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Found 48 results

  1. Eki1210

    Mocs, Mods and trifles

    Hello and welcome to this Thread, in which i want to share some stuff that i build. To not spam up the whole Train Tech Sub I decided to make a "one for all" Thread. First I have some Locos which i build and over the Time modified and refined to my liking. I build in 6 wide / City scale, so please don´t expect perfect replicas like so often seen here in Train Tech Let´s start with a diesel engine, meant for shunting and freight transport: (The stickers used front and back are repros from set "Load and Haul Railroad 4563") Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Next up is a japanese styled passenger / commuter Train. Due to its boxy shape it can easily be fitted with powered up and working lights: (I quite liked how it turned out, it uses many parts from set 60197, which i really disliked because of the giant "singefront-pieces") Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Next up are some Mods to existing Sets, starting with the great "4551 Crocodile" from the good old 9V days. I tried to lessen the gaps between the cab and the "snouts" of the engine. Other notable modifications are the new roof with redesigned pantographs. The goal was to get it looking more like the ÖBB 1020 series. Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Staying with Set 4551, the following engine is based on the B-Model of aforementioned set. A row of modifications were made and the color switched to green, like a lot of classic german electric locos. Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Next up some freight cars First an open freight car, loosely based on german EAOS: Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr A tank car. I would like it to be lighter und to use less parts, but this car can be build in a lot of colours. The basic concept has been used a lot in Tank Car so mocs, so credit to whoever came up with this solution Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr A stake car, loaded with trunks: Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr 2 passenger cars and a dining car with pantograph. Again, based on european / german rolling stock (IC/UIC coaches) Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Another mod, more so a redesign of the old TTX cars Lego released. I wanted it to fit 6 wide containers, but to keep the outsides of the cars like the original set. The solution i came up with was to use Lego train-baseplates as, well, the base . I haven´t seen this posted before, so maybe it is of interest to some. Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Staying on topic regarding containers, yet another mod of an existing set (or a part of it, to be more precise). The container crane of set 7939. Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr A closer look of the container car Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Now a building, the grat Metro Station (4551). I did not change much, mainly the Colour. Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr To stop the pic dump, what better MOC to use than a buffer Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr Ohne Titel by Henrik S, auf Flickr
  2. Hi all and Happy New Year!!! Since I'm waiting for H0 parts to arrive to continue my experiments, I am browsing the Internet a lot to get some inspiration. Searching for some American locomotives I found (again) the Bipolar, a locomotive which I like a lot...but I always end forgetting its name. I recall the GG1 in my mind...but the name Bipolar name simple does not fit into my 64kb of memory (38911 bytes free)! So, I thought it could be nice to try this big lady in 12v, just for fun. In this case, I built the E-2, the lattest rebuild of one of the Bipolar family, made in 1953. It's a massive thing, and the two motors will surely be helpful to move the locomotive and the Hiawatha train (I did not design the wagons, but for sure they would be...heavy!!!). As the original E2, the locomotive has asymmetric details on the two "big noses". The colors are WRONG - yellow should be orange, black should be dark gray, so I kept a 7740 paint scheme, well suited to the color range available in the 80s. As any high-end locomotive it has some expensive parts (all the windows). One note - the 2x2 windows can be also in old gray (from 7740), a bit cheaper option. The locomotive has 6 point of articulation, I think it could manage the R40 curves - my real life DB BR78 is less articulated, just to made an example. As you can see, the whole body seems a bit taller than normal 12v trains, but all in all, the real bigger details are the two pantographs. I don't think I'll ever build it in real bricks - for the only reason that I'm not so convinced to see it going around R40 curves. Maybe it could be a good shelf queen I hope you like this one! Ciao! Davide
  3. Not much to say about this one other than that it is an early electric tram.
  4. Rise Comics

    Rise Comics's trains

    So this is gonna be like my default thread for posting lego trains. Anyways, lemme start off by posting this double pacific Garratt, complete with railings, fully modeled valve gear, number plates, and full articulation Here's a side view with light effects
  5. FreelanceArtist

