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Found 70 results

  1. You may have encountered it: you built a nice model in LDD, but it looks surreal because it lacks decorations on e.g. the minifigs. This tutorial is here to help you with that. In this little tutorial, I will try to explain how you can enhance the POV-Ray renders of your LDD models with custom decorations. You can design entirely new figures for example, or you can apply the decorations that aren’t available in LDD. My example in this tutorial will be a stormtrooper minifig. This figure lacks all decoration in LDD, and is commonly used in digital Star Wars builds. It gives me the opportunity to explain how to decorate surfaces that aren’t directly accessible in LDD, how to fit custom decals and explain the general principles. This method doesn’t involve any hacking and doesn’t require any sick programming skills (although the custom decorations might need your artistic talents…). And the best of all: all programs I use here are entirely free! I’ll be using Lego Digital Designer, LDD2POV-Ray, POV-Ray and Inkscape. So let’s get started! Decorate the target pieces in LDD LDD2POV-Ray, the program that will eventually place your custom decorations, can only replace already applied decorations. So firstly, you need to give the pieces you want to decorate a replacement decoration in LDD. Make sure to use different decorations for each surface, so that you later can keep track of which filler to replace with which substitute. Also, taking a screenshot for reference is not a bad idea to support your memory. But wait a minute… Some parts don’t allow for any decorations at all in LDD! Minifig torso’s are not a problem at all, but things like helmets are a whole different story. But luckily, there is an easy way to apply decorations that will work in most cases (no guarantees though!). You have to export your .lxf file to the LXFML format (File -> Export Model). This .lxfml file is actually a textual representation of your model. Among others, it contains a list with the placed parts, including their color(s) and decoration(s). To find your part, use the search function (Ctrl + F / Cmd + F) and type in: in which you replace 30408 (the designID of the storm trooper helmet in this example) with the designID of the part you desperately want to decorate. You can find this ID by clicking on the part in LDD and looking at the bottom left corner. If multiple of these parts are available, you can give the specific part a different color and check for the one that says materials=”26” in which you replace 26 with the number of the color you used (you can find this number by hovering over the color in the color menu in LDD). The key part is then to change the part that says decorations=”0,0,0” in which the amount of zeros dictates the amount of surfaces that you can decorate. If the line isn’t present at all, you’re out of luck and won’t be able to decorate your part. Otherwise, replace the zeros with valid decoration ID’s. It’s best to take decorations that are square and detailed (I will explain why later), so I suggest using the decorations of the 2x2 flat tiles. You can find these ID’s by placing some of these decorated tiles in your model, and check in the LXFML file what number is filled in in the decorations line of those parts. To make it easier for you, here are some handy decoration ID’s you can use: 73023, 63708, 99825, 55350, 63404, 601245 Then, save your file, and open it with LDD. You’ll see your parts are looking very ugly with those random decorations, but you’ll be happy to have decorations. You can copy these parts to a ‘normal’ .lxf file, and get rid of the parts you used to find the decoration numbers. Now we can move on to step 2! 2. Open your model with LDD2POV-Ray LDD2POV-Ray is a program that converts your LDD model into a file that can be rendered with POV-Ray, a ray tracer that simulates the behaviour of real light to simulate a realistic effect. You can set lighting etc, but more importantly, you can set your own decorations. To do this, go to the “Decorations” tab, and check the box “Use custom decorations”. A list will appear at the bottom, showing all the decorations you used. Clicking on them will reveal a thumbnail. Now you’ll be happy that you used different decorations to know which is which. You’ll notice that the decorations (unless they are square) are a bit stretched out. That’s because the program only accepts square decorations. So to load your own decorations, you’ll have to make sure they are square. Otherwise, they won’t cover the whole area you intended. If you already have your decorations (you found them on one of the indexes of the customisation forum here, for example), you can skip to step 4. Otherwise, I’ll give a brief account on how to make your own decorations in step 3. 3. Create your own decorations Personally, I make my decorations with Inkscape. It’s an easy to use vector based program. That means you can easily create very clean, smooth and crisp shapes. I’ll leave it to others to educate you in this nice software, but I’ll show you some general strategies to make accurate decorations. When working on complex curved shapes, like the storm trooper helmet, you won’t know for certain how your image will be mapped to the surface. That’s when the screenshot you took comes in handily. Because you have used decorations with a lot of detail (if you’ve been following properly!), you can easily see how the image is deformed and placed on the surface. You can identify the regions where you want your details to come, look to what part of the placed decoration it corresponds, see what it looks like in its flat state (you can see this in the thumbnail in LDD2POV-Ray), and place your detail in the according place. So in the example of the storm trooper helmet, you can see that the mouth should somewhere at the center of the graph. LDD2POV-Ray shows that that graph is a bit above the, so now you know you have to place the mouth around the center of your decal. When you’ve finished your decoration, you have to make sure your decoration is square. This will most certainly occur when you’re designing decorations for minifig torsos. If you leave it in its actual proportions and plug it in LDD2POV-Ray, you’ll see that the image doesn’t fill the whole area, compared to the stretched out decoration you have to replace. So you resize your decoration. In Inkscape, simply go to the top, where you can enter dimensions. Then you go to File -> Export Bitmap and a dialogue box will pop up. Make sure to select ‘from selection’, and that the amount of pixels of your image is high enough. Otherwise it will look pixelated in the render. Finally, chose .png as file format, and remove the background color of your decoration. Because it might look like the right color in Inkscape, but in your render it will look like the decal has a different color than the body, which isn’t what you wanted. So now you have your parts temporarily decorated, and you got your custom decorations ready. So time to replace them and render them. 4. Render your decorated model Firstly, you have to load your new decorations in LDD2POV-Ray. There are multiple ways to do this, but the easiest method is to select the decoration you want to replace and then click on the empty canvas. A window will pop up to allow you to select your decoration. Just select it. Repeat for the other decorations, making sure you replace the right decoration with the right replacement (that screenshot will come in handy now, especially since you can’t have both LDD and LDD2POV-Ray open at the same time at this moment!). Then you can fiddle around with different settings like lighting etc. For test renders I suggest to place in the first tab the slider on the lowest positions: ‘LDD geometry’. This will result in slightly less good, but much faster renders, allowing you to quickly get feedback about your decorations, so that you can adjust placement and proportions. For flat parts this won’t be necessary, but it can help for curved parts. That’s why I included the TIE pilot in the render. You can see the ensignas are slightly deformed. That’s not my intention, but I already predeformed the circles in the decal, so that it looks more or less round on the surface. You’ll have to experiment a lot with these ones. Anyway, when you're satisfied and feel the need for a more glamorous render, you can turn 'render with visible bevels' on in the slider bar, and wait for some time. You'll get something like this. Hopefully now you know all about rendering your custom minifigs, making your models more realistic. I hope to see some around! Anyway: happy rendering of your minifigs! If anyone is interested in downloading the decorations I designed for the stormtrooper (for now without back printing) and the TIE pilot (torso printing already present in LDD), have a look at this page. Hope you've found this useful.
  2. I compared the different LEGO rendering engines available through LDD, Bluerender and Stud.io. Have a look at the results:
  3. Shroud

