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Found 17 results

  1. Hello everyone, in the near future I would like to show you a little bit of my Lego City, which is still under construction. To begin with, here is a video about the beach area I made yesterday. What do you think? Beach Area - Bricksonville
  2. Discover a place where music is on the menu! Drop in at the LEGO® Creator Expert 10260 Downtown Diner, where you’ll discover a healthy portion of fun and surprises. This impressive model features removable building sections for easy access to the detailed interior, which comprises a ground-level 1950s-style diner with a large curved front window, red bar stools, jukebox, counter and an open-plan kitchen. The mid level has a gym with boxing ring, punching bag and weight training room, while on the upper-level you’ll find a recording studio, complete with vocal booth, mixing desk and a refreshments cabinet. The facade of the building features pink-and-teal Streamline Moderne styling with a large ‘DINER’ sign. Other external features include arched windows, balconies and a staircase, plus a pink convertible car and a detailed sidewalk, complete with mailbox, parking meter, flowerpots and a streetlamp. This incredible collectible toy has been designed to provide a challenging and rewarding building experience with a touch of nostalgia and charm. Includes 6 minifigures. • Includes 6 minifigures: a chef, waitress, boxer, rock star, manager and a bodybuilder. • The 3-level Downtown Diner comes with an array of brick-built details, including a detailed facade with pink-and-teal Streamline Moderne styling and a large ‘DINER’ sign, external staircase, arched windows, drainpipe, balconies, decorative roofline, opening skylight and a rooftop terrace, plus a detailed sidewalk with a mailbox, parking meter, flowerpots and an ornate streetlamp. This set also includes a pink 1950s-style convertible. • Ground level features 1950s downtown American diner styling with a large curved front window, red barstools, benches, jukebox, candy machine, counter, 2 soda dispensers, and a kitchen with a coffee machine, stove and a cooker hood. • Mid-level features a gym with a boxing ring, punching bag, weight training room, water dispenser and a wall clock. • Upper level features a recording studio complete with vocal booth, soundproofed walls, mixing desk and a refreshments cabinet. • Take a ride in the stylish convertible and head for a diner where fast food and music are on the menu. • Help the chef prepare the fastest food in town while the roller-skating waitress lines up the orders. • Drop in at the gym for a couple of rounds in the boxing ring or a good workout on the punching bag. • Open the skylight and eavesdrop on the making of a hit album. • Accessory elements include roller skates, guitar, golden record award and a buildable barbell. • Remove the building sections to access the detailed interior. • New decorated elements include a decorated door, album cover, lots of teal-colored and pink-colored elements, and a dual-face minifigure with singing and smiling expressions. • Special elements include new flower stalks and flower heads, plus 1x3 ‘jumper’ plates, 2x2 plate with 2 studs and a minifigure torso with boxing gloves. • Collect and build an entire town with the LEGO® Creator Expert Modular Building series 10243 Parisian Restaurant, 10246 Detective’s Office, 10251 Brick Bank and 10255 Assembly Square. • Measures over 13” (34cm) high, 9” (25cm) wide and 9” (25cm) deep. 10260 Downtown Diner Ages 16+. 2,480 pieces. US $169.99 - CA $219.99 - DE 149.99€ - UK £129.99 - DK 1399.00 DKK *Euro pricing varies by country. Please visit shop.LEGO.com for regional pricing. Available for sale directly through LEGO® beginning January 1, 2018 via shop.LEGO.com, LEGO® Stores or via phone: US Contact Center: 1-800-453-4652 CA (English) Contact Center 1-800-453-4652 CA (French) Contact Center: 1-877-518-5346 European Contact Center: 00-800-5346-1111 LEGO, the LEGO logo and the Minifigure are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2018 The LEGO Group. All rights reserved.
