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Found 309 results

  1. Not just trains, but train related. I built a big blast furnace with 13k bricks a while ago. It took several weeks to build it all in LDD. I tested the stability of the pipes i.r.l. with random bricks to be sure. When I posted those pictures, quite a few people asked for instructions so I decided to make a small blast furnace instead and enter it at Lego Ideas. It comes with all the main process features except the storage bunkers and crane. If you are interested in more pictures, please have a look at the linked page. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/7e689689-cd51-4f10-9e9f-ead01adae6b8 blast furnace by Yvonne Strijbos, on Flickr Blast furnace front by Yvonne Strijbos, on Flickr Blat furnace real built 2 by Yvonne Strijbos, on Flickr Blast furnace real built 1 by Yvonne Strijbos, on Flickr
  2. Anybody got an idea on below green traced tile, how this is done? I’m not sure if this tile is split in 6-7 studs or full length 10-12 studs.  For the tile on the right I already have a modified square tile with 2 studs on top.
  3. Hello all! I have recently started taking interest in Lego medieval MOC's and I was wondering if there is any kind of basic inventory to start the collection with. I mean an inventory of the most commonly used 20-50 items in these kind of builds, the absolute must have pieces. I've been experimenting with bricklink wanted lists, but some advice from the experienced builders would be much appreciated! :) Have a nice day!
  4. paupadros

