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Found 38 results

  1. Hello LEGO fans! I want to share with my new MOC. I tried to make my LEGO railway more realistic. And that's what I did! As you can see, LEGO train tracks looks more interesting with some trees and grass. If you already have LEGO railway, try to add some objects to make it realistic. I like the result! Now my LEGO trains look great on these layouts. Have a nice day!
  2. These models are heavily inspired by Whoward69's fleet of train cars, as seen on his Flickr feed and his instructions linked below. First up is a set off a crane wagon. I modified the original model model's instructions to include a longer base for the crane, and using newer parts to make it a bit more durable. The rear of the crane car should feature six of this print where the yellow 1 x 2 tiles are. The crane car can move side to side or up and down with two sets of ropes to either raise / lower the hook or operate the boom. Please NOTE: I don't have the exact measurements for the two strings as they wasn't listed in said instructions. However, I think two of this string here should be long enough. I also added a flatcar carrying train track for the crane to off-load. This Box Van was a Banana Van when I built from these instructions. I already have two boxcars in this form, and thought four more would be a good idea. This flat car was just a random addition to the train, with no real specific prototype. The brake van was mostly made from these instructions. I embellished the design with a couple of my own touches to keep it in line with the above-mentioned boxcars. I was inspired by the Lone Ranger "Constitution Train Chase" (set number 79111) and it's jail car to add tail lights to this car. This print should go where the black 1 x 2 tiles are under the rear windows. The LDD file for the six boxcars, one depressed center flatcar and the singular guards van is available for download here... ...while the crane car and flat wagon are available for download in this link. Comments, Questions, & Complaints are always welcome! (NOTE: These models should be built IRL by January 2018!)
  3. This model was inspired by set 10199 / 10249, Winter Village toy Shop. I originally built this as an open-back building in 2013, and scrapped it in 2015 for a larger, full-bodied station. I never did forget about this model, and recently rediscovered it while looking for my Hogsmeade station to go with my Hogwarts Express model I had designed. The track side features a space for eight printed 1 x 1 letter tiles to be placed to designate the station name along with plenty of passenger seating along the five-track-long platform. Here is the street side of the station. This side includes an overhang that protects passengers from the rain along with a wheelchair / luggage ramp access to the platform. The model features two modular lift-off levels and two split-away platform sections, along with some inside details. The lower floor features a fireplace, four chairs, and a desk for workers to hand out tickets. The top level features the station master's office. (I'm thinking about adding a staircase from this level to the platform... just have to get around to adding it into the structure.) Here is the complete LDD file. I already have 95% of this model collected IRL, and I just need to order the last 430 parts later this year. Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome!
  4. Lego Railway Signaling

    Hey guys! After a few weeks of break I'm back and working on my test-setup for train signaling. As some of you know, I've built a small test track on my desk and wired up a lot of sensors and LEDs to program and develop a signaling system for trains. I'm finally at a point where I can drive trains over a layout that has block signaling fully working and completely automated too. Here's a video: When the train passes over the block sensor, a flag is set and it's only when the flag is removed (i.e. the train has fully passed over the signal and an additional time of 1 second has passed), that the signal switches to red and vice versa. The code only makes the block-section check it's sensors and flags get set and removed automatically meaning I have minimal code maintenance to do if I want to change anything. I have a lot more signals planned for the future including switch track signals, crossings and station signals. If you're interested, I can provide a PDF with all the signals I came up with. Let me know what you think. All feedback is appreciated.
  5. These buildings were inspired color scheme - wise by set 7222 and the steam locos of the 12v era, which later became Brick Railways Systems main colors. This model was originally built by my father around 2005 / 2006 for an old-style MOC steam engine we built together based off set 7722. It was three tracks long and one track wide at first, but recently I reworked it to be five tracks long and two tracks wide, and with a completely new removable roof. This model can hold any of my steam engines (okay, maybe not the western one, as it is pretty tall), although it is probably too short in length for my diesel units. The rear of the shed. The building is 5 tracks long, which is 80 studs in length. The maximum side clearance is good enough for a 10 stud wide model while the trains can be no more than 11 bricks tall. The original model's roof is permanently attached, while the remake features one large removable section. My father built his original old grey water tower way back in the 1990's back when 9V was king. When he built my first LEGO train (it was a set 7722 inspired steamer, which gave me the idea for my red & black color scheme) in 2006, he built me the water tower to go with it. It wasn't until 2014 when I built myself a long-awaited coaling tower using inspiration from the website called LGauge (link: http://lgauge.com/ ) Anyway, these models are built to be sat the correct height for most official engines, such as the My Own Train series, along with all my custom engines such as my 4-8-2 "Mountain", 2-8-2 "Mikado", 2-6-0 "Mogul", 4-4-0 "American", and so on. The coaling tower features a movable chute to load the (imaginary) coal into the engine's coal bunker or separate tender. The Forgotten Daylight 4460 is a oil burner, so it does not use this particular tower. The girders on the rear of the coal tower are supposed to represent real-world idea of housing a bucket-conveyor system to load the bin inside the tower. Here, in LEGO, it is just for looks. The water tower features a movable spout to fill up the engine's tanks / tender. Here are the LDD files for the buildings so far: LDD file for the double track shed: shed with doors ldd file LDD file for both refueling towers: refueling towers file NOTE: This thread is a W-I-P: the shed parts have been ordered as of 2/3/16, but the switch tower is a ways off into the future. I should have the shed built by this time next week or the week after! EDIT 2/22/16: The shed is finished, while the switch tower is pushed back some.. it won't be built for a while. EDITED 1/14/17: As of January 2017 the shed now has opening engine doors which are colored to match the red stripe on the walls. They will be added to the real life model as soon as funds allow, but there is a sneak peek in the latest post! (The LDD file has been updated as well with the doors.)
