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Found 79 results

  1. Simons Brick World

    The bridge is completed

    Hello there, today again a small update to the Lego city. This time I sat down and finished the bridge over the future river. The middle part is kept quite thin to lose as little space as possible under the bridge. To make sure that the whole thing fits exactly into the 32x32 modules again, the bridge is exactly 64x64 blocks in size and so it fits into 4 standard squares. The details on the bridge (streetlights, people, cars, etc.) will be added later. Of course there is also an update video for this construction progress. Feel free to watch the video. Also, as usual, I've included a few pictures of the city and the bridge. The bridge from the side with the first module of the promenade. And the whole again from the other side. At the moment still quite empty but for it a quite large extension of the city. I hope you like the extension. Let me know if there are any points of improvement.
  2. Simons Brick World

    bridge & waterfront for the city

    Hello there, there is again an update to my digital LEGO city. This time I dared to bring some water into the city. I have long thought about how I want to design the water. My final result is a design with transparent tiles. To make the riverside a bit more appealing and above all usable for a city, I also built a walk near the water with a retaining wall directly next to the beginning of the bridge over the river. But have a look at the current progress in the update video or in the pictures below. Have fun Here you can see the new part of the city with the bridge and the wall for the walk downstairs. The detail from the river side the bridge and the promenade with stairway to the street. At the edge of the river the water beats lightly against the wall and some water lilies and plant remains collect here. Finally, the overview of the new modules with bridge approach and retaining wall. The delivery truck is inspired by a well-known company and should further support the US character of the city. I hope you enjoyed the update. Feel free to write me if you have any other ideas or suggestions for improvement.
  3. Hello, Finally my latest model is complete and filmed, this time it is of the Bateman Assault Bridge Carrier, an experimental bridge-laying machine of the inter-war period. HISTORY This is an extremely obscure historical military vehicle, and there is very little information about it anywhere, this is just my understanding from traces of information found in different places online: The Bateman Assault Bridge Carrier was an early attempt by the British Royal Engineers at a bridge-laying military vehicle, and the first dedicated bridge-layer, as previous attempts at such a vehicle had been First World War - type landships fitted with an assault bridge on the front. Additionally, the BABC was the first bridge-layer to carry its assault bridge on top of the vehicle. It was based upon the Medium Dragon Mk. I Artillery Tractor, which itself was produced from 1922, and the BABC was trialled at the Premier Dominion Power & Speed demonstration at Camberley, England in 1926, meaning the prototype(s?) must have appeared between 1922 and 1926, being scrapped afterward. The universal scissor-bridge system seen on modern bridge-layers did not appear until the mid-1930s, so the BABC uses a more primitive, rigid bridge design, which is carried on runners and deployed using a hand-cranked winch on the rear of the vehicle. In some instances, a smaller rigid structure is deployed by hand before the main bridge, which is used to better align bridge deployment and increase distance over wider obstacles, however there some photographs show that this was not a vital part of the machine and therefore I have not included it in my model. When retreiving the bridge it must be hauled back by hand once the bridge reaches a certain point on the runners. It is also worth noting that the bridge could only be picked up from one side, and I have kept this historically accurate in my model. THE MODEL I had been building this vehicle since mid-June, and certainly it took far longer than I had expected, mostly due to the problems I encountered regarding the drive and the winching system, but also because I have been busy with work. In the end I was not entirely satisfied with the vehicle, as the machine cannot cross its own bridge due to its immense weight. I spent a great deal of time trying to achieve this goal, include the installation of two additional PF-XL motors to couple at the rear drive wheels, and I managed to get it crossing the bridge up to about 6.5kg. However once I had built the superstructure the weight of the model increased to over 7.7kg, and now the weak point in the drive was the rear axles, which twisted quite badly when put under too much stress. In theory by heavily gearing down all of the drive wheels, I could probably have the vehicle cross the bridge under its own power, however the speed would be so reduced I thought it not worth the bother. I decided I would be happier having the vehicle drive on flat ground at a decent pace, than being able to cross the bridge at snail-pace. A transmission on such a heavy vehicle was out of the question entirely of course. The question may be asked then; Why build it so big and heavy? The answer is that I wanted to keep it in scale with my other Tanks: 1/8 scale, however I mistakenly underestimated how big it would be after planning and draughting it, and honestly being able to cross the bridge at 6.5kg it did look promising for a while that it would still be able to cross when it was finished. Sadly this was not the case, but I had come too far to restart given my limited time. I am still mostly pleased with the result, as the fact that the vehicle being so heavy can still drive at such a speed is already quite impressive, but more so that the model is very detailed, accurate and functional. It is great fun driving around and seeing the bridge-deployment in action. FEATURES -1:8 Scale. The bridge measures 1.1m in length. -Highly detailed, featuring the driver's compartment, mud-chutes, hand-cranks, grill, exhaust pipe, and bridge latticework. It is great to look at with high historical accuracy. I also quite like the strings used to keep the bridge in place when moving. -Unladen Weight: 7.7kg -Laden Weight: 9.4kg -Bridge Weight: 1.7kg -Fully tracked drive: each track powered by three PF-XL Motors, two for each rear drive wheel, one for each front drive wheel. The vehicle is reasonably fast given its size. -One AA battery box per track - each fitted with three Li-Ion 14500 batteries and three dummy batteries. -Powered by two SBricks; one per track. -Functional vertical coil-spring bogie suspension, historically accurate to the real vehicle. -Functional track tensioners. -Functional headlamp. -Functional Armstrong-Siddeley Air-Cooled V8 Engine. -Functional bridge-deployment system using a winch, which is powered by one PF-L Motor. IMAGES More images can be found on my Imgur post: https://imgur.com/gallery/pWfYT98
  4. The Crumbling Bridge Last November I built a MOC in which two weird guys lived 30 feet in the air in minimal but cozy stilts. It was called Stilt Houses precisely. In the diorama there was also an off-road vehicle for which I wanted to build a small dedicated setting. Recently I came up with the idea of creating an ironic scene with some building techniques that I had never used, such as the rocks made of many dark bluish gray slopes and inverted slopes. The diorama is quite small but cute, and it manages to get a smile, in this period there is a need… It is mainly composed of three parts: two rocky blocks covered with shrubs and a crumbling bridge that joins them. In the middle the all-terrain vehicle is crossing the bridge escaping from the hungry bear to take shelter on the stilts. Hope you like it! Thanks for stopping by!
  5. Hi. I just want to show my bridge made up of only Lego Technic parts. Over 1400 liftarms/beams and way over 3500 pins Technic Lego all the way, not a single stud anywhere on the bridge. Even though there’s no studs on the bridge, it’s still 254 studs long – that’s 2032 mm (over 6½ feet). The total weight of the bridge is over 4 kg (9 lbs). If the weight is distributed evenly the bridge can support over 5½ kg (12 lbs).
  6. RoxYourBlox

