Search the Community

Showing results for tags '8-wide'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 18 results

  1. Models in this thread: #1: Wrecker (60056 MOD) #2: Container Truck (60027 MOD) #3: Ice Cream Truck (70804 MOD) #4: Joe the Plumber's Badass Step Van (70811 MOD) Hi all, while everybody seems to be freaking out about "alternate models a 7-10 year old could build" I have a different suggestion to make: alternate models for grown-ups - we're AFOLs after all, aren't we? Of course what I'm thinking of are no real alternates - you will have to add quite a few parts. But what you - hopefully - get are more elaborate City vehicles that are supposed to go well with the modulars. As we all know Town vehicles are primarily designed for Children, they lack the complexity of the CC buildings. On the other hand they often have attractive colour designs plus great functional elements that are worth preserving. Thus what I'll try to do is to modify some vehicles according to the following rules: using the typical design elements of Town vehicles (windscreens, mudguards etc.) omitting most of the studs fixing holes where possible keeping all that’s nice and replacing all that’s too simple using not too fancy building techniques, models must be easy to reproduce use of stickers from the set allowed keeping or even enhancing the playability functions must be functions, devices shouldn’t be movable just by hand seating at least one fig - but under no circumstances in the center of the cockpit ;-) 100% Lego, no third party stuff allowed By saying no fancy techniques there is one - very important - exception: the wheels (but more on that subject later). This is the actual range of widths I'm building all my vehicles in: #1: 60056 Custom Wrecker The original model of this wrecker (see http://brickset.com/sets/60056-1/Tow-Truck) is one of my favourite town sets of the actual range. I really love its nice colour scheme plus there are some great design elements which I've tried to preserve as you may see. As said, wheels are very important in my opinion, that's why I try to avoid the usual City wheel/mudguard combination which leads to a certain monotony in town layouts, especially due to the fact that the same combination is being used on passenger cars and on trucks which makes no sense to me. Thus I try to use as many combinations as possible. Another advantage of this is that you get different types of wheels with many different diameters suitable for quite a few purposes. Another important aspect of this model is functionality - a tow truck should be usable for towing purposes. The original set is already quite functional, however, I wanted to have separate functions for the boom and for the lifting cradle. Plus both should be functions in the above mentioned sense, that means, not just movable by hand. That's why some technical stuff is built in - which is much easier with a 7w than a 6w form factor, as you may recognize. That's the way it works: Thanks for looking, some more pics on my Flickr. More vehicles to come.
  2. Commander Wolf