    [MOC] Disco 2000 Vinyl Store

    The concert's on, come have a listen! Disco 2000 Vinyl Store is my (I think) ninth modular and the closure of the A Summer in Tuscany - Klee Corner - Disco 2000 trilogy. I was dying to do a new corner building, mainly for three reasons: First, Lego's doing one this year, so I figured... why not? Second, because I hadn't done a pure 32x32 corner building since Sweets & Co., almost a year and a half ago! And third, because I wanted to. Without further ado.... It may not be apparent at first glance, but this modular has easily been the most time-costing and hardest modular to build. The ground floor was built up fairly quickly between May and June 2018, but creating something worthy on top is what took me all summer to figure out. So the model began on steady wheels. The brightly-coloured "boxes" on the ground floor take direct inspiration from both my own Klee Corner (the pizzeria had a similar idea) and the London Undergound. In fact, the dark red ground floor used to be an entrance to an undergound station that was closed down some years ago that has now been transformed into a state-of-the-art vinyl store. The dark red ground floor is almost a copy of those entrances that can be found in the Tube's Northern Line, covered in those beautiful blood-coloured tiles. Even in my Lego interpretation, I was able to add the beautiful sand blue lights. Outside there's a sign, "Disco 2000", it says. The old-fashined font and style of the sign is totally on purpose. Wait, there's people singing and dancing on the street... A paparazzi on the roof of the dark green glass box... Is he famous or something? Both the white windows of the tube entrance and the dark green windows are lying on their sides. In the case of the green ones, it's not quite so obvious, so it's pretty cool. There's some albums outside, which (if you can guess which they are you're a real god), but I'll talk about architecture first. The Architecture: Architecturally speaking, this model is very interesting. Just like in Klee Corner, this has three different buildings onto a single baseplate. The advantage being, of course, that I have two full façades to split them up. The final building is almost colour-coded. Every part of the build has a colour associated to it. The central and most important part of the building, kind of the "eye" of the building, is constructed using a similar method to the one I used for the façade of the lounge on Klee Corner, only this time using a 2-stud-wide pillar going up rather than a 1-stud-wide one. There were so many different iterations for the central part, even one being sort of a peacock-coloured flimsy spaghetti (maybe at building 8 out of the 15 built). I got that bug of wanting this building to do so many things at the same time that I had to chop down things that I'd done which no longer fitted the image I chased. The final result is way simpler than some previous ones and has a lovely Belle Epoque feel to it. This final iteration is inspired by the gorgeous entrances of the Paris Metro (metro entrance over underground entrance, that's kind of hilarious ). I retook one iteration of Klee Corner for the shape of the roof, so it has a perfect triangular balance with the two side pieces. The Iron Horse+Klee Corner+Paris Metro, I think the result's pretty cool! I had already done the first render when I realised the façade needed some more dynamism. Initially, the windows were totally aligned. I then changed that static feel by breaking the lines and making them follow the curvature of the escaling roof. I love the double curve that the escalating windows and the curvature of the building itself have. creator saying stupid stuff. The brown building on the right scared me a little bit, as I'd never been able to pull off a good dark building, brown, for instance. Dark Orange, when rendered in Pov-Ray, though has this chocolate colour which is just delightful. In fact, this side building was not part of the plan first, as a whole building covered the whole "London undergound" ground floor. Then, for quite a while I had a cool texture for a brick wall that was just six studs wide which helped me figure out the measurements for the central building. That idea stuck, but in the end, due to the central building being shrinked, this brown building grew. I gave it some windows inspired by those of a school that I walk past every day and the greatest of rooflines. You really have to look at this: there's pieces looking in four different directions. The right way up, upside down and to both sides! The white/blue/yellow building on the left has a bit less of a tumultuous story to it. It began as a version of the Met Breuer, as the central building was to be something along the lines of a Gehry work. Once I'd settled for a much more colourful design on the other two buildings (after a looooong while), that grey thing looked as terrible as a stain on a red dress. Therefore, I reused on of the ideas for the central building for this side one, adapted some earlier window designs, changed the colours, added the sign, and voilà! There it is! The Interiors: Cross the gates to the awesomeness of the world of music. Because this was done in LDD, I couldn't build those racks full of vinyls, so instead I covered an entire wall of the best-selling vinyls. Note: All the covers are Lego interpretations of real albums! In fact, there's the entire discographies of two bands! Have a guess! The pattern on the floor, funnily enough comes from a "Where's Wally?" book which had a similar one. There's turntables and hanging vinyls on the window shop. On the opposite side, there's a nice Dalí-inspired coach with... again the same special guest!? Now, that can't be a coincidence, can it? The floor above has a magnificent concert stage for artists to play. I really like the atmosphere I captured in this area. I can easily imagine a songwriter playing his/her songs on that stage, as the city lights shine bright behind the sand green building. There's a small bar for guests to take a drink as the concert's on. The room's, though, not big enough for all the audience, so some of those left outside have to climb outside the window and listen from there. Be careful! The interior is built in a Brick Bank kind of way, all the different buildings share one same interior. Finally, the top floor is... A music shop! Couldn't be anything else, could it? 1 Assembly Square can start to tremble as there's a new neighbour next doors with much better instruments and at a better price. The widest range of guitars in all the imaginable colours and shapes, keyboards, amps, synths, drums and pianos. They say the owner of the Magic Shop built this drum kit and his grandchildren have put it on sale. They also say that both pianos, those of Magic Shop and Klee Corner were bought here and that's why they don't have one on stock right now. This drum kit, they say, is so loud that it was able to distort time and make the owner of Magic Shop live over 170 years. Maybe it was his potions what kept him alive. Again, who's that guy? He's everywhere! One Last Image: Disco 2000 Vinyl Store, surrounded by its two new friends, A Summer in Tuscany and Klee Corner. I think that Disco 2000 may even look better surrounded by other models than alone, unlike the other two, which definitely look better alone. Hope you like this modular! Pau
  5. This...is not finished yet. I have yet to make the lobby floor, and create the antenna tower. For now I'm fairly stuck at the lowermost and uppermost areas of both the Studio Center (smaller building) and Broadcast Center (larger building). I also think it looks far too slab-sided to work in a realistic setting. I have ideas (like grafting chunks of the building), but what else can you give me?
  6. LittleJohn

    The Island of El Harraz

    This was my contribution to the Guilds of Historica collaboration at Brickworld this year. I built the entire landscape and started on the buildings, before getting Isaac’s help to finish the model in time. The base split into three portions, and all the buildings were easily removable to allow for convenient transport of the build. It had been a while since I’d done a proper Kaliphlin scene, so it was a really fun build and I think turned out quite well. Also, there are quite a few sig-figs throughout the build. Can you find all of them? Lots more pictures on Brickbuilt. Thanks for looking, and as always, C&C are very welcome
  7. MODification of one of my favorite sets, 10027 Train Engine Shed. Probably designed 6 years ago and only slightly upgraded since Building instructions at snakebyte.dk Very high setting render from Stud.io
  8. What are your favorite MOC genres to build within, admire others' work from, or aspire to hopefully build within in the near future if you'll ever have the opportunity? Whether they be based upon past or present preexisting themes, licenses, or product lines already covered by Lego (Star Wars, Classic Space, Ninjago, etc.), or perhaps they've never been truly touched upon by Lego (Steampunk, Post-Apocalyptic, Licensed Franchises never yet partnered with TLG, etc.), discuss your favorites here and share creations from those genres built by yourself or others.
  9. craigslegostuff

