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Found 7 results

  1. Hey Guys, I'm back with my second alternate model of the Zetros set (42129). As you might remember from the presentation of my Unimog alternate, I was originally entertaining the thought of rebuilding the Zetros into a Jeep, but I passed since Tim has already built one. However, as I kept thinking of how I would do it, it became clear that I had quite different ideas in mind, and it was just too tempting to do it, so I gave it a go. Here I will write down the design process as that seemed to be something interesting for you guys in case of the Unimog as well, and I also prefer such presentations. Features - 3-link floating axle suspension with Panhard rod at the front - simplified rear floating axle suspension with 2 links of limited degrees of freedom and a Panhard rod - 2-speed gearbox with coupled RWD/AWD selector (hi gear is RWD, lo gear is AWD) - smooth and highly colour consistent bodywork - openable doors, bonnet and trunk - detachable hardtop - detailed interior with green accents, built seats - detailed engine, snorkel, minor extras (roof rack, jerry can, fire extinguishers) Here's a real 2-door model in dark grey color which I used as a visual reference: I also used a blue print to roughly set the proportions in a 1:10 scale. Bodywork Interestingly, this model started out from the bodywork, which I don't do often. As a fan of Jeeps, I have long been wondering what the best ways are for replicating its characteristic details, such as the hood and the grill with Lego parts. My Willys Jeep (alternate of the Defender) uses system parts for the (flat) hood and a simple vertical grill, but I wanted to build one with technic panels as well, replicating the slanted surfaces. I have seen two major techniques, one with the long wing-shaped panels (such as the models of @Madoca 1977 and @rm8), and the other with the long curved panel, mainly the classic model of @Sheepo. Since this set has those curved panels in DBG, and the wheels are about the same size as on Sheepo's model, I was wondering if a similar front could be built from the set, especially the angled placement of the curved part, along with the downward slanting of the whole hood, which also needed to be openable. It turned out that with quite a few alterations here and there, the hood could be built, and even better, they could be built using a few large panels only, which makes it look more clean and uniform.. Some arches needed to be redesigned, and the whole became 2 studs narrower, but the proportions worked fine. Then I moved on to the front and the grill, where much more redesign was needed due to different parts available, but after a few iterations with increasing the width and height of the vertical 'bars', I found the one that fit nicely with the smaller lights in the set and the newer curved small panel extenders (and as far as I can tell, newer Jeeps has such bigger grill, so it seemed fine). From there, I moved on to the sides. I knew it was critical to use the BDG panels carefully, because otherwise there would not be enough DBG beams to build the whole body, and I wanted a clean and colour consistent body. I quickly concluded that the doors can easily be built with the large panels, and the windows can also be built with the DBG connectors. The next critical point was to use the thinner long DBG panels in the rear part above the fenders. The difficulty was that they only left one possibility to mount the pieces of the fenders, so I had to use all those black angled beams there, and I had to build the fenders a bit wider so that I can actually connect the two ends to make it a stable piece. Fortunately, the wider fenders also made it possible to build the front ones from black beams at the same angle, even without more available angled beams using triangulation. The last critical piece was to use the small BDG panels in front of the doors, which just fit there tight. If I had to build that section from beams (as I started out), it would have cost too many beams and connecting them to the chassis would have been difficult as well, but the panel solved both problems (unfortunately, it has a drawback as well, which I will cover later). The remaining DBG panels were used in the back, also allowing for an opening trunk. The last tricky part was the rear corners with the lights. I wanted to make them more rounded with the curved panel extenders, but they would have screwed up the proportions, so I just used a slightly curved system brick to give it some curvature. Also I managed to use the black arched beams to replicate the characteristic rear roll bars, and the black tubular parts to build the roll cage, along with the 15L flip-flop beams, which proved to be critical for mounting the roof. The many flat black panels of the set were enough to build the whole roof, along with the side windows in a way that the whole hardtop is detachable from the roll cage as a single piece. Later, when it was more clear what parts remain, I also added the two bumpers, and even a nice snorkel and minimalistic roof racks were doable to give it more interesting details. Gearbox After being satisfied with the rough bodywork, I started designing the functional parts, which I also wanted to put emphasis on, since that's what technic is all about. However, since my Unimog alternate was about the suspension, this time I wanted to focus more on the RC gearbox and build a less articulated suspension which takes less space. I have been tinkering with the idea of a coupled 2-speed gearbox and a central diff-lock for a while (and @Pattspatt also teased me about it), but I never managed to design a compact one, where the drive motors are also placed conveniently. When I looked up a Jeep Wrangler drivetrain, I found this image, which was particularly interesting for me because of the front wheel drive that can be decoupled. Being offset to the side, I thought this could actually be nicely reproduced with lego clutch gears (something similar I already did with my Willys Jeep