    Eris MoC

    Hi all, Shameless post here looking for feedback from my redesigned Eris fighter. I can’t post the image here for some reason but this is the link: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/c19983a7-da53-442f-886d-44be3bedeeff Regards Shroud
  4. Hi everyone I'm a regular on Eurobricks but this is the first time I've posted anything in the digital building forums. I've recently started to design MOC's using Lego Digital Designer and this is my first creation... All the images were rendered using Blue render which I like because it's fairly fast and incredibly easy to use. I was quite happy with these images but then I saw a few other renders that people have created online and am blown away by the quality of them. Some of them are so good that it's hard to tell they aren't built from real bricks. Can anyone suggest to me, the best software or method of rendering images from models created in LDD. I've tried POV Ray but am not that impressed with the results. Even in top quality the renders seem to have a fake looking sheen that makes them look artificial and almost as if they've been shrink wrapped in plastic. It also takes hours to render the images on my PC using POV Ray. I've been pouring over other threads in the forum and have read a lot about people using Blender. As far as I can tell though the only way of getting LDD models to open in Blender is by converting them to LDraw files first. When I tried this though it messes up a lot of the bricks in my model. Similarly I tried importing them in to Mecabricks but this messes up any bricks that have printed elements on them. Does anyone know of another way of getting LDD files in to Blender directly without it messing up the models? From what I've seen, Bluerender seems to be the most user friendly option for creating renders. I read somewhere on here that a "Sunflow" patch had been created for Bluerender which gave a more realistic result with better detail and the Lego logo on each stud. When I followed the link to download this though it redirected me to a different site, so I assume this patch has since been removed. So I'd be very grateful if anyone could suggest anything I can do to make my renders look more realistic or suggest any other software or methods that might give a better result. Thanks!
  5. New FebRovery MOC, Mighty Micros: Classic-Space Rovers. Mighty Micros: Classic-Space Rovers by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr More information in my blog!
  6. KamalMYafi