  6. [MOC] ICE 3

    Hi everyone! Fortunately I have the time to share here my newest creation! It's a train and it's the model of an ICE 3. It is 196 stud (157 cm) long and contains more than 3300 pieces, two IR receivers, two battery boxes and two train motors. Hope you like it! Oh, and another important information is, that it will be visible on Zusammengebaut 2016 in November and on Bricks am Meer in April 2017 in Germany!At first please watch these two videos! The first one shows a crash. The place, where I made the video, wasn't horizontal, and on the slope the train got a too high speed The records of the second one were made after I repaired the train. Well, I can say it is quite stable construction, despite the building techniques of the front. During the crash, only the boogies fell down! I'm really happy, that it is ready! It took me almost a year to build and become satisfied with the result. You may know, if someone build a train, the front is the most important thing. If it's not good, it's unnecessary to build the other sections. Everything started with an LDD model from a front-idea. I built something in the program, but I didn't like it. Later it came always into my mind and didn't allow me to be calm. So I started to develope the construction. Some month later it looked nice enough to order some parts and make it in real life. It contained so many interesting and strange techniques, that it was a real challenge to put the bricks together in the program, and with real bricks it was hard, too. And the real 3D model was ugly! But I said, that it has to be possible to find out something, which makes the model better. So I made some changes, and some more, and some more, and finally I liked it, and I thoght that I found the maximum! I stored the train (only the front section) and some other parts on the table in the middle of our house. And one night, I couldn't sleep. I woke up and went out to the table to do something. And I don't know why, but I put an element into the middle of the front. And I said 'wow'! It was perfect (for me of course, for you, I still don't know, but I will read the comments :) )! Some gaps disappeared, some sections got new positions. That element made so big changes on the overall look, that it was incredible! I felt high, but next day I was very sleepy. :D More pictures are available here: http://www.moc-pages.com/moc.php/433076 Thanks for watching!
  7. This building is inspired by 2011 Harry Potter set 10217 (Diagon Alley), specifically the Borgin and Burkes shop that is technically not on Diagon Alley in the HP universe. (it is instead of a neighboring street where evil wizards / witches dwell) Here is the front of the building. The number "1887" goes on the four studs above the middle second floor windows using printed number tiles. That year was the year the building was built, by the way. The new rear half of the building features a back door and a couple windows. This model will serve as my fictional railroad's headquarters on my town, and as such has a miniature model railroad inside. (just for the heck of it) The building also features a tower, two story fireplace, and staircase to the upper floor. The lack of other interior furnishings is intentional, as I haven't been able to think of a single piece of early to mid 1900's furniture for the offices of the railway president and the accompanying secretary. The building has hinges to allow for it to open up to 90 degrees, but no further due to the wall ornaments being in the way. As usual, the building is locked together by a friction-less Technic pin to allow for easy opening and shutting. The original building from set 10217 has 14 dark green windows I need for a updated train (seen here: http://www.eurobrick...howtopic=138020 ), so this building will be built sooner rather than later, probably next month, if possible. (I really don't know, as I'm juggling about five possible next-builds at the moment. All will be built eventually, but whatever's next I don't know for sure!) Comments, Questions, and Complaints are always welcome, plus the LDD file for the entire model is available here: http://www.moc-pages.com/user_images/80135/1471631763m.lxf Thanks for viewing! UPDATE 8/19/16: The buildings was an odd number of studs long, which was causing problems. I have since fixed that, and as such the LDD file and pictures have been updated.
  8. <http://imgur.com/zrHfANm> <http://imgur.com/fKuqmvK> <http://imgur.com/1ACtwEu> <http://imgur.com/pxYSecM> Just a little bit of history: The Great Western Railway's 517 class (first introduced 1868) had seen over 60 years of service and, in 1932, they were in need of replacing. The 4800 class was based on the 517 class, in fact, you could see how they looked like 517 class. The 2800 class locomotives were modified for oil firing and they were renamed the 4800s and the 4800s were renamed 1400 and there were 74 locomotives of the 1400s class (#1400-#1474). The 1400s were withdrawn from 1963 though 1965 and only four are preserved today; 1420, 1442, 1450, 1466. The 1400s are my favorite class. They were small and reliable. As for my build of it, its not the best but I like it. Though it originally had a powered chassis, The Drive Wheels are now connected using 3 36-teethed gears.