  3. The Glacier Falls Lodge!

    This was one of my first large-scale MOCs, that came before the Orient Express Thriller or Winterfield Academy were even conceived! (back in 2014) I had watched the miniseries for "The Shining", and I've always been enamored with National Park lodges. So, the product was The Glacier Falls Lodge, the official lodge for Brickler Mountain National Park! A perfect getaway destination/luxury hotel catering to any minifig's vacation needs! This MOC went through at least six different iterations, before finally being pared down to a (very) downsized version fit for LEGO Ideas. At its prime, though, the Lodge contained an enormous lobby, full dining room and kitchen, and several guest rooms upstairs, with two bathrooms per floor (kind of in the style of Chico Hot Springs in Montana). The first iteration was built in 2014, during that summer we had a major fire that caused us to evacuate. This hotel was thrown in a box and taken with us in a car at night fleeing to Seattle. Later, when the fire season was over and we returned, the hotel sat on the desk for several months without being worked on. The Second Iteration had a change to the tower, it was more octagonal and separated from the roof. And I used the Town Hall Skylights for the Lobby. The Third Iteration sadly has no pictures, as my computer had crashed and we lost them. But it was pretty ugly. I had the idea to try and make octagonal towers on either side of the main doors, with the idea not turning out very well. That iteration was fragile, and fell apart easily. The Fourth Iteration was a HUGE model, with an upgraded, fancier porch and a sign out front! This was also when I made it into more of a Victorian style hotel, with a large wrap around porch, and the two towers on either side. These were half-octagonal towers, which made it a lot easier to stay together. (I had actually figured out how to build them, and gotten the pieces for it). The roof was a major challenge, but we made it work! This iteration also had an enormous, well thought out and beautifully built dining room, as well as a large kitchen with three to four walk in freezers! The Fifth Iteration was downsized in terms of length to make it fit through the door, lol! The basic hotel structure remained the same, however, with the exception of a large rearranging of the rooms inside. This was the first project that I submitted to LEGO Ideas, before having to downsize it again for it to be accepted. This was by far the best iteration of the six, and the only one we have interior pictures of. 5th Iteration furniture and Grand Fireplace 5th Iteration First Floor Porch Detail Lobby Facing the Dining Room Lobby picture 2 Piano Music Room Lobby Picture 3 The cool part was that the interior walls of the 5th Iteration were removable! 1st/2nd floors This was also the first iteration to have major interior decorating and fancy chandeliers! The 6th and Final Iteration of this MOC kept most of the basic structure, subtracting much of the width, in order to make the 3000 piece LEGO Ideas limit. This unfortunately was at the cost of sacrificing the entirety of the interior minus several pieces of furniture. This iteration currently, sadly does not exist anymore. It was torn down and the pieces used for Winterfield Academy (pictured below) However the 6th Iteration is still up on LEGO Ideas right now, and currently has 2036 Supporters! If you would like to give your support as well, I'll include the link here. We would really appreciate any support given! :) https://ideas.lego.com/projects/66655f37-9622-4836-a2cb-797e916f4e2b Anyways, that's the whole story on the MOC! This was by far (not counting my disastrous attempt at a county courthouse when I was 15) my first successful MOC that I thought looked relatively decent! Please tell me what you think, anything you like about it, etc., in your replies! I'll finish with a couple shots from last December and our promotional Winter Photoshoot! :) Thanks for reading! :)
  4. Hi everyone! I have been a Lego enthusiast for years, but since I started school, I never had the time and money to focus on the hobby anymore. However now that I have the time, I do not have the space and need to build my bank. I am mainly Technic flagship and Ultimate Collectors oriented, and I prefer the newer sets as well. I have started a Bricklink store to sell some items I own that are either taking up too much space or I have no interest in it. These items are all new and sealed, and they include: -Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS (I do not like supercars generally, despite being Technic) -$349.99 CAD -Lego Technic 8480 Space Shuttle -$800 CAD -Lego Technic 8860 Car Chassis -$850 CAD -Lego Star Wars 7965 Millennium Falcon -$260 CAD -and Lego Creator 10226 SOPWITH CAMEL (will be added to the store soon ~CAD$185) Prices are a bit lower than its competition, only because I do not aim for high profits and just want the buyer to make the most out of it...and free up space in my home :) All are brand new except model 8860, box is open, and the black beams sit freely in the box (do not remember if they came in a bag or not), but all the bags and books are factory sealed and new, never opened or built. Many of the sets are old and vintage, and I will add more as I determine if I want to keep the set or not that I find. Also, I live in Canada so shipping will be determined on the weight/size of the Lego set and distance. I can do local pickups if you live around Toronto, ON. -My business email is: 1awansua@gmail.com -My bricklink store it: https://store.bricklink.com/legomaster1686&utm_content=globalnav#/shop?o={"showHomeItems":1} -My eBay only has model 8480 Space Ship added to it at the moment, but I will add the rest to it soon if you prefer buying off eBay: http://www.ebay.ca/usr/usamawa0?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
  5. It seems that Creator is stepping their game a lot, not only Expert range but "normal" range seems to be every year better and better(Hello year 2017, I look at you ) .When city fails and their only budget is police, fire department or research teams, creator is going to save the day for minifigs(And buyers). What I like to see is police cruiser in 8-10 stud wide range and also in 1:16 scale or bigger to chase down these great creator cars!Also I like to see sedan, combi, muscle type of vehicle in normal creator range. Thanks for read
  6. [MOC] Half Modular Jewelry Store!

