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Found 99 results

  1. I propose to keep here an up-to-date ldraw.xml, the file used by LDD to convert to and from LDraw files. Download: latest version On Windows 32 bits: download and replace the one in “C:\Program Files\LEGO Company\LEGO Digital Designer\” On Windows 64 bits: download and replace the one in “C:\Program Files (x86)\LEGO Company\LEGO Digital Designer\” On Mac: download and replace the one in the “Contents\Resources\” folder in the app (open “Applications” in Finder, right click on the “LEGO Digital Designer” package and select the “Show Package Contents” option to explore the pakage folders). (Thanks manglegrat!) If you have other modifications or additions, post them here or send me a personal message and I’ll include them to the benefit of all. If you need a part, feel free to ask here and I’ll try to add it (provided it exists in LDraw and LDD). History and Contents It’s based upon gallaghersart’s latest version (see this thread). It includes the modifications shutterfreak published in his thread. It uses some of the LDraw unofficial parts (mainly for new parts in LDD Brick version 2075). It includes some name corrections (because LDraw renamed or moved some parts, added new variants, etc.). I tried to more accurately convert the colors (now mainly according to Ryan Howerter’s conversion table). It’s not easy because all sources (Swooshable, Mecabricks, Ryan) don’t agree, and there are holes and overlaps. But as these differences, holes, and overlaps occur for rare colors or colors that aren’t available in LDD, it should be okay. In a megalomaniacal way, all the entries I have modified have an “SLS” at the end of their heading comments. New entries have an “SLS” at the front of the comments. So it’s easy to know when to blame me. As of 2016-09-16 and the big overhaul, I assume all the errors. Know Limitations As of LDD 4.3.9, flex parts (hoses) are not exported anymore (even unflexed). Minifig arms and hands are not connected in LDraw. I don’t know whose geometry is off (both?) but the shapes differ a lot. At least, hands are correctly connected to whatever they clip and arms are correctly placed in their sockets and somewhat wrap around the hands’s stems. Some variants are not recognized by LDD (e.g. clips, or tiles with/without groove, etc.) In those cases, I prefer to use the most recent variant in LDraw as it generally is easier to find and cheaper. Sometimes, several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part. Sometimes, the transformation is accurate for one variant but not for another. For example, the Flag 2 x 2 is known to LDD as 2335, 11055, and 60779, but LDraw only has the 2335 variant. 2335 and 60779 use the same transformation but 11055 is vertically offset. I preferred to badly convert 11055 to 2335 rather than not convert it at all or badly convert 2335 and 60779. ldraw.xml is used both ways (LDD to/from LDraw). It’s not something I do frequently (too many resulting collisions) so it’s not well tested. One problem I can see is that, when several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part, the conversion that’s listed last is the one that will be used. The reverse (first written is the one used) is true for assemblies that use the same subparts, in the same quantity (like electric cables). A lot of LDraw parts are simply wrong. Almost all the parts that combine System (studs and anti-studs) and Technic (pins and axles, and their holes) are wrong in that they assume the technic holes are at the same height than side studs (on the picture below, the circles are concentric). LDD assumes the holes are 0.2 mm (0.5 LDU) higher. In ABS, the holes are 0.12 mm (0.375 LDU) higher (dixit Jamie Berard in his famous presentation). In order to limit the number and magnitude of errors, LDD is considered to be right. How to write a new transformation for a part in ldraw.xml What? ldraw.xml is an XML file that defines how LDD can export to (or import from) LDraw files. It does so by defining a match between the part’s IDs and how to rotate and translate the part from one geometry to the