    [MOC] Alco HH1000 Switcher

    I was looking at that thread about compact PF solutions, and I thought about posting this MOC. The Alco HH series is a line of very early diesel-electric switchers (made in 'Murrika of course) produced between 1931 and 1940 after which it was succeeded by the much more well-know S series. The HH1000 was the 1000HP variant of the HH series of which 34 were produced between 1939 and 1940. Because other companies' color schemes were more difficult to implement, my HH1000 carries that of Union Pacific. UP owned exactly one HH1000, numbered 1251, which it acquired from the Mount Hood Railway in the late 60s. It was probably retired not long after. The most difficult part of the prototype to implement in Lego was by far the cab. Ideally the columns at the corners of the cab would be something like 2LU x 2LU, but that is pretty much impossible in Lego. After much fiddling I was able to get 2LU gaps in the back, but the cab is too long by about a stud to accomodate 5LU columns from the side. You'll notice the PF receiver sticking out of the center window. To me the main feature of this loco is that it is the perfect shape to cram two M motors, the AA battery box, and the reciever into a body 30 studs long. The receiver is actually just floating because that's the only orientation that works. The tractive effort is a little less than what I was able to get out of the RF-16, a combination I think of less weight and shorter bogies, but for practical purposes it'll basically pull anything reasonable - just slowly. As far as I can tell having a gear ratio other than 1:1 is more or less impossible here. This model has been about 85% complete for the past month or two, mainly for testing, but I'm about to BL the remaining parts, so it should get done soon! I didn't realize dark gray/blay saber blades were so expensive; so spoiled by LDD now.
  3. Hi all, hopefully it's okay to put all the train stuff together in one thread - I don't have that many train MOCs yet, plus all things belong together somehow. A few of you might know me as a car builder mainly, however, from the beginning I was interested in the different elements of Lego layouts - cars don't mean that much to me without a proper surrounding. That's why I've also built some other stuff over the years - which leads to the question of a proper scale. Scale When dealing with several types of vehicles and buildings, scale becomes an important aspect, that's why I've tried to find a proper graduation of widths for vehicles (like others did, too, but a bit larger since I'm developing things with the cars in mind): Some more info about this subject you may find in this EB thread: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/97314-citytown-vehicles-range-of-possible-widths/ The Monorail Regarding trains, I started in 2013 with a PF-driven Monorail train: The EB thread you may find here: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/82147-moc-monorail-train-7w-with-powerfunctions/. There are some developments going on regarding the Monorail, too, but that will be shown later. The GP38-2 The GP38-2 you can see in the photo above was a first step into the "real" Lego Train world in 2015. I'm a huge fan of those great US Lego train layouts plus I wanted to see what trains and especially locos would have to look like to match the other stuff I’m building, especially the cars. I soon found out that even 8w might be too small for one of those gigantic American locomotives I wanted to build, that’s why I opted for 9w (plus railings), which furthermore looks quite good on the Lego rails with their large scale. When looking for a proper livery I soon found out that the St. Louis - San Francisco Railway (“Frisco”) would be a good choice since the rather simple logo could be built completely out of Lego quite easily. There don’t seem to be too many of them in Lego, I’ve seen 2 or 3 of them since, I guess, but maybe that’s rather due to my lack of knowledge in this field. The GP38-2 has gone through some changes recently to make it more fit for its duties (see below) - it originally had body-mounted couplers which didn't work out - and to improve its handling so that it might be more or less finished right now. This is what it looks like today: Some more pics on Flickr. The loco has moving radiators, propelled by an M-motor, connected with the front lighting and operated via the IR receiver so that you have a bit of a startup procedure and the possibility to let it idle properly which is otherwise rather difficult when mimicking diesel-electric locos with Lego. Some specs: Scale: 1/43 Length (platform): 50 studs Length over couplers: 42 cm Width (platform): 9w Weight (with 4 batteries and two aluminum dummies): 1,130 kg The Hump Yard Originally meant to pull a (probably rather short) cargo train within a collaborative layout I recently thought about having a hump yard in order to get some more action on the layout. The GP38-2 had to be modified for that purpose (especially regarding the trucks), plus there had to be a second loco (a GP15-1, still a WIP) to push the cars uphill with 2 locos combined (which also proves to be a big improvement when pulling rather heavy cargo trains through curves). I also built some cars (also WIPs, except the caboose below). On a meeting with fellow builder Steffen Kasteleiner (see https://www.flickr.com/photos/29666619@N04) I was able to use two of his magnificent tanker cars so that there were already 5 cars to be humped, as is documented in this video: The main point here is the decoupler for which I used the great and well-known decoupler design by CamelBoy68: http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?/forums/topic/80286-decoupler/ However, I added a spring so that you don't have to operate it any time you want to decouple a car. The downside of this is that you have to take off the decoupler part when pulling the train out of the yard. Still thinking about a solution to set down the whole spring unit for that purpose. Another possibility would be to pull out the sorted trains at the opposite side of the yard so that the hump is omitted completely. But that would require even more room. Of course the switches are operated by hand at the moment, I just edited that in the video. I'd love to enlarge the whole thing - however already a baby hump yard like this requires a lot of room. The Caboose Now for the caboose: Some more pics on Flickr. The caboose is also 9 studs wide, of course, the cupola even 11 studs. I would have loved to build the cupola in 10w, however, I wouldn't have been able to build the roof in the style I've wanted. I've already been told on Flickr that there should be done more regarding the trucks, however, I haven't found a proper solution for that purpose yet - in fact you don't see much of the trucks from above at this width, but that might not be a proper excuse for you train guys! One aspect in the title is still missing: containers. You may spot the 9w yellow well car with a 7w container in the video which is still in the making. Containers are an important aspect regarding scale since you can't use the usual 6w containers in such a surrounding. Plus containers are quite important to me because they are some kind of interface between road and track vehicles. There's already a proper container truck, there's a 7w container design with a special stacking lock, and there's a (hand-operated) reach stacker in the making. Hopefully this can all be presented together in the near future. 100% Lego. Thanks for reading all this stuff, more to come!
