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Found 12 results

  1. I would like to build a sailing ship, whether it be a Lego set or MOC so, as the title suggests, what is the *most realistic* sailing ship out there? I find most of the themed ships just seem like toys to me (yeah, yeah, I know - that's exactly what they're meant to be) - but what I want to do is just build a really nice sailing ship.that isn't full of minifigs, pirates, ripped sails or any other gimmicky stuff.... just after something that looks historically realistic. Having said the above, at a pinch, I could probably build the 10210 Imperial flagship if I can get the parts - obviously there are not going to be any still being sold (except for those evil Chinese ripoff kits) The best I've found so far is this magnificent MOC and might be the one I build - if I can find all the parts at Bricklink (and afford them too!) . Googling for "Lego sailing ship" doesn't show me too much else that look reailstic but I'm interested to hear from anyone else that may have built something like this or know of some nice MOCs or ships I could consider. Cheers, Mike
  2. Mitch Henry

    [MOC] Odd Thorgalson

    A mighty Nordic warrior, Odd Thorgalson has survived more battles than expected for a man of his age. It seems like the only thing that can stop him is old age... More photos As some of you can probably guess, this moc was heavily inspired by one of my favorite Bio-Cup 2018 entries, Dylan Mievis' Gærrar Valbrandsson . Just a bit more muppet-like.
  3. My little LEGO Ideas project, BrickHeadz versions of Butch Cassidy, Etta Place and the Sundance Kid - https://ideas.lego.com/projects/8afd087a-f284-43d3-b676-6f808463da29
  4. I'm back with a new (digital) MOC, LEGO Mini Modular: Book Museum. Book Museum - Main by Kamal Muftie Yafi, on Flickr More Images and Information in my Blog!
  5. Hi guys, Here's my latest MOC - Grand Central Terminal! Hope you enjoy the detail jam-packed into this MOC. It's up on Ideas. Dozens of photos and a time lapse video here Grand Central Terminal on IDEAS. PS - Why is the max total size for an image upload set at 100KB??? At that limit, I can barely get one thumbnail in.
  6. Gary The Procrastinator

    Battle of Waterloo: "Steady lads!"

    Well, Michael Ozzie beat me to it today with his outstanding La Belle Alliance, but here is my build celebrating the 200th Anniversary of this major event. Click on the picture for more detail: 200 years ago today, a truly epic and historical battle raged between three armies on sodden fields near the Belgian hamlet of Waterloo. The conflict determined the fate of Napoleon Bonaparte once and for all, and changed Europe forever as Great Britain became the dominant power over France, and Germany's power began to rise in the world as well. To commemorate this historic anniversary and pay tribute to the brave souls who fought and perished there, here is a quick build of that iconic Napoleonic Era infantry formation, the Regimental Square (or putting it more accurately, a corner of one...) Brave French Cuirassiers (Heavy Cavalry) charge this indomitable formation, the British Square, to no avail; in spite of all their courage, armor and powerful mounts, they never break through that long day as every British Square which had time to form never broke (though some units such as the Kings German Legion (KGL) 8th Line Battalion were caught mid-formation by the French cavalry and were decimated). British officers on horseback called for the rank and file to remain steady, and in general they did, allowing the Duke of Wellington's multi-national army to survive long enough for the arrival of the third army, the Prussians, to tip the balance. There should be bayonets on the end of those muskets, which is why it was so hard for cavalry to charge into a RS like this one. The LEGO musket barrel shape prevents anything but 2nd-party elements from working well, and being a bit of a purist (apart from that flag from Cape Madness) I won't use those non-LEGO parts. JBIronworks and I are currently working on a massive build of the key farmhouse in the center of the British line at Waterloo, La Haye Sainte, defended by the 2nd Light Infantry Battalion of the KGL; we should have it done in a few weeks so keep an eye out for it. Originally I had wanted to post La Haye Sainte today but we ran out of time. We will certainl finish it and it will be posted here in a month or so. Cheers!
  7. Mark of Falworth

    The Battle of Paphos.

    The Battle of Paphos. by Mark E., on Flickr The Column Cornered! by Mark E., on Flickr Attacked in the back! by Mark E., on Flickr My latest Roman/Greek inspired MOC for my Neo Pieria series! Hope you guys like it!
  8. Gary The Procrastinator