    [MOC] ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE SBB BE 4/6

    Hi there! This is my debut publication and let me present to you this Swiss Electric Locomotive, reproduced as faithfully as possible from the SBB Be 4/6 locomotive. This is a minifig-scale model. The model has a removable roof. Inside the model are: two electric motors, transformer, tools (4 pieces), compressor (x2) and a tool suitcase. The set includes a figure of a train driver with a briefcase: Inside the cab Front view New design of pantograph - first variant: ... and second variant: The first variant is not pretty enough, but it allows the pantograph to fold. The second variant is more elegant and plausible, but does not allow the pantograph to fully add up. This model can be motorized with the 1x 8809 and 2 x88013 Powered Up kit. Model info: Length: 50 cm (45 studs), Width: 9 cm (6/7 studs). Total parts: 1140. If you like this model, you can support it on LEGO IDEAS Thank you for your attention! I hope you enjoy this locomotive!
  6. Eki1210

    JNR Class EF65 MOC

    Hello there, this is my lego version of the japanese electric locomotive JNR Class EF65-1000. It´s operating on passenger and freight services in Japan since 1965. I really like the bulky and boxy shape, i think this translated pretty well to lego . Feel free to tell me what you think, comments and critic is very welcome! But enough talk for now, have fun watching the pictures: JNR EF65-1000 Lego MOC by Henrik S, auf Flickr JNR EF65-1000 Lego MOC by Henrik S, auf Flickr JNR EF65-1000 Lego MOC by Henrik S, auf Flickr JNR EF65-1000 Lego MOC by Henrik S, auf Flickr JNR EF65-1000 Lego MOC by Henrik S, auf Flickr (The loco is fully able to navigate the lego switches and R40 curves, the front and back boogies can swivel, the middle boogie holds the chassis of the loco)
  7. Hi everyone, I've lurked on this forum for half a year and this is my first post. I'd like to thank the community for the mere fact that it exists , the sheer talent behind many of the MOCs displayed here is mindblowing! You have inspired me to make a stab at building my favorite electric loco: ES 499.1 of erstwhile Czechoslovak Railways, now the class 363 in the service of various Slovak and Czech carriers. With its 1980s boxy design, this class might not be an exact eye-pleaser to every trainhead, but it occupies a special place in my heart! At the time the two prototypes rolled off the production line (1980), they were the first kind of double-system locomotive (3 kV DC/25 kV AC) with a thyristor pulse regulation of traction motors in the world (says Wikipedia). Be that as it may, the pulse regulation worked at three fixed frequencies (33 1/3, 100 and 300 Hz), lending the loco its characteristic buzzing sound, which can be heard here: (video by Lookfromlok) In the region where I live (as opposed to the rest of the country), the class was nicknamed the "Pershing" after the eponymous US intermediate-range ballistic missile, deployed in Western Europe in the late Cold War days . There was a heavy dose of sarcasm attached: due to then-frequent malfunctions of the pulse regulation, the class was perceived as capable of a lightning-quick acceleration but only a "short range" ride - just as the missile with the reputation for being less-than-reliable in its early stages of life. Later, bugs were identified and the technology tweaked, with these locos still being a common sight on both Slovak and Czech railways three decades later. Here is the original: I tried to render it in 6-wide because of the windscreen. (The moment I saw it, I thought - Pershing!) 0b6cc045de0c3c04054a968f24143064 (1) by Martin, on Flickr tr02 by Martin, on Flickr I intend to use stickers for logos, number plates and etc, but the coronavirus lockdown has put those plans on hold. tr04 by Martin, on Flickr Only a few test stickers have been applied to one cab, but the red color doesn't quite feel right. I'm still grappling with this tr07 by Martin, on Flickr The other side of the loco body has four round windows, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ČSD_Class_ES_499.1#/media/File:363_099-3,_Slovakia.jpg but I opted to go with standard non-round Lego 2x2 windows due to size constraints tr08 by Martin, on Flickr tr09 by Martin, on Flickr tr11 by Martin, on Flickr tr05 by Martin, on Flickr tr06 by Martin, on Flickr What do you think? Any constructive feedback/criticism welcome Cheers!
  8. Eki1210