    Mrs Miyagi's Flowers

    My 6th Modular Building! I've been very busy this last year, working on three modular MOCs. After the mammoth 32x32 Ice Cream shop, I was eager to do something smaller and simpler this time, and I ended up with a florist. I had a ton of flowers to use up and also fancied doing something with a greenhouse. Very fast and pleasant design/building experience this one; I really enjoyed working with these colours. FIRST FLOOR: Mrs Myagi's Flowers - Flowers. Dozens of 'em, all shapes and sizes. - Shelves with, well... gardening products, I guess. Shark repellant, anyone? - Till area - Greenhouse to the rear, featuring more greenery and a sink. - also to the rear, a staircase leading to Mrs Miyagi's apartment. SECOND FLOOR: APARTMENT KITCHEN / LOUNGE - Kitchen with food items (Joker lettuce, anyone?), sink, fridge, cupboards, counter, oven etc. - Lounge features TV, coffee table, and a sofa on a brightly coloured rug. THIRD FLOOR: APARTMENT BEDROOM / BATHROOM / - Main bedroom with bed, drawers, and a PC. - W/C with sink, toilet and shower. Hope you enjoy! Leave me a comment if you have any questions or comments! Craig, June 2018 Untitled by Craig Brooks, on Flickr
  10. Bricked1980

    [MOC] BRICK SQUARE POST OFFICE

    Hi everyone I'd like to present my latest MOC, and the follow up to my previous Modular, "The Queen Bricktoria Pub". This time I've designed another British style building, a Post Office, set some time during the late 1950's. There is much more to it than just a Post Office though. Read on to find out more... As you can see this modular building has 3 floors and is built on a 32 x 32 base plate. I have designed it to appear as 2 separate buildings situated around a small town square. The post office is intended to be the main focus of the model but the building on the right also contains a fish & chip shop and other businesses. The Minifigures I've included 6 minifigs with this MOC. From left to right they are: Post Office Worker, Post Office Manager, The Postman, Chip Shop Owner, Cafe Barista and a Business man. Brick Square and Ground Level Details Both the buildings are arranged around "Brick Square". I've included a small flowering tree in the centre of the square and outside the post office there is a pillar box, bench, rubbish bin and flower pots. Outside the fish and chip shop is a table with parasol. The Pillar box is a simple build made up from 2x2 round bricks, plates and tiles, stacked up and held together with a technic axle running through the middle. The shaped slot section towards the top is made from a red wheel flipped on its side. Sandwiched between both buildings is a shared stairwell which can be accessed from the street. This is how the minifigs access the upper floors. The Post Office The pictures below show the interior of the post office. Mail Sorting Office On the floor above the post office is the room where all the mail gets sorted, ready to be sent out. This room is accessed via the stair well outside the post office. Fish & Chip Shop Another iconic British building - a fish and Chip Shop. The shop sells chips, battered fish, burgers, sausages and drinks. Coffee Shop Above the Fish & Ship Shop is a little cafe with a coffee machine, cake stand, table and seat. In the corner of the cafe is a stair case leading up to the top floor. Office Above the cafe is an office used by a local businessman. I've included a desk with drawers, telephone and paperwork. There is also a grandfather clock and plant pots. Mail Van I have also included a vehicle with this MOC, a vintage style Mail van. The Finished Model Here is a shot of the Brick Square Post Office, alongside my other modulars, The Queen Bricktoria and Convenience Store. If you'd like to read more about these other MOCs then follow the links below. Convenience Store Queen Bricktoria Thanks very much for reading. If you'd like to see more pictures of the Brick Square Post Office then head across to my Flickr page, I've added over 60 pictures of it there. I hope you like my latest MOC, feel free to leave comments and let me know what you think. EDIT: Building instructions for this MOC are now available from Rebrickable at the following link https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-22101/Bricked1980/brick-square-post-office/#comments
  11. needyblue