  4. Similar to my thread of a year ago, wanted to share a couple more freight cars I've been building on the side: Conrail N6A I've shown this Conrail transfer caboose in a couple of my threads, but never formally, so here it is. The prototype is one of several classes of transfer caboose Conrail inherited from the Penn Central. The model was designed almost two years ago, and I got around to putting it together last year. The "skirt" that covers the tops of the wheels is typically the toughest thing to model on American freight cars: if you run on R40 track, the bogies usually need to pivot enough such that the wheels will scrape... this isn't a problem on the N6A because it's quite short; no fancy engineering is required to compensate! The geometry of the skirt and such are still similar to that of my earlier flatcar. And with stickers Brickshelf Gallery PRR G43 Like the caboose, this gondola might have shown up a few times, but never formally. The G43 is a 52' gondola built during the last decade of the PRR. Most of them went to PC and then Conrail. This model was designed and built last year. The dimensions are very similar to the aforementioned flatcar, and it's basically built the same way: the structural component (the sides) is studs-out, and the floor and trucks are studs-up. Once again, much of the work done to make the skirts work on the flatcar are applicable here. Thus, the hardest thing here was figuring out what to do about the shallow trapezoidal part in the middle - eventually I went with wing plates. Finally, this probably should have been dark red or reddish brown, but all three colors seemed to somewhat off, so I ended up going with the most common. I also looked at weathered designs, but its a little bit too difficult when there are a lot of large, exposed parts like the wings. Brickshelf Gallery Alaska Railroad 15800 Series This is a side-dump car, typically used for MoW work. Technically Wikipedia thinks its a type of gondola. As you can see, the specialized feature of this type of car is that it empties sideways: unfortunately the model does not have this feature! This car has actually never been posted: I only recently completed the design and model: Doing the textures on the sides was a little big challenging, especially trying to "blend" it with the ends. On the prototype there are a ton of funny angles that are hard to model in LEGO. Construction is otherwise typical: studs-out for the body, studs-up for the chassis. Those droid-body things are really good for the big pneumatic pistons. Brickshelf gallery Finally, this is a repost, but here is the gondola and caboose running with my EMD Model 40:
  5. After taking a shot at creating a couple of 9-wide 2017 F1 cars, I though it would be fun to turn the clock back 50 years… to 1967. The cars back then were incredibly dangerous mid-engine-missiles, but I have been a fan of their classic look and simplicity for a long time. I made an effort to recreate one in 8-wide LEGO as a kid, but I was never fully satisfied with the results. Today I’ve started all over with new designs, and I’ve done my best to capture some key details that made these cars look so distinct. I present to you the Ferrari 312 vs. the Lotus 49. ^ And here they are! The yellow racing livery on the nose of the Lotus is made up of five individual custom stickers, and nothing is folded. I felt there were no attractive options for brick-built livery, plus I knew I’d have to make stickers regardless for the racing numbers, “TEAM LOTUS” logos, etc. ^ The ’67 Ferrari 312 is one of my absolute F1 favorites, producing what is perhaps my favorite engine sound of all time. It was featured prominently in that Ferrari/Shell V-power commercial showcasing a variety of Ferrari’s Grand Prix machines. ^ The iconic Lotus 49 was easily the fastest F1 car in ’67, but arguably lost the championship because it… broke a lot. Still, with the innovation of bolting the engine directly to the chassis to act as part of the car’s structure, Lotus effectively changed the sport. ^ The raised lip surrounding the cockpit is, in my opinion, an important aspect of these classic cars’ look. I tried several ideas for capturing it before settling on this one. ^ The sections of the Lotus’ low lying exhaust pipes seen beneath the rear axle are actually attached separately from the rest of the pipes seen in the rear, using minifigure “Tool Box Wrench” pieces. ^ These two models, like their real life counterparts, differ most visibly in shape towards the rear. While there was no way to capture every detail in this scale, I did my best to approximate the distinct look of each car. The Ferrari’s 3-litre V12 engine is very different from the Lotus’ famous Cosworth DFV V8. ^ Note that the rear tyres are wider than the fronts, just like the real cars. Those older LEGO tyres actually fit perfectly on the newer Speed Champions wheels, which really worked great for these MOCs. ^ These classic cars are essentially in scale with both of the 2017 F1 cars I built a little while ago. The wheelbase of this Ferrari 312 is just over 2/3rds the length of the wheelbase on the Ferrari SF70H, which is accurate! The 2017 cars are also a bit wider than the 1967 cars (9-wide vs. 8-wide), which is also just about right. ^ While full minifigures can’t fit in the cars’ narrow cockpits, it is possible to build “drivers” using minifig heads on 1x1 bricks with a round 1x1 plates underneath. They may look like bizarre board game pieces on their own, but they work well inside the cars for display. Thanks for taking a moment to look at my MOCs! I've also posted this on MOCpages (link), and larger images can be found on my Flickr page (link). Comments and feedback are always appreciated.
  6. Commander Wolf