other. Matches are defined by “Brick” XML elements. For example, this one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 that it knows as 3005 is also known to LDraw as 3005: <Brick ldraw="3005.dat" lego="3005" /> (Note the “.dat” in the ldraw ID.) Matches are not needed if the part IDs are the same: the transformation element is sufficient for LDD to know the part exists. (So the example above is useless ) Rotations and translations are defined by “Transformation” XML elements. This one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 just needs to be moved up: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> The translation (tx, ty, and tz) is in centimeters (0.8 cm is the width of a brick, 0.96 cm its height). The rotation is given by its axis (the line passing through and ), and its angle in radians. And all the coordinates are in the direct (“riht-handed”), Y points up, coordinates system of LDD. The transformation explains what should be done to import from LDraw besides changing the axes (LDD’s Y is up and XYZ is a direct basis, LDraw’s Y is down and XYZ is an indirect basis; so changing the axes only means changing the sign of Y). So, in an LDD to LDraw point of view, the transformation is reversed: it says what happens to a part if you don’t do anything to its coordinates besides changing the sign of Y. In other words, the opposite transformation has to be applied to the LDD coordinates of the part in order to get the LDraw coordinates (with Y reversed). Why? Each part has an orientation (which way up? which way left?) and a center, point of origin, or reference point (we’ll use “reference point” from now on). But LDD and LDraw don’t always agree. To know the orientation and reference point in LDD, insert the part without rotating it nor attaching it to any other part. It will be aligned along the scene’s axes (LDD’s axes). The reference point is near the mouse pointer’s head. To know the orientation and reference point in LDraw, I find LeoCAD the easiest tool: just select the part and its axes are drawn (X red, Y green, Z blue), starting at its reference point. Okay, LeoCAD’s «X, Y, Z» is LDraw’s «X, -Z, Y» but what’s another little change of basis? Sometimes, their disagreement is trivial. For example, for the simple 1x1 brick (3005), both LDD and LDraw agree: the stud is on top and the reference point is on the vertical line going through the center of the stud. But they differ for the height at which the reference point should be: LDD says it’s at the base of the brick, LDraw at its top (but at the base of the stud). (On every picture, X will be red, Y green, and Z blue.) So the transformation for that part is straightforward: if the LDraw part is imported as is, with only Y reversed, it will end up 0.96 cm (the height of the brick) higher than it should. So we have to lower it by 0.96 cm: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> Sometimes, their disagreement is more profound and the transformation is therefore more complicated. For example, for the musket (Minifig Gun Musket 2561), LDD puts the reference point in the handle and “up” means the handle is vertical but LDraw puts the reference point in the barrel and “up” means the barrel is vertical. Even more, the stock is on the wrong side, so X and Z are different too. With an identity transformation, the part is rotated by an eighth of a turn (X to Y) (π/4) around the Z axis to put the barrel vertical, and then by a quarter turn (X to Z) (-π/2) around the Y axis. After that, it has been translated up and horizontally. After calculations (see below), we’ll end up with this transformation: <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> How? So, how do we find the right values to have the correct transformations? What’s the ID? Having the right part Check the ID of the part in LDD. Check the ID of the part in LDraw. Beware of variants, LDraw uses a letter suffix (a, b, c…) where LDD totally changes the ID or keeps the same ID for new variants. Don’t hesitate to look on BrickLink for the part ID: BrickLink keeps a list of alternate IDs (when the same part has several IDs) and links to variants and