    [MOC] Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

    My latest creation, Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse, reflects a desire to create an autobiographical MOC to share joy and pain non-verbally. It was inspired aesthetically by Split Rock Lighthouse on Lake Superior, thematically by Voyage of Life (1842) by Thomas Cole, and structurally by Obelisk Overpass, Boulder Dam, plus an early draft of River Wheel (featuring pirate ship gondolas rather than lumber). In fact, the 96 x 96-stud plot vacated by the dismantled River Wheel fed my drive to combine structures absent from my Lego city—a bridge, dam, and Ferris wheel. As you may imagine from the photos, a hilltop lighthouse teeters over an ocean, beneath a collection of galaxies spiraling through the nighttime sky, while a shooting star passes overhead. The light and dark figurative sailboats represent positive and negative memories, while the logarithmic spiral of galaxies in the sky is reflected in the earth below by the failed attempt of humankind to overcome the nature of life itself. Stats 26400 pieces 75 lbs (34 kg) Footprint: 96 or 128 square studs Volume: 156 x 156 x 176 studs Timeline Phase 1 Idea conceived: January 2020 Digital design: 8 weeks total Wheel: 2 weeks Lighthouse: 2 weeks Bridge: 2 days Cliff: 4 weeks Shipping: 13 weeks Building: 2 weeks Phase 2 Digital design revision: 1 week Shipping: 4* weeks Building: ongoing *Multiple international part orders in October never did arrive and had to be repurchased domestically. For more, follow me on flickr, instagram, or ideas.
  7. Based on a tip from his new Onondaga friends, Captain Brickleton and a squad of the 18th Hussars head inland into the interior of Lacryma in search of a waterfall that rains gold. At least that's how the Onondaga describe it. Deciding that if the waterfall really rained gold the riches would be too good to pass up, Captain Brickleton plans a day trip on horseback. As the group passes over a rickety bridge on foot, they reach the end of the Elizabethville road and the beginning of the Onondaga single-track that preceded it.
  8. Darth Bjorn

