGO Ideas contest submission. Concept: one set to create multiple sports (more than shown here) so you can always build any sport you and your friends like with just one set, and start playing. The field is modular so you can I hope you'll love it, and will vote for it if you like it. Thanks! https://ideas.lego.com/s/ca:68a77abdd25247acb9f590a999774b55
  12. Mestari

    Parisian Restaurant

    Hello! I would like to show you my rendition of the Chez Albert Parisian Restaurant :) There aren't many things in common with the beloved modular, I simply wanted to have my own idea about what a Parisian restaurant may look like. And the one from creator was simply too small.. So without further ado, here it is: It all began in January 2018 when we visited our family and they had this painting on the wall (reproduction of a fragment only): This served as inspiration to my build which of course was not an exact representation of that building, but it was a good start. It took me around 18 months to complete this party due to size, family obligations and some "great" ideas I had like including all interiors and a 9V lighting system for the ground floor and one of the rooms on the first floor. But I like the effect :) You turn the lights on and off by removing part of the awning which gives you access to old style 9V battery box: The building is modular: On the ground floor there is the restaurant together with toilet for the guests and restaurant kitchen. There is also a staircase leading to apartments upstairs: I also thought that including a part of build that no-one will ever see or notice is brillaint idea, here is the restaurant ceiling for you to enjoy ;) You can also see all the lights - 3 for restaurant, 1 for the entry and 1 for kitchen. Then there goes floor number one and first apartment with bathroom, corridor, bedroom and living room with kitchenette. First view from the top: and view of the kitchenette: Second floor has similar layout, just different finish: The attic is a typical place for singles ;) No dedicated bedroom... and a view of the kitchenette (a shot from a WIP): and last but not least - the roof! It was supposed to be flat, but since this is LEGO it bends up like a boat... I plan to complement this building with another one of similar size. Together they will form a small wall of buildings, a mini version of a street. This is already a work in progress that will likely not be finished this year. But who knows ;) I hope you enjoy this one for now :)
  13. higgins91

    Modular Alex' Bar

    Hello, I present to you my last modular. A cafe, the Alex 'Bar. Why Alex because it's my nickname IMG_7279 by alex peraux, sur Flickr Completely dedicated to fun (in these times of Covid-19 this is necessary) On the ground floor is the main room. I wanted to make a floor with 45 ° tiles. IMG_7289 by alex peraux, sur Flickr There is a large table where several people can meet for a glass (beer, wine or orange juice, it's up to you). The bar is in the corner of the building, there is a coffee machine on the side, the cash register is discreet but you have to pay for your drinks! IMG_7287 by alex peraux, sur Flickr Behind the door is the storage room with the garbage cans and the exterior access door. IMG_7290 by alex peraux, sur Flickr Upstairs we have the game room. An arcade machine, a dart board and a pool table. Everyone is having fun! IMG_7292 by alex peraux, sur Flickr IMG_7293 by alex peraux, sur Flickr IMG_7294 by alex peraux, sur Flickr Finally we are on the roof top. The atmosphere is already much more festive and musical! One DJ mixes the records while customers dance in front of the stage while others relax. IMG_7298 by alex peraux, sur Flickr IMG_7299 by alex peraux, sur Flickr IMG_7301 by alex peraux, sur Flickr I created the building under LDD to build it then. There are some change between lxf file and photos. I share the file with pleasure, if you want to build it or be inspired by it! You will find more photos in the album flickr https://bricksafe.com/files/higgins91/alexbar/batiment1.lxf
  14. Xon67