  9. Hi folks, It is one of my earlier builds that I want to share with you: an automatic railway crossing. The LDD sketch: The barriers of the crossing are powered by two medium PF motors. I use two PF receivers: one to control the PF motors of the barriers, and one to control the lights. The two PF lights are crosswise connected to the PF receiver. By this means, I am able to get flashing lights and add sound. All of this above is controlled by a Lego Mindstorms NXT and an Hi-Technic HR link (in case you don't know: with the HR link you can translate Mindstorms commands into PF commands). In the video below you can see and hear the result: In the video below you can see the result in a small train layout. A PC application controls the two trains (both having a Mindstorms NXT + HiTechnic sensor to control the train) and also the Mindstorms NXT that controls the railway crossing. Hope you like it. /Hans
  10. Hi guys! It's my first Topic here, on Eurobricks, hope you'd love it(: I called this base "CargoB-808": its name consists of words "Cargo" and "Base". Train have quite a lot of place inside its aim is to transport some sort of ammunition, weapons, usefull little things^^ Some pictures made from the front: The ground floor plays the role of warehouse: Here u can see a jail and and a surgery: And there are a lot of control pannels on the first floor(: One more beautifull photo and thats it!)
  11. [MOC] - Watchman's House

    Hi everyone! If you recall the memories about my older buildings (Snack Bar, Airport Control Tower, Floriculture), you may realise, that all of them had a very detailed interior, and it was more attractive, than the exterior. Now I tried to create a building with a highly detailed overall look. And it has no interior, because I had to use the space inside for building different things, which keep the door, the windows and the chimney. After some brainstorming I found out, that I make something in the style of the old Hungarian railway buildings. There are a lot of interesting challenges at this topic. Stations, sheds, water houses, warehouses, etc. Finally I decided to build the wathman's house, because it is the smallest, and this size is still okay for my budget :) The next picture shows the house with my Siemens Taurus. Not exactly the same era - totally different :D but I think they look cool together! The pictures below show a lot of interesting things around the house, after them you can see the building tricks I used in or on the house. I'm really proud of two things. The first is the white MÁV (hungarian railway company) fence. It is possible to find it almost everywhere (picture of the real one). My Lego version is not perfect, a little bit different from the real one, but I guess, I cant do it better with Lego bricks. The fence is modular, and only the gravity holds it. Basic rule of Lego is 2 studs = 5 plates. It is not true. Theoretically it is possible to make an endless fence, but the truth is that only these five moduls are enough to create an ugly difference between the basement and the fence The second is the two bushes. They are also held by the gravity. I used this and this elements to create them. Furthermore there is an outhouse and a garden shower in the courtyard. Another interesting thing is the roof. I always used platebuilt roofs with hinges, but it is possible to create only a few angles with them, whithout a gap at the top, between the two half. But now I found out this new technique with technic pieces. More pictures are on MOCpages! Thanks for visiting!
  12. Burlington Northern EMD SD40-2

    Hey fellow EBers, I'd like to present my second-ever train MOC, and the one I'm most proud of; a Burlington Northern EMD SD40-2 Burlington Northern EMD SD40-2 by Joshua, on Flickr Here's the engine without the base: EMD SD40-2 without base by Joshua, on Flickr The SD40-2 was introduced in January 1972 as part of EMD's Dash 2 series, competing against the GE U30C and the ALCO Century 630. Although higher-horsepower locomotives were available, including EMD's own SD45-2, the reliability and versatility of the 3,000-horsepower (2,200 kW) SD40-2 made it the best-selling model in EMD's history and the standard of the industry for several decades after its introduction. The SD40-2 was an improvement over the SD40, with modular electronic control systems similar to those of the experimental DDA40X. Peak production of the SD40-2 was in the mid-1970s. Sales of the SD40-2 began to diminish after 1981 due to the oil crisis, increased competition from GE's Dash-7 series and the introduction of the EMD SD50, which was available concurrently to late SD40-2 production. The last SD40-2 delivered to a United States railroad was built in July 1984, with production continuing for railroads in Canada until 1988, Mexico until February 1986, and Brazil until October 1989. As of 2013, nearly all still remain in service. The SD40-2 has seen service in Canada, Mexico, Brazil and Guinea. To suit export country specifications, General Motors designed the JT26CW-SS (British Rail Class 59) for Great Britain, the GT26CW-2 for Yugoslavia, South Korea, Iran, Morocco, Peru and Pakistan, while the GT26CU-2 went to