notes. If the IDs are the same. Nothing to do. If the IDs differ. We add a Brick element: <Brick ldraw="123a.dat" lego="456" /> Don’t forget the “.dat”! That was the easy part. Which way is up? Finding the rotation axis and angle We start in LDD. Up is Y, or Y is up. X and Z are a bit harder to see on the LDD scene unless you use LDD’s developper mode (which has the LDD axes drawn at «0,0,0» as red X, green Y, and blue Z lines). Or, if you’re sure you didn’t move the camera in a brand new model/file, X is pointing bottom right, and Z bottom left. We place our part among other parts that we know will be correctly converted (like 1x1 plates, or harpoons ) to have references. Using different colors greatly helps! We export to LDraw… … and look at the results: We decompose the transformation in multiple simple rotations, around the X, Y, or Z axis. If it has been turned around X, a quarter turn from Y to Z is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Z, a quarter turn from X to Y is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Y, a quarter turn from Z to X is a positive π/2 angle. To make it short, it’s a direct (right-handed) basis. If you can’t figure out the problems with an existing transformation, “clear” it by using an identity transformation: <transformation tx="0" ty="0 tz="0" ax="0" ay="1" az="0 angle="0"/> (All zeroes but one of the a_ which is 1.) You can try each simple rotation one by one to be sure of their angles (especially their signs ). Beware, combining rotations change their axes (e.g. turning around first X then Y is equivalent to turning around first Y then Z). So if you check that the Y rotation is okay, then the X rotation, don’t forget to combine them as Y then Z. For the musket, we need two rotations: an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z (blue) axis that puts the barrel vertical, and then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis. Or we can first make the quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis, and then an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the X (red) axis. Remember, “import”-wise, we’re trying to find what should happen to the part in the LDD scene to be like the LDraw one, with the LDD axes (the harpoons ). My head is turning. Combining rotations If more than one simple rotation is needed, we have to combine them. For that, we’ll use quaternions. Eh come back! That’s not that difficult! A quaternion q can be written as q = a + b.i + c.j + d.k, where i² = j² = k² = i.j.k = -1 (so i.j = k = -j.i, j.k = i = -k.j, k.i = j = -i.k). a is the real part, b.i + c.j + d.k is the imaginary part. A rotation by the angle angle around the axis «ax, ay, az» is the quaternion q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) Do note the 1/2 factor on the angle! To combine two rotations, we just multiply their quaternions and apply the rules above to end up with a a + b.i + c.j + d.k form (or, more accurately, a C + S.(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) form, where C and S are cosine and sine of the same angle and ax² + ay² + az² = 1 ). If we rotate first by q and then by p, the result is the rotation by p.q. Note the order: q then p is p.q. Multiplication is not commutative with quaternions: if you do it the wrong way, you’ll end up with the correct values but the wrong signs. There’re lots of fun to have with quaternions and rotations as quaternions. But what is said here is sufficient for our purposes. An example: Most of the times, we do π/2 rotations (quarter turns, 90°). angle = π/2 therefore cos(angle/2) = sin(angle/2) = cos(π/4) = sin(π/4) = √2/2; So, for a “horizontal” quarter turn (yaw, around Y): q = √2/2 + √2/2.j (as j/Y is the “vertical” axis). Let’s combine it with a half turn (π, 180°) around the X axis (IOW, upside-down): cos(π/2) = 0, sin(π/2) = 1, so p = 0 + i p.q = (0 + i) . (√2/2 + √2/2 j) = √2/2 i + √2/2 i.j = 0 + √2/2 ( i + k ) Now, let’s get the resulting angle: The real part of p.q, 0, is the cosine of angle/2. 