    [H19 - Skye - TT] Clipped Wings

    *Your entry has earned 13 XP* Some time later onboard the ISD Pandemonium... Lt. Traum [over the comms]: *Sir! We’ve detected shield signatures around the old capital, and ships are fleeing the system. Reaper Squad reports several natives fleeing into the highlands and to the former capital. Reaper Squad is bringing the Queen to you now. What are your orders?* Grand Prince Serion: The old capital is of no concern - leave it! Round up all capable survivors in the ruined region. If there’s any natives among them, clip their wings, and process them. No need to destroy a valuable workforce. Wipe out any agitators… Grand Prince Serion: Ah… The famous descendant of Kharys is here... A little less majestic I see… Queen Edi’kharys: *snnnifflles quitely* damn you… Grand Prince Serion: No reason to extend your peril… You will die knowing that your kind will be robbed of all freedom…Throw her out the nearest airlock! General Hathe, prepare your troops for a surface attack! /// I'm pretty happy with how building out in all directions turned out... This entry may be a tad bit grim, but then again... We are the bad guys...
  9. Terraversa, East of King's Port, August 620 "Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army on the march. Long way from home, paying the price in young men's lives." The first battle had been won, and several bridgeheads had been conquered all over the island. The losses had been relatively mild but, still, they were the highest suffered since the Juniper War. And that damned island was still largely to conquer. The first, rather obvious objective was the capital city, King's Port: the city had the largest harbor and was right in the middle of the excellent road system of western Terraversa. The capital city of the island also had a strong strategic and politic value: its capture marked the turning point between an island successfully resisting to the invasion and some minor strongholds still in enemy hands... and, for foreign nations, it could also make the difference between joining a war or supporting isolated pockets of resistance. Therefore, they had to conquer King's Port, and quickly! During the T-Day, the forts of the city had been shelled and stormed, and the vanguard of the army had entered the city from South and East. However, refraining from a brutal bombing with heavy artillery had had its cost, and the bluecoats were still fighting in the streets, with the local militia clinging to buildings and barricades. The troops landed West of the city, so North of the King's River, on the contrary, had successfully captured fortifications and batteries but were still too weak to attack the city and defend themselves by a counterattack from Pamu, so they had entrenched and were waiting for reinforcements. And the easiest way to bring those reinforcements was crossing the King's River from the South, building a proper bridge, and using it to bring soldiers, supplies and artillery between King's Port and Pamu, cutting the city off from the Kingshead district. The designated crossing point was a few miles East of the city, where the King's River was nothing more than a fast stream... quite easy to cross for a man, but an insuperable obstacle for a cannon. Combat engineers and common soldiers started working hard, reinforcing the riverbank by hammering long wooden poles in the sand. More poles were hammered directly into the bottom of the river, creating a robust anchorage for the pontoons... for sure a difficult and uncomfortable job. On the other side of the river, the bank was cleared from the bushes and the sand was leveled with shovels and spades. The next step was far more difficult, especially considering the fast flow of the river. Empty barrels were thrown in the water and secured to the poles, creating a sort of floating platform: the buoyancy of each barrel could barely sustain a single soldier, while the complete structure will hold men, horses and even cannons. While the privates worked, the officers planned the next moves with the chief engineer: according to him, the bridge could be completed in half a day, enough to let the column rest and to complete the siege before the evening, if they marched quickly enough. Soldiers and sailors followed the instructions of the combat engineers, trying to keep the barrels in position before they are dragged away... and trying not to be dragged away themselves while working in the deep water! The bridge quickly started to take shape, at first as a simple row of ropes and barrels... ...and then, when planks and earth were cast over the structure, as a robust floating platform. For sure not a bridge intended to last, but a fast solution to bring men and cannons onto the other side of the river. The soldiers marched forward, platoon after platoon, ready to face the enemy on the battlefield. Among them, the veterans of the Mardierian Legion. Several of those soldiers lived on Terraversa -or were even born on the island- before the "Terraversan patriots" forced them to flee with their families. Some were members of the garrison, others were simply political opponents of L'Olius or Oldis, who had ended up in proscription lists for a reason or the other. For them, the war was something far more personal... a chance come back to their land and to get their deliverance! -------------------------------------------------------------- A series of three builds I've done for the invasion liberation: the river banks remain the same, with the soldiers progressively clearing the bushes and building the bridge. Probably it would've been better using a larger river, this one doesn't really seem worth of a bridge... but I imagine that it would still be a problem for our cannons!
  10. *Your entry has earned 7 XP* Part 1: The Sound in the Streets (Surface Battle) "Aboard the Peace and Quiet", by journalist Gutat Lupak. Pre-Battle Briefing from Data Master Bey’wan Pwua’Tua About the Ship: Meet the Crew! Additional Pictures for Judging Huge thanks to the other CFS players, who are a consistent source of feedback and good company. To be concluded in Part 3.
  11. Hi there, I am new to this forum ... I recently acquired the bridge set 3774 (pre-owned), immediately I found the train does not go through the bridge, ie: stuck on both the incline as well as delcine1/2 on the bridge. In another word, it won't go thru. I had brand new battery and the wheels are clean free of dust or hair. Has anyone experience similar or any tricks and technique to make it run ?? Cheers ! -D
  12. Ravelino