Zimbabwe and Brazil. Various customizations led Algeria to receive their version of a SD40-2, known as GT26HCW-2. SD40-2s are still quite usable nearly fifty years after the first SD40 was made, and many SD40s and locomotives from the pre-Dash-2 series (GP/SD 40s, 39s and 38s, and even some SD45s) have been updated to Dash-2 specifications, possibly including downgrading from 20-645E to 16-645E engines, including, certainly, Dash-2 electrical controls, although the pre-Dash-2 frames cannot accommodate the somewhat similar HTC truck in the space allocated to the Flexicoil C truck (the frame is not long enough). Most SD40-2s which remain in service have by now been rebuilt "in-kind" for another 30 to 40 years of service, although a few (under 30) have been rebuilt to incorporate a 12-cylinder EFI-equipped 710G engine. Source, Wikipedia --------------------------------------------------------- This model has been in existence for several years, but just now reached the stage where I'm comfortable posting it, as all the previous versions were, quite frankly, abysmal. worth noting is that this model was blogged on The Brother's Brick: http://www.brothers-...0-2-locomotive/ Although you can't see it in these photos, the model features working front lights. Hope you all like it! C&C welcome! Cheers, Joshua
  13. Hi! As you can see on the two pictures above and in this short , this MOC is a copy of a real thing.We haven’t got a Grand Canyon, or an Eiffel in Hungary, but it’s still possible to find nice places here. For example Szilvásvárad (a little village) is one of the most best places of the country. There is a small valley here, which was made by the Szalajka creek. And at the and of it there is this beautiful waterfall. There are a lot of other sights, too, for example the ancient men’s cave, the lookout tower, etc. It’s possible to reach the end of the valley on foot, by bicycle, and by the narrow gauge railway. It has a 4 km long trank in the forest, near the creek. It was a forestry railway in the past, and now it’s the only narrow gauge railway in Hungary, which can maintain itself. It has more, than 200 000 passengers a year. The railway usually uses two engines. One of them was modernized a few years ago, it is the one on the main photo. My Lego version contains this engine, a passenger coach and the snack bar wagon. The snack bar wagon is almost always near the waterfall, sometimes the engine takes it back to the village to refill it. The amount of tourists is increasing, I guess it was the reason of some developments there. Due to them, the valley contains to much buildings and asphalt, but it’s still nice. Don’t forget to visit it, if you are in Hungary! You can find more pictures about the Lego model, and the real train on Mocpages! Thanks for watching!
  14. Hello All, I've been working on a town layout in my lair for a long time, and today i achieved a milestone in the construcion of the railway station. it is 3x Baseplates wide here is the design i was working on in LDD and as of tonight, after 5 Bricklink orders i have achieved building the main structure: plans are to develop a bus stop, some small stores such as newspaper stand etc, and add higher level detail... will pave the entire area, and I am looking into learning the artform of making my own decals/stickers. will keep you posted.
  15. This model was inspired by Scotnick1 and his Maithwaite Station model from "The Railway Series", also known as "Thomas and Friends". Here is a album of his with the original station in it: https://www.flickr.c...157639900227095 The station features a five track long platform, which can be retracted to a minimum of three tracks by removing the two side segments. More sections can be added to increase the length to whatever you need, with removable end-caps at either left / right side. All of these platforms are held together by Technic pins. Inside the station proper is a help / ticket desk with cash register, and off to the left side is a employees-only area with stairs to the second floor office. This office features a desk with chair and fireplace. The second floor roof, the second floor proper and first floor roof are removable. Also, the two clocks on the second floor roof are supposed to have this print: http://www.bricklink...asp?P=3960pb024 (This print is not currently available in LDD.) The street side features a short staircase to the front entryway. The studs above these doors and the same on the opposite side are supposed to spell out the station name. I haven't decided on a name for this one yet, but am leaning towards the name "Imperial". Here we see the individual components of the station. This includes: - first floor / main platform (1) - second floor (1) - roof of first floor (1) - roof of second floor / clock tower (1) - end-caps for platform (1 left and 1 right version) - identical platform extenders (2) Here is the LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1430322575m.lxf This station will replace Barretts station on my layout (some parts of Barretts will be reused on this model), as this station is larger that the other, and has a street side, whereas Barretts does not. Comments are always welcome!