    Assembling Bricksburg

    edited to put all final images in the first post... After seeing the LEGO movie, I wanted to re-create buildings from Emmet's neighborhood. While researching, I realized a great deal of what was in the movie was based on previously-existing sets. I thought it would be interesting to do a project that compared the original LEGO sets to the modified movie versions. Knowing how much time, money, and physical space it would take to build these out of real bricks, I decided to try my hand at LEGO Digital Designer (LDD). After having created a couple of the buildings in LDD, I ran across the post for Bluerender and used it to generate photo-real renderings. Here are my results: .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...logo_final_.lxf The latest image posts: "I wanna go home!" LEGO Movie 2 logo The latest WIP of Emmet's Mech (with BlackStar): .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/movie_emmetsmech_2017-07-20.lxf Emmet's apartment Emmet's apartment interior How Emmet fits a 50-stud-wide apartment into a 30-stud-wide building: A variation on Emmet's apartment (green with a slanted roof) Pet Store (right) Pet Store (left) Plumber Joe's apartment .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...the_plumber.lxf Condemned building Fresh Fruit market Sherrie Scratchen-Post's apartment Emmet's street Emmet's street in micro scale Fire Brigade .lxf file: http://www.brickshel...ire_brigade.lxf Fire Brigade Tower (updated) Filling Station Garage Street Corner Rooftop garden 1 Rooftop garden 2 An example of the reuse of building parts Warehouse 1 Warehouse 2 (Fire Brigade) Mega Green Grocer Bricksburg Castle Bricksburg Castle back Cafe Corner / hotel with clock tower Fish (market?/restaurant?) Office(?) Building Office Building Church It's not mentioned in the images, but the the ice cream cart in this image, the giant Green Grocer, and the "fish" building comes from 10211 Grand Emporium. Cheese Slope building Fire Brigade Radio Station Plaza with Bob's Kabobs Here are some Bricksburg accessories from the Movie, including garbage containers, rooftop details, a street corner, billboards, and the mosaics from the "fish" and "fresh fruit" buildings, including the LDD file, for you to use in your own MOCs: lxf file: http://www.brickshel...accessories.lxf Condemned building Condemned building Ma and Pa Cop's house Highway Overpass Train bridge Monorail stop .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/_movie_train_stop_stairs_alt3.lxf Downtown plaza Skyscraper ground level The Coffee Chain .lxf file: http://www.brickshelf.com/gallery/Xon67/Movie/movie_coffee_chain.lxf Downtown Bricksburg and the Kragle antidote. Skyscraper 1 Skyscraper 2 Skyscraper 3 Skyscraper 4 Skyscraper 5 Skyscraper 6 Skyscraper 7 Downtown: Flying cranes Downtown: Larry's flying coffee machine Skyscraper under construction 1 Skyscraper under construction 2 Construction site Construction Site Update: Small cement mixer Tipper Truck Cement mixer Dump Truck Crawler Crane Instruction Tube Large crawler crane Instruction Holder Building cranes Building crane Construction helicrane Brick sorter Front end loader Back hoe Heavy loader Emmet's mech Emmet's mech compared to the official set Rush hour traffic Small car Public transportation, monorail, and Surfer Dave's car SUV Small van Delivery truck Police cruiser SWAT van Octan HQ micro scale upper floors Octan HQ micro scale Octan HQ from Finn's basement Octan HQ minifig scale Octan reception: Lord Business' relic room Octan corridor with MetalBeard and Benny Octan sound stage--news conference stage Octan sound stage--80s-something technology Octan sound stage--Where Are My Pants? Octan offices. Octan Control Room. Octan DJ booth Octan Executive Conference Room Lord Business' ThinkTank Octan flying cube. The many moods of MetalBeard MetalBeard's strong, virile body MetalBeard's "Down on the Farm" form Mrs. Scratchen-Post's kitty sled lxf file: http://www.brickshel...post_sleigh.lxf A Christmas tree assembled by The LEGO Movie Master Builders Emmet's snow sculpture A surprise Christmas tree for Bad Cop Nathan Sawaya's Oscar statue from the 2015 Academy Awards. Mark Mothersbaugh's LEGO energy domes from the 2015 Academy Awards Awards given to all Emmet Awards nominees End Title Concept End credits: Movie Theater End credits: WyldStyle's tag End credits: Music End credits: Movie premiere End credits: Kragle End credits: Taco Tuesday End credits: Consessions End credits: Secret Police End credits: Sound stage End credits: Construction End credits: Warehouse More on the way!
  15. I took two bridge designs (lattice girder and truss) and combined them. I know it isn't realistic, but the design is the best I could come up with. However, the truss part is removable via Technic pins, so it can become more viable for display at shows or home layout use. Here is the bridge with the top trusses on. The bridge with the top trusses removed. The 18 Technic holes could be used for decoration of some sort. The two ramps (which are included in the LDD file) use two-thirds of a brick every 16 studs over three track-lengths to make the gap from base-plate level to full bridge height. PLEASE NOTE: Their is a height restriction for the bridge with the top attached if you use the Maersk double-stack train cars or anything taller than set 10014 (My Own Train - Caboose). The bridge will simply not fit anything taller without modifications. (The train car is NOT included in the LDD file!) Here is my original inspiration for the bridge, courtesy of Flickr user Fireglo450: lattice girder bridge on Flickr The Lego Digital Designer file for my model is here: LDD file This bridge will be built in real life sometime around January 2017. Comments, Questions, & complaints are welcome!
  16. darkhorse00

