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Found 969 results

  1. LEGO train bridges

    Dear All, my train layout is built “into/around” my home office, which is located in the attic. With the pitched roof area beginning at a height of about 60 cm (2,0 feet), there are not that many options for placing longer runs of LEGO track, as close to the walls in about 40 cm (1,3 feet) height. The floor area is 4,2 x 6,3 m2 (26,5 m2 = 285 square feet), whereas at 2 m height (6,6 feet) there is only a 40 cm (1,3 feet) width section … so beware of your head! Figure 1: Schematic views of my home office. Top: Room cross section. Bottom: Floor plan. All numbers in meters. [The most important question of course is: 2,3 feet? I simply used an online tool for the conversion – I am wondering, is the “,3” bit in the decimal system? Which would mean: 1 foot and 3 tens of a foot. That does not make much sense as there are 12 inches in one foot … and 2,54 cm in an inch. There are 30,5 cm in one foot (rounded) – so we have 3/10*30,5 + 30,5 cm = 39,7 cm which is close enough to 40 cm.] OK, I am just kidding – I lived for 4 years in the US – changed/added a good deal of things around and to the house and - it is absolutely no problem to adjust to the yard – feet – inch world. None what so ever. Because you have to; there are simply no “cm” or “m” in the US … Uhmmm – what did I want to show … sorry: Yes, bridges. When you live in an attic, there may be holes in the floor to get there via stairs. And maybe doors opening to another room. And furniture; certainly not only 60 cm high (I leave it in the metric world) … so you need to mount your track to the walls behind or even “through” furniture, under desks, and you need bridges – many. Essentially it is one large bridge - this post is about the brick- or semi-brick built sections on my train layout. Figure 2: Floorplan and track layout. Left: “Principal” track arrangement: Two main outer loops, two smaller independent loops around the chimney on the left and on the right. Right: Actual BlueBrick track layout. Note that there are two track levels. Red rectangles indicate bridges as referenced below. With respect to Figure 2, left: This was the principal idea: Two parallel main track sections going around the entire room (outer two red lines). Then one circle on the right and one around the chimney on the left. There are possible track levels, as indicated by the two stacked red lines in Figure 2, top left. Problem #1: The stairs (shown in green, top) to get up to my office; here only one section of track fits in between outer wall and hole in the floor. Solution #1: A long incline eventually allowing the two track sections to run “stacked”. Problem #2: The door (also in green, bottom) giving way to the next room stuffed with stuff that we regularly look for. Solution #2: A draw bridge, which is always in the “up” position when I am not playing. On the same image on the right, a BlueBrick generated track layout is overlaid. It actually consist of two “layers” – there is a good section of elevated track under my desk on the left and also behind some book shelves on the right. This is why the layout looks pretty congested in some areas. Most of the track running close to the walls is not visible (or is behind furniture) and is mounted on wooden supports which in turn are mounted to the wall. Some of these areas are rather complex modular constructions, as I need to get there from time to time. Then there are some regions covered with low-level “table” type areas (IKEA is your friend) – as well as supports mounted to furniture. The same is true for “tunnels” – they are all over the place as I have to run some track sections “through furniture”. Coming back to bridges: The red rectangles in Figure 2 on the right indicate the LEGO built bridge sections. I used all sorts of LEGO bricks: DUPLOs from my daughters (now 20 and 22 years old; asked for permission of course!) to swiftly gain elevation, combined with System bricks and plates to adjust to required heights/widths. And Technic stuff to secure things. Oh well and Monorail track … I guess Monorail enthusiast will not like that … BUT: This stuff is fantastic to structurally support bridges!!! Bridge 1 This one is lame – uses the Monorail straight tracks as main structural support – and DUPLO bricks mixed with System bricks and plates for the end-sections. Figure 3a: Bridge 1, location on layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 3b: Bridge 1. Bridge 2 This one is a little more complex. It is a fully automated draw bridge integrated into my PBrick control scheme (and here). The PBrick operating that thing is a Scout. It has its own ID address and understands 4 commands: “Up”, “Down”, “Stop”, and “Status”. Manual control is also possible; the switch to toggle the mode from “remote” to “manual” control is the light brick in combination with the built-in light sensor of the Scout. Further, there are two touch sensors to ensure that the Scout knows the status of the bridge. One detects the fully “up” and the other the fully “down” position. When both sensors are open, the bridge is somewhere in between. To make things a little more appealing, a slightly modified/extended #42042 crane is used as power source. I needed to extend and fix the boom to the ceiling as the load is fairly heavy. Furthermore, I used a pulley system apparently called “threefold purchase” (according to Fig. 6-21 on page 64 in Sariel’s extremely helpful “The unofficial technic builder’s guide” book (http://sariel.pl/2016/10/guide2/) to get a mechanical pulling power advantage of 6. This way the PF M motor used in #42042 manages to draw the bridge up from the fully down position, which requires the biggest drawing momentum, without hassle. Figure 4a: Bridge 2, location on layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 4b: Bridge 2, entire structure, “down” position. Top: Top view showing the track. Bottom: Side view with a “track lift” on the left, LEGO storage shelves on the right, and a door to the storage room, which remains clear in the “up” position. Figure 4c: Bridge 2, details of the sensor mounts (“up” sensor mounted to the book shelf, “down” sensor mounted to the underside of the bridge) and the pair of guide rollers. Figure 4d: Bridge 2, details of the Scout PBrick, the #42042 crane, and the pulley mechanism providing a mechanical advantage of 6 when drawing/releasing the bridge. This video shows a little more … Bridge 3 This bridge is fully LEGO brick-built and spans my entire “City” area. It also connects to the next bridge via a curved elevated segment, which was quite challenging (for me …) to give the supporting structure a “solid” appearance. Figure 5a: Bridge 3, location on the layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 5b: Bridge 3. Top: From the wooden shelf track support on the left an elevated two track segment travels behind the City buildings. Bottom: The two elevated tracks merge into a curved one-track segment. Figure 5c: Bridge 3. Bottom left: The curved one-track segment. Bottom right: There is a small pedestrian bridge providing access to the light house. Top: The curved