    TTX Articulated Intermodal Spine Car

    This project started, in a wholly different form, several years ago in response to two thoughts I had: "How can I make a long train without making excessively expensive?" and "I really want some modern rolling stock". Originally the obvious answer was articulated well cars. Well cars have very little structure to build, and Jacobs bogies mean relatively few wheels and even fewer couplers per unit length (compared to a train of the same length made up of "regular" 4-axle, 2-bogie rolling stock), both of which are particularly expensive parts. I would need to build containers to "fill out" the train, but that did not seem to be a big issue. Unfortunately the articulated well car project got to something like 95 to 99 percent completion when I pulled the plug. The car looked fine, that was never a problem, but they turned out to have more operational and structural issues than I had hoped: most poignantly they couldn't clear switch handles right after turns and the bottoms would fall out after extended running. Furthermore, to make the car look "filled" enough, I would need to build something like 15 to 20 TEU worth of containers, which increased part count and weight. Double-stacking containers also decreased stability and made the bottoms more likely to fall out. So the well cars ran empty at like one BayLTC show, and then they were shelved while I tried to think of solutions that I never found.Fast forward another year and I found out about articulated spine cars. Spine cars are similar to well cars in that they are articulated and intermodal, but spine cars trade density for flexibility: they can't carry as many containers per unit length as well cars, but they can carry containers or trailers and can fit in a small loading gauge. From a modeling perspective, spines have even less structure than wells, and more importantly can be filled with half of the 15 to 20 TEU worth of container, saving more weight and more parts. So here's the model: The car itself is 214 studs long and comprises just 1018 parts, giving a part per stud length of 4.76. For comparison a relatively tame looking "regular" piece of rolling stock like my flat car is 33 studs long with 335 parts, giving a part per stud length of 9.85 - almost twice that of the spine car, so that gives an idea of how efficient the spine car actually is. Construction is very simple. Everything is studs up save for some of the trim. The center of each section is actually pretty strong since it's just stacks of plate, but there is still a bit of structural non-integrity around the bogies since the spines have to taper down to a single plate for clearance. The most difficult part was of course making sure nothing scraped or interfered with anything when the car goes through a full R40 curve: I mocked up three sections of the car before committing to the final build: And of course, the build would not be complete without containers. With the well cars, I built an ad-hoc collection of 20 and 40 foot containers, each with a slightly different design, partly because I didn't feel like it was the main part of the build, and partly because I needed so many. Since the spine cars would need much fewer containers to load up, I decided to make them good. There's essentially two kinds of containers here: a "detailed" type and an "efficient" type. The detailed type is actually what I call the "RailBricks Container", which appeared in issue 14 of the now defunct(?) publication. The efficient type is just made of panels and detailed with a sticker in order to be light, but all the containers at least have tiled roofs to clean up the lines. There is also a trailer mostly designed by @jtlan And all the bits put together: All the weight-saving seems to have paid off as the loaded car doesn't seem to be that heavy - even my EMD Model 40 can handle the whole thing just fine. Having run it at several local LUG meetings and a full-day event, I think I have run it long enough to verify that the cars don't develop structural issues after long periods of activity. There is of course video from these runs: 0:23: Test run with the Model 40 0:31: Clearing the switch handle 0:43: Running under 9v power Full gallery here, and have a nice day!
  7. Legownz