    The Big Mystery WIP

    Tall Black Tower WIP by Jip Kempers, on Flickr So yesterday I started uploading my latest WIP Project to its own Flickr Album I decided to upload every day or two depending how fast it progresses to get some feedback and tips while I build instead of having to alter a thousand things in the end. Which’ll probably still occur lol! I also decided to make a little guessing game of what it will be and to spice it up a bit I upped the ante by asking what the full title of the finalized project will be. (I have it in my head since brick one) Winner will get a nice memento once the project is finished, and the rules are in the descriptions of today’s upload and if you don’t have a Flickr account you can send me a pm here or on the LowLug forum. C&c welcome, wanted, needed!
  13. Although mostly known as a sandpit (glad to be a part of it, haha!), some parts of Kaliphlin actually does contain water and some rather lush vegetation. The Arkbri river has quite a few smaller rivers and creeks running from it that are essential in supplying the otherwise barren landscape with water. Goats are well equipped in dealing with the harsh climate and although not too common (mainly because of the insane prices of goats in all of historica...), there are quite a few goat herders that call Kaliphlin their home. Some of them live a nomadic life, covering large distances while maintaining the well-being of their livestock. One of them is Mae'Iz, a somewhat grumpy man that prefers the company of goats over men any day of the week. He was particularly grumpy on this day as he had heard rumours about the current rise in population along some parts of the Arkbri river...Buildings had began to sprung up and a small community had even began to take shape as trade had increased in the region. So this is a little scene that I made to illustrate a bit of the surroundings north of Mophet, where the expansion is beginning to take shape... The bridge is made from a bunch of 4L bars with 1x1 plate with clips on each side. The whole thing is slightly bent to match the curve of the fence-pieces. Hope you like it
  14. McDiesel92

    Train Signal Bridge

    Hi everyone, I'm Alex. I'm starting to build up a train layout and wanted to add a signal bridge. I've seen this design (https://www.pinterest.com/pin/503910645807246353/) on Pinterest and really liked but have not been able to find the last two pages of the instructions. Does anyone have the same design built or the finished instructions?
  15. Haddock51