segment continues with a longer straight stretch. A largely modified #10027 train shed (with an additional structure on top) serves (also) as track support. There is a small grating type secured elevated path, which allows the City train personnel to survey the City traffic situation and act properly … Bridge 4 This bridge is a semi-brick-built structure; however, as it spans the opening for the stairs to the story below my office, I wanted to be sure. There is a wall mounted main support which is “decorated” with a supporting structure consisting of Monorail curved track segments; on top though the long incline in the back as well as the elevated track segment connecting to Bridge 3 is entirely brick-built and self-supporting. Again with System and DUPLO bricks – there is even some DUPLO SNOT. With the addition of Technic beams, the pylons have become quite sturdy, so I may even replace the wooden “floor” sections with actual LEGO bricks and plates but that has to wait for a longer time, I guess … Figure 6a: Bridge 4, location on the layout cf. Figure 2. Figure 6b: Bridge 4. Bottom: Entire view of the bridge structure; on the right, the City bridge structure merges with the level 2 section of the outer loop (cf. Figure 2). Top left: In the front (barely noticeable) the inner main loop at level 1; in the back the long incline (sloped at 2 plates/ 9V track piece) of the outer loop main loop. The arrow points to the incline on both pictures. Top right: Last bridge section leading to a long stretch of track behind book shelves. Figure 6c: Bridge 4. View from the stairs giving access to the attic (cf. Figure 2), showing the curved Monorail tracks as supports along with the Technic cross bars. Figure 6d: Bridge 4. Some details of the Duplo-, Technic-, and System-bricks used for the support structure. Figure 6e: Bridge 4. Details of the last bridge section leading behind some book shelves using straight mono rail tracks and bridge support parts (#55767) as main structural elements. The pylons are made from Duplo and System bricks. Bottom right: Some Duplo SNOT on the main pylon. There are some more images on BrickShelf (http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=ThorstenB), just navigate to the “bridges” folder. These are pretty large in size though. Best regards, Thorsten
  2. After some month of building I like to show you my latest MOC: A Mercedes Zetros 6x6 truck. It is a ~ 1:13,5 scale model of the Mercedes Zetros 2733. All functions are Full RC. It is 69 cm long, 21 cm wide and has a height of 27,5 cm. The weight is 4553 g. As battery I use the BuWizz. The Zetros is remote controlled by 4 Sbricks via iPhone. Functions and used parts: Propulsion: 4 Lego Technic Buggy Motor Steering: 1 Lego PF Servo Diff Locks (front / rear axles + central lock): 1 Lego PF Servo 4 Lego Pneumatic V1 + V2 1x5 (Automatic) Compressor: 1 Lego PF L-Motor 4 Lego Pneumatic Pump (V2) Winch: 1 Lego PF L-Motor Telescope Crane: 1 Lego PF M-Motor 3 Lego PF Servo 3 Lego Pneumatic V2 Cylinder 2x11 2 Lego Pneumatic V2 Cylinder 1x11 Outriggers: 1 Lego PF Servo 1 Lego PF M-Motor 2 Lego Pneumatic V2 Cylinder 2x11 Lights: 10 pairs Lego PF LED plus several Lego extension wires Some more highlights: Full independent Multi link live axle suspension Portal Axes Planetary Gears Working head lights, rear lights and flood lights Working turn signals and warning lights [/url Edit: I nearly forgot some special picture pair ;) [/url] Second edit: I corrected the scale which I'd miscalculated.
  3. Again - after almost 1 year of silence - a short teaser; See the section 'Silo Truck' on my website: www.designer-han.nl/lego for more renders & information. As of today only the MLcad files are ready, and thanks (again) to Blakbird for rendering the files so that I am able to share them in advance. Model core features are: PF M-motor driven pneumatic system for loading/unloading the mobile silo. The same M-motor drives the cabin tilting or the outriggers extension at the rear side, based on the switchbox selection. But there's more; so I would suggest check my site for renders and other 'cool stuff' in this model. I expect the BI's being ready in December... for those living in the NL, the model will be shown on LEGOworld2017 in Utrecht, starting next week Wednesday (18 Oct onwards for 7 days). Enjoy all your autumn and winter time to build what you have on your wishlist!
  4. Some month ago, I found a random image of what looks like an exploration truck. As i did not have enough info on the real machine it was impossible to use it as reference, so, some choice have been made: Mini size : not enough part to build something big when I started (other stuff in progress and cancelled since, that's why) A classical front wheel steering would have been possible, but very fragile due to the size of the vehicle. And I will need a pivot + linear actuator system for a future project, so it was a good opportunity to use it. No differential, because size matters. Suspension if possible Tracks, of course. The full album is available on FlickR. Power function part used : 1x PF-M for Steering trough mini Linear Actuator 1x PF-M for AWD propulsion without differential IR receptor Rechargeable battery Cabin is reaaaaaly ugly. One day I will be able to make cool design. Unfortunately/fortunately, after I had finished this little boi, I found a new picture of the real vehicle. But not searching with "arctic/exploration truck", I had all wrong since the beginning. This thing is actually an Oilfield flatbed truck: the Cossack from ATK: Guess what ? It will soon be a real thing. Bigger, with some function. Best regards
  5. 1H 2015 - LEGO Technic Sets 42057: Ultralight Helicopter Pieces: 199 Age: 8 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $9.99, Europe: 9.99€ B Model: 42058: Stunt Bike Pieces: 140 Age: 7 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $14.99, Europe: 14.99€ B Model: 42059: Stunt Truck Pieces: 142 Age: 7 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $14.99, Europe: 14.99€ 42060: Street Working Cars Pieces: 365 Age: 8 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $24.99, Europe: 24.99€ B Model: 42061: Telescopic Forklift Pieces: 260 Age: 8 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $24.99, Europe: 19.99€ B Model: 42062: Container Transport Pieces: 631 Age: 8 to 14 Retail Price: USA: $34.99, Europe: 29.99€ B Model: 42063: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Bike Pieces: 603 Age: 10 to 16 Retail Price: USA: $59.99, Europe: 49.99€ 42064: Searching Ship Pieces: 1327 Age: 10 to 16 Retail Price: USA: $129.99, Europe: 119.99€ B Model: 42065: RC Tracked Racer Pieces: 370 Age: 9 to 16 Retail Price: USA: $59.99, Europe: ? B Model: 42066: Air Race Jet Pieces: 1151 Age: 10 to 16 Retail Price: USA: $119.99, Europe: 109.99€ B Model: --- 42067 ? 42068: Fire Rescue Vehicle Pieces: ? Age: 10-16 Retail Price: ? 42069: Extreme Adventure Pieces: ? Age: 11-16 Retail Price: ? B Model: 42070: 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck Pieces: ? Age: ? Retail Price: ? B Model: Also, to celebrate the 40th anniversary of LEGO Technic, each set comes with a special commemorative brick!