    8-Wide City Bus

    Hi everyone! I haven't posted on EB in a while and this is my first time posting in the Town Forum. So a few months back, I decided I wanted to design a city bus based on a bus I saw in a Youtube video quite a long time ago: My final model definitely looks a lot like my inspiration, but I'd like to think I put a bit of my own spin on it as well. I tried to squeeze in detail in the front, which turned out alright, I think. The bus has seating for 16 people and a few small places for baggage. The doors can open as well, but for them to work in LDD, two parts need to be removed first. I'm not completely satisfied with the design, as I think it needs more detail and the door mechanism improved. However, I don't have too many ideas at the moment on how to solve those problems. If anyone wants the LXF file, let me know and I can send it to you. Thanks for reading!
  8. Hi everybody, new guy here! I'll admit, I've been reading and following Eurobricks for years, more years than I can count fingers on my hand. I officially signed up a couple months back, but have yet to post anything until now. I wanted to have something interesting to show you guys before I did, and now I do (hopefully). Allow me to present my custom LEGO Speed Champions MOC's! First of all, I love the Speed Champions sets. As a car guy and a LEGO fan, these are the best of both worlds. That being said, the designs leave a lot to be desired, which is also part of why I love them so much. I see an opportunity to exercise some creativity and do some hands-on building to make them as accurate to their real counterparts as possible. It starts with widening these models to 8-studs. That makes them too large for City-scale, but improves the look dramatically. Plus, with the added dimensions, you can put more detail into the models and get the proportions of auxiliary features (such as lights, exhaust, grille, etc.) correct. Truth be told, many of these had been in the works for almost a year, the first wave, that is. Most of the second wave is still in the works, though the Mustang and Corvette you see above are almost done. I've been constantly tweaking, retweaking, and fine-tuning my designs and I feel like I'm never fully satisfied with any of them. Some of the cars you see above haven't been fully completed. Some of the other Speed Champions are not shown in the photo because they're still half-built. In time, I will eventually show all of them. Today, I'll be showing one that has been completed to my liking: the Porsche 918 Spyder. With these models, I stick to a few rules that I set for myself: One, use as few of the stickers as possible. Stickers can only give so much depth; therefore, brick-built designs will look more authentic. Two, no custom parts or custom stickers. In the occasion that I do use stickers, I only use what's given on the sticker sheet. Three, no illegal building techniques. I want these to resemble a model that LEGO themselves would put out as a set. The common opinion is that the Porsche 918 is the dullest of the first wave of Speed Champions. I quite enjoyed tooling with this one, and it was actually easier than expected. I ditched the stickers for the front and rear intakes. I used stickers for the badges, fuel caps, and headlights. Technically, I could've gone with trans-clear cheese slopes for the headlights, but it didn't look quite right to me. I'm not a fan of the Speed Champions window/cockpit pieces for doing 8-wide builds. This is a Spyder, so it wasn't too hard to come up with a brick-built substitute. Without the window pieces, I'm now able to fit two minifigures side-by-side. It works because the construction of the sides is relatively simple and not very bulky. Being a convertible also helps too. I went with the brown leather plastic interior because I think it looks very classy. I try to recreate the interiors as accurately as possible. Side mirrors are an extra touch for added realism. This model also features a removable front trunk (frunk?) that can fit a couple of the suitcase pieces. You can see it in the short little video I have below! So, that's it for my first post! Let me know what you guys think! I'm always open to constructive criticism and if you have any alternate building techniques in mind, I'd love to hear about them! Also, please let me know if I'm doing something wrong with regards to posting and/or forum conduct. I'm still learning!
  9. Commander Wolf