    MOC DB Class 143

    Hello everyone, and thanks for stopping by! I´d like to show you my MOC of the DB Class 143. The proportions, similar to my class 111, aren´t 100 percent perfect to the prototype, but i´d like to think that it fits well with the official lego city trains. Maybe some of you guys will like it, if not that´s okay too Hope you enjoy the pictures, feel free to comment and critizise! DB BR 143 by Henrik S, auf Flickr DB BR 143 by Henrik S, auf Flickr DB BR 143 by Henrik S, auf Flickr As suggested by @Duq in the class 111 thread, the skies are now attached to the pantograph via 1x1 tile with clip DB BR 143 by Henrik S, auf Flickr
  9. Eki1210

    [MOC] DB Class 111

    Hello everyone. I´d like to present you my version of a DB Class 111. DB Baureihe 111 by Henrik S, auf Flickr A view of the front. I used bley frames for the windows, i think it fits well and looks very much like the prototype. I´m not quite sure if it would look better if the windows were rotated to their sides. It would certainly need a lot of tinkering and a bigger change to the front-section of the loco. DB Baureihe 111 by Henrik S, auf Flickr A closer look at the Pantograph. I´m quite satisfied with how they came out . DB Baureihe 111 - Pantograph by Henrik S, auf Flickr Please feel free to tell me your opinions and offer critique where you see fit. Best regards and thanks for stopping by! Reference picture
  10. Hi everyone, this is my first post on Eurobricks. I want to show you a scale model of a High Voltage Transformer in service in High Voltage Substations. This machine is able to supply energy to an entire region. The model was developed on Studio 2.0. Below some pictures. Hope you like it!
  11. Hi All, I'd like to show here my latest MOC, based on the artbook "the electric state" by Simon Stalenhag. Unfortunately I cannot upload image due to a mistrerious error, I asked to the site but I can't find the way to show picture here, so I put the link, sorry. Hope you like https://itlug.org/forum/uploads/monthly_2020_06/Electric_State_6.jpg.b5b843e7ef3fafe988ee6a77bb532561.jpg https://itlug.org/forum/uploads/monthly_2020_06/Electric_State_1.jpg.98bc844d1183a83b40d1b0f78d287fd5.jpg
  12. The coaches are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The Lego Land Railway runs the train from World City to Heartlake City with stops at Classic Town, Paradisia Coast, Duplo-Ville, Ninjago City, (where the electric loco is replaced by a steamer or vise versa for the rest of the trip) Fabu-Land, Technic Town, Fort Legoredo and the Castle Realm. (with extensions into the Forest of Failed Themes and the Outer Dimension of Galidor at certain times of the year.) As both sides are the same (even for the headlamp color), I decided to take only one picture of the ends of the loco. This model was inspired by both a 1999 version of the engine built by Flickr user legosteveb user and a couple of digital-only designs by @Sunder. The pantographs on top are inspired by set 10277. (Crocodile locomotive) Unfortunately, this is as low as they go because I built them from pictures and didn't do it right. (Oh well!) Fictional history: This electric engine (number 9028) was originally designed as a un-streamlined freight workhorse for use in the mountains of the Western half of the North American continent on the electrified section of the Lego-Land Rail-Road mainline back in 1925. The engine uses a 2-C+C-2 arrangement, which means single frame (really, it's split in two in the middle, as the curves were too tight to do one single piece, but that's just too technical.) mounted upon a set of two axles unpowered (the "2") and three axles powered (the "C") hinged with the ball and socket to another frame of the same design (the +). The unpowered "2" axles are at either end of the locomotive. As you can see, the three axles in the middle two sections are connected by drive rods. After serving dutifully for around seven years as a freight loco, the engine was upgraded to a fully streamline-shrouded passenger unit after another of it's eight-strong class was written off after a accident with a stuck Shell tanker truck blocking a road crossing. (Thankfully, the steeple-cab design protected the crew, who survived!) The 9028 was also given a higher gear ratio in it's trucks, to allow for the higher speeds that the passenger schedule called for. The engine's class has a reputation as a tough hauler, taking care of almost anything thrown at it in freight service, and plowing through the most impossible schedules as passenger engines. There have been times, however, when they