paupadros

Eurobricks Knights
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  1. Thanks a lot! When designing it's also a lot more pleasant as you don't have to constantly be checking if x piece is available in y colour because you're working with pretty common pieces most on the time (plus that makes it cheaper). The size of the plots behind the buildings vary in size depending on the amount of buildings that you put. In my mind, I would put a park along the lines of Begijnhof.
  2. Thanks a lot! Getting all the finnicky details was quite challenging as I'm not too used to working in microscale but extremely rewarding. Glad you like it!
  3. paupadros

    Modular Building Sets - Rumours and Discussion

    I was suggesting a save in pieces mostly as the gallery has no first or second floors. Plus, no interiors in that whole area. It's true though that this alignment has more pieces dedicated to façades and probably floors/ceilings for each floor as you were saying. If it were to have this layout, it would be the best composition since Downtown Diner for me.
  4. paupadros

    Modular Building Sets - Rumours and Discussion

    Nice sketch! If the description clearly suggests the Flatiron as a similar building architecturally, I think that the wall you've drawn with the "Hotel" sign would be gone. It would go straight from the front-facing façade into the angled façade maybe using some kind of technique like the onle used in the Titanic's hull. I like the layout quite a lot if it actually turns out to be like you've drawn it. I've seen plenty of modulars and none yet with this footprint. And I know that one of the challenges that us MOC modular builders face is finding a novel way of juxtaposing façades in a new and interesting way. A lot of surface area is lost with this concept, though. Although that would be hugely benefitial to the piece count.
  5. Thank you! After building a few, Dutch buildings can get a bit repetitive. Building that much SNOT in such a crammed area certainly was painful occasionally!
  6. Project completed! Thanks for taking a look at my builds and leaving feedback! The link to all of the free instructions on the first post!
  7. The eighth (and last!) model is out! Herengracht 152! The Model: Much like Singel 2, this model originated from a scout on Google Maps. This time, I was looking for a final model that ticked the following boxes: it had to be a corner (I wanted two of the eight models to be corners), it had to be two buildings (I wanted to try my hand at two buildings in a single baseplate) and it had to be colourful (I was tired of building in brown and tan! ). This building ticked all the boxes. Real building: If I had used the same format that I had used for Prinsengracht 2 (the other corner model), there was just no way I could fit the whole thing. So, I went two studs larger on the side with the two façades. This makes it asymetrical, but it causes no real trouble besides that. As for the building itself. It's a SNOT fest again. Because of the narrow 4-wide façades, I had to attach them via the exterior walls and with a bracket core in the inside of each floor of each house. In order for it to fit with the other models in the series, I had to enlarge the black building a smidge. This meant adding the extra floor of windows on the first floor. The consequence of this is that the black building is half-a-plate (1/6 of a brick) off grid vertically . This means that from that point upwards, the two buildings are pretty much independent and can't interact with one another. Oh well. As for technqiues, there are fun ones all the way around. The funkiest technique is around the gables. They are upside-down in some areas, attached with nipple bricks, daleks facing forwards... Anyway, a fun mess. With the previous buildings: Hope you like it! You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Herengracht 152 ===================================================
  8. The seventh model is out! Singel 2! The Model: This building originated from a scout I did on Google Maps to find some cool buildings to recreate. This one sits at the north entrance of Singel, probably the most famous canal in Amsterdam and just has a presence that none of other buildings that I found had. It has a large step gable and a very beautiful combination of brick, white painted wood with details in black. The original is a café called Café Kobalt. I instantly knew I had to recreate it. Real building: One of the first things I realised is that there was no way I could fit that building in the 6-wide format I was doing. I went for 8-wide. Maybe 10-wide would have kept the proportions even better, but the piece count would have tripled the others easily. Because of the extra width, one of the next decisions I made was to make it a straight model instead of the corner unit that it is. I didn't want it to be even wider. The build itself was the toughest in this series and one of the hardest I have ever done. To achieve the details, I had to used SNOT for everything. The ground level (whilst a complete SNOT fest ), is roomy enough a allow for a fairly simple build. The first point of contention were the black windows on the central column of the building. Originally, the brackets were not going to be the windows. They were just temporary as I built the windows and would later on be concealed. The thing is that I tried everything that came to mind, but the space is just too crammed for anything to fit (plus, 5/6 of a brick tall). The only decent solution was the temporary one! So I went with that one! The second point of contention was the gable. As the bell gable gets smaller, there is less and less room to fit to connections to make it all work. Up on the gable, the connections get very finnicky and borderline unacceptable for my standards. Still, I reckon it's challenging but sturdy enough for me to accept it. Honestly, it's as good as I was going to be able to make it. With the previous buildings: Hope you like it! You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Singel 2 ===================================================