  6. Hi, Does anybody have any ideas on how to vertically support rings which are made up of 4 curved gear strips, putting gears inside of them would not be smooth enough. I have tried putting different types of pulleys and Lego system 2x2 tile round with centre hole in the channel on each side of the gear strips but the spacing is imperfect and there is no bricks thin and small enough to fill this spacing. and it would also offset a big proportion of the whole model. If not, I could always just use NXT/EV3 motors as they have a strong output hub which is supported by the motor enclosure anyhow, but this will be expensive and noisy. I need something that will allow for the curved gear racks to spin smoothly because they are used as wheels. here are the pictures of what I have tried: https://imgur.com/a/H5Wfq https://imgur.com/CpFwpwO https://imgur.com/2q4308j
  7. Ever since set 42039 hit the shelves, I feel attracted to building Le Mans prototype cars, due to their characteristic shape and almost futuristic looks. So I think you can imagine the delight I felt when during my random stroll on the interwebs a few months back, I stumbled upon the following concept car. Back then, I tried building a Lego version of it and got quite far. But due to lack of pieces I had to abandon early. I have since bricklinked a thing or two and want to redo the model from scratch. I think the actual car doesn't even exist in reality yet, and I think this is actually a rendered image. If I remember correctly, it is a concept that they want to try to build in reality in 2020. Personally I think it's the least car-like looking car there is (if you only count serious car models). If you forget the wheels and decals, it could be modern architecture as well. What's also cool is how the black wheel arches are actually almost shaped like Technic panels. I will be using the wheels of 8070, 42039 et al. These are slightly less than 9 studs in diameter, which justifies the following side view: The planned functions are: front steering rear drive, driving a fake engine suspension doors (powered by the damped springs also used in 8448) There's little space, so I don't count on having a gearbox. With a bit of luck, I can find room for a 2-speed, which at least gives the idea of a gearbox. But it probably won't be a proper "supercar" in the Lego sense of the word. We'll see, and I might need some help from you guys with this later on. OK, let's start. All I have so far is the two suspension modules. Here's the front suspension: First thing you might notice is, I'm using the long wishbone arms. Personally this is what makes the suspension much more interesting to myself, because it's more challenging to make it work and looks much more like F1-type suspension. Also you see I'm using only 1 small spring per wheel. The suspension travel is very little (about 1 stud) so I hope having 1 spring per axle is enough. It'll have to be though, because the mechanism isn't very strong, so a stronger spring will result in parts coming loose. The black axle on the left is the steering input, to that's where the rest of the car will come. Thanks to the pins with pin hole, the 5x7 frame is pretty rigidly attached to the whole thing. The chassis will be connected to that 5x7 frame. The rear suspension is unsteered, and therefore less spectacular. But it holds the differential: Those two modules is where I am right now. I do want to have said beforehand that I'm really not good at recreating existing car bodies, so it will be difficult and I will take some slack here and there. But how fortunate is it, that Lego has the perfect color for this car. Older Technic fans know these panels from the great Offroader 8466 and its smaller brother 8465. I'm actually not even a fan of the old panels, but this car is really the perfect opportunity to put them to use (and indeed, I bricklinked some, so I have a nice collection of them). Unfortunately though, these four pairs of panels are the only pieces in this color (except a very rare ribbed hose I don't have). So the body will necessarily be a bit crude. A body with modern pieces would probably be better, but I want to see how far I can come using these good old panels. When we get there, your feedback will be very welcome. The gaps will be filled up with black, I think. But a word of warning: I will probably add some details in a second color, simply because I find black a bit boring to work with. OK, that's it for the opening post. I hope you don't mind all the rambling I do between the pics. Next up will be a basic chassis connecting the two modules together at the right distance.
  8. Hi guys! At least I has finished my next MOC and want to introduced the finished model to all of you! Welcome my International Lonestar truck! It's dimensions are: - Lengh: 101 stud or 80 cm - Width: 31 studs or 25 cm without mirrors - High: 37 studs or 30 cm excluding antennas and exhaust pipes. It consists of more than 5000 Lego parts, including 9 motors. It has: - Great Charbel's 8 speed gearbox, modified by me to the 16 speed one by adding high/low gear to the main output. It has a special shifter. It's all RC. - Independant powerfull pneumatic brakes on each wheel. Inspired by Sheepo's Peterbilt. - Pneumatically controlled fifth wheel. - Independant suspencion on front and dependant one on the rear axles. - Suspended driver's and passenger's seats, doors with locks and shock absorbers. - Detalized interior. - Inline 6 cylinder engine like the real truck. Power functions is described at the picture below, I think this is more interesting than just to read. Also I include pneumatics sheme. Enjoy the pictures please, I hope some video will apear nowadays. Unfortunately, rear differentials can't cope with such a huge torgue and truck cant drive fast on the floor, sorry. Please visit my Bricksafe page for more photo. Building instructions are available here: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-9788/OleJka/international-lonestar-truck/#comments VIDEO AVAILABLE NOW!!
  9. TECHNIC WACKY WHEELS CONTEST After a fierce battle bots competition it's time for a less serious competition. How about a Virtual Race through LEGO City using Wacky Wheels?! DESCRIPTION The Wacky Wheels competition is loosely based on the 1994 Arcade game by Apogee, which strongly puts the emphasis on fun instead of realism, both in looks and gameplay. Each contestant needs to have a wacky vehicle to participate in the most ludicrous race of the year. And you will be designing and building that vehicle! The first requirement for the vehicle is that it needs to have wheels or treads, since it is a road race! Your vehicle can be anything you want (also a boat, plane, etc), but it needs to have wheels, since it's a driving contest. The second requirement is that it needs to have at least one wacky function besides driving and steering. This function can be anything to gain an advantage in the race. Of course it can also be function to hinder your opponent. Anything goes! Thanks to Erik Leppen for pitching this idea DEADLINE Deadline date is Monday 16th of October, 2017. Contest will be closed on Tuesday 17th of October, OR LATER. Disclaimer: I will close the contest when I see fit and when I have the time to process the results. This can be later than the deadline date. Please don't complain about this not being fair and all. RULES AND REGULATIONS The following section describes the contest specific and general rules and regulations. But before that, please take notice of a simple motto regarding the Eurobricks Contests: CONTESTS ARE FOR FUN! Of course there's competition, but at the end of the day, LEGO is just a hobby and the main goal for each of us is to have fun! CONTEST SPECIFIC RULES AND REGULATIONS Each vehicle needs to have a WACKY NAME (no name, no entry). Each vehicle needs to have at least a WACKY FUNCTION (besides steering and driving). Your vehicle needs to have WHEELS and be able to drive. It can be a plane, boat, etc, but it still needs to drive during the competition. Your vehicle needs to be able to STEER. Only OFFICIAL LEGO PARTS. 3rd party STRINGS, HOSES and RUBBER BANDS are permitted. NO 3rd party tires. There is NO size limit. Model Team style building IS allowed. GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS The contest is open to all EB members (also new members). Members who joined EB after the start of the contest can be banned from voting (when vote rigging is suspected). Voting rules will be explained later in the voting topic. One entry per member. Entries need to be new (never posted anywhere previously or shown at an event/LUG meeting). Only physical builds, so no LDD or other virtual entry. If you have any doubts about the suitability of your entry contact me, or Milan. All entries are to include only real LEGO. No clone brands, 3rd party parts, or digital entries allowed. Custom stickers are allowed. No cutting, sculpting or modifying parts. Entries are to be placed in the entry topic in this forum. Entries not in the entry topic are not eligible for voting. The entry post may be edited at any time up to the end of the contest, so feel free to make improvements if you wish. The contest might be closed later than the deadline. Don't complain about this not being fair. You have enough time to build. Don't ask for more time. We reserve the right to disqualify any entry that does not follow these rules. These rules can be changed whenever we see fit to ensure that people follow the intent of the contest. Staff members are Jim is not eligible for winning prizes. WHAT DO I NEED TO ENTER? All participant need to create a discussion topic and create a post in the entry topic. DISCUSSION TOPIC A discussion topic starting with [TC12]. A discussion topic needs to show some actual progress (i.e. pictures of the build in progress) and should NOT be used to "reserve an idea". ENTRY POST The entry post in the entry topic should contain: Entry name. Short description explaining the function(s). One or more pictures (max 3 of max 1024x1024). Embedded video (mandatory). Link to the discussion topic. VOTING The voting criteria will be: Originality & Wackiness. Looks (shape, color scheme etc). Quality of the build. Functionality. PRIZES The LEGO Group is so kind to provide the Top-3 contestants with a great Technic set. And of course, we will be so kind to award you with eternal fame and a medal tag.