have been helpless: In January 1952 engine 9030 and of the premier Lego-Land Rail-Road trains (The City of Heartlake) got stuck in the Rocky Mountains due to a large snowdrift on the tracks and 100-MPH winds in blizzard conditions. They got boxed in, and were stuck there for six days before rescue crews could reach them. (This actually happened to the real world City of San Francisco train in the Sierra Nevada's in January, 1952. The rotary snowplows froze to the rails trying to get through!) (picture coming soon) The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the lowered position here, though normally the one closest to the train it was hauling would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp to the repair shop. This baggage / passenger car is called a combine which is short for "combination". All the doors can open on this train, even the sliding ones shown here. The three 1980's-style coaches are identical in every way. The observation car, the rear-most coach on the train, features a platform for sight seeing. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 12/17/19: Added revised real life pictures. Comments, questions and suggestions are always welcome!
  13. I am so glad to share with you my model after more than 1.5 years of development Lamborghini millennio terzo 2020 I would like to share with all of you my latest Greatest Model " Super Car Lamborghini Millennio terzo " that I tried to make a MOC out of it, I felt in love with the original model. (It is a concept car shall come in 2020) With LEGO I am able to shape the things I like to have my own model and that's why I came to this MOC. I believe that pictures are better than words , Also Video will make it much more better than any written description! The Model is 1:7 ratio. Your support and feedback is highly appreciated! Thanks.
  14. I am so glad to share with you my model after more than 1.5 years of development Lamborghini millennio terzo 2020 I would like to share with all of you my latest Greatest Model " Super Car Lamborghini Millennio terzo " that I tried to make a MOC out of it, I felt in love with the original model. (It is a concept car shall come in 2020) With LEGO I am able to shape the things I like to have my own model and that's why I came to this MOC. I believe that pictures are better than words , Also Video will make it much more better than any written description! The Model is 1:7 ratio. Your support and feedback is highly appreciated! Thanks.
  15. My second creation I just have for you to show today, simultaneously my private second place in workshop achievements, the 6-axis manipulator. The robot is a successor of older humanoid's arm. It was made mainly due to one reason: I want to design an arm that has wide range of movements, because his predecessor was shame of it. Moreover, a goal for near future is to make the arm (finally) programmable, perhaps with using of non-Lego components... But a model you see is still pure fully Technic-themed robot prototype that looks better than works : Arm, similarly to my other creations was presented at a bit of places in Poland's exhibitions or events for robotic and engineering enthusiasts. It has been appreciated at "Diamonds Explorers" foundation for talented students' innovative ideas. Technically, it contains of 5 motors (only because one had been broken during tests), 3 IR receivers and 3 battery boxes (a pair as a counterweight). Features 3 primary and 3 additionaly axes of movement and a pneumatic gripper that reminds me well one Toys Story scene... So, let's watch the video featuring an egg as 3-eyed alien mascot: Some photos: PS: I'm still working on next version...
  16. Hi! As a new member of our large society I'd like to present you one of (as I humbly think) my greatest models so far - the humanoid's arm. Creation has been building by mine for January and February this year. In April it has taken a third place in local competition for students and, as if that wasn't enough, in June I was also presented it at Warsaw, Polish capital. Here's also a humorous entry featured it at Brother's Brick blog: https://www.brothers-brick.com/2018/04/17/judgment-day-starts-with-a-technic-arm/?fbclid=IwAR1f4tKQdujN5YtRemM4K3OmIlpCGO6GcdgWRsEgeJDDWpn7Ayb3K4tl-hs#more-107955 The arm itself is a combination of pneumatic and electric (Power Functions) componenets controlled remotely or by panel with system of valves. It's quite large, even slighty more than actual human's arm. It includes a total of 6 motors, 2 IR receivers, 7 pneumatic cylinders and 4 linear actuators. Features prehensile palm with tendon-like controlled fingers, natural range of thumb's movement, fingers abduction, movable forwards and backwards wrist axis, rotated and elevated forearm. Just look: Also let's see some photos: If you liked it, I'll try to upload some photos and videos of my robots soon! Sorry for my poor English :/