    [MOC] Tanker Rover

    FebRovery is on again! Now I came up with a Tanker Rover. FebRovery Tanker - Front by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr FebRovery Tanker - Rear by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr More information in my blog!
  7. Found a fun way to make huge lego classic simcity style rendering image. All we have to do is render every modules with same light and iso camera setting without background. Each module have to be render 4 times for 4 directions (N/S/W/E). Than just combine things together using image software. vean 's lxf 10246-1 - iso view render test (4k) by Nachapon S., on Flickr lego iso view render test by Nachapon S., on Flickr Modular Buildings lxf source 10182 - Cafe Corner - by Vee - 10185 - Green Grocer - by Man with a hat - 10190 - Market Street - by Johnnhiszippy3 - 10197 - Fire Brigade - by Man with a hat - 10211 - Grand Emporium - by Johnnhiszippy3 - 10218 - Pet Shop - by P4trickvH - 10224 - Town Hall - by Sjuip - 10232 - Palace Cinema - by Stephan - 10243 Parisian Restaurant by kcoon
  8. I was asked to put together a tutorial on rendering LDraw-produced models in POV-Ray in as clear and simple a way as possible. Although the following might seem a bit lengthy, I have tried to keep it clear, which is what caused it require a lot of explanation. I plan on updating things and changing things as time goes on and as people give me their input, so as to create a useful guide for everyone here on Eurobricks. NOTE: To give an idea of how long these images can take to render, I will be adding the render time of each image to the tutorial. As I don't rely on POV-Ray's anti-aliasing, I have rendered each image at 2880x1620 with AA set to off, and then crop and resize the image afterwards. For computer spec comparisons, I use an Intel Core i5 running at 2.67 GHz, with 4GB of RAM running at 1333 MHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 with 1GB of RAM. I'm also using POV-Ray 3.7, which can take advantage of more than one CPU core. Contents Introduction Requirements MLCad (including LSynth and SR 3D Builder) Special files LDView Setting up POV-Ray Rendering your model in POV-Ray (including lighting and effects) Downloads More information Version history 1. Introduction Unlike LEGO’s own Digital Designer (LDD), which can currently only output an image of exactly what you can see within the LDD window, LEGO models created using LDraw can be turned into high-quality and, in some cases, photo-realistic images. This brief tutorial covers some of the basics of converting files created in LDraw and other compatible programs into something that looks almost real. As an example throughout this guide, I will be using a model I made in MLCad of the tipper from 4201 Loader and Tipper, which can be found here. 2. Requirements Regarding operating system, I currently use Windows 7, so this tutorial will be written to mainly accommodate Windows users, and I shall assume you are using a 32-bit version of Windows with the default installation path for LDraw. For anyone using a 64-bit version, when referencing folder paths please use “C:\Program Files (x86)” instead of “C:\Program Files”. Firstly, if you do not have it installed already, you need to install the LDraw All-In-One Installer, which contains the following programs required for this tutorial: The LDraw parts library MLCad, used for building the models LSynth [optional], a system for building flexible parts within MLCad LDView, used for converting models into a POV-Ray file LGEO, a parts library built specifically for POV-Ray POV-Ray, a ray-tracer that can render 3D models in high-quality You can find the installer here: http://www.ldraw.org/ This will install everything within the "C:\Program Files\LDRAW" folder, although POV-Ray will get its own installation folder. More information on this installer can be found at http://www.holly-woo...w/aioi1-en.html At the moment, the installer seems to install POV-Ray 3.6, but if you're using a computer with multiple CPUs then it would be worth downloading and installing beta version 3.7, as this can make use of more than one CPU. This can be downloaded from http://www.povray.org/beta/ and is installed in the Program Files folder, but installs the "ini" and "include" files in your My Documents folder. Although it's still in beta, I've had no issues when using this to render images. 3. MLCad MLCad is a user-interface for the LDraw system, and makes it easier to create virtual LEGO models than hand-coding the location of each piece. It’s not as straight-forward to use as LEGO Digital Designer, but the parts list contains a greater number of “older” pieces, you ultimately have complete control over brick placement as LDD-style collision is ignored, and (if you’re feeling adventurous) you can even recreate LEGO elements yourself, if they have not been created already, and submit them to the LDraw parts lists. It is missing a number of more recent parts, but new elements are always being submitted and can be downloaded and installed fairly easily. There are many excellent tutorials on how to use MLCad, so I won’t cover that here. However, there are a few settings within MLCad that I use that you may find useful. Firstly, under Settings → General → Change... and then on the Step, Grid, Snap tab, I set the values as below: The coarse settings are left at MLCad’s default setting. The medium settings are changed to 1 unit per step, and the rotation angle is set to mimic the rotation of the new-style locking hinge pieces, which can be set at angles of 22.5 degrees. 11.25 degrees gives you slightly more freedom when using the old-style hinge pieces, but the correct angle is easily set for the locking hinges, which can be reproduced in sets of two rotations. Finally, the fine settings are set very low, so that I can accurately place items that have been rotated. Of course, if you find MLCad’s default settings enough, then they can be left as they are. I then set up the parts tree to something more useable, under Settings → Parts Tree → Tree Configuration…, although this can be quite time-consuming and if you accidentally reset the tree you cannot easily get the settings back, as the information is stored in your computer's registry. For ease of use, I have created a group file that automatically adds the values for you, an explanation of which is available in the “Downloads” section. 