    Here's one of my smaller MOCs, the Half Modular Jewelry Store! I originally made this as a glass shop, but then I realized that not many people would recognize a glass shop and so I converted the downstairs area into a pretty jewelry store. This building has an elevator on the side and is compatible with all the regular Modular buildings. The upstairs is an apartment with a large kitchen and chandelier, and the roof features a garden! Here is the Flickr page for this MOC: https://www.flickr.com/photos/150692089@N03/albums/72157676732056872 Please tell me what you think!
  7. Orient Express Thriller!

    Well, here it is! My first train MOC that I've ever made, the Orient Express! Including a large Pacific class style locomotive similar to the Emerald Night, a tender, and a passenger car, I cobbled this together from several Bricklink orders and the LEGO Constitution Train Chase. ( I was very sad to take it apart, but it was for the greater good!) The passenger coach features opening doors, and I was able to put two lights into the roof, so it can light up at night! Here's the official story on this MOC: -Oh no! There's a Mummy on the Orient Express! Join dashing, adventurous Arthur Rutledge as he travels across Europe with several priceless artifacts to be delivered to the Louvre Museum in Paris. But be careful, his evil nemesis Cad Goldwater is also aboard, and will stop at nothing to acquire the relics. Will Rutledge be successful, or will the Orient Express be stopped by the nefarious plans of Cad? It's up to you! You can also see more photos of this MOC on the Orient Express Thriller page on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/150692089@N03/albums/72157676895085431/with/31865151642/ This project is also on LEGO Ideas to support! https://ideas.lego.com/projects/162979 We would really appreciate the support! Thank you. :) A couple extra pictures!
  8. Tram of Opicina

    Hi! I'm a new train LEGO fan, my new passion started last spring... But I think that a LEGO tram is missing, so I created in LEGO the tram of my little city. This is my MOC: Tram of Opicina #DSC_1058 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #IMG_2473 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #IMG_2496 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #DSC_1061 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Now I submit it on LEGO Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/158520 Please, support & share if you like it! Thanks! Every comment helps me to improve!
  9. It's 1964. Vietnam is starting. Martin Luther King receives the Nobel Peace Prize the year Nelson Mandela is jailed. Sony introduces the Video Cassette Recorder, and the computer mouse is invented. Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor marry for the first time. The Beatles are riding high in international charts, but I want you to put I Get Around by the Beach Boys on your internal gramophone, grab your shorts and the keys to your Bug, and head on over to Californ-eye-ay coz' we are going surfin'! Apparently. The VW Beetle, or Volkswagen Type I, was already over 25 years old in 1964. It was conceived in Germany in 1938, but let's gloss over that part of its history; production didn't pick up until 1945. Over the car's 65 year production span, an astonishing 21 million were built; it is unsurprising therefore that the Beetle was named in 1999's Car of the Century competition as the fourth most influential car of the 20th century (after the Citroen DS? Really?) and that may explain its inclusion as the logical LEGO follow-up to 2014's 10242 Mini Cooper, which came second in that competition. Review: 10252 Volkswagen Beetle This is not The LEGO Co.'s first VW Beetle set. Believe it or not, it's not even the second - many of you will remember the largely studded 10187 from 2008. To find the first, we have to go all the way back to the first year of LEGO mass-produced toys - 1958 - when an ambiguously numbered die-cast metal 260 VW Beetle was available; several iterations of the Beetle featured in the early days of LEGO metal cars, including one from 1964, but I believe 10187 was the first to be built in LEGO bricks. This latest offering joins the Mini in the recently introduced LEGO Creator Expert range. It's a very different bucket of worms to the last Beetle, making use of curves and angles rather than its predecessor's studs-up sculpture, and ascends to the mainstream another peripheral colour: Dark Azure. Set Information Name: Volkswagen Beetle Number: 10252 Theme: CREATOR Expert Release: 2016 Parts: 1167 Figures: N/A Price: EUR €89.99 - 104.99 | GB £69.99 | US $99.99 | AU $149.99 | CA $129.99 | DKK 799.00 Links ... LEGO Shop ... Brickset ... Bricklink The Box Click for a larger full-frontal image The minimalist Creator Expert packaging shares more in common with the Exclusives