  10. Hello everybody, I didn't notice yet any MOD page of the Volvo EW160 excavator. I find this a really good set and as I'm an excavator lover, I couldn't resist to add a few modifications. I have already done 2- 3 and I have others in my mind. Here are the first ones I took away the cab elevating mechanism. I find the excavator better proportioned this way. It looks a lot more like the real machine and IMHO also a lot nicer. The cab was in the original model too much forward and got in the way of good playability. I still have to get rid of the grey beam behind the cab. I also put a swivel and turning mechanism on the grab, which also looks better and approaches the looks of the real machine. The mods I'm planning is to arrange the hoses on the boom and add rigid hoses.
  11. I may be posting in the wrong place and if I am I apologize. I'm a grandma with a Winter Village that lured me into Lego. I had it at work as a kids therapist for 2 years but it outgrew my office and has a spot at home now. Lots of children play with it from Thanksgiving to New Years. They run the trains, and build their families out of minifigs so it is more strong than elegant. Three years ago I saw some pretty cool ski lifts online and I want one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnJ2M1iKt40 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIZ5WkQp-Uo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSwdposR3Sk and went a little nuts on bricklink buying what I thought I might need. Last year I copied the seats from twigman's non operational warming hut. https://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/49952-winter-village-ski-lift-and-warming-hut/ Then I stayed intimidated and did nothing until last week. I copied the Friends ski lift which is pretty worthless for what I want and then I built an ugly fortress. Then I went online and learned as much as I could about how real ski lifts work. I bought Sariel's book and built a better tower that doesn't pop off the hill as easily. I finally uploaded my first pix ever to flickr hoping someone here can help me. https://www.flickr.com/photos/143898716@N08/ I tried twine, drapery cord, and yarn to drive my bullwheels but all are too slippery and if I tighten them I collapse my towers. Also my motor needs to be geared down but I'm not understanding enough. I let kids crash trains but I want this to work well before they get their hands on the remote. There is a local LUG but I have to Take care of my Dad on the weekend it meets. I would appreciate any advice. Thanks, Karen
  12. Technic General Discussion Welcome to the Technic General Discussion topic. Here you can post small questions or comments about Lego Technic which don't need a topic of their own. This way we will keep the number of topics limited. Examples Has anyone built vehicle x? Where can I find this or that? I missed this set on eBay...darn!
  13. Hello to all LEGO fans. Today I am presenting you the future of racing cars of 24 hours Lemans. TESLA concept race car. It is driven by 2 electric Buggy motors.Power suply is via freshly charged batteries. ( our future i think) It has a concept steering mechanisem for better driving propertis. It is a concept from Tesla and Michelin group. Its called Das koncept. The whole car inspired me to make someting like the real concept of Tesla T1.But not in the shape, only the steerin system. ( it is ugly ) So i decided to make my own version of the body shape and chassis. Lets see some pictures of my design: Some detailed interior with opening the cabin. Picture of the undercarriage. As you can see, nothing special. It has full independent suspension on all wheels. Rear axle is direct driven from iner output of buggy motors. Frot axle is steered via RC unit. Some dimensions: lenght: 62 studs, width: 28 studs, height:14 studs. weight is 1380 grams. Speed: I did not measure it, But for this weight and size its wery wery fast. After the shooting for the video, i was playing with this litle race monster abouth 1 hour or something. Spectacular driving. I was again a litle child. And the video. I hope you like it. Best regards, Valter
  14. Hi! I was very impressed by new 42054 set so I’ve decided to motorize it. The chassis was completely replaced but the body is the same like in the official set. There are four motorized functions in my model: AWD, front and rear steering and cab rotation. Also I’ve added electric PTO for outer RC attachments. I plan to create new rig in the near future. Let’s see my MOD in action: A few photos: New transmission: BB switch as in original set: Electric PTO: Thanks for watching! I hope you like it :)
  15. "The Pursuit of Perfection" - slogan of the Lexus brand. I'm now back with my greatest Lego creation ever. A 2010 Lexus GX 460 with EV3. It's a replica of my Dad's car, but this one's in gray with black interior. I made it as much as I could to the real car, thanks to pieces from the Arocs and Porsche set. Features Sariel's 4-speed sequential gearbox controlled by a medium motor All-wheel-drive Independent suspension Rack-and-pinion steering Fake V8 engine Six seats (could not fit a seventh one) with the rear four being foldable Opening side doors, trunk door, and hood. Detailed interior The gearbox and the two differentials in the car like to click while moving (especially on rough terrain) around, but the result was a car that was heavy, slow, but also makes lots of torque. I'm very happy with how this car came out and I couldn't have done it without all of the helpful people on the Lego community and EuroBricks. Thanks especially to my good friend TheMindGarage for never making me give up. Now I can officially call myself a true master builder. Check out this build on my EV3 community account too for more photos and information about it. I would love to make a YouTube video soon about the features of the GX EV3 and footage of me taking this build on some dirt trails in a park. I also want to take a picture of this right next to my Dad's actual car. So please follow this post to check out some stuff I might upload in the future! To finish this post, here's some collages with photos of the GX EV3.