3.1. LSynth If this is installed alongside MLCad, it will allow you to render flexible elements, such as hoses, and store these within your LDR and MPD files. It has a bit of a learning curve (pun not intended), but once you’ve got the hang of it, it can really improve models that contain flexible parts. A modest example of what it can do can be found here in a Technic model that I’ve rendered. A good guide can also be found at http://www.holly-woo...utorial-en.html 3.2. SR 3D Builder A lot of people use SR 3D Builder as an alternative to MLCad, as it uses a system that is a little more like LDD. It uses a file format called L3B, which is essentially the LDraw format but with a bit more functionality. These files can also be opened within LDView, but certain special elements created within SR 3D Builder (such as rubber hoses) cannot be displayed using LDView, and therefore cannot be exported to POV-Ray for rendering. As far as I’m aware, SR 3D Builder does not recognise the LSynth library of parts. 4. Special files There are a few special files that are installed with the All-In-One installer which need some adjusting before rendering your model in POV-Ray. LGEO.xml This file contains all of the colour and element definitions for when LDView is exporting a model to the POV-Ray format. The default version is missing some colours, so I have created a more complete version, which can be found in 8. Downloads. Simply replace the default version with this one, and you will have more of LDraw’s colours available to render with. This needs to be saved to “C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LDView” lg_color.inc This file is installed into LGEO's program folder, in the "lg" sub-folder. It contains definitions to all of the colours of the bricks that POV-Ray uses, as well as information on element finish (transparency, reflection, etc.). The default one does not render accurate LEGO colours, so a replacement for this one can be found in 8. Downloads. This needs to be saved to "C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LGEO\lg" 5. LDView Once you have completed your model in MLCad, open LDView and locate the model file (either an LDR or MPD file, or L3B is you have used SR 3D Builder). Depending on how good your graphics card is, you should see a representation of your model that looks better than the one shown in MLCad. As LDView also displays the LEGO logo on element studs, you can use this to check to see if they are set to your desired rotation, as this will carry through to the POV-Ray render. Settings-wise, there is little that needs tweaking here, as it is mainly just for visual effect. However, you can set a better default angle, as LDView’s default is more top-down than the default one in MLCad, and when you export the model to POV-Ray, it will use the angle you currently have your model rotated to. Select View → Viewing Angles → Specify latitude/longitude, and enter your desired values. As I said, I like the default MLCad 3D angle, so I use latitude 23 and longitude 45, although latitude 30 works well with some long, low models, such as cars. Click OK and then go back to View → Viewing Angles and then click Save Current as Default. Now, when you open any model within LDView, it will always be initially displayed at this angle. The model I will be using as it appears within LDView: Render time: N/A 5.1. Exporting to a .pov file Now that you have your file open in LDView, click File → Export. This will bring up a dialog box which allows you to specify where you wish to save the exported file. It also has a button called Options..., which allows you to define various parameters. This is where you can set the aspect ratio for your render, and gives you some specific options: 5:4, 4:3, 3:2, 5:3, 16:9 and 2.35:1. I tend to go with 16:9, as that’s the ratio that modern widescreen TVs and monitors tend to use. It’s important that you remember which one you use, as you will need to set up another file in POV-Ray to account for this. There are a few other options to choose from here, and I use the ones shown below: Once you’ve chosen your settings, click OK and then from the Export window click Save. This will create a .pov file at your chosen location, using your chosen file name (by default this is the filename of the model you were looking at in LDView). 6. Setting up POV-Ray 6.1. Image resolution presets The first thing to set up is the file that contains the default resolution presets. If you are using POV-Ray 3.6, this will be located within the “C:\Program Files (x86)\POV-Ray for Windows v3.6\renderer” folder and will be called “quickres.ini”, and this cannot be edited from here, so you may need to copy the file to your desktop first and then open it from there. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.7, this can be edited within the program itself, as it stores it in you user area, so you can just open POV-Ray and select Tools → Edit resolution INI file. Open this file with a text editor and you should be able to see a list of screen resolutions, listed in this format: [1280x1024, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=1024 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 The first line is the name of the preset, and this is displayed in a drop-down box within POV-Ray. The following lines are the actual settings themselves. Copy and paste one of these settings to another location in this file, so we can create a new preset. You can leave both Antialias and Antialias_Threshold alone, as these are best left at default. If you wish to create an image that matches the aspect ratio set within LDView, this is where you set it. As I prefer to render in 16:9, then I need to make a width and height that matches this. So, for example, an image that is 1280 pixels in width must be 720 pixels in height, so you need to change this for your new preset, resulting in something like this: [1280x720 16:9, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=720 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 I add the 16:9 comment to the preset’s title, just to make it easier to see the ratio. If you’ve had to edit this from your desktop, then just copy it back to the original location. 6.2. POV-Ray INI file (3.7 only) This file is the one that contains the paths to the LGEO pieces that POV-Ray utilizes in rendering. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.6 it should already have the right paths in it. However, if you’ve manually installed the POV-Ray 3.7 beta, then it needs to be set up. Open POV-Ray and go to Tools → Edit master POVRAY.INI, and this should open the file within a text editor. At the bottom of the file, you need to insert three lines to ensure that POV-Ray can locate the right files. These are: Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\ar" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\lg" Don’t forget that if you’re using a 64-bit operating system to make sure that the path uses "C:\Program Files (x86)".
  9. KamalMYafi