sets than the main CREATOR range, but it's smart and allows the set picture to dominate. Here a surf-equipped Beetle drives itself (hilarity ensues) down a sandy track. The set manages to stand out even against the similarly-coloured sea; the choice of surf theme for the set really dictates the box art. I wonder whether the set's colour scheme was decided by the reference image, or whether the artist hunted around for a suitable image. If the latter, they found one, and it's displayed on the right hand side: Click for a larger image Judging by the roof rack, I think the set designer must have used this image for inspiration. It also affects the set's historical accuracy: the real-life Beetle here is a pre-1965 model, given the smaller window apertures. On the back of the box, the sentient car parks itself among the dunes, and leans its surfboard against a conveniently-placed inset of the set features: Click for a larger image I love that. The board even casts a shadow on the inset! The insets show off the set's salient features well, though the main image is rather similar to the box front and I would have shown the car's rear off here. The box measures H 279 x W 478 x D 72 mm (11" x 19" x 3" approx) and weighs 1352 g (3 lb). It is tape-sealed . On the underside is the Volkswagen licensing information, interestingly in the official VW typeface. As is customary for CREATOR sets, the set inventory is displayed on the box top. The Instructions Now, I was under the impression that The LEGO Company had listened to the whinges of its die-hard fan-base, and endeavoured to wrap the instructions and sticker sheets of the more expensive sets to prevent bad things happening. Not so here. My instructions were loose and crumpled in the box. I hope that is just because I have an early promotional copy of the set, and that this doesn't represent a policy change. The single, perfect-bound volume has a cover similar to the box front. There are no technical or historical tidbits, unlike the LEGO Ideas or Architecture sets; I'd like to have seen a bit of information about the Beetle, but not if it would inflate the price of the set. The instruction steps are clear, with part call-outs, and a handy yellow line to show you where new bits are added. This doesn't help when you miss an entire step, as I did! The only other problem I encountered was trying to identify the colour of a 1x1 round stud which looked either white or grey (but probably meant to be flat silver). Sticker Sheet Mercifully, my sticker sheet was only crumpled but not damaged by its journey loose in the box. There stickers are handily numbered, though not unfortunately in the order you apply them. There's a lot of redundancy here, so you can get away with applying as few as 12 of the 24 decals: stickers 13 - 16 are duplicated, and the instructions suggest only applying one of each. You can choose which country's registration to use, though I was delighted to find that there are tiles enough to allow you apply all of them, and change the registration plate to enable a James Bond escape or something. The countries represented are USA, Australia (I think, assuming 'QLD' is Queensland), the UK, and (West) Germany. The Parts The parts are divided into three modules, of 3, 2, and 3 polybags each, as shown here, and the tyres were loose in the box. My first task was to confirm the colour - having not read the official LEGO blurb, I did what I always do when confronted with an unfamiliar colour, which is compare it to a part in a known set. Most of our LEGO is packed away, but fortunately the kids came to the rescue. So Duplo confirms this blue is Dark Azure. The three modules' parts are laid out below. Click each frame for a close-up It's great to see such a large choice of parts in a relatively rare colour, previously found mostly on minifigs and Duplo, or, more recently, in Basic Bricks sets. Prior to this Beetle there were no plates available in Dark Azure. Whether this means there'll be an abundance of regular sets in this colour remains to be seen; I had high hopes for Bright Green after the CITY recycling sets a few years ago but nothing came of that. Unlike, say, Dark Green or Dark Red, I can't see that there'll be much demand for Dark Azure amongst MOCers, though it might make a nice base colour for a re-imagined Classic Space. Otherwise, there are a load of handy SNOT bricks and plates of various kinds, and a few parts of interest: The dark azure corner brick is a new part, ID 24599, and I think would be described as Brick, Round Corner 5x5. Its curvature matches that of the Brick, Modified 1 x 2 x 1 1/3 but it is only three plates high. The 24246 heel-print tile is new this year in a few Mixels sets, and only in white; 23443 bar holder with handle is new, and listed on Bricklink but not yet appearing in any sets. New to me are the 