    [MOC] MG TC Racing Green

    Sharing my MOC 1948 MG TC Racing Green. The build is meant for a series of my modular building MOC 6-studs wide vehicles, this time round for the Pet Shop townhouse. :) Hope you guys like the it! Reference photo of MG TC Racing taken from ClassicarGarage/Marc Vorgers Check out my other MOC vehicles for modular building: MOC Volkswagon Beetle Type 1 for Pet Shop: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/141253-moc-volkswagon-beetle-type-1/ MOD Cadillac v16 Convertible for Palace Cinema: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/121161-moc-1938-cadillac-v16-convertible/ MOC A4 Checker Cab for Cafe corner: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/123511-moc-1950-a4-checker-cab/ MOC Ford Thunderbird (First Generation) for Parisan Restaurant: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/143150-moc-1955-ford-thunderbird-first-generation/ MOC Volkswagon Camper Van for Detective Office: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/144105-moc-volkswagen-type-2-camper-van/
  17. This is my Mini Modular version of the LEGO 10255 Assembly Square modular building. LXF here: https://bricksafe.com/pages/o0ger/minimodulars
  18. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

    My latest creation, Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse, reflects a desire to create an autobiographical MOC to share joy and pain non-verbally. It was inspired aesthetically by Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior, thematically by Voyage of Life (1842) by Thomas Cole, and structurally by Obelisk Overpass, Boulder Dam, plus an early draft of River Wheel (featuring pirate ship gondolas rather than lumber). In fact, the 96 x 96-stud plot vacated by the dismantled River Wheel fed my drive to combine structures absent from my Lego city—a bridge, dam, and Ferris wheel. As you may imagine from the photos, a hilltop lighthouse teeters over an ocean, beneath a collection of galaxies spiraling through the nighttime sky, while a shooting star passes overhead. The light and dark figurative sailboats represent positive and negative memories, while the logarithmic spiral of galaxies in the sky is reflected in the earth below by the failed attempt of humankind to overcome the nature of life itself. Stats 26400 pieces 75 lbs (34 kg) Footprint: 96 or 128 square studs Volume: 156 x 156 x 176 studs Timeline Phase 1 Idea conceived: January 2020 Digital design: 8 weeks total Wheel: 2 weeks Lighthouse: 2 weeks Bridge: 2 days Cliff: 4 weeks Shipping: 13 weeks Building: 2 weeks Phase 2 Digital design revision: 1 week Shipping: 4* weeks Building: ongoing *Multiple international part orders in October never did arrive and had to be repurchased domestically. For more, follow me on flickr, instagram, or ideas.
  19. hoiharry

    [MOC] Small Art Gallery - Modular

    Hi everyone, I present to you my very first modular moc . For this little project I mainly focused on the outside as that is where most of the appeal of a modular building is (for me at least ). For the outside I wanted to try and make someting that you could see here in The Netherlands and my main inspirations where the buildings in Amsterdam. I did want the outside to be colourful tho, as to make it fit with the official modular sets. As the inside so small I didn't know what to with it for a long time. As an art gallery is mostly decorated on the walls, I thought it would fit well. Also because it's an art gallery, I wanted to make it look like the building has been expanded on the backside and thus make it feel more "modern". You can see the full album on my Flickr. Hope you all like it!
  20. Dakar A