  16. (Logo for Brick Railway Systems, or BRS for short. Railway rolling stock color scheme is black with a thin red base stripe) Background info on the Company: Brick Railway Systems (BRS) was constructed in the early 1870's from pieces of other roads. It began small, with only 120 miles of track laid as of 1873. (Note: Only 57 of those miles were actually constructed by BRS, not by the former component roads) By 1910, BRS had rose through the ranks of the other roads to become the top freight hauler in the country. However, In World War One, the railway was was run into the ground by government control via the Imperial Railroad Administration (IRA), which took over control of all railroads in 1914 and kept them until 1920. Upon return of the company to it's civilian owners, the railroad itself was in shambles The company responded by trimming the unnecessary trains that had been kept running during the war years even though they were practically useless. By 1928, the company had remade itself so much so that it had electrified most of it's main line between Glencoe, Ironwood, & Fort Legoredo. This cut back majorly on some of the costs of steam engine fuel and maintenance for the railroad. The benefit of this was not evident immediately, but later payed for itself when the Great Depression hit. By the the Second World War, BRS was even better off than had been projected in the depths of the depression The war traffic barely affected the system, as the 1920's upgrades had unexpectedly prepared the system for the surge in goods and soldiers. In the late 40's, while several other roads had started getting rid of their steam engines for diesels, BRS was resisting the flow by building more steam, and experimenting with more advanced designs such as duplexes, triplexes, & Garrett’s These efforts never payed off, but the they did give the BRS engineers valuable advice on what to do and what not to do with steam. Meanwhile, diesels were on the railroad from starting around 1936, but not in great numbers until the late '60's. 'The System' (as she is sometimes called) was doing fine at this time, while other roads were struggling. By the '70's, diesel fuel prices had put a stop to the diesel takeover, and optimism was high. This feeling continued right up until 1987. The main competitor, Federal Railways, had gone up for sale and Brick Railway Systems was getting a ring-side seat on what could happen if a road got out of hand. Before their eyes, the road was torn apart by lack of leadership, (not helped by the fact the Federal Railway / Brick Railway Systems merger was denied) lack of funds and working motive power. Then, in late 1992, the railway was finally gone, eaten up by hungry debtors and rival railroads alike. (some of it was eventually bought by BRS) The other half of the '90's & the early 2000's had Brick Railway Systems wondering if the same financial breakdown would happen to it. By 2010 the shock had worn off, and the optimism had returned, albeit with a little more caution. Background on the building: Built in 1977 - 77 after a tornado destroyed the vintage 1899 headquarters for Brick Railway Systems, this building has been modernized several times in it's long life. The first section or "Building A", as it's now known, is shown here and was finished in 1977. A copy was added in 1991 and another in 2010, forming the identical buildings B & C. The rear of the building. The first floor (top right) is the reception area, where visitors wait for the person whom them are visiting to come and get them. The second floor (bottom right) features an area of cube-less cubicles. In the 1970's, it was thought that an open floor plan would encourage free thinking and higher productivity. The idea never caught on outside of BRS, and has become a hallmark of the company. The third floor (bottom left) is the executive level. It contains a very large model railroad showing the humble beginnings of Brick Railway Systems back in 1869 through 1879, when the line ran from Glencoe to Barretts Station and on towards Washington, Missouri. Builder's notes: This model is based off of set 60047 (The 2014 Police Station) and has been modified to an extreme extent. The billboard is a modified and enlarged Grand Emporium sign, which is supposed to say the words BRICK RAILWAY SYSTEMS (in printed 1 x 1 tiles). The LDD file is avalible, and can be downloaded here: LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1428872293m.lxf Comments, Questions, & complaints welcome!
  17. 0-6-0 steam heavy-duty switcher This model is an Americanized version of Scotnick's Thomas & friends model "Stanley" (link to that engine on Flickr: https://www.flickr.c...N07/8732762280/ ) with some new running gear provided by Hunter Dobbs from his model of the Thomas & Friends engine "Lady". (link to that engine on Flickr: https://www.flickr.c...02/16562999581/ ) The engine features a new headlight on top of the smokebox and is a little longer than the last version by about four studs. The pistons (hopefully) will work in real life, as I messed with and extended Hunter Dobbs design to include a third axle. The engine is going to be numbered 4990, with the number going on the saddle tank and the letters BRS going on the rear of the locomotive, right between the two red stripes on the coal bunker. NOTE: This model requires custom Big Ben Bricks small steam engine drivers, as in 4 flanged and 2 blind. The gears seen here are placeholders and will NOT work on track! (Link to Big Ben Bricks: http://www.bigbenbricks.com/ ) The rear of the locomotive. Background: Built in 1922 by H.K. Porter, this steam locomotive is of a saddle tank design, (that means it carries the water over-the-top of the boiler in tanks, kinda like a saddle on a horse) as part of an order for 25 engines by Brick Railway Systems, numbered 4975 to 5000. The class was built for yard work, though some were sent out onto the main lines to haul commuter trains when the need arose. This engine class features red stripes on the sides and over the tanks on top of the boiler. I will be purchasing this engine after the parts for locomotive shed I posted on February 15th. LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1428605637m.lxf 0-4-0 steam dockyard switcher This was originally set 3740, Small Locomotive from the My Own Train series. I revamped the 2001 set, adding Big Ben Brick medium wheels and working pistons courtesy of Hunter Dobbs. NOTE: All four of the wheels are removed from them LDD model. The proper parts are available at the Big Ben Bricks website, and are not in LDD. (You need four of the "Medium Flanged Drivers")The number of the engine (3007) goes on the side of the boiler, while the letters "BRS" go on the side of the cab. Fictional background: Built in 1923 by Baldwin Locomotive Works for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), engine 3007 was part of a 250 strong class of switchers made for the tight industrial & dockyard trackage of Brick Railway Systems. The class spread from number 3000 to 3250. They were painted in classic BRS black with a red stripe along the base. LDD file: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1428604656m.lxf Thought, Comments, and questions are all welcome! (EDIT 9-15-2015: Fixed the LDD file and pictures, plus I added a another switcher to the first post.)