0 is also the cosine of ±π/2 (±90°). Therefore, the resulting angle is π (180°). Now the axis, «ax, ay, az»: It’s the √2/2( i + k) imaginary part. That’s the vector «√2/2, 0, √2/2». We need to remove the sin(angle/2) factor. That’s easy as the sine of π/2 is 1. So our axis is «ax = √2/2, ay = 0, az = √2/2». Written in ldraw.xml: ax="0.707…" ay="0" az="0.707…" angle="3.1415…" Another one, a quarter turn around Y and then around X: q = √2/2 + √2/2 j = √2/2 (1 + j) p = √2/2 + √2/2 i = √2/2 (1 + i) p.q = 1/2 (1 + i) (1 + j) = 1/2 + 1/2 (i + j + k) We rewrite it as p.q = 1/2 + √3/2 (√⅓ i + √⅓ j + √⅓ k) to have a unit vector (ax² + ay² + az² = 1) in the parenthesis and to clarify the cosine and sine: 1/2 and √3/2. They are the sine and cosine of π/3 (60°). Therefore, the resulting angle is 2π/3 (120°). In ldraw.xml: ax="0.577…" ay="0.577…" az="0.577…" angle="2.094…" Back to our musket: An eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z axis that puts the barrel vertical: q = cos(π/8) + sin(π/8).i = C + S.k Then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y axis: p = cos(-π/4) + sin(-π/4).j = √2/2 (1 - j) p.q = √2/2.(1 - j)(C + S.k) = √2/2.(C - S.j.k - C.j + S.k) = √2/2.C + (-√2/2.S.i - √2/2.C.j + √2/2.S.k) Wow! Hum, okay. So √2/2.cos(-π/8) is the cosine of half our angle. Get the calculator out… angle/2 = Acos(√2/2.cos(-π/8)) = 0.8589 Our angle is 1.7178. We “remove” the sine of angle/2 from our vector, so that p.q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k): ax = -√2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.3574 ay = -√2/2.cos(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.8629 az = √2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = 0.3574 As an exercise, you can verify that ax² + ay² + az² = 1. So we did it right! Et voilà: ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016" One step to the left. Getting the translation right Now that the part is correctly oriented, it may need to be moved. The translation is in centimeters (cm). 20 LDU = 0.8 cm. Values are often multiples of 0.4 (half a stud) for tx and tz and multiples of 0.32 (height of a plate) for ty. Other, finer, tunings are often in multiples of 0.008. If the rotation is complex, all bets are off In LDD, we try to place the part so that its LDraw up axis ends up up in the scene, and we try to align its LDraw X and Z axes with X and Z of the scene (at least, that it is not rotated by a weird angle). That way, moving the part along its axes is also moving the part along the scene’s axes. It will be easier for getting the translation right. For our musket, that means the barrel up. (I didn’t align the X and Z axes here because, yeah, I’m a warrior, I don’t need that. Besides, you’ll see what happens because of that. ) Again, I find it easier in LeoCAD: the key bindings, the coordinates clearly shown in the status bar, etc. The thing is, LeoCAD uses a direct Z up basis. So if you move «dx, dy, dz» in LeoCAD, you’re moving «dx, -dz, dy» in LDD (and vice versa). Confusing? Noooh. Anyway, choose your own poison but beware of its little quirks. To help fine tuning, using transparent colors greatly helps, especially for clip-bar connections. Now, we note the coordinates of our part in our LDraw editor and move it so that it ends up the way it should. We look how much we moved it. That’s it! Just convert it to cm (= LDU × 0.8 / 20) and we have our translation. Well, mostly, the signs are wrong. Remember: the transformation is what should happen to the LDD part to end up like the LDraw part, we just did the opposite and moved the LDraw part to be like the LDD one. Besides the signs, if you didn’t correctly align the axes, you’ll have to find which is which For our musket, we need to go up and sligthly to the “left” (from bottom right to upper left when your LDraw view is oriented as a new LDD file, as are all the screenshots here). That means negative dy and dx. But as the part is not aligned on X and Z (but still not badly rotated), the negative dx becomes a positive dz. Et voilà! <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> (So, okay. I had to try first tx then tz, both negative and positive, before I found the right one. But I didn’t want to have to remake the pictures! There: I’m not a warrior, I’m just lazy.)