    The Essence of Modular Building

    Waaayyy back in 2007, the Lego Group started one of their arguably most successful ventures in recent history- the Modular Building series. There have been 12 sets to date, and with such a large source material, patterns, themes, and styles can be picked out and analyzed. This post is for anyone with an appreciation for the Modular Buildings, and particularly for those who plan to or have built one in the past. I hope you come away with a deeper understanding of what makes these buildings so lovely, and an eye for detail that others may overlook. The Cafe Corner was the progenitor of the modular series, and played a large hand in establishing trends and guidelines for the series. The building has a bottom floor done in a contrasting color to the upper levels, horizontal color striping, strong focus on texture, accent colors, and color blocking, as well as an asymmetrical design. All of these concepts will be discussed in further detail. The Green Grocer is the truest 'successor' to the Cafe Corner, in that carries over the big ideas of the set much better (in my opinion) than Market Street, and thus takes the #2 spot on the list. Note that the build uses Sand green and tan as its primary and secondary color, with blue and brown accents, as well as the requisite modular color palette of light & dark grey, black, and white. It also solidified the modular pattern of a tall first floor. The modulars frequently look good because the adhere well to the golden ratio. This is executed by having the first floor of the building be much taller than the subsequent floors. Here I begin a deconstruction of what makes a modular building a modular building. In this render, can you tell at first what is different about the build? The sand green 'texture' bricks have been changed to flat faced bricks. Texture bricks, including but not limited to 'brick' bricks, grille bricks, garage door bricks, and those odd little poofy bricks have all been used in Modular buildings to give an extra layer of visual 'crunchiness' to a build and can cause a MOC to seem off without careful inclusion. Striping is another key component of the modulars. Lego is a naturally stripe-forming medium, given the need to have each floor divided by a 2 plate tall difference, at minimum. But the modular buildings lean fully into this identity, making liberal use of striping throughout their builds. The Green Grocer has tan striping on the upper floors and dark green on the base floor, along with light/dark grey between the floors. Finally, color blocking is important not only in a modular building, but in ANY Lego MOC. A solid slab of color with nothing to contrast against it is boring to the human eye. Even in the most minimalist abstract compositions (Like Piet Mondrian's Red, Blue, and Yellow or Mark Rothko's Orange, Red, Yellow, there are implementations of color blocking in order to give the piece visual interest). Here, the light grey 'gutters' have been removed from the building, as well as the 2x2 inverted slopes that signal the shift from building front to the roof. There is further reduction that could be done here, but the removals as they stand give such a different impression from the final set that the point should be obvious. The Fire Brigade is a masterpiece of color blocking, texture, and depth. The build is indisputably based on an American firehouse (that flag doesn't lie!), and a great many lackluster MOCs draw on a similar brownstone/terrace house façade. One of the more notable things that sets the Fire Brigade apart is its depth. The central 'column' of the façade is set forward one brick from the rest of the façade, and its line continues upward, bringing the eye to the belltower atop the building. The left and right flanks of this column are recessed, not only by being 1 stud behind the center column, but also being bookended by SNOT texturing on the far left and right of the building, giving the facade a sort of W shape, if viewed from a bird's eye view. This serves to break up what could very well be a boring façade. Additional elements that balance the 'whitespace' of the building against visual interest are the flag, fire helmet displays, and date. Many a builder has incorporated similar elements into their builds without understanding what purpose they serve. These elements were not added to the build simply because the builder wanted to put a SNOT date in a build, but rather because they serve to add visual interest to sections of the build that would otherwise be bland, while still being balanced against the rest of the façade. The Grand Emporium is an exercise in how to successfully use repetitive structures in a build without it becoming bland. Take a moment to absorb the build and try to figure out how exactly the designers differentiated sections of the build. Firstly, the sections of the build themselves are visually interesting, incorporating texture bricks, varying depths, and striping to give a strong base level of enjoyable design that is built on in some surprisingly simple ways. This building makes liberal use of simple decorations to balance the build and prevent it from drowning the viewer in symmetry. The mailbox, ice cream stand, window washer, and billboard all stand to work as enjoyable elements that draw the eye around the build, preventing the viewer's mind from simply noting the pattern of the build and passing along. They also help to weight the build's center of focus down towards the first floor, something that the differently colored floors help to do in the modular building series. Though this analysis is focused on what the modular buildings share, each one exercises a different muscle in bucking convention. Not only does the Pet Shop throw the standard of one building per set out the window, it also challenges the pattern of differentiated bottom floors in the red building. Instead of using a contrasting first floor to draw visual interest, the red building focuses attention vertically on the bay window, similar to how the Green Grocer had its bay window highlighted by its own 'frame'. In order to compensate for this, the red building leans more heavily on texture and depth to lend visual interest to the rest of its bottom floors, along with a 2nd, weaker vertical line through the windows and door. The Pet Shop itself, on the other hand draws more from the past buildings, with a contrasting bottom floor, lots of striping and garage bricks, and a more symmetrical build. It's also notable for introducing the now-common technique of adding planters around windows to give them greater visual interest. The Town Hall set is similar to the Fire Brigade in that both are based on American architecture from the 1900's, in line with the rest of the modular building series. The Town Hall again uses a protruding center section to give visual interest and carry the eye towards the top and the clock tower. Whereas the Fire Brigade used the garage door to do this on the ground floor, the Town Hall uses the greek columns and a