    [MOCs] Various American Freight Cars

    Hi EB! I haven't posted in a long time, but I have actually been building stuff. I promise. I had been looking to put together an american freight train for some time now: I originally thought I could get away with building a long articulated well car (which would make up the entire length of a practically sized lego train), but the well car has proven to have more restrictions and less reliability than I would have liked, and as such it was time to build some regular freight cars. Tank Car All of these freight cars were actually designed in maybe 2014, but at the time I did not actually intend to build them, preferring the aforementioned well car instead. This tank car was completed first because I was able to acquire almost all of the parts through my local LUG. The only expensive parts were the 8x8 dishes on the ends, which are apparently quite rare. As much as I hate to be imprecise, the car is a little bit of a freelance: I did work off a drawing to get the proportions, but I apparently could not find a photo or model of the thing in the drawing, so the greeble around the the dome and platform is a bit of a guess. The ladders are also a bit disproportioned, but that is more of a convenience. This car probably has the most interesting construction of the three here: I wanted to use the various 8-wide circle parts, but I did not want them to make up the load-bearing structure (so you can't pull the car apart). Therefore the load-bearing structure is actually a Technic frame that kind of moves up and down such that the top and bottom set of circle parts can connect at alternating bulkheads. Flat Car Like the tank car this is a little bit of a freelance, but I really wanted a flatcar such that I could put random stuff on it, and modern flatcars at our scale are far too long to run on R40. I found two models for reference, and I believe my drawing is for the bottom one, but the car itself really takes more from the top one. This one was actually the toughest one to build. As I designed it in 2014, there wasn't nearly enough structural integrity and the wheels would easily rub on various other parts in curves. It took me quite a few iterations to increase the structural integrity to an acceptable level without compromising the overall appearance of the car (mainly not making it too tall). As you can see the details of the final design look nothing like the details on my original LDD build. Build-wise, the key to making it structurally sound was to make the studs-out sides the load-bearing element, and the difficulty was doing that while still giving the trucks enough clearance to pivot fully in an R40 curve. If you press on the car in a turn there is still a but of scrubbing, but for now I consider that acceptable. Hopper Car Unlike the other two, this car is actually based solely on a specific model! It is the latest one to be completed, and I think it is actually my favorite of the lot. It took me a while to get around to it one because I thought it would need a lot of parts, but it was mainly just the 1x2 rails (something like 100 of them) and they were relatively cheap. Construction is mainly studs up for the chassis and studs forward/backward for the sides. Each side is a studs forward and a studs backward section held together with rails on the top and bottom with some additional SNOT needed to go around the ends. It's probably the sturdiest of the three cars, but also the heaviest. Well that's it for now. There is a full gallery with a few more pics if it ever gets moderated. I do have a new locomotive in the works too, and it will be interesting.
  10. Hey all, I'm finally getting around to sharing one of my latest MOCs, a Norfolk and Western GE U30B. The U30B is a four-axle second-gen diesel-electric locomotive produced between 1966 and 1975. 296 units were built for 12 railroads, of which 110 went to the N&W. With the U30B I wanted to make a "no compromises" Power Functions locomotive. I felt that my first three Pf implementations had gotten progressively better, but that they all still suffered from what I considered various compromises like not being able to change gear ratios or not being able to easily replace batteries. The no compromises loco would have to hit these checkboxes: good PF visibility easy to change batteries high structural integrity max traction/power for given form factor ability to use different PF motors/change them ability to use different gear ratios/change them Given these constraints, I chose the N&W U30B because it was one of the last modern diesels to have 1) a high short hood, which I really like, and 2) 4-axle trucks which are more easy to make with more structural integrity than 6-axle trucks. Those being said, U30Bs for other railroads were built with low short hoods, and the 6-axle U30C was twice as popular as the U30B. After a few months of on and off development and construction, this loco was completed in February, just in time for locomotive power testing! At my usual scale of 15" per stud, the 1100 part loco is 8-wide and a whopping 51-long from magnet face to magnet face - the longest I've ever made. The construction isn't really anything to write home about: like my HH1000, most of the model is studs up with large tiled plates forming the detail on the sides. The handrails are made of a third-party tubing, which isn't quite as good as flex, but orders of magnitude cheaper. There is one slightly clever bit where the roof has been raised by 1LU in order to not have a ridge between the "plate with bow" and the "roof tile" and said 1LU gap is filled with a bracket: But the real question is: how does it fair with regard to my original requirements? The PF receiver sits at the end of the loco with the dome exposed - I consider this generally the best case for PF; reception from the front isn't quite as good as it could be, but I'd rather have that than the top of the receiver sticking up further. As with my previous two PF diesels, I have used the big AA battery box in order to get the most amount of energy into the loco without going to a custom power source. This drives two L motors - the biggest motors you can fit in a 5-wide body - connected to a V2 receiver. The battery box is secured by two "crossaxle 3M with knobs". Pulling off the sides (which are connected with about 6 studs) and pulling out these pins allows the box to drop out the bottom. Similar to a Real modern diesel, most of the structural integrity is in the frame (blue), which is just a big mesh of big plates. Furthermore, the battery box is mounted to a set of technic beams (green) which rests on the gearboxes (yellow): the weight prevents the gearboxes (which are just studded together) from coming apart when a lot of torque is applied. But those L-motors are pinned into the gearboxes with a pattern (red) such that M motors would also work! And E motors! And I have left enough space and connection such that the old geared motor with the appropriate extra reduction could also be used (I think). Finally, the motors are oriented such that the drivetrain has an extra stage (green) where gears of different sizes can be used and the gear ratio changed. This screencap shows 3:1, but in practice I have been using 5:3 with the 20-tooth and 12-tooth bevels, which I find to be a better balance between speed and torque. ... and finally, the full gallery and a video of the engine running with said 5:3 gear ratio: ... and if you've gotten here, thanks for looking!
  11. Streetcar PCC 551 I had built a generic European Streetcar/Tram that I posted here and had then been shown images of a local (to me at least) Streetcar used in Kansas City. Once I saw it I knew I had to build it. This is an 8-wide, 48 stud long recreation of that Streetcar. The were a number of different paint schemes used in PCC 551's history including one with a black swoosh down the side, but this one is a later version. I used the red tile on a headlight brick to represent the KC Public Service logo which is the Scout image. Here's an image of the original taken by Stephen Rees https://flic.kr/p/5unpgz The windows are 'authentic'. Apparently the head of the KC Public Services department decided that the traditional split windows that normally come with the PCC looked old fashioned so he commissioned the new single pane approach. Here's an image of the doors - they're inset half a stud using jumper plates and made up of a combination of SNOT plates and tiles, L-shaped plates and Darth Maul's Light Sabers! Here's the door build details Of course there's an interior! With seating for 19 Passengers and standing room for a further 11. And one final shot of the Streetcar with a couple of passenger's who probably won't get it. Comments, criticism and ridicule most welcome! Edit: Having a chance to think about the front end I'd like to show you this revised version
  12. eurotrash