    [MOC] Pharmacy

    Hello to everyone, this is my latest creation. I called it "Pharmacy". It's a modular building of 2802 bricks. On Flickr Lego Pharmacy
  12. paupadros

    [MOC] Klee Corner

    Klee Corner Hello guys and welcome to “Klee Corner”, (technically) my eighth modular building, packing a whopping 4480 pieces. Coming from “A Summer in Tuscany”, with its bright yellow and orange colours screaming “look at me”, its follow-up had to do something entirely different. Therefore, instead of a 48×32 baseplate, I chose the classic 32×32 (hadn't done a 32×32 modular since Sweets & Co., over a year ago!) and decided to cram it with details to (near) insanity levels. Without further ado… Klee Corner marks many personal “firsts” in my modular history: First model with three buildings (plus on a single 32x32 baseplate), first curved façade, first alleyway that crosses an entire model through and first building narrower than 8 studs. I'll walk you through my model in a little extra detail. This model packs a big number of colours in the Lego inventory 29 out of 41 solid colours and 11 out of 15 transparent colours, making a total of 40 different colours! The Blue and Curved Buildings: This is the narrowest house I've ever built, at just 6 studs wide! Inevitably, it is difficult for it to have a prominent silhouette to mark a staple in the skyline, but it definitely helps to add variety to an otherwise rather monotonous skyline. As it is skinnier, I placed it further in front of the composition, to make it draw a little more attention. The inspiration for this building comes mostly from Bilbao, a city in the Basque Country, north of the Iberian Peninsula, where they've placed bold metal boxes, full of windows to modernise the old city centre. Wonder where the name “Klee Corner” comes from? From Paul Klee, of course, the famous Swiss painter. His and many other artist's interpretation of the world lend themselves right here. It's quite funny, as the ground floor for this (the red box) remains from the first sessions of building, but the top part has had close to ten different iterations. The last one is absolutely perfect and does everything I hoped it would. Interior-wise, these two buildings work together, as I didn't think possible any way of making the curved façade actually modular (detachable and duplicable). This creative decision makes the two share all five interiors. Bottom Floor: The metal-enclosed box is similar to one to be found in “The Little Owl Restaurant”, in New York City. In such bold ground floor, there could be nothing less than a bustling pizzeria! Overlook Magic Shop – or any building, as in modular land, everything's possible! - through the windowed section as you wait for your pizza to come. The tiling is particularly interesting, and I managed to sneak details such as plants, drawers, napkin servers and overhanging lights. Middle Floor: The middle floor and top floors can be accessed through the white door next to the red box (the blue building's door, per say). These two floors encompass a night lounge bar only for select ABS humanoids to go. Drinks are served in weirdly-coloured bottles, as light comes through in shades of orange and yellow through the windows. Top Floor: In the most intimate nights, the piano is an element that needs to be present. Its sinuous curves invite all clients to walk up the spiral staircase to hear the pianist magically craft long chord progressions and fugacious staccatos. The Brownish/Reddish/Greenish/Yellowish Buildings Yes, the easiest name to remember, right!? The façade of this building tries to improve Detective's Office’s (I'll leave that to your judgement) blue building, adding it extra texture, colours and (hopefully) life. Bottom Floor: Houses the oldest pharmacy in town dating as far back as 1932. It even preserves the old tile mosaic on its outer façade and the tenths of glass bottles in which they kept serums and medicines. They say Ole Kirk Kristiansen used to shop for medicine here. I love the flooring here, by the way. Middle and Top Floors: Ever wondered where they made ordinary object before our world became a disposable polluted sphere? One of the practically lost jobs was making and selling umbrellas, and my little modular town couldn't go without one, could it? Due to the way the walls are built (extremely parts heavy, by the way! This building has more pieces than the other two together!), the interior is very crammed and doesn't allow for much detail, but it nevertheless is a cool little area. Pink umbrella… I wonder who might want to buy one of those… Erm… Hagrid? Some extra images: More awesome pictures to be found on my Flickr, with some really cool ones from awkward angles and such. Hope you've enjoyed Klee Corner, as well as reading through what I've written about it. Have a very nice day, wherever on Earth you might be! Pau
  13. This railway shed was inspired by Shaun Baseby (or @lightningtiger here on Eurobricks) and his smaller farm shed from 2014. He designed the basic Technic frame on this shed, and I ran with it to create this wooden western-style steam locomotive shed. This shed is 4 1/4 tracks long with a total of 68 studs from back wall to entrance to the building, along with a 10 stud wide entrance for stream locomotives. The shed features a cow skull on the front above the entrance, just to give it that wild west flair. The rear wall of the shed. The roof of the shed is not removable, but it can fold open a bit on clips. With this view you can see how the Technic frame supports the roof. Here is the scene with the three steam locos stationed at the Fort Legoredo area depot The shed will normally hold my 4-6-0 and 4-4-0 steam locomotives, with the smaller 4-2-4 sitting on a third track outside the shed as shown. That's the BTTF time train on the fourth track, in the way back. Comments, Suggestions and Complaints are always welcome!
  14. DigitalDreams