tympanum to concentrate the lines of the structure upwards. Another notable feature is the use of 'puffy' bricks to separate the windows and give visual interest. The Palace Cinema is unique in that it is both an homage to the Cafe Corner AND Grauman's Chinese Theatre. You can see the dark red roofing and brown windows with round tops, as well as the parallelogram top as the homage to Cafe Corner, and the general asian design and theatre aspect. Much like Cafe Corner, the façade is separated into 3 sub-structures- the left and right walls and the central column. The left and right walls use varied depth and dark tan elements to carry the eye upwards and accentuate the border between the 2nd floor and the roofline. The Parisian Restaurant again bucks modular convention in that the bottom floor is mostly the same color as the second floor. However, the use of brown windows and white accent pieces give it a different feel. Throughout the build, the designers use a concert of olive green bricks and white bricks as contrast, with a similar grey border scheme to the Green Grocer. The Detective's Office is another American styled building, but it is very different from the previous Fire Brigade and Town Hall. It uses separate color palettes to differentiate the 'separate' buildings, though they are truly just one large building built together. The barbershop makes heavy use of striping, both vertical and horizontal, to give the build more visual interest. Without the contrasting blues, the right façade could be visually boring, but because they are varied, the structure is interesting. Note as well the building's use of dark blue and tan instead of the normal light grey or black to differentiate the bottom floor. What truly makes this building stand out is the harmony of the striping, depth, and color used. The windows are recessed 1/2 a brick, the horizontal stripe continues their visual narrative around the side of the building, and the color focuses the eye inwards on the windows. The Brick Bank is a good example of how a build with a muted color palette can be made to stand out. The main colors are the monochrome spectrum of white, light and dark grey, and black, but the critical accents of dark tan and sand green stand out so much more because of this. By smartly using color, you can accent your builds and take them up a level. Assembly Square, while being an homage to ALL the past modular buildings, is also a great keystone to hold together all the techniques and ideas so far. The bakery building is primarily tan, but uses the dark orange tiles as texture and also to give the front a color that has a limited number of pieces in production. The florist uses varying depth on its second floor to break up an otherwise simple façade. The cafe uses white tiles to carry the eye up the façade, as well as grill bricks to give the wall visual interest. The bottom floor of all three buildings uses more basic colors and a large number of windows in order to differentiate the upper floors. The color is blocked together on all 3 buildings into sections to give the accent colors more power. Additionally, the rooflines of each building are textured across to, again, give visual interest. One more feature that I've neglected to point out is that the upper floors of a large number of the modulars use a lower line that is different from the upper parts. Here you can see it in the bakery with the grey jumper plates, in the florist with the flowers, and the cafe as the tan/dark tans. So after analyzing the modulars themselves, I will try to deconstruct MOC modulars and what they do wrong and right. First is a build by /u/Vinklem (on Reddit) that attempts to scale up the Corner Deli set. They get the first floor right in that there is good use of windows and differentiated colors, as well as striping between the upper floors. However, the upper floors do not have a cohesive visual line, and there is no depth variation, leading the build to appear as one large, flat plane instead of a visually separated building. The builder could have improved on this by carrying the line between the Lego store and the deli up the building. This building by /u/SeargentSasquatch gets the texture elements and use of light grey correct, but it fails in carrying a cohesive line up the façade and in differentiating the upper floors from the base. The building has more color around the back, but by not letting that shine through the front the builder has given their building an almost brutalist aesthetic. The build could be fixed by carrying other colors around to the front, and varying the depth of the windows on the center of the building to make a more cohesive line. I picked this building by /u/dm86 because while it mimics many of the aspects of the Pet Shop builds, it loses something in the execution. The most obvious issue is the failure to differ the bottom floor from the upper two. By having a short base floor with a tan color that continues up the build, the builder sacrifices the golden ratio proportions that both the Pet Shop buildings have. The build could be fixed by heightening the bottom floor, sticking to light grey and dark green on the upper floors, and adding texture around the windows in order to have a good looking build. This build by /u/whit123 captures the Modular aesthetic the best of the builds we've looked at so far, but still has some flaws to be addressed. The building does a good job of color blocking and texture. The ground floor is too short, however, and there is no differentiation between the 2nd and 3rd floors. Additionally, the white color blocks are somewhat overbearing- the builder could have used a different color, possibly tan, for the texturing above the windows and the flower beds below. This build, by /u/shdon, is our closest yet! It captures the first floor at an appropriate height, has cohesive lines and color blocking, and even depth in the windows! But it fails in the avenue of depth. This could allow it to truly come into its own. As it stands, the build is solid, but it lacks the character that depth variation in the façade could give it. This build from /u/Skaare42 again comes close to the ideal, but the upper floors lack much depth variation. However, some builders do not build specifically to fit with the standard modular aesthetic, and this is one of those. This Simpsons house mod by /u/droomangroup was chosen because it illustrates some of our concepts well. The builder did a good job of working with the parts they had and converting the Simpsons set into the modular format. However, it does not match the modular 'aesthetic' very well, in that it looks out of place amongst the sets it is placed next to. The building has texturing and reasonable vertical lines, but a big part of what defines the modulars is their color usage and variation. The Simpson's house set only contains a few colors of exterior bricks, and so the builder was limited to a brown, tan, and flesh colored building, which does not fit well with the multi-colored modular buildings. Even the