    Spoiler Alert!

    Not a real movie spoiler, just a meme! Spoiler alert! ⚠ by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr
  10. KamalMYafi

    Getting ready for 2018!

    Yes, 2018 is just in front of us! That's how I create this creation, the opened door represent we’re going to 2018 and the bright light in front of it means a bright future which I hope we all have it! Getting Ready for 2018! ? by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr Happy New Year all!
  11. There’s another celebration again! Today is Eid al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice). It is the second of two Muslim holidays celebrated worldwide each year. It honors the willingness of Ibrahim to sacrifice his son Ishmael, as an act of obedience to Allah’s (God’s) command. Before he sacrificed his son, God intervened by sending his angel Jibrīl who then put a ram in his son’s place. In commemoration of this, an animal is sacrificed (know more in Wikipedia). As a Muslim, I celebrate it too in real life and in LEGO. The model I’m gonna show to celebrate this occasion is a Minecraft scene with a pen, some animals, a house, and completed with Minecraft style background. Happy Eid al-Adha 2017! by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr I’m not a Minecraft gamer. The model is done by searching for a reference on the internet, so I’m sorry if I made some inaccuracies in the render. Anyway, it always fun to create a model in a selected theme that you haven’t make or know about it.
  12. I'm back again with new MOC! This is a "Military Half-Track Truck". The model is about 20-studs long, about 18-bricks tall, and 8-studs wide (about 10-studs with tires and tracks). The model also features, articulated steering and suspension, front pendular suspension, rear track suspension, openable bed, and interior. Though it has an interior, but it can't fit any minifig. Half-Track Truck - Front by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr Anyway, this model was originally built for Dgustafsson13's 10K Building Competition. And you can read some more information and renders in my Blog!
  13. KamalMYafi

    [MOC] Glorious Indonesia!

    Marking 72 years of being an independent nation, this August 17th is a day that will be celebrated by Indonesian people, and so I am. I tried to replicate the Jayawijaya mountain and put a small Indonesian flag in the top of it. So here it is. I think I've done a great job on creating this. Glorious Indonesia! (Indonesia Jaya!) by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr See a blog post on DigiBrickz.com!
  14. I'm in the middle of learning Blender, but I stumbled upon Poliigon and was blown away. I'd really like something to aspire to once I've got a grasp on the basics, so has anyone tried applying a Poliigon texture to a Lego render of any sort?
  15. BEAVeR