    [MOC] Science Museum

    Full Flickr Album contains many more images, all with descriptions.
  15. Sbm1

    My Layout is a Mess :(

    Long Story Short: I have long had hopes for how I wanted my town to turn out, and built a huge table that I dreamed of filling with custom creations and an elaborate layout… However, after many years of collecting lego, it seems as though not even the least of my plans will EVER be fulfilled. I have posted photos of how my layout looks currently: messy and full of holes that rely on the idea of custom buildings. What I need is some advice on how to best arrange my present collection, using only what I've got (some extra parts permitting) to make the most of it, but allow for effective additions down the track. I am also open to suggestions for custom builds that I can start and complete with what I've got. Short story long: All of the sets I own are pictured, all complete, but some with parts floating around elsewhere in the room. In addition to what is shown, I have the 7744 police station (demolished because I couldn't stand the blue windows and unfinished structure) the 4956 creator houses (sacrificed in an attempt to build the large red-roof house at the back) and the bridge from 7900 heavy loader set. To be honest, the town looks pretty lost without the police station and random emergency vehicles floating around. If anybody has ideas on how to repurpose the police station or photos of fitting, alternate designs would be great. In the past, I've gotten sick of seeing things the same all the time, and tried to make little modifications here and there which I could never finish properly with the parts I had. Most of those have been reverted, but I've started too many projects and finished none. The simplest plan I had for this corner of the town was to have a marina running along the water's edge, a port where the large boat is parked, and a railway line from the port wrapping around the outside edge of the table. The shopfronts you see, in a mad rush, were placed around a makeshift square, lane, and the idea was to have port vehicles drive up and around the back of the port, and exit along the water. All of which I can guess is very space ineficcient, and is holding up many other decisions for my layout. A proper automotive shop is currently in the workings to replace the car dealership, but that's it. I have no idea whether what I'm doing is right or wrong, but would greatly appreciate some advice to straighten my thinking, and give me a cleaner slate to work with.
  16. I made Instructions for my MOC: 10211 Grand Emporium Alternative buildwith the theme of "Wedding Hall"You can make this Alternative build only using parts of 10211 lego set, without any extra bricks.Model design, Instructions by Inyong Lee Store pages: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Lego-10211-alternative-build-instructions/132595113153?hash=item1edf48dcc1:g:Vs4AAOSwdMBa3hef https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-14248/InyongBricks/10211-alternative-build/
  17. Bricked1980