  18. Fictional background: This 4-4-0 (also known as an American type) was built by Rodgers Locomotive & Machine Works for Brick Railway Systems (BRS) in 1870, and features a bright red-yellow-&-black paint scheme. Number 11 pulled passenger trains for 15 years before being reassigned to Freight duties in 1885. By 1890, the engine was worn out, and sent to a scrapper, who sold the engine to a museum for $100. Eventually, the museum was reorganized as the Imperial Rail Museum, where the engine rests today in non-operable condition. There were plans to get number 11 in working order for the US Bicentennial in 1976, but nothing ever came it, and the engine has remained cold and silent to this day. (This engine is the oldest surviving BRS loco in existence.) The model and color scheme was inspired by the steam engine from LEGO Toy Story set #7597 "Western Train Chase" (Link to Bricklink: http://www.bricklink...em.asp?S=7597-1 ) Here is the original model from the stock set. I've tried three times to get this engine right (working pistons and can go around curves + switches) and, twice I've failed. Let's hope the third time's the charm! The rear of the locomotive. Here is a better view of the side rods and wheels. The letters BRS go on the sides of the tender while the number 11 should go on the cab sides. One of these goes on the firebox door in the cab (Bricklink link: http://www.bricklink...asp?P=4150pb086 ) Other than that those parts, everything is where it should be. Here are the car's it's going to pull: (As a side note, the chains on the car ends have a glitch and refused to bend. They are supposed to sit on the 1x1 clip plates, and not the handrail / bar itself.) I was inspired by HunterDobbs and his red train cars to build my own versions. I think he got the idea from set 10173, Holiday Train. (link: http://www.bricklink...m.asp?S=10173-1 ) but his red versions look so much better than the plain white originals. I intened on using these with my 4-4-0 steam engine... once I build I get around to building it! (Here is a link to HunterDobbs' Flickr photostream: https://www.flickr.c.../117260213@N02/ ) Here is the train with 4-4-0. I think it looks like a contrast to my dark green 2-6-0 and matching train. Here is the other train for comparison. The LDD file (for the 4-4-0 engine only) is here, if anyone wants it: http://www.mocpages....1428585286m.lxf The LDD file (for the 4-4-0 & it's train) is here, if anyone wants it: http://www.mocpages....1428593703m.lxf Comments, Questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  19. Here is my Victorian-inspired train station and signal tower. If I made a topic about the station before, I am sorry. I'm reposting it as I couldn't find it. First up is the station: Background info: This station was built between the East & West Barrett's Tunnels in 1893 by the Missouri Pacific Railroad. It was used until 1944, when the war-time traffic became too much, and the two single track tunnels were bypassed by a double track cut-through built right next door. The Station and the West tunnel were preserved, while the East tunnel was covered up and buried under a road, which was eventually named Barrett's Station Road. The site of the station was turned into a museum known as the Museum of Transportation. Builder's notes: This station was originally the Toy Shop from the Winter Village series of LEGO sets. In real life, the story I just told you is 100% true. However, the Barret's station was not made in 1893, and looks nothing like the one seen here. The inspiration for the station came from the real-life Kirkwood Railroad Station which was built in 1893, is still used by Amtrak and is located a short distance up the track from the Museum of Transportation. Their are supposed to be printed 1x1 tiles spelling out BARRETTS on the sign on the front on the station. The other version I uploaded yesterday of this station will not work with my budget, so I went back to the drawing board and looked at my original station made from set 10199. I then combined the best of both stations into this model. This station is the fourth station I have made from 10199, and uses mostly parts from the second version from 2013. Here we see the station separated into it's modular components: - left platform - right platform - station building with access ramp (lower level) - station building and roof (upper floor) - station building tower roof The inside of the station features the following on the first floor: inside seating, stone fireplace, and a old-fashioned cash register for ticket sales. (This piece: http://www.bricklink....asp?P=3039pb26 ) The second floor (tower) is a employees-only area and houses some machinery. Here is the brand new street side of the station. This side includes an overhang that protects passengers from the rain.\ Next is the tower: Fictional History: This tower was built in 1893 at the same time as Barrett's Station, to control the single track mainline. The tower was updated in 1928 with modern controls and bypassed in 1944 by a double-track cutoff to avoid the bottleneck of the two single-track Barrett's Tunnels. The tower was preserved by the Museum of Transportation and has been recently turned into a public lookout point for the busy Brick Railway Systems mainline. Builder's Notes: This is a Signal tower that matches the color scheme and design features of my Barrett's Station model. This Victorian-era tower features a signal bridge, a spiral staircase to connect the two floors and a signal / switch computer from more modern times. The story on Barrett's Station is inspired by real life, but the real station was a one story affair and had no tower accompanying it. The Museum of Transportation does exist, however, and there is an elevated platform (at the way back of the property) to watch Union Pacific trains go by every fifteen minutes or so. The first floor features the spiral staircase. The signal arm disconnects from the first floor, and is attached to the second floor. The signal arm is a modified version of the one at the L Gauge website. (Link: http://lgauge.com/ ) The second floor features the control panel for the lights, and a desk for dispatching orders to the train crews, or in this case, holding a newspaper. The (updated) LDD file for the station is here: http://www.mocpages....1428338100m.lxf The LDD file for the tower is here: http://www.mocpages....1419790555m.lxf This model was inspired by set 10199, Winter Village toy Shop. The model is up for a remodel into a double sided version with a bigger interior, so I though I'd take some pictures while it's still together in this form. The platform splits off into three parts: left side (which is about three tracks in length) right side, (which is about one track long) and the building itself. (which is two tracks in length) The building is open backed, and features a desk on the top floor and ticket counter with cash register on the first floor. Comments welcome!