  17. A spontaneuosly built creation, somewhat as a result of good purchase for electric elements I've done almost 2 years ago. Then I just was made a tracked machine, at one forum named after "the wallie on roids", due to obvious similarity to one of Pixar's characters. So, ladies and gentlemen, I have a pleasure to present you... Robbie - the human-friendly robot (at least in theory :)). The robot is fully based on Technic theme elements and Power Functions electric system that consists of a total of 10 motors, 5 IR receivers and 2 battery boxes. All of this makes the model relatively heavy - over 2.2 kg. It features clever and easily RC controlled arms and independently propelled tracks. Luckily, I had taken some videos during work in progress, so you can see how much it was changing over the building phases: Traction tests featuring my slippers: And finally working shown to the world at one of small displays: And that's all. Sadly, I don't have so many photos this time, but I hope you liked it :)
  18. G'Day everyone, I'm Avanish Shrestha from Australia, currently at uni. It hasn't been too long since I started sharing some creations with the Lego community—but here's the first one from 2018, a Tesla Roadster, previewed at an event in November 2017. I hope you enjoy! Franz von Holzhausen—Chief Designer. Credits to Rolands Kirpis for the door hinge design.
  19. Welcome aboard the Astro-train! This stream-liner was a mix of the 1910's Earth train called the "Bipolar" built specifically for use by Classic Space forces as high-speed, high-security ground transports for senior level officers such as Benny. Unlike the Earth version, the Astro-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 400 MPH on special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's of tens of miles.\ BUILDER'S NOTES: In reality, I liked my original take on the Classic Space Aerotrain, but it can't be built due to design and motorization issues. thus, I stretched the design into the model you see here but with my Super Bipolar at the head. This will be able to allow the engine to pull freight cars, (such as Benny's road car on a flat car) too. This model was inspired by both a 1999 version of the original, real-world Bipolar engine built by user Legosteveb and by a digital-only design by @Sunder to create the Super Bipolar you see in my picture above. Note, the two 4 x 2 slopes should have this CS print while the four white 1 x 1 tiles should have this "60" print. Also, a bonus for this engine model is if I ever show off this train at a LEGO show, I can replace the middle wheel-set on the loco with another person's 9V motor swapped in to power the train. This is the baggage car, and like the rest of the train, all the doors open. (Although there are no interior details, so it can be whatever you want it to be inside!) These are the two passenger cars. The observation car. This is the complete train. I'm planning on building this in 2019 in real bricks, at some point, hopefully. Anyway, comments, questions, complaints, and suggestions are always welcome!
  20. Hello, Nine years ago i try to make a Replica of this Engine: Well since I improved a little bit my "skills" and there is much more Lego Parts then 9 years ago, this is my second try: CP 4700 Lego 1:20 Scale by Sérgio Batista, no Flickr
  21. Confession: I have been wanting to build a Bipolar for a long time, about six years. Longer than the Daylight or my Aerotrain models have been around, even on my computer, and longer than most of my 80+ strong fleet. Now, after years of waiting and thinking, designing and re-developing: it is here! But first, here is what it's based on: The Real life inspiration: The LEGO model of this engine is sitting on the side of the real locomotive. Real life inspiration: From 1919 to 1962, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (known as the Milwaukee Road) had these five General Electric-made behemoths pulling trains under the wires on two sections on the Pacific Extension, pulling trains part-way on their journey to Seattle or Chicago. They were called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. These locos were so powerful they could out-pull modern steam locos, and what used to take two steamers took just one bipolar. However, after a