    [MOC] THE QUEEN BRICKTORIA PUB

    Hi everyone I'd like to share with you my second MOC which I have been working on over the past few weeks. For this project I decided to tackle a subject very close to my heart - the Great British Pub! So without further ado... Grab yourself a pint and join me for a guided tour of The Queen Bricktoria! As you can see this is a modular style corner building with 3 floors built on a 32x32 base plate. The design is intended to be reminiscent of British town centre pubs or more specifically the style of pubs we'd see in London. The Minifigures There are 7 minifigs with the model. The 3 characters below are the pub workers. From left to right we have the Owner/Landlord and his daughter the barmaid. The guy with the guitar is a local singer who has been booked to play a gig at the pub. The 4 figures below are the pub regulars. The guy with the beard is the typical sort of old gent we find in many pubs propping up the bar and boring everyone to death with their stories of the good old days. The guy in the green top and the girl are boyfriend and girlfriend. Level 1 - The Bar Outside the building we have a busy street corner. I've included an iconic British red phone box and an outside covered seating area. There is also a sign board advertising events etc at the pub. The main entrance leads us in to the bar/lounge area. Inside we have a well stocked bar and a cozy fireplace. There are also tables and bar stool for the minifigs to sit and enjoy their drinks. Brown carrots make pretty good beer pump handles. At the back of the bar is a staircase leading us up to level 2. Level 2 - Pool and Darts Room On the second level is a games room featuring a Pool table and Dart board. There is also a pool cue rack and a shelf with trophies won by the resident darts team. At the back of the room is another staircase that leads to level 3. Level 3 - Live Music Room Level 3 has a stage for Live Music gigs and Karaoke. On the stage we have a keyboard, guitar, amps and microphone. Also on this level is more seating for the minifigs and a door that leads to a small balcony seating area. Oh dear!!! The singer seems to be a bit of a hit with the ladies. The Finished Model Here is a picture of the Queen Bricktoria next to my first MOC design, The Convenience store, as you can see my new MOC is much much bigger. Another picture below shows the pub next to one of the official modulars, to help give a sense of the size of the model. Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my newest MOC. There are more pictures of it on my Flickr page so feel free to check them out and let me know what you think.
  18. wooootles

    MOC: Corporate Plaza

    Hey guys, Here's the third skyscraper in Wasabi District: Corporate Plaza! At just over 3 feet tall and over 5000 pieces, this 10-storey building is the first office skyscraper in Wasabi District! Yes, it's smaller than my previous buildings, but I finished it in 3 months, a record time for me finishing anything larger than a car! Granted, it's also a pretty basic design, one expected of modern, run-of-the-mill office skyscrapers. Interior shots should be coming up soon. Please, let me know what you guys think! In the meantime, you know what to do if you want to see more pics, check My flickr account for more shots. Check my Instagram account for more WIP pics of the skyscraper, as well as the general WIP status of Wasabi District. Thanks for looking!
  19. fillishave

    [MOC] House of the Inventor

    Hi everyone! First post! My name if Filip and even though I have been playing around with Lego for many years both as a kid and with my own kids I'm quite new to the AFOL-scene. I was encouraged to post this to Eurobricks by LegoModularFan who gave me some overwhelmingly nice comments on Flickr yesterday when I posted this so here goes! I created this for Brixtars modular building competition and this is my second attempt at a full fledged 32x32 modular building. My first building, "The Queens Brick" was quite square in it's shape so I wanted to challenge myself this time and put much more round shapes and angles in there. It was a lot of fun trying out different techniques where some worked better than others but I'm quite happy with the end result even though it will for sure not win any prizes for stability ;) Technically it doesn't really meet the requirements of a modular since I didn't put the technical bricks in there and the street is a bit narrow but it would be an easy enough mod to make it legal. Enough words and on with pictures of my steam-punkish house on the hill with a secret lab for horrible experiments on the top floor and a basement where the irresponsible owner pours his toxic waste out in the sewer system. Here is a link to the rest of the images: https://flic.kr/s/aHskuXCmdk It's quite often one sees micro builds of regular sized modulars but this was actually made the other way around. The idea started with an all digital micro build I did for a competition last year that looked like this: The instructions for the building is available on Brixtar but please bear in mind that the digital instructions are not 100%. For instance, the smaller roof used some parts that didn't actually exist so they need to be replace. Also both roofs need some very heavy reinforcing or they will, I know from hard experience, crumble in your hands :) But please use them as a source for inspiration if you wish! Last but not least, cred where cred is due; the fences/walls were created after inspiration from Jonas Kramms fantastic examples and the usage of tan skeleton legs for the decorations around the windows was something similar I saw a while ago but I couldn't find that image so I'm not sure who came up with it in the first place. Please let me know if you are the person who made that and i will of course mention you both here and on Flickr! Thanks for watching and please let me know both what you might like and what you might not like so I can learn and improve!
  20. o0ger