  20. (Please note: I could not remember making a topic for this train. I looked through about 15 pages of train topics and couldn't find anything like this... sorry if I missed it or something.) This four car passenger train was inspired by LEGO sets 10015 (Passenger Wagon) and 79111. (Constitution Train chase) The color scheme is based upon the one seen in the movie "The Lone Ranger", although that film takes place in the 1870's and this train is from the 1910's. The locomotive is a 2-6-0 (two leading, six driving, and zero trailing wheels) steam locomotive. The piston design was taken from Benn Coifman and his instructions for adding pistons to set 79111's locomotive, while the tender was inspired by the one attached to Anthony Sava's 4-6-2 steam engine, with SNOT (Studs Not On Top) stripes from his 4-6-0 engine's tender. The rear of the engine features a ladder for access to the cab from the train along with a red tail lamp. The coaches were originally designed to look like set 10015, but the design evolved to it's current form through a combination of expensive parts shortages, guessing and inspiration. The rear of the train is supposed to have "BRS" (short for Brick Railway Systems) in black printed 1x1 tiles situated on the back railing. These letters also go on the sides of the tender, while the number 4613 go on the locomotive cab sides. The LDD file is here if anyone wants it: http://www.mocpages....1421791760m.lxf Here is the pictures of the train in real life: The locomotive is a 2-6-0 (two leading, six driving, and zero trailing wheels) steam locomotive. Engine number 4613 usually pulls the Emerald Express. Combination baggage and passenger car for the Emerald Express. Two identical passenger coaches for the Emerald Express. The observation car of the Emerald Express. The letters BRS stand for Brick Railway Systems, the owner of the train. Comments, questions, & complaints welcome!
  21. This railway shed was inspired by Shaun Baseby. (alias: Lightningtiger or "LT") He designed the basic frame on this shed with one of his town buildings, and I ran with it. The platform in the center is low enough 8 wide trains can drive by, but only barely. This model was inspired by the Roberts Building at the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri... now all it needs is a clock tower in the center! side view. The model itself is 5 tracks long, but sits on a 32 x 96 stud base-plate (that's three 32 x 32's put together) This photo shows how tall the shed is. That's the Southern Pacific 4-8-4 Daylight number 4460 & my Brick Railway Systems 2-10-4 "Texas" number 6297 in there. The engines are also my longest to date, and they fit inside with room to spare. (The Daylight and / or Texas type are NOT included in the LDD file, by the way) And yes,set set 10014 Caboose can fit under this as well. LDD file: http://www.mocpages....1427740513m.lxf Comments welcome!
  22. I'd like your input on this set I made recently: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/95531 It's based on a very famous event in US history in 1869, when the rail networks of the East and West coasts were symbolically connected for the first time with the driving of a final golden railroad spike with a silver hammer. To the best of my knowledge, this would be the first non-fictional Wild West Lego train set. The 150th anniversary of this event is only a few years away, so I figure now is as good a time as ever for Lego to release something like this.
  23. Extra Boiler Details

    Hey guys, I have found a cool way to use the minifigure style head piece to go inside boilers. I just used that and an upside down 1x1 to give it some depth. Lego train Boiler by Railco1, on Flickr Lego train Boiler by Railco1, on Flickr I think it adds a small touch to the boiler and I hope you like it! -Rail Co [How you can use it for cars!]: http://www.eurobrick...howtopic=105602