    MOC: Chicken Bus

    Lego Chicken Bus I've been wanting to build a Bus Depot for my economically deprived Lego city for a while, but it morphed into a Far-eastern Jeepney Depot which was kind of good, but the Jeepneys I built looked they really belonged in a circus (pictures on my Flickr account) so I leveled the Bus Depot and rebuilt the Jeepney into a Chicken Bus! The chassis is six-wide, the passenger space seven-wide and the roof-eight wide. I wanted a top heavy vehicle that looked like it would lurch around corners scattering the luggage and goods (and chickens) off the roof. There's a Bike rack on one side. Here's a view of the Luggage rack - the crates, ruck sack and empty beer bottles are secured with an old POTC fishing net. The Bus's schedule is loose and variable and it will frequently pull into towns to drop off and pick up passengers, but whatever you do do not let the Bus leave the town without you! - you might be there for a long time It's been a long time since that windscreen has seen a squeegee.... And a final shot of the spacious interior with comfy seating for at least six minifigs. Comments, criticisms and ridicule encouraged!
  13. First of all, I have to admit that both of these are not so much "my own". The cargo truck was reverse engineered from someone's MOC that I once saw at classic-town.net, but couldn't find ever since. The dump truck (its hopper to be exact) is almost identical to the hopper Zed designed for his unbelievable KRAZ, definitely check that one out. So, here go the pictures. Cargo truck: Nothing special inside, just some furniture, boxes and a dog: I'd like to point out the washing machine, 1x1 round tile was made for this: Now the dump truck, nothing special here: So here you go, two trucks, one dog and a washing machine. For those interested, the .lxf files are attached. EDIT: .lxf files are now uploaded to Brickshelf, so here's a link to the cargo truck, and here's a link to the dump truck
  14. imvanya