    [MOC] Cavity Corner

    Hi everyone. I'd like to share my latest creation with you. It's called Cavity Corner. It's a 32x32 Modular Corner Building. Building this, I was trying to challenge myself to build with colors I wouldn't normally use. This is the result. My second modular. It was great fun (but frustrating) to build :) Somewhere halfway into the designing process I got the idea to have two very contrasting buildings as next door neighbors. This resulted in the contrasting colors, the older house next to the newer and the dentist versus the candy shop. Please tell me what you think! This house is built for a BriXtar contest. BriXtar is an app for iOS and Android where you can share LEGO creations with others. I have uploaded a 3D-version of this MOC to BriXtar, so you can view it in 3D and see how it's built.
  21. Francois' Hardware Store || The Pit || The Asylum I always wanted to make some Modular MOCs but the prospect of the huge pool of available parts seemed daunting. Then a couple of brick orders didn't go exactly the way I expected and so I decided to make the best out of it and try to redesign some of the Modulars as 16 wide buildings. Whether it is because you don't have enough space in your town, or you want a use for a duplicate set you somehow got, or maybe you're just tired of looking at the official model, these alternate builds are a great way to utilize the parts from the original sets. I'm hoping that this will also inspire other would-be-MOCers to try their hand at alternate models as I think they are a perfect way to reuse the bricks. And for me personally the restrictions of the available parts makes it more focused and promotes creativity. I am hoping eventually to redesign all of the Modulars, potentially with the exception of the Pet Shop which is basically already done. So without further ado, I would like to present the first two buildings: Francois' Hardware Store (alternate build of the Fire Brigade), The Pit (alternate build of the Palace Cinema) and The Asylum (alternate build of the Cafe Corner): Francois' Hardware Store The idea behind this one was to reuse all of the equipment from the Fire Brigade in a way that makes sense. A store was the obvious choice as you can display the items as merchandise. The owner is an avid artist who displays his paintings throughout the house as decoration. Lots of furniture, both new and old, fill out the interior and a homemade sculpture adorns the facade. The Pit For the Palace Cinema alternate build, I wanted to really move as far away from the original's look as possible. While the color scheme is obviously limited by the bricks available in the original, there is a substantial amount of blue plates that can be used for accents. Combined with a departure from the original style to the Detective's Office layout, I believe this building can fulfil a very different function in a town layout as well as appeal to people who dislike the Cinema's unique style. In terms of interesting features, I was forced to use a brick-built door for the entrance to the first floor as there was no space for stairs on the ground floor and there is only one actual door piece in the original model. In the end it worked out quite well and it can be easily opened and closed without leaving unsightly gaps, but at the cost of being a tad too wide. There is also a "sliding" french window in the apartment leading out to the balcony. Another interesting problem was the lack of a 16w baseplate. In order to be a "true" alternate model, I didn't want to use one from a different set so instead I managed to find a way to create a pseudo-baseplate from the leftover plates in the set. The main disadvantage here is that the ground is thicker than a standard baseplate, so I would suggest you change it into a standard baseplate if you have a spare one (or use the spare one from the Fire Brigade, if you're building both of the above). The Asylum This particular building highlights how many different parts we often forget about or misremember when it comes to large builds. If you take a look at the stock Cafe Corner modular building, you'll see very little blue. It's prominently featured on the ground floor, though mostly obstructed by other features. The upper floors don't really have any visible blue at all. When doing an alternate model, I try to move as far as possible from the original, because using the same colors automatically evokes the image of the two buildings being related. The Asylum is the first of my MOCs to have a simple story tied to it. Anisse comes in to seek help from doctor Tim E. Discants, but his treatments are not exactly orthodox. The first floor features an admission counter and a White room, intended to hold the patients and keep them from injurying themselves. The second floor houses the Extraction room, enabling the good doctor to extract the "disease" from his patients. That leaves them ready for the Operating room. Suffice it to say, once the patients experience the treatments, they look for any way out. Check out my post further down or click on the link above for more pictures and the full story. More to come soon hopefully! Let me know if there's a specific Modular you would want to see 16ed.
  22. Hello everyone! After a constructive stop of a couple of months at the beginning of the year I decided to try my hand at building a medieval mill. I like to think of this mill set in the Middle Ages, inhabited by a simple family that lived in an era where today's technology did not exist yet, without cell phones, computers and the Internet. Only a stone and wood house built with the toil of the hands and a life led to produce flour for bread and to grow vegetables and products of the earth. All surrounded by a luxuriant nature without the traffic and the polluted air of today. A life that is certainly very difficult but much simpler and built on basic concepts like family, land and food. The construction of this moc took a couple of months and made up of about 5,200 pieces and it took two months of construction. The blades of the mill are powered by a Medium Lego motor and can be turned over with a button on the back of the house. Moc presented for the first time at the MEI in Verona 2018 (Italy). View the complete gallery on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sdrnet/albums/72157690184763535 Comments very welcome. Good vision! Sandro
  23. jerryyao