1 x 1 x 3 brick, though it's been around since 2014 and quite common, the Technic axle 3 yellow, and the Ring pull tile, which I can see being very useful. The Round 1x1 tile with gauge featured of course in the Mini and several other sets. The clippy plate is shown only because of the mold difference: both types occur in this set (or my copy, at least) - they are I believe Bricklink types b and d. Then of course there's the new VW print tile. The tile is light bluish grey with a slightly reflective 'negative' print; I would rather have seen a shiny VW 'positive' print on a darker tile, buy hey. There are two spares in this set and I can see these being useful for CITY cars. Finally, there's the vaunted 'updated windshield design': I didn't even notice this until I read the blurb when writing the review: hence the stickers are already on! The mold is a stud less deep, but still quite sturdy; this design would have been quite handy for the Mini whose older design windscreen is also shown here. The Build The build starts with the chassis and is largely pedestrian until towards the end of module one, where SNOT begins to be applied in more detail and things quite suddenly get exciting. In the interest of brevity, I will not describe the build process in detail here, but it is shown in detail on my flickr; I will instead show a few interesting techniques. This is the back end of the car, late in module 1: A large chunk of tan and bley plates and bricks has been inserted, studs facing to the rear, with male and female clips pointing upwards. It's not until module 3 that you find out what the clips are for - they attach the rear window and engine cover. Behind that, a light bley 2x2 SNOT plate tessellates perfectly with a dark bley 1x1 SNOT brick with two 1x1 bley plates: these hold the tail lights; this technique is used in a few places in the set. Interesting SNOT abounds (*thinks of children* ). Here the rear (centre) and front (right) seat uprights are made; the rear one makes use of a stack of headlight bricks alternating studs right/studs up to make a stud reverser that is exactly 3 plates wide; when combined with the left and right halves, this makes 20 plate-heights or exactly 8 brick widths - so the seat rear fits neatly in the gap. I'll remember that technique! The front seats use 1x1 bricks with studs on two sides; these seats are slightly wider than 4 bricks each as they don't need to fit into a confined space - see here (you can also see where I missed a step - the bley plates either side of the rear seat should be a brick higher ). The entire front end of the car is initially attached only via the front axle, and at a half-stud offset: This is then corrected with the judicious application of jumper plates. You'll be able to see more when we look at the underside later. More delightful SNOT-work builds the front wings, including a repeat of the tessellation I pointed out earlier: The small construction I have removed here contains a SNOT plate that is used to correct the sideways-facing studs shown in the picture. I love that sort of thing! You can also see how the headlights are attached, with a technique similar to the Mini's. You'll be able to see more when we come to the features, or check my flickr. The Finished Car I've chosen the German plates for my car, partly because it's a German car, and partly because I put the British number plate stickers on badly. Plus I built it left-hand drive before thinking about it (you can very easily convert it). It does also mean that I can point out The Significance Of The WOB. The bonnet boot luggage compartment cover (from now on, it's 'luggage cover' and 'engine cover', mkay?) has popped open in the above picture, which happens all too easily. Here it is from the reverse angle with the cover closed: The designer has gone to extraordinary lengths to recreate the challenging curves of this iconic vehicle. Look at the nearside headlight: below it is a SNOT-mounted 1x2 cheese wedge; above it a regularly-placed 1x1 cheese next to a 1x3 bow; the contour these form almost perfectly matches the curve of the new 5x5 cover piece forming the wing. The entire wing then marries reasonably neatly to the luggage cover, itself a two-part design attempting to recreate the curves of the real thing. Conscious as I am that the stuff on the roof distracts from the car itself, I removed it: You can see a bit more clearly how the wing curves of the 5x5 corner bricks matches the 1x1 modified bricks at medial ends of both front and rear wings. Strangely, without the roof stuff, the wheels and wings themselves start to look a little too chunky to my eye, but we'll do a formal comparison shortly. Note the use of the new bar with handle parts to mount the door mirrors. From this view, the problem with the car's windscreen is becoming increasingly apparent. There's