  9. The sixth model is out! Prinsengracht 211! The Model: After having successfully recreated Prinsengracht 2, I thought that I might have a go at another famous house from the city (funnily enough from the same canal). Building this house was attractive for a couple of reasons. First, the architecture is quite different from any of the previous that I had done as the original was designed as a wearhouse originally (despite it currently being housing). Secondly, it has more floors than any of the others, while it had to fit in a similar height to the previous. Fianlly, and probably, the top reason why I chose it: that triangular gable. I was sure that if I put my mind to it, I could make it work. Real building: The first challenge was the gable. It is triangular and has a white trim. To me, there was only one option in that scale, the 2x2 triangular tile. That's why it dictated the whole design. The colour scheme, for instance. The original quite obviously would translate better to Dark Tan, but that piece is only available in regular Tan, so I had to build to whole thing in Tan. The toughest part was figuring out a way to add that white trim. Nothing really worked in such a crammed space. After many attempts, I came up with a novel use of quite a surprising piece to achieve that. Can you guess what? This one! If you want to take a full look at how it all connects, go check the instructions or the 3D view. The rest of the building was basically using the same technique from Delft Blue Shop to achieve the windows (I think I only changed a 1x1 plate for a 1x2 jumper in red to simulate the shutters), and making a very low ground floor to fit all the windows. If you search the original, you'll see how it's a row of a few of these houses side by side. By building a couple of this model, you could definitely achieve that look. With the previous buildings: Hope you like it! You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Prinsengracht 211 ===================================================
  10. The fifth model is out! Spuistraat 334! The Model: This model has a bit of a funny background. I started building a ground floor without anything in particular as reference. I basically took the already finished Flower Shop as using the same format, I built the black ground floor you can see here. I liked it quite a bit, so I went on a bit of a scout to find a building to put on top of it. I looked around all the places I had visited in Amsterdam. The tram that went from out hotel to the Central Station stopped at a square called 'Spui'. It always sounded funny to me (don't know why). Looking around, one of the buildings just for some reason screamed 'Amsterdam' to my foreign eye. So I chose that one. Real Building: The original was a corner, but since I had just done one, I chose to omit the side façade entirely. Since I was already modifying quite heavily the reference, I bent it a bit more. Instead of the 3x3 grid of windows, mine has a 2x2. Sure, building the 3x3 grid is definitely possible, but it might end up a bit cluttered. My solution is a lot simpler and more readable. I did recreate the gable with a fun use of these Technic pieces for the side bit and a 1x2 Technic brick with a connector hole for the center. Technic really is a good ally for us System builders . I am not a fan of using the same colour scheme from Prinsengracht 2 for this one, but there are only a handful of colours that are realistic for Amsterdam and Medium Nougat + White just happen to be a very common one in the city. With the previous buildings: Hope you like it! You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Spuistraat 334 ===================================================
  11. Thank you! I would love to see your version of Prinsengracht 2! I'm guessing it's in minifig scale? I wouldn't go as far as to say that I overspent time looking for buildings, but I also did spend my little while looking around and picking what to build.
  12. The fourth model is out! Prinsengracht 2! The Model: When tackling the fourth model, I wanted to build another sculpture that I owned. There was a bit of an issue though. They either were Tan/Dark Tan which I had already used as main colours for buildings or I just couldn't get to work (admittedly, there were two models that I pitifully failed to recreate in Lego bricks ). So I turned my attention to real houses. These had two major issues comapred to models. Firstly, you can get a sense of space with physical models that you just simply can't get with images online. And secondly, models are already an interpretation of a house (i.e. the superfluous details simply aren't there, so you can just pretty much recreate everything). Since I was going for a real house, I wanted to go for a house I had seen in dozens of Amsterdam postcards as well as travel guides. A quick seach revealed that it was the townhouse on the corner of Prinsengracht and Brouwersgracht. In real life, this house is a café. Real building: The first thing I had to figure out was how to adapt the format I was using to a corner unit. This proved to be quite easy and soon enough I was building the house itself. In order to get the windows how I wanted them, I had to get a 1x1 brick with a stud on one of the sides to do the corner, which meant losing a brick of façade space. While I could get around that, there are a few details I had to omit, such as the variable window size on the middle floors. My favourite part of the build is the gable/roof area. Of course, this area is the one that gives the building its flair, so I had to get it right. I took the gable from the Amsterdam Internet Café and adapted it to this building. Tying the roof on the back to finish the building was quite fun and surprisingly tough. The window on the gable is attached with an Erling brick which means that it has a small (1/6 of a brick, I believe) ledge on the back. To make the roof "jump" over that I had to use the slipper and the upside-down slipper which is kind of funky. With the previous buildings: Hope you like it! You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Prinsengracht 2 ===================================================
  13. The third model is out! The Flower Shop! The Model: After the first two models were based on sculptures we brought back from Amsterdam, I wanted to build another. Most of the sculptures we took home with use, though, were tan in colour. I had already built one in Dark Tan and another in regular Tan, so I didn't want to repeat myself. I turned my attention to a magnet that had a colour close to Olive Green as the main façade colour. Inspiration behind it: The toughest part to get right in this one, similarly to the Amsterdam Internet Café, was choosing the details to represent and the ones to cut. Because I had already set the scale, I had to build this to fit with the previous builds. In order for it to work, I had to cut some of the detials. One that I was particularly struggling with was the row of red flowers on the top of the building. I just couldn't get them to look decent in the space I had available. So, I chose to not feature them. Having made this decision, I basically enlarged the white section on top, altering the proportions of the original. This gave me the opportinity to add the yellow flowers to represent the Flower Shop, which was a nice touch. With the previous buildings: You can check out the model in the Mecabricks 3D Viewer. I think it's very interesting to see how things are built and with the 3D viewer you can zoom, hide pieces to see the insides... =================================================== Instructions: Flower Shop ===================================================