    [MOC] Temse Skyline

    It wasn't until I went to university and only came home in the weekends, I realized how much I love the sight of my hometown of Temse in Belgium. I always try to have a seat to the left of the train, near a big window, especially near sunset. Because when my train crosses the Temse Bridge over the Schelde river, the view is just magnificent and then I know I'm home. [MOC] Temse Skyline by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr You can imagine that on reading the assignment of Rebrick's "Dream Skylines" competition, "Build a Skyline of somewhere close to your heart", I didn't hesitate for a moment on what to build. But I think that choice might have been the only easy part about this contest! Since the creation has to be in the style of the existing LEGO Architecture skylines, I had to come up with several ways to add enough detail and texture at the small scale, and at the same time had to adhere to the maximum size requirements that didn't allow for any overhang. Personally, I also wanted to create something that's completely buildable in real life with solid connections and only existing part/color combinations - because who knows, maybe one day my town will be interested to have one of these for real? - which caused me a lot of headaches. All of that made for a build time of nearly a month for this seemingly small creation (that still contains close to 800 bricks). After all that building, I managed to cram in most (though not everything) of what I wanted to represent. From left to right, you have the Boelwerf Crane, the Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church, the Old Town Hall and the Temse Bridge. If you're interested in more information about those individual buildings, just keep reading! [MOC] Temse Skyline - Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr The Onze Lieve Vrouwe Church is the defining building of the Temse skyline, and rightfully so. The original dates back to the 770's, erected by the holy Amelberga, the patron saint of the parish. It is believed that she fled her suitor, a powerful man, because she wanted to dedicate her life to God. And when she was cut of by the Schelde river, a giant sturgeon appeared from the water to lead her safely to the other side, where she erected the church out of gratitude. To this day, we have a yearly procession to celebrate her. Of course the church was rebuilt several times, and I depicted it as it appears today,the way I know her inside and out because this is the building where I go to mass and have gotten to know a lot of wonderful people. I love this building so much that I actually tried to build it several times before this contest. However, i always got stuck on the iconic but hard to capture shape of the clocktower. However, having to work at this small scale forced a certain size of the tower on me, which enabled me to have a more focused problem. When eventually I found out that the classic medieval helmet worked perfectly to capture the bell shape of the bottom part of the roof, and that's what really kicked of this entire creation. Since I couldn't connect anything to the helmet, I had to work with an external support, but luckily it doesn't get in the way of appreciating the creation too much. I also had a lot of variations for the rest of the tower, but in the end this version with the notches nicely corresponding to features on the actual building made it, also thanks to the input of my family on this issue! From there on, it was mostly a lot of complicated SNOT work to let the windows and the buttresses work, but it gave a nicely textured result. To top it all of, I included the statue of the Blessed Priest Poppe, who is also a central figure in our community. [MOC] Temse Skyline - Old Town Hall by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr Up until a couple of years ago, this was the administrative heart of Temse, but now everything apart from some ceremonies has moved to the new administrative center in a modern building for which I didn't have enough space to include... Still, it's a beautiful building from the beginning of the twentieth century that actually stands on the place where once the home of my ancestors stood. One of the ceremonies being held here, is the memorial of two of my ancestors, who became famous after allegedly dying in each other's arms during the first World War, becoming a symbol for love between brothers. This year, it was exactly 100 years ago that happened, so there was a ceremony on this very fitting location, where my sister and I also read some poems one of the two brothers wrote. Truly a special experience! Building this also was a special experience if you can call it like that, because of all of the tricky SNOT fitted into a really tiny package. I'm really happy with how the roof turned out. And while it's a pity that the spires of the main tower have to be held in place by a rubber band, at least the official LEGO rubber band with the right size had the right color as well. [MOC] Temse Skyline - Boelwerf Crane by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr I was born just half a year too late... If I would have been born sooner, I would have seen the Boelwerf working with my own eyes. It was a big shipyard along the Schelde river just outside of the town which was the economic heart of Temse for quite some time, with the biggest ship of the world at that time being build there. My grandfather was one of the employees there working among the docks, the cranes, the machine shops... Whenever I see pictures of those periods, I begin drooling and dreaming about that time that I sadly never knew. Because right now, where once the Boelwerf was, now a lot of new apartment buildings, houses, shops like my hairdresser and the new administrative building stand. The only thing that remembers the glory days is a beautiful and huge crane that never actually belonged to the Boelwerf but became an essential part of our skyline, and a couple of poles in the water and a hidden dry dock. Building this one actually went surprisingly easy when compared to the previous two buildings, and I'm pretty satisfied with how I managed to maintain the spindly look of the construction and the realistic angles of the supports, realized by putting technic pints over minifig antennas. The difficult part about this build actually was keeping it within the prescribed size limits of the build without overhang. That's why I had to sacrifice one of the three wrenches in the back, but luckily it isn't as noticeable. And nice to know: the crane can actually swivel around! [MOC] Temse Skyline - Back of the Box by Bert Van Raemdonck, on Flickr I really had a lot of fun making the renders for this creation, trying to match the box art from the official skyline sets as well as possible, and I'm very happy with the results that accomplish my goal. Just ask if you want to know more about the rendering process. This is also a place to discuss the final building: the Temse Bridge on the far right. Although it doesn't look like it from the build, this was with its 365 meter for a long time the longest bridge over water in Belgium, and also one of the prettiest, in my opinion! The original actually was designed by Gustave Eiffel (yes, thát Eiffel!), but that one was deliberately blown up during the second World War. In 2009, a second bridge next to it opened to allow for more traffic to pass because it was getting a bit problematic. That bridge is actually nine meters longer than the original one, so in Temse we have just one, but the two longest bridges over water in Belgium! Giving the bridge the skeletal look was impossible to do on this scale, but the bottom of the plates actually still gives a nice texture to it. I couldn't make it as long as I wanted, and I had to place it at an angle, just to stay within the size requirements, so in reality it is of course way longer. Also, the 2009 bridge didn't fit on even though I created a model for it. But then again, that bridge pales in comparison to the older one. In the end, I'm very pleased with the result, so it was worth all of the work. It gives me the same feeling as when I see the real skyline from the train on a Friday evening, the feeling of coming home. Which is really nice that I'm on a two month internship in South-Korea! Thanks for looking, and I hope you enjoy your home as much as I do! _________________ The digital file (LDD)
  16. LegoAcklay