    Suspension bridge

    Where can I find pictures of suspension bridges built in Lego? Estimated length: approx. 1 meter.
  16. This through-truss bridge design was originally downloaded by me (I don't remember the name of the original designer who created the bridge) from the LEGO Factory / Design By ME page in 2010-ish and was never built in real life due to questions about it's strength. I came across it again while looking at my MOCpage account's older files and made it into the version seen above using newer parts and a longer frame quite a while ago. (and as to those original questions about it's strength: It's built like a safe, yet I can pick it up with a single finger by the top..... just don't drop it, because the reddish brown parts won't survive the landing!) More recently, I revised the deck where the track goes to be able to take the RC track up and be able to put down 9V down more easily. (We run 9V trains at shows in Gateway LUG.) In short, the track is now more easily removable to become 9V, 12V, or even a road bridge. The bridge fits any of my trains, and should fit all official LEGO trains except for double stack containers such as sets 10219 (Maersk Train) and 10170 (TTX Intermodal Double-Stack Car). Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! Many more Wild West items can be seen in my Historic sub-forum topic here.
  17. Here is my final design of the St. Louis bridge, commonly known as the Eads bridge because of it's designer, James B. Eads. It uses Indiana Jones roller-coaster ramps for the arches, which looks pretty cool. The bridge is nine tracks total in length and 19 bricks high from base to track. (This means about fourteen bricks of clearance between arch top and floor, so some small ships could pass through!) First, a little background info from Wikipedia (which is also where this picture came from): "The Eads Bridge is a combined road and railway bridge over the Mississippi River at St. Louis, connecting St. Louis and East St. Louis, Illinois. The bridge is named for its designer and builder, James B. Eads. When completed in 1874, the Eads Bridge was the longest arch bridge in the world, with an overall length of 6,442 feet (1,964 m). The ribbed steel arch spans were considered daring, as was the use of steel as a primary structural material: it was the first such use of true steel in a major bridge project. The Eads Bridge, which became an iconic image of the city of St. Louis, from the time of its erection until 1965 when the Gateway Arch was constructed, is still in use. The bridge crosses the St. Louis riverfront between Laclede's Landing, to the north, and the grounds of the Gateway Arch, to the south. Today the road deck has been restored, allowing vehicular and pedestrian traffic to cross the river. The St. Louis MetroLink light rail line has used the rail deck since 1993." This is a rough representation, as it is missing a lot, (I.E. no car deck, missing tunnel under downtown, and lack of the East St Louis ramp approach.) A close-up view of the arches of one of the three identical spans. The bridge as separated out for transit. Here we see the modular connections for transporting dissembling the bridge for taking to shows and such, along with the older deck (the dark bluish gray line) for when the bridge was single track. The modular component of the bridge's design also makes it a LOT easier to carry as the whole bridge with the three sections weighs about 10 pounds total. 4/12/19 BIG UPDATE: Real life pictures / text updated to reflect the newly remodeled bridge. (it now is double track!) Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  18. I had a spare truss bridge model lying around and thought it could use a revamp. Then I thought of the turntable I had designed, and realized it could use a transfer table companion model. Thus, this transfer table was finished just today. The whole table moves on four wheels at the edges and three guide-ways in the center. The model sits on four vintage 32 x 32 stud base-plates arranged in a square. I'm currently thinking about slicing up what's left of a gray 48 x 48 into a strip for the leading tracks to rest on. The height from the track to the top of the truss-work is a hair shorter than 13 1/3 bricks tall, which is tall enough for most locomotives but not enough for cabooses, extra-tall double stacked container cars and double-decker lounge cars. The length of the table is four tracks long, which is plenty for any of my single-unit locomotives or official LEGO models. (Diesel cab and booster units will have to be split up to fit, however.) In progress shot of me loading a 4-8-2 steam locomotive onto the table. Lining up the tracks as perfect as can be is key to keeping the loco on the rails and steady! Moving any loco sideways is easy enough to do with one hand... lining it up and rolling the engine off, however, needs steady two hands and a good eye. A better pic of it lined up at the shed track after unloading the steamer. Please NOTE: There is a two stud gap (and a bit of incline) between table and lead-in track: It is NOT 100% flat! Comments, suggestions, complaints, and compliments are always welcome!
  19. TAFOL