alternate, not knowing that it's done similarly in real life). After a lot of juggling with the placement of the motors and the gearbox components, I came up with this quite compact drivetrain setup with the gearbox inside the 11x7 frames, which not only includes the drive motors, but the steering motor too (later on that as well). The key ideas regarding the overall chassis structure are the following. First, I use a simplified (limited degrees of freedom) rear suspension, which requires only one CV joint, which makes the rear part of the drivetrain shorter, making more space for the gearbox, which is placed a bit to the back. Second, I placed the motors to the front of the middle section, and use the back of the motors as the mounting point for the front lower suspension links. Thus, the motors play a major structural role in the chassis. Here is the central part: And here is the whole drivetrain without the motors and the frames: As you can see, the rear part is short, and the front is offset to the side, and can just be routed between the drive motors, under the steering motor. Another interesting thing about it, is that it actually has two shafts (yellow axles at the front) coming from the two drive motors (but they are coupled by the red gear in the middle), and one of the shafts powers the 2-speed gearbox, that then goes to the rear axle, and the other shaft powers the the front axle, so the front axle drive does not pass through the gearbox, as it's only active in low gear. The orange selector switches both the gearbox and the RWD/AWD switch at the same time, activating the front of the drive train when low gear is selected. As with my Unimog, the placement of the gearbox motor was again difficult, as a lot of additional elements (end stoppers, clutch gear protection, down-gearing) need to be placed, so the gearbox motor had to be routed out to the trunk. Suspension As I outlined above, the rear suspension is a somewhat simplified live axle. I saw this trick first in @nico71's Ford F150 alternate, but builds of @rm8 use it as well. It is like a ball-joint based suspension, but without the ball-joint as support that prevents the axle from rotating forward/backward. In case of non-motorized models or smaller RC ones with less powerful motors, the joint itself is enough to keep the axle from rotating, but it was not enough in this case (the coupled motors could just rip apart the driveshaft), so I had to fix it explicitly. I opted for a suspension link that does not let the axle rotate forward on the far end, only tilt sideways (not using towball pins, just regular axles). This setup provides strong enough support to prevent the torque from ripping the driveshaft apart. A Panhard rod further stabilizes the axle to prevent sideways movement. Unfortunately, it's still not as solid as a ball-joint would be, and does not relieve all friction from the driveshaft. On the front, I used a similar 3-link suspension as the Unimog, but I had to move the Panhard rod behind the axle as the space was even less in the front, and managed to move the springs further in, giving it a softer and longer travel. It actually came out too articulated and had to be limited, as the wheels hit the fenders. Also, I used a better steering geometry than the Unimog (no anti-Ackermann geometry), and the max steering angle became very good, too good actually, as the wheels hit the bodywork at max angle, and can get stuck in it, so I limited the angle a bit, but is still better than the Zetros (the limiters are just half pins, which can be taken out to get a lot of steering angle, at the cost of risking the front wheel getting stuck in the body at max angle and max articulation, but work pretty good on flat surface). So the suspension is not bad actually, limited a bit by the bodywork, but the model still drives around quite okay on real terrain. Also, I wanted to experiment with a different steering setup, not placing the steering motor onto the axle. As said above, I found it a nice place between the drive motors, and using the CV joints there was just enough space to route it to the axle. It works okay, however, the two joints already introduce some lag in the steering, which is most noticeable when trying to automatically return to center, it does not center totally. But it's still okay and can be controlled with fine adjustments. Interior As the seats in the Zetros set were too small for this scale I needed to build bigger ones. Since I did not want to use the green beams on the outside, I used them as accents on the inside, they were enough to build seats and to be used in the middle console. I entertained the idea of making the steering wheel functional, since the steering motor is not on the axle, but there was not enough space to route it to the steering wheel, and furthermore, the curved panels used as a dashboard just block the way, and otherwise they are important structural elements that hold the front and the sides, so I did not want to alter them. The battery is placed between the B columns, as there was no other convenient place, and there it's easily accessible. The seats can be folded forward, to give room for replacing the batteries. The engine details are just some imaginary ones built from the remaining parts (nothing working). But the snorkel tubing continues on the inside :) Here is the whole chassis with the interior: And here are a few more renders and photos of the complete model, but much more is available on Bricksafe. Building instructions are available on Rebrickable. Let me know how you like it! Cheers, Viktor
  2. Mini Truck Model 8, Jeep Wrangler 1:15.No play Lego in over half a year, now 'Jeep' coming...At the same time,I would pay respects to Madoca.L motor +new wheel hubs, BuWizz normal.Infomations:L28xW14.5xH15cm, Weight: 970G,Still, simple and good playability, like RC, like real Jeep. instructions for free: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-79593/dpi2000/lego-mini-truck-wrangler-115-moc/#detailsThanks, again! Trial video This chassis part was built last year.