    [LDD MOC] Race car

    I'm back with another MOC, but it's quite different from most of the previous ones. The main difference is that I finally figured out how to render my LDD MOCs in POV-Ray, so now it's a render rather than a screenshot. When it comes to the build itself it also stands out. Being 8 studs wide, this car has very peculiar proportions as It's two times wider but still lower than most of City cars I usually build. Other than that it's quite standard, there were quite a few similar official sets like Speed Racer ones. And once again the MOC started as just a test of one of my ideas. I decided to use the snowboard as a front splitter, which turned out pretty well. So here's the render of the result: Of course, the snowboard doesn't exist in black. However, looking at the prototypes - real race cars like NASCAR ones, it would be quite possible to build this model IRL using an existing version of the snowboard and still be able to create a good-looking and still believable colour scheme as real race cars are often very colourful Anyway, comments are welcome, here's a link to the .lxf file if you happen to need it
  15. Here I am again, sharing my LDD designs. Today I wanted to show you the following three. 1. American-style semi with a trailer: 2. Stunt car. It started as a copy of the incredible Ford Mustang MOC by 'Carbohydrates' (awesome name, by the way) that I came across here at Eurobricks. But I already had a lot of "borrowed" MOCs in my LDD Creations folder and decided to change it a little bit. The end result looks a lot like a smaller version of 8227 Dragon dueler, and that's because I really like that bottom curve. So here it is: 3. Racing truck. The front wouldn't be very sturdy if actually built, but I really like the way it looks with the winch and additional lamps. And unlike the stunt car, it can fit a minfigure: I would really like to hear your opinions) EDIT: links to the .lxf files - semi & stunt car and racing truck
  16. imvanya

    [LDD MOC] School bus

    Just a little post, this is a MOC I come back to from time to time and "polish" it. It's more of a "proof of concept" kind of thing, as many of the parts don't come in the colours I've used: EDIT: added a link to the .lxf file
  17. imvanya

    [LDD MOC] Garbage truck

    Once again, I'm sharing something I am most definitely unable to build in real life as my LEGO collection is very modest. Also, some most of the parts I used were never produced in the colors that LDD was more than ready to provide me with) Still, the cab, which is the part I really like, can be actually built - white is a much more popular color than dark green. So, without further adieu, an 8-wide Garbage truck: It's a bit on the chubby side, that's a fact, but I still like the overall look. That's what I was going for: I have a bunch more pictures on my flickr page EDIT: I've just created a Brickshelf folder, so here's a link to the .lxf file
  18. Henchmen4Hire

    S&S Wildland Ultra XT 6x6

    ***Updated pictures ***Added .LXF file - http://www.mediafire...15pccqmlrfh27uw ***Updated .LXF file (changed non-existant pieces, replaced rear "storage boxes" with safes, strengthened some areas) Behold the second ever LEGO Ultra XT 6x6 built to date haha You've seen it in 6-wide, now let's see how it looks in the mighty 8-wide! Features: -Opening doors -Rolling wheels -Colors -Made of plastic lol -There's a hidden floor compartment to stash dirty underwear: -Just to add a play feature, I made the top hinged so it can easily be filled with "water". -Ideally I'd use a 2x2 manget plate with magnet for the rear dump valve, but I can't find the magnet plate in LDD. -There's a 10-stud long, 2-stud wide, 4-plate tall compartment running down the middle of the chassis, great for storing shovels, pulaskis, fishing rods, hot mermaids, etc. -Not exactly sure what's supposed to go in that empty section visible from the top -Could easily make it modular, it would just take some strategic placing of tiles on the chassis. You might also like: Type-2 Ambulance http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=77140 Vactor 2100 http://www.eurobrick...showtopic=66784 I got certified as a Wildland Firefighter last year, passed with flying colors, but couldn't keep going because my stupid deviated septum makes it impossible to breathe when doing heavy labor. Oh well, another crushed dream for the bucket. :(