  16. Lexus GX EV3

    (For original post) Hey guys. I just got done posting the video for my Lexus GX EV3 on YouTube. Check it out! The entire video was made about a month ago and I just posted it now. Now it's time to take this apart and head to my next build, which is finally putting together the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set I got for my birthday (I used some of its pieces in this). Be well, StudRobotics
  17. My latest MOC, the 4x4 crawler! This was modeled off some 1960/70 pickups, hence it’s boxy look. The goal was to have a powerful drive and a winch, with a release like in 42069 so it can be pulled by hand then engaged. I am happy to say that these goals have been achieved. In the video, the crawler has no trouble driving on ice and frozen grass, and I also made a course out of books to test the crawler indoors. When driving outside, the temperature was -2C. The crawler is powered by 2 L motors, steering by a servo motor as well as engine and winch controlled by M motors. Video: Pictures: Thank you so much for watching and reading! Looking forward to your comments! BbBT
  18. This Ford GT is the ultimate expression of form following function. Its teardrop- shape body is the result of extensive work in the wind tunnel. Its carbon-fibre body and its 600-plus horsepower 3.5L EcoBoost V6 engine are the ultimate expressions of technological innovation. Flickr: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm7qSxrk Hello Ford and Technic addicts! Thorsten has completed professional instructions for the Ford GT. It might be time to disassemble your 42056 Porsche Kit and build this orange replica of the 2017 Ford GT! Avail at Rebrickable, check it out! Rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-10792/Loxlego/ford-gt Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/gp/139930963@N04/83f95A Video: https://youtu.be/bV8_uOz50oU Ford GT - race car for the road 🏁 by lachlan cameron, on Flickr This supercar packs RWD driven by 2 XL-Motors, Servo for steering, pushrod-actuated torsion bar style suspension front and rear, Sport and track mode suspension, V6 engine, Sbrick plus, Rear spoiler with manual lift, 2 M-motors (1 for each door), button to turn on the car under the hood, easy battery access. Ford GT - From drawing board to reality 🏁 by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Nothing about this build was easy. This car had so many new things that I've have never accomplished before. To start was the framework. I was worried this build would be too heavy for the pushrod suspension. Each wheel has 2 inboard shocks that are positioned in the same fashion as the real Ford GT. Ford GT - door mechanics - filter shot by lachlan cameron, on Flickr I really wanted to have the doors open the same as the real car and this is where difficulty started. Opening those huge, heavy doors was a small feat in itself. The pressure required to pop the door to the final position upwards is immense, so I has to seriously gear down the axle. Ford GT - doors by lachlan cameron, on Flickr The next challenge was the motor placement. Man was it ever hard to fit everything inside a tear drop bodywork! I had to use the middle of the seats for the Sbrick, which may not look too cosmetically appealing, but I can assure you it did completely strengthen the framework immensely. (this may be my sturdiest frame I've made) IMG_0043 by lachlan cameron, on Flickr Lastly, I kept the Veneno to race the Ford GT as they have identical gearing. If you watch the video, you'll see who wins. I will work with Thorsten as well for professional instructions in the future. Ford GT back view 🏁 by lachlan cameron, on Flickr A big thanks to @brunojj1 for suggesting to place more studs between the wheels. I tried it this time (2 extra studs) and I feel it looks proper. thanks! Ford GT - white room - filter by lachlan cameron, on Flickr
  19. REVIEW - 42070 - 6X6 ALL TERRAIN TOW TRUCK INTRODUCTION It is that time of year again. The time when the most interesting new Technic sets will be (or already have been, in some cases) released. The flagship set is obviously builds loads of anticipation and expectancy. Interesting enough this year's flagship set isn't the biggest set, when we are merely regarding the number of parts. Even though the 42069 has more parts, this set is still considered to be the flagship. It's quite obvious when you see the size of the box or when you look at the price. At first sight the set looks as impressive as the box. Six big wheels, introduced in the Claas last year. Full RC, which means you can use a remote to drive the vehicle and to operate the crane and outriggers. There is only one remote however, so the functions need to be switched, using gears and levers. I am anxious to find out how the gear box works. Since several videos and reviews have been released, we already know that this set received a lot of criticism. One of the main complaints is the hefty price tag. It's as expensive as the Bucket Wheel Excavator, yet is has less than half the parts. There must be something in this set justifying the price tag. Why don't we start building, so we can find out what that might be. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42070 Title: 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck Theme: Technic Released: 2017 Part Count: 1862 Box Weight: 4,0 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 58,0 cm x 47,7 cm x 11,9 cm Set Price (MSRP): € 279 Price per Part: € 0,15 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX Upon looking at the box, it's clear that this set is this year's flagship. Obviously the lid/flap is a clear indication that we're dealing with the flagship, but the box itself is also pretty impressive. INSIDE FLAP The inside of the flap shows a single picture of the model, with the outriggers extended. Admittedly, it does look cool and appealing. According to the designers this is the truck that will tow the truck that was supposed to tow your car. If this bad boy doesn't get the job done, what will?! INSIDE The inside of the box shows the different functions, translated in no less than eight languages. At the bottom you can see an overview of all the Power Functions components. BACKSIDE The backside of the box also shows some of the functions, together with the B-model, a Research Explorer Vehicle. Not that I am particularly familiar with research vehicles, but it doesn't resemble anything I have ever seen CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1 Single book with stickers 6 Tires 18 Bags BOOK WITH STICKERS The way every bigger Technic (or LEGO set in general for that matter) should be packed, the sticker sheet combined with the book. BOOK The book is quite heavy and it contains almost 400 pages for 590 building steps. STICKER SHEET Since the sticker sheet is packed with the book, it's unharmed during transit. Hopefully the bear is unharmed too. The colors of the stickers are very vibrant, which perfectly match the Dark Azure look of the truck itself. TIRES One of the key elements of this set are the six big tires, introduced in the Claas in 2016. I am big fan of these tires, so I was delighted that the rumors about a 6x6 Truck with Claas tires were true. BAGS This set contains 18 unnumbered bags, containing a total of 1862 parts. The PF components are combined with the rims and are packed in two separate bags. By looking at the bags you can already see a lot of different bright colors. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This section describes the interesting parts. POWER FUNCTIONS This set contains the following Power Functions elements: Battery Box Infrared Receiver Infrared Remote Control M Motor XL Motor Compared to the Bucket Wheel Excavator this set does have the IR Receiver and Transmitter, while the BWE doesn't. And it has an M Motor, which the BWE lacks. So it has three more PF components. This is important for comparing the price. It's a nice PF Starter Pack for those of you getting (back) into the hobby. 