something I just don't like about it, but it's hard to put my finger on what. Here's a comparison shot of a '64 Beetle: Image from photogallery.classiccars.com It's not a perfect comparator. The wings are indeed a little too chunky on the LEGO version, but that's not the problem with the screen; '64 Beetles had flat screens with an arch shape, which the dark bley tile above the screen fails to recreate convincingly. Let's look at it in more detail from the side: Image from lehnan.hol.es The rake of the windscreen is too steep. It's a small difference, and it ought to be subtle, but combined with the relative loss of curvature of the front end of the roof, it has a dramatic effect making the windscreen look more like a Citroen 2CV than a Beetle. However, aside from the chunky wings and steep windscreen, the overall shape is otherwise remarkably good. Let's move rearward, where things start to get better again. The wonderful curves continue towards the engine compartment: You can see how the tapered door pillar gives gradient to the side of the car, and the 4x4 corner slope helps to smooth the lines from the wider sides to the narrower rear. This part sits, incidentally, on one of these, which defines the slope of the rear window. The engine cover uses a SNOTty construction to achieve a half-plate step, giving the (faint) illusion of a lateral curve. The curves of the rear wings are a little fussier than the front ones, but they still create nice effect even if they are not quite as flared as the real thing: Image from foundonthestreet.net The LEGO version uses grille tiles to depict the iconic air-cooled engine intakes; the effect is not entirely successful, and I wonder if they might have been better off using these (or even these, if they were still available). I do like the rear lights; I'm tempted to replace the deeper of the two bley 1x1 plates under the amber light with a body-coloured one (there are spares in the set!). Front-on, the gap between the luggage cover and bodywork starts to show, but this is the only angle from which it's noticeable. The windscreen, again, looks odd, but the wing curves look great. The tyres are possibly a little too wide. This view isn't quite so forgiving of the rear, which looks better from oblique angles, but I still think the rear is the car's best side. Note the bumpers, made with modern curved pieces, with a hinge to help at the rear; they are nice (but they're crying out for some chrome). I'm conscious at this point that I'm being quite critical. Take a look at this shot from above: Look at the apex of the luggage cover at the front, and follow the ovoid line of the bodywork backwards, round to the side, and in again at the rear, and then back again; then look again at the curves of the wings, especially at the front; then compare to the schematic: It is a remarkable feat to get anything near to the shape of this delightfully contoured car in LEGO. And back down to earth, quite literally: The underside is remarkable for one point, which I alluded to earlier: the axles are not threaded through the chassis as you might expect, but attached almost independently until the structure is built around it. You can also see how the front end of the chassis sits at a half-stud offset, I think in order to accommodate the spare wheel. Features Now let's have a look in a bit more detail. We saw this earlier, but here's another look at the elaborate work going in to get the wings looking as smooth as possible. It's not the most elegant solution, perhaps, and not perfect, but reasonable. Behind the wheel you can see some studs facing outwards - these are from two inverted brackets that form the walls of the luggage compartment; the studs don't connect to anything. Talking of which ... ... here it is, and looking roomier than in real life. The black bit with the VW badge is the fuel tank. The spare wheel just sits there; it rattles around a bit. Being the same size as the Mini spare wheel, it's also too small when compared to the main tyres! Some fiddly jumper plates go to make the door attachment, but the result is smooth and surprisingly sturdy, if a little unsightly. The seat construction is gorgeous, and I like the telephone door handles. The gauge behind the steering wheel is the sole instrument on the dashboard. No radio? I've removed part of the roof to give a better view of the interior. Again, the seat construction is highly effective; it's not obvious here but they are mounted on jumpers to give a brick-wide gap between in which sits the handbrake. Towards the front is a gearstick, made simply from a classic space aerial, but which sits on a semicircular curved brick representing the transmission tunnel ... ... and which continues to the rear: Both front and rear seats flip forward; behind the rear seat is a luggage shelf - true to life - in which