    Battle of New Orleans, January 8, 1815

    Displaying at the National Museum of the Marine Corps on April 11th, I had to come up with something featuring the USMC and also what’s apparently become my theme this year, the Anniversary of Something, so here’s my take on this iconic conflict. I only had about 6 hours to build it, so no border, and I would have liked to build up those ramparts higher but overall, fairly satisfied with this one. 100% LEGO except for the custom flags. Click on the pictures below for more detail. —————————— Ever forget something that was really important not to forget? The Battle of New Orleans, fought on January 8, 1815 was the last major combat of the War of 1812. 4732 American combatants, commanded by Major General Andrew Jackson, prevented nearly 11,000 British infantry and Royal Marines, commanded by General Edward Pakenham, from seizing New Orleans as a strategic prize to end the war. The war was actually over by the time the main battle was fought, ended by the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814, but since the US government had not yet approved the treaty, the fighting in Louisiana would continue until the British withdrew on January 18th. One of the most lop-sided victories in history, the British advanced under very heavy fire only to find once they reached the American ramparts that the ladders necessary to ascend the fortifications were not available, having been forgotten by the negligence of the Colonel in charge of them. With limited access to the Americans and taking fire the entire time, all British officers over the rank of Major in the front ranks were killed, leaving no one to sound the retreat. Their casualties were therefore disproportionately high, losing over 2000 in just 25 minutes of fighting, compared to less than 100 American casualties (only 13 were actually killed). As for the USMC, 58 US Marines fought at New Orleans, and they are the American troops portrayed here (hence the USMC uniforms). Hope you like it, comments are welcome! Correction: This was the last major land battle of the war. As 2Maxwell points out below, the last combat was the naval battle between the USS Constitution vs. HMS Levant and HMS Cyane...which would make an outstanding LEGO build sometime as well!
  9. Hello everyone, This is one of my greatest creations , the replica of the historic train River Douro , Portugal . Has two locomotives, one steam with the 2-8-4 configuration, the CP0186 built in Germany in 1924 by Henschel & Sohn and the CP1185 Diesel , a small tractor Sentinel which was painted black (originally is yellow ) nicknamed " Darth Vader " to ensure the reliability of the locomotive Steam in case of failure . Both have the engine 9V engines, need to pull the 5 wood carruages 3 are color lacquered wood , the other 2 are painted dark green on the outside and white inside . This train makes tourist trips in the summer , as a rule, travel always with the windows open , as such , I did not use any window or transclear panel , simulating that the windows are wide open and so I could get enough space to have comfortably seated 12 minifigures in each cars ( total of 60 minifigures ) . The train have more than 5000 pieces is 7 wide and 2.20 meters long, flowing smoothly over all the possible configuration rails. You can seem many photos of the original here http://trains.smugmu...Douro/i-mQQxwdG LEGO - Comboio Histórico do Douro by SergioBatista, on Flickr original size: https://farm8.static...46008e9b4_o.jpg Video
  10. Brickadier General

    Queen Elizabeth II and the Gold State Coach

    Because of work and school, I do not have a lot of time to build. Between semesters, I had a two week break to build, and this carriage was the product of that vacation. It is a minifig-scale representation of the Gold State Coach. The real one was built in England in 1762 as the ultimate ride for the Royal Family and has been used in every coronation ceremony since King George III. It has also been used for special events like royal weddings. The real carriage is beautifully ornate and gilt in gold. It's so heavy that it takes a team of eight horses to pull it! I was inspired to build this model after seeing the carousel horses in set 10235, Winter Village Market. They reminded me of the horses pulling the royal carriage. From the beginning, I wanted to build the carriage out of pearl gold and metallic gold parts. This created a big challenge because pearl gold is usually only used as an accent color in sets. As far as I know, basic bricks and plates are not available in pearl gold. A few years back, Sir Nadroj proved pearl gold could make for a stunning carriage with his "Bavarian Autumn." Since then, the number of parts in pearl gold has expanded to include the wagon wheels, minifigures, etc. The build was definitely not easy, but it was fun to see how a limited range of parts could be configured to make something recognizable. Questions, comments and criticism are welcome. For those who are interested in this project, it is on Lego CUUSOO via the following link: http://lego.cuusoo.c...deas/view/52291 More pictures can be found via my flickr account: http://www.flickr.com/photos/29934333@N02/sets/72157637177950964/with/10602636545/ This build is intended to represent the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. She is represented by the minifig in the front. I chose this period because I used to collect toy soldiers, and one of my favorite toy soldier sets was the Britains coronation carriage released in 1953. Here is a side view of the carriage. Here is a rear-view image of the carriage. The rubber-bands on the wagon wheels are a nod to Sir Nadroj. They also give the wheels some traction! Instead of using the new carousel horses, I used rubber bands and gold coins to cover the horses heads. Pearl gold clips and rings from Lord of the Rings sets helped for decorating the horses even further. There are four Tritons (mermen) on the carriage in real-life. Fortunately, the Atlantis sets offered up the appropriate minifigure. For the Tritons in the front, the pearl gold cobra and axe-head are designed to serve as their tails. Lego doesn't make pearl gold hair, so I had to paint some. The top of the carriage features micro-minifigs, used to represent the cherubim on top of the real carriage (though the real carriage only has 3, not 4). The interior of the carriage features dark red plates to represent velvet, and it can seat one minifigure. The four ornate corners of the carriage were built using Prince of Persia helmets, pauldrons and crowns. The Tritons on the back feature "angel wings," and the bottom portion of their bodies was built using a scorpion and robot arm and 2 teeth for the tail. If you would like to learn more about the real Gold State Coach, there is an excellent video on .Thanks for taking a look, and happy building!
  11. I created this MOC for a contest organised by a Bulgarian Lego forum for recreating a historical event. The project I'd like to present to you is a scene from the early 17th century and depicts Giordano Bruno's burning at the stake. His execution is now seen as a symbol of the brutality with which the Inquisition dealt with the great minds of the Middle Ages and the obscurantism of the times. This happens to be not only my first MOC here, but also my first post! So I want to say "Hi" to everyone. Hope you like the MOC! :)