  24. The Van Conundrum.

    So I've been steadily increasing my collection of steam era 7 wide wagons over the last few months. Most of them came out remarkably well and remarkably quickly and needed little or no modifications to the original design, others (well the brakevan) needed a little work but didn't take too long all the same. Then there's the van conundrum. I just can't get these right, and it continues to bug me that the most simple shape a railway wagon can be is causing me the most issues. The original design took a lot of time to perfect, and in LDD looked pretty good, but it turned out to be less than solid in the bricks, and whilst it basically looks really good, it's also a bit too short compared to the other rolling stock I have and am designing. After a fair bit of faffing, I was still not altogether happy, so I decided to pad around the net for other people's ideas, and I stumbled across H.A.Brick's PF battery van kit. It arrived, and I enjoyed building it (there's an extra instruction book and some extra pieces to build it without the sensor hole), but it only served to highlight the problems with my existing design (too short, not sturdy enough). Never the less, it gave me some ideas, such as using some black Lego to represent the frames the van is sat on to bulk up it's height, so after slightly modifying the (upper part of the) build to closer fit my needs, I set upon one of my existing vans to have a look at the idea with my standard truck chassis design. The height was good, but the bufferbeam was terrible, in order to line up with the rest of my rolling stock, it needed to be lower than the 'frames' which just doesn't look right at all. The current line up, L-R: modified H.A.Bricks van, modified version of my cattlevan MOC (with some random colours and random gaps), my original standard van MOC. The modified H.A.Bricks design. Internally strengthened and black plate/rail removed from between the body and the roof to bring down to my preferred height. (See also the rather ugly bufferbeam of the truck next to it.) Modified version of my cattle van. Although now the correct hight, I really don't like the fact the bufferbeam isn't inline with the 'frames'. Original design. See the less than perfect panel alignment due to less than perfect internal structure plus old and chewed bricks. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Still not exactly happy with any of the designs, I went back to LDD. First I married the H.A.Bricks design with my own frames, and it wasn't bad but I was still not sure it was right for my preferred style and level of detail. Another thought I had was to add an extra plank to my existing design (and drastically redesign it internally). I've come up with several variations, none of which feels like a complete winner to me. H.A.Bricks inspired vans, both short and long bodied (whichever style I settle on, I will eventually produce long and short bodied versions). Several variations on the 7 high version of my van and cattle van. At the moment, my preferred normal van is the one with the 1x8 tiles running down the side and preferred cattle van will probably be a long bodied version of the one with the 1x8 tiles hanging down the side (although I can't decide on plain doors (middle version) or slatted doors (other two). ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Any ideas or suggestions are very welcome, also if anybody wants the LDD files to play with (complete with engine and brakevan), feel free to PM me.
  25. Winter Village Station

    Here is my latest creation: the Winter Station! As previously announced in the spring of 2014, the station was the last big building I had in mind to achieve. I got there just now because I can finally put the railroad in my diorama in a new row of bases on the front. The station occupies two bases 32x32 and has a considerable size but always in line with the other buildings in my village (visit here: https://www.flickr.c...57638505699563/). I tried to enter details as possible using many small parts and developing very both the architectural interiors. Throughout the building (including its two bases of support) has over 4600 pieces. The architecture is reminiscent of a mix front of some stations real, for example for the clock on top of the roof I was inspired by some Italian stations. The tracks pass close to the dock, which allows travelers to get on and off easily by train. On front side windows with embellishments side obtained with techniques snot and upper ones have the shutters of wood with a central cross that look a bit the north-European style. The clock on top is an addition to not leave the roof too simple. But now we speak of the interior: I worked a lot on the interior looking at part of recreating a station in reality. It helped me in this also my personal experience in the world of railways and railway signaling. In the central part of the ground floor there is an open corridor (without front door) of passage for the public. At the bottom left you can see the control room with the head station while controlling rail traffic with all its equipment. Alongside you can see instead of the ticket office with two doors to the public, monitor for announcements of trains departing and arriving, a tree with Christmas decorations and accessories. At the bottom right is the waiting room. In this room is accessed by a door from the central corridor. The room is composed of a series of wooden benches for waiting minifig and some accessories such as newspapers, lamps, flowers and paintings. The walls and floors look a little stations of 60/70 years with a retrò style. And now comes the most interesting part: the attic. The floor is reached by a staircase from the hallway and opening a trap door on the attic. For some time I wanted to make an attic by inserting a bit 'of everything. The basic idea was to make it look like a storage of goods, or rather a warehouse where it was placed a bit 'of everything and consequently left abandoned over time. No attendant at the station today remembers what is stored there! If you look around carefully you will notice several things extravagant and of course I have not forgotten the reference to some famous films, especially the golden object on the right. The boxes with printed markings are 3 accessories can be purchased on site www.minifigforlife.com Other details The floor gives access to the side doors to two small terraces in which it was done a Christmas tree (left) and a little man with snow (right). The gear technic you see behind the clock serves to adjust the time, of course, will allow us to have just the right time twice a day! In the building there are 10 minifigs and as usual I have included a number of fairly rare pieces as if it were a UCS. The part of the roof is easily removable for a better look at the ceiling; Also the entire first floor is removable in order to better observe the ground floor. Finally, the entire station is removable from the base to be able to put in boxes for transport. Enjoy! Gallery HD images on Flickr: https://www.flickr.c...57650075760667/