the Picnic Rug is stowed. Note further clever SNOT supporting the door pillars. I alluded to this earlier, but here is how the rear window and engine cover are fixed: The upward-pointing male clips hold the window; the two flat silver (these are the ones that caused me trouble in the build) 1x1 studs prevent the window collapsing in. It looks fiddly, but it comes together easily and is remarkably durable. And here's what's in the rear: This is a simple but reasonable facsimile of the VW aircooled engine of the original Beetle. It looks like it might be a rotary engine but it's actually a flat 4; the larger wheel looks like it might be the fan, but it's actually the fan pulley - the fan being in the round black thing behind. In case you wanted to know! I think the LEGO version works really well. Finally, there's the window-dressing: A cool-box containing two green bottles and a green can with a ring-pull top, nicely made with simple but clever SNOT, and a surfboard that looks a little thrown together - I think it would be possible to make it without the white protrusions at the tip and the tail, but it's a minor thing. You might also just be able to make out the lip of a white 1x1 tile in the exact centre of the board - why they didn't use a plate here, I don't know. It all fits snugly on the roof rack, the box via one stud, the board by being wedged between the edges and those black rubber cheating-pieces: Comparison to 10242 Mini Cooper I don't have the 2008 Beetle, and anyway this set's immediate ancestor (and main competitor) is 2014's Mini Cooper. How do they compare? Next to the clean Mini, the Beetle's lines do look a little fussy. The Mini also highlights another minor complaint about the Beetle - the lack of chrome (or metallic silver, at least); though I understand that the Beetle would require a lot of silver parts or it would appear mismatched. The front end of the Mini is so good that meaningful comparison is lost; the Beetle is, after all, a much more difficult shape to render in LEGO. This really isn't a fair comparison! Everything about that Mini is spot on - probably the only thing about it I would change is the tinted windows. So how do they sit together on the shelf? Pretty well, actually, though the scale is off, and the Mini is noticeably larger than it ought it be compared to the Beetle (I estimate it would need to be 3 studs narrower to be at the correct scale). But who cares about that when they look so good! If you had to choose, which would you buy? The Mini, despite slightly fewer pieces, is more expensive, though only just - this may be a licensing issue. The Beetle is a more interesting build, even if the end result isn't quite so good. Here is how I would sum up this comparison: people might say of the Beetle, 'Wow, that blue LEGO car looks like a Beetle!' But they would say of the Mini, 'you know, that Mini model is actually made of LEGO!' But is that a good thing? Maybe it's all down to the Battle of the Picnics: Conclusion This has been a really difficult set to review. Inspired in no small way by the joy that is the Mini, I was eagerly anticipating this set, and really wanted to love it. I like it, but do I love it? I'm not so sure. The parts selection is interesting and useful, and largely in an unusual colour. The build is fun and instructive. The way those curves are achieved is delightful ... but it's just not quite accurate enough. I've been spoiled by the Mini's near-perfection, and this is a much more difficult and less forgiving original, so it's understandable - but disappointing all the same. Design 7 It's just not quite a Beetle, though it's close. Parts 8 A useful selection and unusual colour. More chrome or silver would be welcome. And what's with the crumpled instructions, TLG? Build 9 Fun, engaging, and instructive. Features 7 Opening compartments, doors, folding seats, picnic stuff, but this is a display set, really, and the cool box and surfboard are actually a bit of a distraction. Give me chrome instead! Value 9 At under £70 this is really good value - in the UK, at least. Overall 80% My Score 7/10 Do I like it? Yes. Do I love it? No. Would I buy it (if I didn't already have it)? Oh yes. Do I want to see more classic vehicles? Absolutely. I just wish they'd tilted that windscreen ... Thanks for reading! I hope you enjoyed the review. Comments welcome. Rufus Resources 1. VW Beetle on Wikipedia 2. VW air-cooled engine My flickr album
  10. Modular Expert B models.

    Hi all Just got into the whole modular building idea after purchasing a couple of the predesigned models, Cinema, and Detectives office. I've had a bash a MOCing using the very limited parts I have to join them. I was just wondering if there has been much interest in creating B models and instructions, from the parts in the modular sets, which retain the modular rules?