arguably most color-centric set, the Green Grocer, uses tan, white, light grey, brown, black, and blue as accent colors. This is the closest build we have seen so far to capturing the modular aesthetic. Everything is done right, save for the dark green and white section at the roofline. This illustrates a pitfall that many builders succumb to- overdecoration. While the designers over in Billund have essentially free reign on what pieces and colors to use, we peons do not have that luxury, and as a result often have to make part substitutions or adjustments to our ideal designs. One thing that many builders immediately jump to is creating large 'decorations' in order to cover a lack of pieces in the right color, style, or amount. DO NOT DO THIS. Go for subtlety in your modular MOCs. The Green Grocer does not have a large sign outside saying 'GROCER', the Brick Bank does not have a large brick-built dollar sign outside. Try to show what the building is through your architecture, not through explicit decorations. And if you feel the need to add some visual flavor through decoration, go the Assembly Square route and keep it small; minifig scale if you can. This build is again near perfect, but has one key flaw- the builder did not go far enough with separating the tower section on the right side of the building from the rest. It is obvious that it is supposed to be a separate visual line from the rest of the build, but by keeping to the pattern of the rest of the upper floor façade the builder prevents the section from sticking out and speaking for itself. Finally, we get to great examples of Modular MOCs. These all demonstrate an especially solid grasp on the tenants and patterns that make the Modular series distinct and implement them, while exercising their own artistic vision to create unique buildings. This first building by Tobias T. on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/131278188@N08/29112270563/in/faves-75784937@N07/) employs excellent color blocking, making great use of only white and dark orange to create the requisite separation between floors and the building's striping. The black windows provide a consistent contrast to the colors used throughout the build, and the sand green on the first floor and old aqua on the roof provide an extra splash of color. The depth of the build is notable in the dual vertical visual columns that note the different central section. This record store by Sebastian Z (https://www.flickr.com/photos/15902478@N02/12760729075/in/faves-75784937@N07/) is another great example of using only vertical visual columns to give a build weight and detail lines. The eye is immediately drawn to the rounded structure and the rest of the building is observed in relation to that anchor. Like the Fire Brigade, though this building is only 2 floors tall, it manages to fit the aesthetic handily. This build is a great example of great variation within the bounds of the Modular system. The building hardly fits in with the 'standard' of mostly rectangular modular buildings, while still seeming like it could be an official set. This is because the build has a differentiated bottom floor, strong texturing throughout, a careful use of striping, and fantastic color blocking. (It's also the winner of the Modular Madness contest on here!) This Bike Shop build by Lukasz Libuszewski (https://www.flickr.com/photos/137778552@N08/30263533053/in/faves-75784937@N07/) is one of the closest I have seen to capturing the polish of the official sets. It has the color blocking, texture, depth, and striping to fit in, but excels in creating a scene that feels imbued with real life; creating a build that feels 'lived in'. One thing that helps this is the photography- taking well-lit photos of your builds with non-obstructive backgrounds can drastically alter the perception of others when viewing them. This build, Bootblack Street, by patika (https://www.flickr.com/photos/138380948@N04/33681797771/in/faves-75784937@N07/) also has the je ne sais quoi of livelihood that the official Modular sets encapsulate. Note how greatly the depth of the build varies; do not be afraid to have a section of your building jut out many studs from the rest of it! Another MOC by Lukasz, this one is notable for its use of color. The build uses flame yellow, yellow, and tan, 3 colors in the same color family that are usually not put next to each other in Lego buildings, with builders opting for more 'realistic' colors. Do not be afraid to experiment with rare or odd colors in your builds. Purples, mint greens, aquas, and even bright reds can have a place in Modular MOCs; it is up to you to put them there! This is the first in a number of MOCs by Pete Streege/RedCoKid (https://www.flickr.com/photos/redcokid/). This build is titled 'Apple Square University'. Note his use of vertical visual columns in the bay window sections running up the upper floors. Tan is again used as a base color here, added on to with dark blue, medium nougat, dark red, and black sharing an equal stage. Also note the use of vertical striping to break up the large sections of tan between floors. This build is titled Natural History Museum. It is a fantastic example of showing a building's function through its architecture, as opposed to large signs. The only explicit clues to the building's purpose on the outside are the two dinosaur statues. However, as the viewers we can tell what the building's purpose is through the white columns, the bone shaped railings, and the green banners at the top. This building is the Pumpkin Factory and is a good example of depth and line. Notice how the lines created by the windows carry up to the roof of the building, but the lines created by the recessed sections with 'puffy' bricks do not. The depth of the sections with the 'puffy' bricks bears pointing out as well- in order to create a contrast with the rest of the build they are set back half a brick, instead of simply including them in the wall. This gives the building an extra level of visual 'crunch'. Finally, we come upon his Lawyer Laundromat. This build is a tour de force of color, texture, and line. The build employs a multitude of colors, from the common dark tan, black, and dark grey, to the exotic sand red, sand green, and pearl gold. The colors are used intelligently so as not to overwhelm the viewer. Instead they create a pleasing palette. The building's texture is mainly created by alternating SNOT rows of plates and cheese slopes. These provide a great contrast to the solid vertical lines that encapsulate them, while not being overtly obtrusive. And the line of the building are carried through masterfully- notice how the olive green columns surrounding the cheese slope textures are carried through into the brick brick stripes around each floor via tan bricks. Hopefully this guide helped you understand the complexities of the Modular building series and what to strive for when making one of your own. If not, I hope that the numerous examples I provided gave you some inspiration. Leg godt!
  21. fillishave