disastrous 1953 rebuilding by the railroad's company shops (who had no clue how to work on a electric loco) the engines were prone to failures and even fire. And so, in 1962, four of them were scrapped with the lone survivor, numbered E-2, towed to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri, where it has sat silent even since. LEGO Model: This model was inspired by a 1999 version of the engine built by user legosteveb. I recreated the actual orange, red and black color scheme used on the loco when it emerged from that 1953 modernization program, but it was too expensive. So, after looking around I decided to use the paint scheme the Milwaukee Road used when the engine was donated. This yellow and red scheme was inspired by the Union Pacific and was adopted very late in the engine's career (mid-50's). As both sides are the same except for the headlamp color, I decided to take only one picture of the ends. As you may have noticed, the LEGO version has two "floating" third axle bogies that were inspired by Anthony Sava that allow the engine to float over switches and curves easily. The engine runs beautifully over the little bit of track I have access to, but due to my lack of a layout and tables at the moment, (I've been forced to pack it all up for now) I couldn't get any pictures of that taken. Here is Steve's original model from 1999. Comments, Questions and complaints welcome! EDIT 8/17/18: Well, it's taken about six years of planning, designing, and redesigning, but it's finally on it's way to the real world. The Milwaukee Road "BiPolar" electric locomotive has been ordered as of the 12th in the form as shown. (minus the blue letter overlay I added in MS Paint, of course!) Keep your eyes peeled for real life pictures! EDIT 8/20/18: Real world pictures added!
  22. So I've decided to take advantage of the instructions provided by his book, but I've run into a colour issue. Which brown is it? I had assumed Reddish Brown, but the finger joint hinges simply do not exist in that colour (at least according to Bricklink). Is it meant to be the old Brown (which they do exist in, but I'd suspect some of the more modern parts don't)? Is there a suitable alternative to this without completely redesigning the ends (the modern ratcheted ones are too tall)? As is usually the case, I'm finding the building a parts wanted list on Bricklink frustrating as all hell (I'm not sure why the hell we need to identify what kind of piece we're looking for when we have the number already), and I want to get this parts list *right* so I can share it, meaning everyone else who has the book doesn't have to go through the same fart on.
  23. From 1919 to 1962, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (known as the Milwaukee Road) had these five General Electric-made behemoths pulling trains under the wires from Chicago to Seattle. They were called the Bipolar's for each of the locomotive's 12 motors had only two field poles, mounted directly to the locomotive frame beside the axle. The motor armature was mounted directly on the axle, providing an entirely gear-less design. These locos were so powerful they could out-pull modern steam locos, and what used to take two steamers took just one bipolar. However, after a disastrous 1953 rebuilding by the railroad's company shops (who had no clue how to work on a electric loco) the engines were prone to failures and even fire. And so, in 1962, four of them were scrapped with the lone survivor, numbered E-2, towed to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri, where it has sat silent even since, as seen above. The slightly stylized LEGO version of the locomotive was inspired by a 1999 version of the Bipolar electric locomotive built by user legosteveb and by a digital-only design by @Sunder. With this updated, more curvy model, the classic orange and red scheme was impossible, and so as the yellow and red of the previous model type. Thus I was forced to invert the red and yellow to the fictional scheme seen. (The black number boards in front and rear should say "E2" in printed 1 x 1 tiles.0 The loco frame is split in three sections as per the original engine. The front and rear section can pivot slightly to make the engine go around curves. Since the last uploading of this model, the wheels have been re-arranged into two groups of seven (they are joined near the end of the frame, with the exact middle section floating freely between the two ends) and the body of the engine has been extended for a total magnet-to-magnet length of 70 studs. The model should perform well on R40 curves / switches, as