    [MOC] Four-Towered Castle

    After finishing it and creating minifigures I uploaded it to LEGO Ideas which you can find here: Four-Towered Castle It contains some extra information such as piece counts. Feel free to leave a support on the LEGO Ideas site if you like it. 3D Model view here on Sketchfab: Four-Towered Castle The Full Inside view. Note that the castle is made in a "L" shaped layout. The left/West Entrance. Notice the flaps that would allow archers/crossbowmen to fire through and take cover. The inside side of the West entrance. Entrance to the hall from the courtyard/bailey. The alchemy room. With a green substance in a flask and a chandelier below the tall ceiling. The certainly need a ladder here. A tower with a wooden hoarding around it. Crossbows are stored here. The armoury. Along with the stacked sword it has a bed for a soldier here as well. View above the towers. Better view of the catapult and the winch for raising the portcullis. Inside the shack extension. The Great Hall. Turnable fire in the great hall's fireplace. Winch which you can rotate the fire and exterior of the hall. Drawbridge Outside. Gate Inside. Chest room. Stone Sigil. Walkway. Romans with a catapult & Celtic Warriors. Upper view.
  17. thecrea1or

    Han Solo Blaster 1:1 Scale

    Hello everyone, this is my second post here about a model that I am very proud of that I designed a while back. I present to you, Han Solo's DL-44 blaster replicated in 1:1 scale using Lego bricks. The model was blogged about on Bricknerd. Link for anyone interested is below: Link More Photos More Photos More Photos More Photos Comments and constructive criticism are appreciated as always.
  18. Today, or maybe yesterday was July 17, and that is the date for World Emoji Day. So I'm gonna celebrate it on my own style, by using LEGO! Celebrating #WorldEmojiDay with LEGO by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr This emoji artwork is rendered using Blender freestyle and I used an orthographic camera to get the best perspective of it. The emojis are just randomly putted, but I focused for the happy emoji to be in the middle of all the Emojis, you want to always be happy right?
  19. A render of a small vignette that'll be used to display some custom figs. 577 pieces in a 22x22 area, and about 6 hours design time.
  20. KamalMYafi

    [MOC] Classroom

    Yes, a classroom is the place for learning! Even though learning could be anywhere. I created an LEGO interior scene of classroom, this model is at minifig-scale. This model was mainly inspired by LegoJalex’s Classroom. Since that is a big built, I tried to make it small and more simple. Classroom by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr I used a unique technique to make the four-legged chair. I forgot where I got that chair design. If you know, please put a link in the comment, I just want to credit the builder.
  21. Creating Tiny Turbo MOC is a great way to design a LEGO Car, it's small and you can add so many details on it. I've done some Tiny Turbos MOCs, so here it is... Let's start with my very first Tiny Turbo creation, Orcar: Orca Car: Orcar by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr The second one, a Hatchback Racer: Hatchback Racer by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr Then get low with this Slance, Slammed or Stanced Car: Slance by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr Got into a concept theme, a Concept Buggy and it's ready for Off-Roading! Concept Buggy by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr And lastly, a Concept Semi Truck: Concept Semi Truck by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr Okay, that's just some of my Tiny Turbos creations, hope you enjoy it! You can see some information about these models in my Blog!
  22. KamalMYafi

    Peaceful Ramadhan...

    Ramadhan is an Islamic month, it’s a special month where every muslims are fasting. It already started about 2 weeks ago so maybe it’s a little late to celebrate it but it’s not a problem right? As a celebration, I created an interior scene. So this is what I came up: Peaceful Ramadhan... by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr It was rendered using Blender via Mecabricks..
  23. papacharly