    [MOC] House of the Inventor

    Hi everyone! First post! My name if Filip and even though I have been playing around with Lego for many years both as a kid and with my own kids I'm quite new to the AFOL-scene. I was encouraged to post this to Eurobricks by LegoModularFan who gave me some overwhelmingly nice comments on Flickr yesterday when I posted this so here goes! I created this for Brixtars modular building competition and this is my second attempt at a full fledged 32x32 modular building. My first building, "The Queens Brick" was quite square in it's shape so I wanted to challenge myself this time and put much more round shapes and angles in there. It was a lot of fun trying out different techniques where some worked better than others but I'm quite happy with the end result even though it will for sure not win any prizes for stability ;) Technically it doesn't really meet the requirements of a modular since I didn't put the technical bricks in there and the street is a bit narrow but it would be an easy enough mod to make it legal. Enough words and on with pictures of my steam-punkish house on the hill with a secret lab for horrible experiments on the top floor and a basement where the irresponsible owner pours his toxic waste out in the sewer system. Here is a link to the rest of the images: https://flic.kr/s/aHskuXCmdk It's quite often one sees micro builds of regular sized modulars but this was actually made the other way around. The idea started with an all digital micro build I did for a competition last year that looked like this: The instructions for the building is available on Brixtar but please bear in mind that the digital instructions are not 100%. For instance, the smaller roof used some parts that didn't actually exist so they need to be replace. Also both roofs need some very heavy reinforcing or they will, I know from hard experience, crumble in your hands :) But please use them as a source for inspiration if you wish! Last but not least, cred where cred is due; the fences/walls were created after inspiration from Jonas Kramms fantastic examples and the usage of tan skeleton legs for the decorations around the windows was something similar I saw a while ago but I couldn't find that image so I'm not sure who came up with it in the first place. Please let me know if you are the person who made that and i will of course mention you both here and on Flickr! Thanks for watching and please let me know both what you might like and what you might not like so I can learn and improve!
  22. ExeSandbox

    [MOC] Umbrella Store

    1 and a half years later, I finally built another Modular Building, WOOOO, hooray, yeah.... I thought I set a pretty high bar with the Doughnut Shop (if I do say so myself), because of that I had trouble thinking of what to build next thematically. So I went the entirely opposite direction, instead of giving it a unique footprint with a rich contrasting color scheme and basing it around an interesting subject, I made the Umbrella Shop a solid rectangular block with a subdued color scheme and gave it the least interesting subject, which is a shop that sells umbrellas. (hOw ExCiTiNg) Of course, then my job was to use those design cues and still make it look nice and interesting. I think I did a pretty good job (but you can be the judge of that. ) (Also just like my previous modular, many building techniques and details were stolen-...ahem...I mean...inspired by the Downtown Diner, some more obvious than others, because I practically worship that modular building at this point. I do feel like the style of this model turned out looking like a scale model building, rather than a LEGO Modular Buildings. But it is still in essence a modular building.) I was initially clueless on how to design the back of the model, since I always pay all my attention to the front, So I just threw in whatever ideas I thought felt good to me. The shuttered windows was actually influenced by my house in which every single window would have a metal lattice placed over it (presumably to prevent easy break-ins.), Exploded view of the model. The tree can actually tilt forwards to allow the upper levels clearance to lift up, this was an accidental but needed feature because I just wanted a solid connection for the tree and the ratchet w/ cross axle receiver element worked for that. Strangely, of all the carefully crafted details in the model, the simple sloped skylight build is my favorite of them all, it really ties everything together nicely. But idk it could just be me. The interior for the titular store. From this view it doesn't look like much is going on unfortunately, but there are some more items and details from other angles. That vintage cash register is way oversized though... It's an odd decision for me to make everything but one item in black and white. But I just couldn't find the right color scheme and I wanted to give off a vintage vibe, so I thought nothing looks more vintage than black and white photographs. I thought the colored shelf looks pretty which is why I left it in. A small little living space, but not good enough to fully sustain a life. The old school-ness really shows on this one with the typewriter and metal frame bed. I'll probably get a raised eyebrow for this, but why is the bathroom fully exposed by a open window and a glass door!? But really, what's there for a minifigure to hide.? If you're one of those people that likes your minifigures a little spicy, ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) please seek help. maybe I'm the one that needs help...... Here's a pic of the iterations this model went through. The first iteration was very very rough and looks like garbage, I established some core ideas with it, but the proportions and window arrangement is bland and unattractive, so I fixed them in the second iteration. I've gotta be pretty careful with what details I add, because for a fairly "simple" building like this, small details can have a massive impact on the way it looks. Welp that's all from me, I hope you enjoyed looking at the model. I gained a lot of satisfaction from designing it, but I have been looking at it everyday for more than a month during designing and the exposure blindness is killing me so it's good to finally be done. Also I went through LEGO rehab and turned a new leaf, so I only used parts in available colors for this model. (well all except for 27150 Minifigure, Utensil Umbrella Folded. Old habits die hard.) Which means I was able to create instructions for this model. If you're interested, you can get it here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-59200/ExeSandbox/umbrella-store/#details (It's a hefty $20 though Do you think this model is worth that much, or should I lower it?) I'd also like to hear what you think about this model. Be as un-objective and critical as possible, don't worry I won't feel bad at all. More pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/exesandbox/albums/72157717310853613
  23. gabrielerava