this picture attests to it's flexibility.... though until it's built in real life, it will remain untested. The newer model is only 1 plate higher than the previous version, with the same length and width. As you can see, it's my longest single locomotive yet designed with 14 axles total. (I'm not 100% sure my articulation attempts in all the boogies and the frame were enough to work on standard LEGO track, but I guess I'll just have to see when it's built in real bricks latter this year!) The passenger train, and the rear car in particular, were inspired by the Milwaukee Road's Olympian Hiawatha service from Tacoma, Washington to with the rearmost car being a Beaver Tail observation car, which were out of service by 1961. (you can read more about these odd-looking cars here on this Wikipedia page.) Actually, I'm not sure the Beaver-tails were ever used all the way to the West Coast on the Olympian, but since it's LEGO, who really cares! That's all I have done for now, and as usual, questions, complaints, comments and suggestions are always welcome! (real life pictures coming to this topic as soon as possible, but the LDD file for the whole train is available here at Bricksafe)
  24. This electric high speed passenger train was inspired by both 7745 (High-Speed City Express Passenger Train Set) from 1985 and 60051 (High-Speed Passenger train) from 2014. The train features two locomotives (with no motors in either), one club car and four coaches. The roof of each car comes off to get at the inside, and all but the locomotives have interior details such as tables and chairs. (The cab cars are supposed to have generators and mechanical details, but I couldn't make it look good so they were removed.) The cabs on the two locomotives have computer screens for the drivers, but the rest of the open space is empty. You can add in PF / or 9v motors to either (or both!) of the locos, but I did not due to my personal preference of hand pushing things around. This car is one of four identical ones that all have removable roof sections. The club car's top roof section is removable to get at the upper floor, but the lower section is not accessible at all. (I did try unsuccessfully to make it work. The LDD file for this model is at brick safe. Please note, the red of the train can be completely replaced by blue, if you wanted to give it some variety. Comments, questions and suggestions are always welcome!
  25. The GG-1 was a class of electric locomotives built for the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) for use in the northeastern United States. 139 GG-1s were constructed by General Electric and PRR's Altoona Works from 1934 to 1943, although mine is used by Brick Railway Systems on the New York - Chicago route. The real GG-1"s never traveled that far west in service, due to the overhead wires ending at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The GG-1's served under the PRR, then Penn Central, and onto Conrail and Amtrak, until finally a few went to New Jersey Transit, with some of these units served from 1935 on the PRR to to retiring with NJ transit in 1983. The model seen here is painted in this fictional Brick Railway Systems blue and red color scheme. This means the engine will be pulling some stretched 1980's style passenger car painted like the ones in sets 7715 / 7718. Unlike my previous model of a GG-1, this one has no interior details. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the one opposite the direction of travel would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp the the repair shop. The loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The coaches this engine will pull are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The doors should be printed like these: http://alpha.brickli...Color=5#T=C&C=5 and http://alpha.brickli...e?P=4182p05#T=C I already have 75% of the parts for this model, including all but one door. Here is the LDD file for the engine by itself: http://www.moc-pages...1461783587m.lxf ...and here is one with the coaches and engine: http://www.moc-pages...1461783797m.lxf According to a Facebook comment made to my post on the LEGO Train Fan Club page, the engine I built look similar to this bi-centennial Conrail-era unit: Comments, complaints and questions are always welcome! (This page will be revised again when the cars are built In Real Life.) Recently, I discovered this neat website on the GG-1's, called the GG-1 homepage, which was last updated in 2002. It features some cool stuff and hard to find info though so here is the link: http://www.spikesys.com/GG1/