    [MOC] Brick Bridge

    In 2017, when LEGO presented the world with set 70922 Joker Manor, almost the entire AFOL community was crazy about the new coastertracks in this set. Finally, people could build the craziest rides for their theme parks. As I didn't see any other applications for these parts, I didn't dwell on them for long. Until images of 75889 Ferrari Ultimate Garage leaked and I got to thinking: if these rails can be used to make a finishline, can you also build other bow-like things with them? Could be a fantastic MOC if done right. So I ordered a tan baseplate, 4 railcurves, 3 roadtiles and a lot of dark tan slopes in different sizes and I got to building. What ultimately led to this MOC. I hope you like it as much as I do. Brick Bridge by TAFOL, on Flickr You can view more pictures on my Brickshelf and/or on my Flickr. And please like and share this MOC on Facebook.
  20. This was my build for the 6th and final round of the 2017 Middle Earth LEGO Olympics. The category was ‘Switched Teams’; so someone who was a villein would now be a good guy, and a place like Rivendell would be evil, etc. I decided to do Minas Morgul, which is the fortress of the Witch King in the Lord of the Rings, so in my version the Witch King is now a noble leader with a valiant force of warriors guarding the splendid fortress. In order to make it look less scary/bad guy-ish, I opted for a white/grey colorscheme and changed the architecture to be slightly less pointy (though I did keep the buttresses and battlements rather spiky), while still keeping the same general layout. I’m quite pleased with the result, and although I didn’t plan on it getting quite this big, it’s now my heaviest build to date, weighing a smashing 31.2 pounds! There are also a few things you can try to find in this build, if you would like (though not many of them are very well hidden, I admit!): 4 frogs 1 bear 2 hedgehogs 1 bird in a birds nest 3 chickens 2 goats Lots more pictures on Brickbuilt. Thanks for looking, and as always, comments and constructive criticism very welcome!
  21. Patgeo

    [MOC] Honoring the Monolith

    Introduction; This MOC is my first attempt, specified in landscape, of this size. The Story; "... In a galaxy far far away, somewhere in one of its corners, there is an unknown and isolated planet. In the center of the area where life has been developed, lies its oldest structure. A stone column with unknown carvings. But this is not the only peculiar thing about it. Every year, it lights up on its own and an abrupt hum is emitted. The next moment, something magical is happening! It's like the whole planet is coming alive - a heady aroma is overflowing everywhere, the flowers bloom, animals wake up and everyone enjoys this magical moment. This day has arrived, and all three tribes of the planet have gathered to celebrate the day of life. Everything rolls pleasantly, until a clank and a thunder shakes the calm atmosphere that prevails ... " 1. Honoring the Monolith MOC by George Patelis, on Flickr 2. Crashing Site 3. Crash Crater 7. The Ceremony 8. The Stream I am looking forward for your comments! You can find more pictures of my creation on my FlickR
  22. One of the major problems of using my Eads bridge at shows is it's only one track wide.... so, I devised a western double-track wooden and iron structure using instructions from an old instruction I found on my hard-drive. (Originally from a defunct website / magazine called Railbricks and in a more modern concrete-looking format). This double structure is about 300 less parts than my single track Eads bridge and sits at the same height / length, so it can fit in the same spot. There are no bricks above track level at the beginning of the bridge so it works with even 10 wide trains or curves / switches immediately off the bridge! (This is unlike the Eads bridge, which cannot have turns right after it.) This trestle has about a track and a half of space between bridge end and truss section for an engine to straighten out on. The 10-wide BTTF time train fits easily though the bridge with room to spare! (time train not included in LDD file!) The new trestle is the same height and length as the Eads bridge, but with double the width for 300 less parts. The Eads bridge is also modular in construction, while the new one is not. (Eads bridge not included in LDD file!) LDD file for the wooden bridge (NO time train or Eads bridge in file!) is available at Brick-safe. Comments, Questions and complaints are always welcome!
  23. Hey all, At the last day of the year I want to show you my build for the bull-back contest. The motor is winded-up using the wheel and relaesed by pusing the axle beside it. From the motor to the clutch it is geared using a 12/36 and a 8/40 combination. After the clutch there is also a 12/36 reduction. If I turn the wheel 4 times around and release it, then the second 36 tooth gear turns almost half around. That is enough for lifting the road completely. I added the clutch for some kind of safety. In neutral I won't wind-up the motor when lowering the bridge. And a video: Next step is building something to slow down the motor. Comments are welcome! https://bricksafe.com/pages/nick97/tc13
  24. Location: Cocovia Type: Minichallenge build The Super Precarious Bridge had been built to cross a gorge on Cocovia Super precarious bridge by North White, on Flickr The Plans had called for them to go at an easier crossing. Super precarious bridge by North White, on Flickr But The WTC is also awesome at building bridges for some reason FIN Just another entry to @Brickwolf's minichallnege. I was originally going to use these for the supports, but it made everything look too pink, and I'm not @Bodi . I didn't really have a story envisioned for this one, which is what most of you seem to come here for, so sorry. Maybe I'll rewrite it. This entry should be considered a 16x48, but if the powers that be otherwise, I suppose it could be reduced. C&C appreciated!