    Rava Town

    Hi to everyone and happy new year, I've been attending to Eurobricks for some years. Here I got inspiration for my Mocs during last years but never posted anything. This is my first post.So I'm proud and glad to introduce and share with you the result of my moccing in the last years: Rava Town. UPDATE November 2020 UPDATE August 2019 UPDATE 2018 - TRAINS and LUNA PARK RUNNING UPDATE 2018 It's composed of both official Lego models and Mocs made by me (mainly modulars). Here follow some photos. Suggestions for improvements are always welcome !!! Thanks and keep posting. Gabriele
  24. snaillad

    MOC: The Coral Hotel

    Hello fellow EB members. Long time no MOC! I've had a bit of a break due to house moving and having to put all my bricks into storage - that sucks and I never want to have to do it again! Anyway I've eased myself back into building with this relatively speedily built Art-Deco hotel I've had drawn for a while now. An excuse to have another go at building with the curved glass pieces. Anyway onto the pics, 5 in all. I've been influenced by many Miami based hotels so this is not a direct replica of any particular one. Any questions about techniques, comments or suggestions welcome. Cheers!
  25. Hi everyone I'd like to present my latest MOC, a new modular building called Bricks & Blooms. I hope you like it. Bricks & Blooms is a modular Garden Centre built over 3 levels on a 32 x 32 base plate. in total it uses 2587 bricks. The facade is supposed to give the impression of being 2 buildings side by side but it is of course just one single building. The front to back measurement of the building is quite narrow, similar to Parisian restaurant. This is because I wanted to maintain plenty of space at the rear of the building for the main outside garden centre / plant sale area. THE MINIFIGURES I've included 6 mini figs and a cat with this MOC. Left to right they are: 2 customers (a father and his daughter), The garden centre shop keeper and gardener, the chef and the Aquatics shop assistant. THE GARDEN CENTRE AND GROUND LEVEL DETAILS The main garden centre area of the store is situated on the ground level. Outside on the street, I've included a tree, bench and lots of plants and flowers for sale. The garden centre also has a fruit and veg stall that sells it's produce directly to passers by on the street. Inside the shop I've included the cashier desk and more plants and gardening tools for sale including a little lawn mower side-build. Here is the interior of the fruit and veg stall that is accessed through a door at the back of the cashier desk. A door at the back of the shop leads out in to the main outdoor gardening area. Here I've included a large glass canopy covering rows of tables holding bedding plants. There are also more flowers, pots and other gardening products including a water feature. The stairs at the back of the building lead up to level 2. LEVEL 2 - CAFE/RESTAURANT No garden centre would be complete without its own cafe/restaurant. The cafe on level 2 has a fully equipped kitchen with serving desk and tables and chairs for the minifigs. There is also a small balcony in the cafe that looks out on to the street below. LEVEL 3 - AQUATICS Many garden centres here in the UK also have departments that specialise in pet fish and Aquatics. Bricks & Blooms is no exception and has it's own dedicated Aquatics section on level 3. The Cat below seems to have its eye on the goldfish. The door behind the desk leads out on to a small roof terrace area. FLOWER CART The model also includes a flower cart. THE FINISHED MODEL The picture below shows Bricks & Blooms combined with my other modulars and vehicle MOC's. Left to right they are. The Queen Bricktoria Convenience Store Brick Square Post Office Bricks & Blooms The Old Workhorse - Traction Engine LEGO IDEAS I have submitted Bricks & Blooms as a LEGO Ideas project. If you like the model I'd be really grateful if you'd be kind enough to head over to LEGO Ideas and give the model your votes. You can find the project at the following link. Many thanks! http://bit.ly/bricksblooms I hope you like my newest MOC and thanks very much for reading. As always, there are many more pics on my Flickr page and feel free to leave comments and let me know what you think.