    The Black Pearl Project

    LDD/MLCad 15D The Black Pearl Project - A joint venture by Courleciel and Papacharly EDIT April 1st 2015: Black Pearl mpd-file is available now. Please also note the relevant post #15 below! End of last year I had been invited by Courleciel to join a project he already started. The goal of this project was to virtually build the Black Pearl from the Lego video game “Pirates of the Caribbean” and, in a second step, to “make great renderings”. At this time the ship had already been built by Courleciel in real bricks. Starting point for this project was an “old” lxf-file (Lego Digital Designer) by captainjack. The virtual model was significantly optimized by Courleciel so as to make it more accurate and complete. A lot of parts have been repainted, some new elements were added (such as anchors, bell, grating, cannons...), and some were adjusted or rebuilt (like the capstan, figurehead, lanterns, masts...). After the model was nearly completed, the LDD file was converted to the LDraw format and my job started. According to Courleciels conceptual work I added rigging, rails, ropes and strings by using SR3D Builder and MLCad/LSynth. Sails were directly created in povray. Additionally it was necessary to manipulate some original LDraw parts (e.g. # x1609 batarang, see stern) to make them authentic with regard to the video game. Finally we decided on all setups for being rendered. All renders have status “as rendered”. There was no “photoshopping” applied, aside from scaling down and anti-aliasing. I have not counted all the hours I spent working on this project. But doing all the work Courleciel and me had a lot of fun. So we hope that you also will enjoy our work and have some fun too. High resolution “technical renders” showing the conceptual work of Courleciel can be found here. For high resolution images of the movie scenes click here. And here is the outcome of our project:: First we have some technical renders of the Black Pearl. Then we show some movie scene remakes. For all those which are not familiar with “Pirates of the Carribean”, please find the original movie scene respectively an original video game screenshot below each rendering. Here comes a remake of a video game screenshot: Two movie scenes from part 1 "The Curse of the Black Pearl": Movie scene “Pantano River” from part 2 "Dead Man’s Chest" Two movie scenes “Locker” from part 3 "At World’s End" Last but not least we have an atmospheric and maybe kitschy sunset render which is not related to any movie scene.
  24. This is a fictional space-themed LEGO shopping mall complex named "The Spaceship" due to the shape of main building resembling a spaceship. If that naming idea had come sooner I would probably have designed something that actually looked more like a spaceship, but the idea only came to me more than halfway through the project when I saw what shape the building was taking so I just used the idea to name and style numerous parts of the model. The model uses approx. 175000 parts and 258 custom sticker designs and measures 3810mm x 3493mm x 519mm (13.3m² footprint). It features 30 shops, 218 car parking spaces, 500 minifigs, bank, post office, library, cinema, amusements, restaurant, foodcourt, admin/security office, service access, maintenance areas, escalators, functional elevators, toilets, ice rink, gymnasium, boating pond, custom brick-built road layout, and real LEGO lighting in most of the main building and ice rink. The design attempts to be as functional as possible by providing convenient car access, separate rear public transport access, and separate rear service vehicle access to all shops on the first two levels, as well as multiple entrances and fire exits. It also attempts to be wheelchair/buggy friendly as much as possible using a mixture of stairs, escalators, ramps and a glass elevator. The main glass roof can be removed in two halves, as can the roofs of the gym, the wing shops, and the rear section, the latter of which reveals the battery packs for the LEGO lighting. There's also manual cable winders on both the customer and service elevators. I managed to get the water tank in too but had to forego the boiler room - despite the size of the build I found myself running out of space. The massive size of the model caused numerous problems, especially due to buggy software and PC limitations, so I had to reduce the intended length of the mall and forego a few other features too, but it's still by far the biggest model I've built. It probably should have taken around 6 to 9 months to complete, but due to personal and technical issues it ended up taking more than 2 years. This virtual LDraw model was built using MLCad software and rendered with LDView (sadly it's too big to render with POV-Ray), with additional construction, graphic and animation support via the use of PHP, LDraw Sticker Generator, LDraw txt2dat, LDraw LSynth, ImageMagick, Paint Shop Pro, GIF Movie Gear, IrfanView, PNGOUT, AviSynth, VirtualDub, and ffmpeg. Even had to use Excel to write macros to compute the precise angles needed for the curved window walls on the wings, which were too difficult to compute on paper. And no, I don't intend building it for real! Links: Flickr (lots more images) YouTube (looks better at 720 resolution) The video contains still images and many flyby sequences which give a better impression of the model by restoring some of the 3D visual cues lost due to the non-raytraced renders containing no shadows. Excuse the length of the video and number of images. It's a REALLY BIG model, and 25 images just wasn't going to do it... This is my first post here, and may well be my last! - during the uploads of the more than 200 images the PC terminally died and the remainder of the uploads and this post had to be done from a Raspberry Pi.
  25. An alternate from 31014: Power Digger set, a Post-Apocalyptic Car. It's an old MOC actually, but I've made a new render of it... Post-Apoc - 31014 Alt (with Instruction) by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr I’ve created an Instruction for this model, if you’re interested to create this model click here for the instruction (it’s free!).