  11. Which Modular Buildings Do You Own?

    I own the pet shop and the fire brigade, my sister owns the green grocer, the grand emporium, the palace cinema and the town hall, she isn't into LEGO anymore, but she keeps them as ornaments.
  12. [MOC] 50's Style American Diner

    I built this little diner to fit into my Modular town. It occupies a single base plate and can serve as an end cap to a row of buildings, but has facades on three sides. To date, this is one of my favorite builds. A little close-up of the marquee: Ground level view of the restaurant: A little profile shot: And then the top came off! Plenty of seating inside: Hamburger, fries, milkshake, or a fresh slice of pie today? The staff is always friendly and helpful. There's always a hoppin' tune playing on the jukebox. Situated in a busy area of town: Thanks for looking! You can see additional pictures (with more details) in my Flickr gallery!
  13. For the Celebricktion event in Atlanta earlier in October, I decided to build a new Modular for our LUG train layout. So, I built a little fast food joint. Here's the entrance: And right above it, a spacious loft apartment perfect for inner city living: Step inside the restaurant for a bite to eat: Then relax on a fall afternoon on your rooftop garden patio: Inside, the restaurant takes up most of the ground floor: Place your order at the counter: Then sit down to enjoy your meal: The upstairs resident keeps his apartment neat: He can always cook in his modern kitchen if he's not craving burgers from downstairs: After a hard day's work, it's always fun to relax with games and movies: On the top floor, you find the bedroom and bath: Where finally, he gets a good night's sleep in his cozy bed: Thanks for looking! Other photos and larger versions of these can be found in my Flickr album!
  14. Hi everybody, I'm thinking in purchase the 10214 Tower Bridge and turn it into a modular building MOC. It would be my first attempt to build my own MOC. I'm not interested on the set itself, but I feel that has a lot of possibilities to switch it into a nice building. My question are: has anybody attempted this? Any examples? Do you think it's a good choice to start with? Thanks in advance!
  15. Hi everybody! :) I'm new to the forum and wanted to share my latest MOC, and in doing so I hope to start a discussion on the set that I've designed and I'm sure that there will be some really interesting dialogue as a result of this. To get something out of the way (and quickly), this set is my very first Lego Idea and as of today it is live - please support it if you think it has merit as a potential Lego set! Monster Miner / Wheel Loader And now, some reflection on the process that led to this model and some thoughts about Lego in general! I'm almost 33 years old and have been mad about Lego for as long as I remember. I love to create things with Lego, and for about 25 years now it's always been Technic-style diggers and cranes, sometimes other construction vehicles, all with functioning gear trains and realistic movements. I'd say that this set I'm sharing here today is the culmination of between 25 and 30 years of Lego experimentation and prototyping. and I just feel that every aspect of this set has "clicked" (pardon the pun) and I'm so happy finally to be able to include a little bit of everything in one big, imposing set. My thinking on Lego today is that there are many sets which don't look very Lego-like (certainly in the MOC realm), and I'm confused by that. Why conceal the medium that makes Lego what it is? With this model I decided to embrace Lego as an educational childs toy (which is what it is, first and foremost), so instead of concealing all the studs and making this more of a replica and less of a toy, I have tried to retain the inherent Lego-ness and sturdy playability of the exterior whilst presenting an equally impressive and more grown-up sort of "model" that would appeal to teenagers and even adults. Basically, it's Lego city, Lego Technic, Lego Model Team etc. rolled into one. Whether that works or not... is up to everybody else! So what do you folks think? Must Lego sets be "niche" products if they are to succeed as merchandise, or is it possible to stretch things a little and cater for more than one market with just one set? To put it another way, I reckon this is the set that I wanted to find in the pages of the 1990s Lego catalogues, especially at the back, in the Model Team section. That's why I built it. Is it just me, or is there intrinsic appeal in this sort of set that straddles the fence delineating different Lego lines? Here are some more pics which may or may not influence your input!
  16. Hi everybody! I'm new to this forum and I want to show you my first Lego Idea: the Brandenburg Gate!! It comes with over 9000 pieces and it' really really detailed!! Here's a render of my project I need your support to transform this in a real Lego set!! Support me at https://ideas.lego.com/projects/87619 Thank you!!