  2. Shackleton's Endurance in Minifig Scale In August 1914, Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton started an incredible expedition to the Antarctic.This voyage is also known as the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Endurance was the name of the ship in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic. On board were 28 men and 69 dogs. Shackleton planned to cross the Antarctic on foot. But shortly before its arrival in the Antarctic the Endurance became locked in ice and was finally crushed. Thus the legendary survival of Shackleton and his crew began. Length 166 studs (131 cm) / Width 50 studs (39 cm) / Height 103 studs (81 cm) Built with LDCad 1.6 alpha 4 / Rendered with POV-Ray Shackleton's Endurance by Papacharly by Papacharly
  3. Please read the guidelines! GUIDELINES Type the number, name and theme of the model (I prefer Brickset themes) at the top of your post. This topic only makes sense if you give a link to your model, so other people can download it Put a picture of the virtual model in your post. Say if there are errors, if there are, tell what the errors are. Not too big pictures, please follow the EuroBricks guidelines. One set in one file. So not one set in 2 files, or 2 sets in file. The set should be build using the original instructions. Exporting models from ldd is forbidden unless you have the permission from the original author. Pleas do check everything very, very carful (also the inside of the model), because the export is not very accurate. Models like Montly Mini Builds or Club models are allowed. software files/programs that are allowed MLcad SR3D Builder Leocad Bricksmith BrickDraw 3D LDCad
  4. I'm using Bricksmith and LPub 4 to create instructions for a rather large MOC (~8k pieces), but I need help with angles for a few ROTSTEP commands. Currently, I have two steps set in Bricksmith as: Step: Relative to default view: x,y,z = 10, -8, 7 Step: Additive: x,y,z = 180, 70, 180 This gives the following commands in the LDraw file: 0 ROTSTEP 10.971 -6.596 8.335 REL. (Side issue - why is this different to the angles I specified??) 0 ROTSTEP 180.000 70.000 180.000 ADD The problem is that Bricksmith does an ADD relative to whatever rotation was used for the previous step, while LPub does an ADD rotation relative to the default step orientation (i.e. ROTSTEP 0 0 0 ADD is identical to a STEP command with no previous rotations). So LPub shows a different view to the one I set in Bricksmith. I know xyz rotation angles cannot be directly added, so I tried converting them to quaternions, combined them, then converted back to an x,y,z rotation angle. Unfortunately (10,-8,7) + (180, 70, 180) gives (-140, -76, -148), which is nothing like what I expected. Is there any way to convert the ROTSTEP ADD command to a ROTSTEP REL command showing exactly the same rotation?
  5. I am trying to get an overview of the features, irregularities and oddities of the stud.io 2.0 export to LDraw. (File -> Export as -> Export a LDraw) It is for the upload functionality of BrickHub.org since many of the submissions are made this way. This is the list I have compiled so far: The extension will be ".ldr" even though the content seems like that of an ".mpd" file. Is this an error or a feature? Right now I'm treating it as an error and will make a "Change to .ldr"-functionality if submodels are detected. Proper use of "0 NOFILE". It seems like stud.io uses "0 NOFILE" lines instead of "0" lines. Does anyone know the proper use of these lines? Should I make a function to replace "0 NOFILE" with "0"? Decimal precision. Stud.io uses six decimals on all positions and matrix coordinates, so instead of "0" it will output "0.000000". This would not have been much of a problem if it were not for some precision issues. Right now I see a lot of lines in the order of "0.000080" and "0.001234" where "0" is expected. I will make a function to fix this in BrickHub. Suffixes in submodels. From MLCad I expect that submodels have ".ldr" or ".dat" as suffixes in both "0 FILE xxx.ldr" and "0 Name: xxx.ldr" lines. This only happens in stud.io if you remember to add ".ldr" to the names of the submodels. I will have to update BrickHub so it also considers submodels without this suffix as "top level sub models". Additional spacing in "0 Name:" lines. For some reason stud.io inserts two spaces after colon on these lines. I expect this to be a minor bug. Missing authors. Stud.io adds "0 Author:" lines without authors. This is unless you import the model from LDraw - then the author is remembered, but additional spacing is present after the colon. "0 NumOfBricks: xxx" lines right before content lines is added. It seems to compute the number properly, although there also here is an additional space. Missing "ROTSTEP". Stud.io seems to not only miss rotation steps, but also strip rotation steps from imported models. To add functionality to create rotation steps in BrickHub might be a big task. Would anyone be interested in using it? Additional "0 STEP" lines. If you import an LDraw file with "0 STEP" as the last line of a submodel, then an additional "0 STEP" will be added. It seems like stud.io simply adds "0 STEP" lines without checking for existing lines first. Any thoughts, comments, or other features?
  6. Block_Smarts Lego Technic

    Opening LDR files

    I found a really cool model i'd like to build, but when I clicked download, It sent me here- http://www.brickvista.com/downloads/models/roverWheels/ArchimedesFlow.ldr Does anyone know how to open it? Thanks!