24-16 TEETH DIFFERENTIAL Surprisingly, this set contains two old style Differentials. Upon close inspection, it seems that the mold has changed a bit, since the innards of the gear slightly protrudes, which wasn't the case with the previous versions. Admittedly, I would probably not have noticed if Sariel hadn't mentioned it. Actually it makes sense that this set contains at least one of these differentials. Since it's full RC and 6x6 we do need a center differential to prevent strain on the axles when powering all the wheels. DARK BLUE AZURE PARTS When we first saw the pictures of this set, we had to guess which color blue was used. This is because TLG has treated us with a wide range of blue elements in the Technic line. Compared to medium blue or medium azure, I definitely prefer this blue color. It would be great if TLG picked one (or two) shade(s) of blue and worked with that for a while though. They probably have heard enough complaints by now, so hopefully they will stick to dark azure as the alternate blue. Downside of getting new colors is the range of available parts. Over time the inventory will hopefully grow, but for now we have to work with this selection of dark azure. Currently there are 215 registered parts in dark azure, but they won't be very useful for building Technic. Unless you like to add Duplo to your truck 4x Liftarm 2x4 13x Liftarm 5L 13x Liftarm 11L 1x #1 and #2 Panel 1x #13 and #14 Panel 6x Curved Panel 11x3 3x Panel 11x3 9x Panel 11x5 4x Tapered Panel 11x5 CURVED PANEL 13x3 For the first time we get these panels in black, which is a very welcome addition to the parts selection. If we can get them in white too, that would be great, thanks CURVED PANEL 3x6x3 Earlier this year this transparent version of the curved 3x6x6 panel was intruced in the BMW R 1200 GS and Uwe conveniently used it as headlights in this truck. DOG BONE For the first time one of the frames (technically it's called a liftarm) is produced in a different color than light bluish grey. Six H Shaped Liftarms in red will be used in this set. One of my favorite parts and they perfectly fit the Mindstorms EV3 color palette. AXLE AND PIN CONNECTOR HUB This year the Axle and Pin Connector Hub is released in red. I already found these at the Factory Store in Legoland Germany and I wondered which set would use these in red. They are most likely not produced in red for this set, but for Baze Malbus from the Star Wars Buildable Figures. ROPE This set contains a new rope. It has kind of a metallic touch to it. It is slightly ticker than the regular rope. Thumbs up for this new version. It looks and feels a lot better. RED #3 CONNECTOR Last but not least, the rerelease of the red #3 connector, last seen in 2011. Lots of MOC-ers will be very happy to be able to use these parts for an affordable price again. I almost forgot that these parts were pretty rare, so I shot this picture afterwards. Four parts is exactly the number I have (or had before now) in my collection. So basically I doubled up! Whoop whoop. INVENTORY This set contains 1862 parts, which is not that many for a flagship these days. THE BUILD Let's build ourselves a 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck, now shall we! As with most trucks we start by building the center section, where the gearbox will be positioned. We immediately get cracking with quite a few gears, including the white safety gear (a.k.a. Clutch Gear). Early on the M Motor is attached to the gear box. This motor will be used to drive several functions, switched manually by two levers. This picture clearly shows that there are four switches to be operated. Eventually there are only two levers (one on each side of the vehicle), so let's wait and see how this will end up. So far the build is enjoyable. It's fun to add the gears and to slowly find out how they will be operated and which function(s) they will be driving. After building most of the center gearbox you will work your way forward and attach the front wheel steering linkage. As you can see the steering is operated off center and the second 12T Bevel Gear is only used to guide the rack. One of the things that also meets the eye is the different colored liftarms on the port and starboard side of the boat...uhmm truck. It seems odd at the moment, but it will prove to be useful later on...if you don't screw up anyway Talking about screw ups. I had quite a few of 'em during the build. It was late and I wasn't really sharp. An example of lack of sharpness is taking the XL Motor to the photo studio (I was building downstairs) and not thinking clearly about where the cable should be positioned. I can tell you...not this way. There is little extra length on the cable, so you will need every centimeter (or even milimeter). Connecting it this way will end up with having too little length on the cable. Lucky for me I was able to turn the motor around without taking too much of the model apart. I had a friend over who is interested in LEGO Technic as well. Obviously, he didn't want to be in spectactor mode during the entire build, so we alternated building every now and then. Since I misplaced the XL Motor, you can see what happened in the picture below. The dark azure liftarms were placed over the wire, which got us into trouble half an hour later or so. Let's talk a bit more about the different colors on the different sides of the truck. Since people tend to frequently make the mistake of misplacing the differentials in a 4x4 model, TLG provided a fool proof way of connecting the differentials. This way you almost cannot make this mistake. So, you would think. Unless you are building with a team mate and you incorrectly correct a mistake. That is exactly what happened during this phase of the build. My buddy had built both live axles. He had built them correctly, but he reversed the second one, resulting in the red liftarms being on the wrong side of the vehicle. I noticed the mistake, but instead of simply turning the second live axle around, I started rebuilding the second live axle. This resulted in both differentials being on the same side. Needless to say, that didn't improve driving performance. This was the moment that we called it a night. As you can see the wire is still incorrectly attached and the rear live axle has an incorrectly placed differential. Little did we know that we *cough* my buddy *cough* also missed a 20T bevel gear right smack in the middle of gearbox. As you can see in the picture below, there is no extra length on the cable of the XL Motor. This is not the most elegant solution, but after you finish the cabin, you won't see the cable anymore. At this point we still had the rear differential the other way around, so when I hooked up the battery box to test all the functions, we noticed the two rear axles turning in different ways...a clear indication you screwed up. I immediately realised that my buddy didn't screw up the build, but simple attached the rear axle incorrectly (or is this also considered a screw up hehe). We both had a laugh and fixed the mistake. Here you can see that the red connector is a tight fit. Not much margin to work with. The finished cabin looks cool. Although, I wonder why TLG keeps using blue panels as seats. I mean, this blue doesn't really match the rest of the truck. I'd say that any other color would have worked better than blue. Yellow would have been okay, or simply dark or light bluish grey, since the set is already very colorful. Come on guys, you can do better than that. The engine powering this behemoth is a powerful 4 cylinder engine. Wait a minute?! That can't be right. A 4 cylinder engine....hmmmph. I reckon its real life counterpart wouldn't use a 4 cylinder engine, but Uwe probably prefered a non-V engine over the correct number of cylinders. I would rather see a big 8 cylinder engine, even if that meant a V8. Even Dokludi used a V8 in his replica, so there is space enough. Other than that; the engine with the two black panels looks cool. The rear outriggers use more or less the same mechanism as the side ones, using an axle instead of gears to operate the stamps. Cool aspect about this technique is that it's quite rare for the outriggers to be operated by a motor. Usually you have to manually extend the stamps, which is rather cumbersome. Or be very patient when you have to wait for the 42009 outriggers to be extended. These outriggers are deployed in no time! Here's the attachment of the gearbox to the mini LA. The axle still needs to be pushed through the bracket. When you are done with the rear outriggers you move onto the crane. The crane looks rather flimsy for a truck this robust. Some panels could be added to make it look more sturdy and robust. It feels unfinished this way. At this point the model looks like you will be adding quite some stuff. On the contrary, you are almost done at this point. I remember my girlfriend looking at the parts I had left, looking at the model and saying "but you still need to build a lot". This is how your 98% complete truck looks like. The fenders and the side panels cover up the chassis and after that you are done. As you can see, the rear of the truck lacks a proper bed, which leaves you with an unfinished feeling, again. The rear and (the looks of the) crane are definitely not the strong suit of this model. The front of the model does look cool though. Unlike the cute bear, the front says "don't mess with me, I will ... you up". At the bottom you can see the 40 year anniversary brick (3L Liftarm), which is present in all of the 2017 sets. Several "Tow 067" stickers need to be applied, but what they mean still remains a mystery. Since set 42067 is missing from the line-up many of us figured the 42067 would be introduced as a new supercar (or something similar) being towed by this truck. The designers were actually quite surprised with this theory (or they acted surprised) and they