    Chinese Pagodas

    It’s been a long time since the Buddhism spread from Indian to worldwide, especially in China. The 1st memory building was named “STUPA” in Indian to memory the Buddha, stored the replics and chanting, mostly it is a tomb of Buddha. When foreigners landed in South China, them were taught the 8 corner tower pronounced “Pagoda”. The word was collected in the dictionary till today, a minus change is to be “Chinese Pagoda” to mean the towers in Asian-Pacific area. Today Chinese people call Pagoda as “Ta” since the word was invented by Ge, Hong in Jin Dynasty. (around AD 300) I selected 6 typical types of Pagoda to be LEGO model, the superstructure of Pagoda can be separated by 3 parts as the picture below: Base, Body, Cha; 1. Basic Stupa The model reflects the main characters of Stupa which is the resource of all pagoda, stupa and etc. Flat base; Hemispherical body; Upside Lotus petal; The “CHA” of tower; 2. Lamaist Stupa The Lamaist stupa was heralded in hemispherical tomb in Fo-kuang Ssu in the latter part of the tenth century. The earliest Lamaist stupa was built in Xizang, China. The model reflects the main characters of Lamaist Stupa Flat and thin base; Higher base (Shu – mi - tso); Aquarius body “Belly” (The variant of hemispherical body); Truncated cone Bottle “Neck” Top “umbrella”; 3. One storied Pagoda The One storied Pagoda may be the 1st culture combined pagoda in Chinese. It mixed the different architecture elements from both Chinese and Indian. It more likes a Chinese pavilion with solid walls and stone or brick roof. The top of body adopts a building technique called “Corbelled brick courses”, they have 2 ways to be shown, positive and negitive. Using the LEGO parts to build this is a real challenge. The picture will show you how. You can also see the “Cha” part is real like the Stupa. 4. Multi-Storied Pagoda I build the 2 storied pagoda only for example. The real Multi-storied Pagoda usually looks similar with the Multi-Eaved Pagoda. The key of distinguish is to see the highest eaves, if they are real close, the pagoda shall be Muti-Eaved, others are Multi-Storied. 5. Bustling Pagoda The bustling pagoda normally use very complex decoration outside, the body sits on a very high Shu – mi – tso. Some pagoda allows people walk inside to the top. 6. Multi-Eaved Pagoda As the name shows, it has several levels of eaves, I built this model in order to show the extreme case, the eaves are very close. I also use a wheel as the “umbrella” part. Through the building progress of these 6 models, you will have a Buddhism trip in Chinese. You can con tact me via jerryyao77@msn.com for the full instructions with a little bucks. Enjoy it! Jerry
  24. Hi I'm legologoart! I've been building with legos for forever, but just recently started sharing my designs on Instagram. I use Lego bricks to recreate logos such as Google, Pepsi, and Apple. I would love to have some fellow lego lovers to give some feedback and check it out at https://www.instagram.com/legologoart/ Have a great day!
  25. jalemac34

    [MOC] Who wants to play tennis?

    Hi everybody, This is my new moc. I tried to be the most reallistic as possible, with a lot of details, electric cables, old walls. there is an outside tennis court, two squash courts and a ping pong table on the 2nd floor. I hope you'll enjoy my first MOC of the year.... Brick on!!! Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr Who wants to play tennis? by Jean Macou, sur Flickr