  3. During a break from building agricultural machinery, I created a cute Buggy from 42122 set :D I had to buy this kit. I knew very well that the new tires were too small for a tractor, but they are perfect for my other WIP model, which has been on the shelf for almost a year. I did not follow a specific buggy model. I was inspired by various vehicles, their proportions and appearance to create my version. I associate it most with desert vechicles. The functions that have been added: HOG control and independent rear suspension, which works nice and soft. Unfortunately, the attempt to use the turntable to create the front suspension failed. This idea changed the appearance of the vehicle a lot, so I gave it up with that. I used 577 items out of 665 available in the set. My first building instruction is also available at: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-61843/M_longer/42122-buggy/ https://sellfy.com/m1longer/p/42122-buggy/ Hope you like the model :)
  4. Hey Guys Jeep Wrangler custom Pickup „Bandit“ 1:10. The model is full motorized and radio controlled. More pics: instagram.com/brickzone_52 1 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 2 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 3x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 4 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 5 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 6x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 7 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 8 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 9 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 10 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 11 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 12 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 13 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 14 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 15x by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 16 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr 17 by Dani Brickzone, auf Flickr
  5. Hello everybody! This is my first post on EuroBricks! My Flickr: Silvavasil_Lego Jurassic Park Jeep PF: Light - Servo -Lipo - XL LDD: Jurassic Jeep Instruction Look and like my Jurassic Jeep on Rebrickable please! ;) This is '90s Jeep Wrangler from legendary blockbuster Steven Spielberg's "Jurassic Park" As a child i feel in love with this movie. Now i have put together two of children's hobbies - lego and dinosaur!) This is lego technic rc MOC Powered by Lego LiPo battery, remote control drive and steering (XL & servo motors) all wheel drive, suspension, working headlights, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and a folding windshield. Photo by me too) Adventure 65million years in the making! Good text from the Brothers Brick: Incredible LEGO Jurassic Park jeep looks right at home in the jungle And Lego Car Blog: Jurassic Jeep
  6. It has been a while since I've introduced you to my early history of Model Team scale and type MOCs I have built years ago. I have to appoligise to the ones who have been looking for more, because there is a lot more to show. Let me correct this mistake and present to you the next page in my LEGO car building history booklet.It's Jeep Wrangler Rubicon - three door version. This was the first MOC I've built using exatly zero white bricks. Maybe it is a bit hard to tell from the sunny background, but the color is dark red. Back in those days we didn't have the new tires in this diameter, therefore I didn't have any other choice than to use those bubble tires. Hard to tell now, which ones would look better for this offroader. Anyways. To tell the story further - it is a three door version. Everything opens. Doors, trunk, hood - all were functional. And of course, as for these cars - the black roof can be detached. It actually consisted of three parts, which you could detach independent. There was one bit on top of the driver, similar one on top of the front passenger. And then the biggest part at the rear. Oh yea.. now, when I see the pics, it was quite a challenge to build the nose, the part which gets narrower. Aaand... the front grille. But all legit. Nothing glued or stressed.Yep... that's it for now. Hope you like it. Feel free to leave some comments or ask any questions about it if you have any. I hope I still would remember the details about it.See ya soon. Hopefully sooner that in two years from now :)Rolic
  7. Columbus019

    Jurassic Park jeep

    I thought that I'd share a little MOC I put together a while ago, the jeep from one of my favorite movies, The original Jurassic Park. Front View The front was the trickiest part to pull off, I wanted it to look as close as possible to the original jeep and so i had to put a side mounted number plate and also make the entire sides of the jeep half of a stud off the rest of it to make the cheese slope stick over the bumper the right amount! The bonnet Up until the windscreen, this thing is crazy accurate and looks like a jeep, I'm quite proud of the bonnet also. The back side of the jeep Definitely not as good as the front half. I hope you liked it Columbus