said it wasn't related at all. It is supposed to have a meaning though, which we will find out later. FINISHED MODEL Without further ado, I hereby present this year's flagship.....the 42070 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck! Some basic observations when looking at the model. I didn't like the color at all when it was first presented. During the build I actually started liking Dark Azure. It works really well with red and the yellow details. There is quite a gap underneath the doors. It's a plus that TLG included the bigger panels, but I can't help but think that the gap could have been avoided. The yellow rims with the black dishes work really well. The overall look of the truck is rather impressive. When you start building and you see the six big tires, it's a sign that it's gonna be "yuge". And that the Mexicans are going to pay for it...oh wait now, that's something totally different. It is huge though. I am well aware that bigger doesn't always mean better, but I am a sucker for big models. The front of the truck with the bull bar definitely matches my expectations for this kind of truck. The chains and the Teddy Bear add nice touches to the exterior. The center of the chassis seems to be bending a bit, which isn't really surprising, given the size of the model. When I go on a cruise, the ship is bending all the time and that's not even a bad thing. I don't really mind this model bending a bit, although one could claim that it needs some reinforcement. Is it even road legal to have the tires sticking out of the vehicle?! I wonder how it looks if you position the panels 1L farther to the outside. This is how the vehicle looks from the back (sorry for the mirrors). As you can see I have attached both chains to the rear end of the vehicle, instead of one to the side. From the rear you can easily see the chassis underneath. The bottom shot of the chassis shows the old style center differential and the pendular axles. A couple of soft springs on each side would have been nice. Some extra pictures for your enjoyment. FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS Now that we have built the model and we know what it looks like. Let's talk about the functions. This model packs six functions powered by two motors. Steering Driving Rotate crane boom Raise/lower crane boom Raise/lower the hook Raise/lower the outriggers Unfortunately you can't switch functions with the IR remote, so you need to change the functions manually, using two levers. Each lever is mounted on one side of the model. The left lever (the one on the driver's side) switches between the Driving Functions and Operator Functions. When you switch this lever to driving mode, the position of the second lever doesn't matter. STEERING Instead of using a servo motor for steering, this truck is using the M Motor, which is also used for some other functions. Steering is very smooth and operates nicely. There is no return to center, but you hardly miss it. I really like the way this is implemented. Downside however is the turning radius. As with many Technic models, this model has a very wide turning radius. You need to go back and forth quite a few times to make a 180-degree turn in a somewhat confined space. Here are two video's demonstrating the steering mechanism. DRIVING Because of the weight of the vehicle, it's geared down using a 8T on a 24T gear in the portal hub. So, don't expect spectacular performance when it comes to top speed. It does have proper torque and it drives smoothly. Using an XL Motor instead of an L motor results in the model coasting when you release the "throttle", instead of abrubtly coming to a halt. All in all I am quite happy with the ability to drive (and steer) this model. Here's a short video of driving the truck: Since I am not really interested in Truck Trial and/or outdoor operation, I won't go into much detail about how suitable this model is for that. If you are interested in that, I can highly recommend watching the video review of our top video reviewer Sariel. What I do like to address is the inability of the IR system to be operated outside. I have never done truck trial or other outdoor PF IR related activities, but it just not possible to operate the model outside of your home. I never really realised that this was a big issue, but when you buy a € 279 RC set you probably expect it to work in your garden as well. Makes me wonder how many calls have been answered by TLG's customer service regarding this matter. It's time for TLG to step up their game and come up with a better solution. OPERATING THE CRANE AND OUTRIGGERS When you switch the lever on the driver's side to upper position you are engaging the non-driving functions of the model. That is operating the crane functions and the outriggers. When you are using this mode you are depending on the second lever to select the functions you want to operate. It's either the outriggers combined with lowering/raising the boom or rotating the crane and raising/lowering the hook. This takes a bit of getting used to, but I found this model easier to operate than the Arocs, which uses a similar approach. The following video demonstrates the operator functions: One thing that kind of bugged me during operating the outriggers is the fact that a 7L axle has been used and it has been stopped by two full bushes. This resulted in the outrigger getting stuck near the panel on the right side. I was surprised by this, since TLG usually makes sure that there is ample space for moving parts. I will be modding this by using an 6L axle and half bushes. MANUAL FUNCTIONS Besides the motorised functions, this model has some manual functions like opening the doors and the bonnet. And according to TLG's website, it has moveable lights. They have yet to be found though. B-MODEL The B-model of this set is what TLG calls an Research Explorer Vehicle. A polar vehicle comes to mind, but the big tires are more suitable for other types of environment. I am not sure what TLG is aiming at. Usually I don't really care for B-models and that's no different for this set. I would be happy to see someone build this vehicle and show us what it's all about. I will take a rain check. PRICE Now that we are almost at the end of this review you have probably noticed that I am rather enthusiastic about this set. Although we haven't found a clear explanation why this set has an MSRP of 279 euro. I was hoping we would find out during the review, but we haven't. Therefore, I am afraid we need to do some math to be able solve the mystery. The most logical way to determine the price of a set is to compare it with similar sets. Other than the usual Technic elements, this set contains PF components and six big tires. Let's look at the Claas because of the tires, the Volvo L350F for the Power Functions and the Bucket Wheel Excavator because it has the same price. Claas has 1977 pieces and has an MSRP of € 149. Four big tires, PF Battery Box and M Motor.. Volvo has 1636 pieces and has an MSRP of € 219. Lots of PF including 2 PF IR Receivers and 2 Transmitters, big tires and a big bucket. BWE has 3929 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. PF Battery Box and XL Motor. 6x6 Truck has 1862 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. More PF than BWE, but way less PF than Volvo. So the BWE has over twice the number of parts, no PF Receiver or Transmitter and a single motor, but it still has the same price. You can argue that the BWE was actually cheap compared to other sets. Okay, let's call the BWE cheap and ignore it. Leaves us with the Volvo to compare to, since that set has a lot of PF components. The volvo has the entire range of PF components, including 2 PF IR Transmitters and Receivers. So it has a lot more PF components than the 6x6 Truck. The Volvo has approximately 200 parts less than the 6x6 Truck. At around 10 cents a piece, this would make up for a maximum of € 20. The Volvo is € 60 cheaper and it has almost double the number of PF components. The Claas isn't overly expensive, so the price of the tires probably don't add extreme costs to producing the set. When looking at the price of other sets, I simply cannot explain why the 6x6 Truck should cost 279 euro. Therefore, I can only jump to the conclusion that this set is overpriced. I'd say the price should be somewhere between the Claas (€ 149) and the Volvo (€ 219). € 149 + 2 tires and more PF components makes me feel like € 199, but no more than that, and definitely no € 279. SUMMARY When I first saw this set, I wasn't very thrilled about it. Even seeing it in Billund didn't change my mind. It's just a big truck which can drive and has yet another shade of blue. I do like big models and I do like the Claas tires, but it just didn't do it for me. Bright colors for a truck like this?! BUILDING EXPERIENCE During the first stages of the build it was clear that this set packs and interesting gearbox to operate some cool features. The set contains over 100 gears, so there obviously is interesting stuff going on. During the build we (I had some help during some of the building stages) made some serious mistakes. This wasn't because of the instructions. This was because it was late and we weren't paying enough attention. The funny thing is that this actually added some fun to the build. We had to take some stuff apart, and investigate where the problem originated. This was somewhat reminiscent of the good old days, where you sometimes had to puzzle your way through the build. So yeah, I really had fun during the build, even though I (we) made some very stupid mistakes. DESIGN Dark azure is a very nice shade of blue. It's way better than medium azure or medium blue. Now let's hope that TLG makes a pick when it comes to blue and add some connectors to the mix. Some parts of the truck look very cool and some look unfinished. Especially the rear of the vehicle and the crane look unfinished. It feels that some modding needs to be done to complete this model. I have very much come to terms with the bright colors though and I have started to appreciate them. What I don't get is the use of bright orange parts in the chassis. Why not throw in some dark azure if you need to use another color than grey. I can totally understand that TLG want to make the build process as understandable as possible, especially with the target audience in mind, but in some aspects they are overdoing it. PLAYABILITY Sometimes when I build a Technic model, the functions just don't seem to work properly. They look like a Proof of Concept, instead of actual working mechanisms. The good thing about this model is that the functions work properly. Steering, driving, operating the crane and the outriggers, everything works fine (except maybe the minor issue with the outriggers). Outdoor playability is virtually non-existent though. Don't expect your kids to have fun in the garden with this thing. They will get frustrated. FEATURES The main functions of the model are all operated by a remote control. Upside is that these functions work really well. Downside is that you still need to manually switch the functions, and you need to be inside. The outriggers are a blast to operate, they are so cool. PARTS In term of special parts this set isn't exactly special. You get six big tires, which you might already own four of, when you own the Claas. For existing PF users, it's mostly parts in new colors. If you are new to Technic or new to PF, this set is a pretty decent starter pack. VALUE FOR MONEY This is where things get ugly. The hefty price tag of € 279 is way too much. Around € 199 would have been reasonable, but € 279 is nowhere near reasonable. VERDICT After building the set and spending some time playing with it I can only come to the conclusion that I really like it. I am even thinking about modding this set and that is something I seldomly do. This set reminds me of the 42039, where I felt like the president of a fan club with very few members. Sometimes a set just works for me and this is such a set. And that's not because it's the best set right out of the box, but it has potential to have a lot of fun with it. Some sets are perfect, but you will hardly touch them after building. The real question is whether people will be forking out such an amount of money for a non-licensed set. 6,8 Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  20. Hey everyone, This MOC is being built for 2 reasons: 1, to celebrate 3 milestones- Canada's 150th anniversary, Technic's 40th anniversary, and me hitting 1000 subscribers on Youtube. In fact, a comment suggested I do this. The second reason is to cure the errors that my 2 previous crawlers had: -weak axles (very weak in fact) -low climbing power -messy building -inefficient steering (used an M motor) -no additional RC functions So here's where I'm at right now: Above is the motor housing. I'm going with 2 L motors for the drive because they have good speed at a sufficient torque. That is the gear housing. Frames are abundant. Now the whole front axle. You can see that it is compact and yet very, very durable. The rear axle. And the two together. This crawler is being built for max performance but awesome looks. So I want to (but may not) do a Tacoma body: Update tomorrow, thanks for reading! BrickbyBrickTechnic
  21. Copied from Facebook User Noman Iqbal from Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. I can split this into a separate topic.
  22. Hi! I'd like to build Avtoros Shaman 8x8 and I do not have enough technic steering portals. Is it possible to replace this part with technic steering wheel hub holder in conjunction with two technic axle towballs without modifying original construction? It is easier to buy the hub holders than portals for me.
  23. Hi all! I'm back with a new car: Lil' Speedster! This was all built because of the trans-clear angle connectors. I thought they would look good as headlights, and I quite like the appearance. It was also partly built just to hone my abilities into becoming a better builder. I believe that this looks at least better than my Supercar. It has a small inline two engine, front and rear suspension, and compact steering. I will probably not make a video of this car. More photos: I have tried out Blueprint for instructions, tell me what you think! Also in folder is the LDD file: https://bricksafe.com/pages/TechnicRCRacer/lil-speedster Thanks for reading! -TechnicRCRacer P.S. The LDD is slightly different that the car in the photos.
  24. Hello Eurobricks AFOLs, I am Engine and this is my first post here on EB forum. My friend HorcikDesigns told me, some of you here want to know more about my last MOC. My pleassure! Original Vehicle: As some of you noticed, my MOC should be scale model of Ghe-o Rescue. It is a Romanian rescue vehicle designed for extreme terrain, with a capacity of up to 11 people. Dimensions are: 5.2 m length; 2.7 m width (even wider version exists); 2.4 m higth (without rooftop carrier). The weight is 3.2 tons. Under the bonnet, more engine types can be monted, with the most powerful one with 500 hp. Live axles are used for suspension, both equipted by lockable differentials. There are also built-in water tanks for 620 liters for fire extinguishing. Another specialty is the possibility to mount tracks to rear wheels or pneumatic "pillows" on wheels for floating on water. Tires are also special. It is Arctictrans 1300x700-24 (diameter 1300 mm and width 700 mm). The manufacturer shows off an independent test in which they won over Avtoros and Trecol manufacturers. Here you can see several cars built on them. And because the tire diameter and width exactly match the 1:16 scale to the LEGO "Tumbler" tires Ø81.6x44, the scale of the model was decided. So far I do not know any other LEGO cration of Ghe-o Rescue. MOC: The MOC was designed for Kostky.org Trophy Competition, organized by our technic race event guru Peter. And the task was to build a drivable, remote-controlled, off-road vehicle that would be able to travel about 3 km. And at the same time, it should be as beautiful as possible and with design matches to original vehicles. Terrible task. The dimensions of the model are: 332 x 168 x 168 mm (41.5 x 21 x 21 studs), weight 1.2 kg. The drive is permanently 4x4 without differentials. Axles are not sprung. But thanks to the torsionally soft frame of the vehicle, decent axle crossing is achieved (some LEGO trial experience here). Inside, there is a functional winch with a length of 2.5 m. Good lighting is a necessity for the expedition special. The control is provided by sBrick. The propulsion is made by 1 x PF XL motor with a total gear ratio of 1: 1. Schizophrenic steering is provided by the PF Servo. The winch is driven by a PF M motor via a worm gear (8: 1 ratio). Five pairs of PF lights really shine in front of the car. Electrical source is a battery box with 6 AA batteries. The whole MOC is pure LEGO exept of: sBrick receiver, high strength thread as winch rope, threaded cardans and event mandatory stickers. Drive ability: Drivig speed corresponds to a pleasant walk. Off-road capabilities were adequate to the track. Tire traction did not limit offroad capabilities, but a small power of e-motor did. Then the winch becomes useful, that is able to lift the entire weight of the vehicle. And if it was still not enough, the other "competitors" were there to help. A minor issue was the steering. Thanks to the loose in steering mechanism and occasional insensivity in the mobile app, sometimes I sent it out of the way. A major issue was energy consumption. Within 1.5 km, I drained out three sets of batteries (2x alkaline GP Ultra Plus, 1x rechargeable GP 2700). And yet I do not know how to solve it. But most likely it is caused by PF Servo motor, as we disscussed after the event with other partipiciants. ----- Thank you for comments and questions. Pictures are here in my gallery. Original post on Kostky.org.