  7. Hi, Does anybody know if the parts from the technic 42083 bugatti chiron are in the ldraw parts libary yet (as official or unnofficial parts). I wanna make a gearbox and need the parts to do so. Replicating them in LDD is too confusing. I have the 42083 set x2. one is half built, so no dismantaling it, and the other is getting returned to lego. there are none of the new parts for sale locally on bricklink yet. regards, SNIPE.
  8. I'm rebooting my idea for a Lego themed RPG made in RPG Maker VX Ace. There seemed to be some interest here last time I mentioned it. There is a Google Code project that talks all about it here. I also created a ModDB page for the game. So far I've rendered and imported a lot of graphics, but one thing I am really missing is a good story or plot to tie it all together. I envision a story that starts in modern small town setting, but grows into a scifi or fantasy tale. Here's the latest video: More videos here:
  9. As an FYI for any users of LPub3D, an update (version 2.2.1) was recently released. This release seems to have addressed issues I had been experiencing with getting LPub3D to successfully render images using "faded" parts in versions 2.1 and 2.2. It appears to have also remedied an issue related to using POV-Ray to render images and POV-Ray is now successfully working for me to render images. My installation is a Windows 7, 32 bit machine, so you may not have been experiencing the same issues. The most recent version of LPub3D is available for download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/lpub3d/ Regards, David
  10. A recreation of popular design using 688 stormtrooper minifigures. It uses a mosiac function and a Lego crowd generation system that I created in python - hope you like it.
  11. As suggested by papacharly, here's a topic about LDcad to discuss and help each other. What is LDcad? LDcad is an LDraw cad program being developed by Roland Melkert. The current version is 1.4, which can be downloaded here. For more information about LDCad, visit the website (and make sure to read the quick manual!). The features are (copy/pasted from the website): Windows and Linux support. Multi-threaded (background) loading of parts. Fast detailed real-time 3D rendering. Basic part snapping on growing collection of (official) parts. Integrated portable flexible parts support (springs, hoses, bands). Script based animation. Full MPD Support. Part grouping. Part ghosting. Nested editing. Relative grids. Multiple file editing (open as many files you like). Instruction stepping support. Full undo/redo. Copy/paste from to other LDraw software. Highly customizable part and color bins. Growing collection of example models. From my own experience, LDcad is quite difficult for beginners and can be quite unintuituve. This may sounds harsh, but it is (from my experience at least). But, if you get through the difficult part, a wonderdful piece of software is available to you and when you know to do, it's actually quite easy. Almost as easy as LDD (if we use that as a benchmark for easiness). It feels a bit like SR3D builder, but it doesn't have the user-friendly way of animation. It doesn have other nice features. It's really worth to take a look at! Roland is most active on the LDraw forums, so if you want to directly talk with him, I recommend going here. Of course, you can post all comments, questions and disscustions regarding LDcad in this topic too. So, this is the topic on EB to talk about LDCad [continuation from the LDraw sets topic] LDcad is quite nice. I've been using it for the past few weeks and I'm quite happy with it. Btw, make sure to turn on part-snapping if you haven't already, in my experience it makes building a lot easier. I just tried to find this setting, but I can't find it anymore. Maybe it's turned on by default nowadays, I can remember I had to set it on... Oh, and if you set Anti Aliassing on the edges on (AA), it makes the view a lot better
  12. New version (0.9.4) January 1, 2018! Go here for the download page. By using JWrapper, LDDMC now runs on both Windows, Mac and Linux, 32bit and 64bit, and without having to install Java. This software has been some years underway. Since I started this request topic, many have contributed with ideas and other input which has helped me developing this mosaic software. Features include - Build your mosaic by either following the instructions in app, by printing, by exporting to LDD or by exporting to LDraw. The in-app building guide (or magnifier) is customizable and can look like this: - Build mosaics using plates, bricks, tiles, and even SNOT. By request I have added a lot of building techniques through the years. 1x2, 1x3, 1x4 and 2x2 plates from top and side are included in the building techniques options menu. Here is how the mosaic looks if you build using SNOT: - Manage exactly which colors you want to use. You can import the latest colors from Rebrickable... or even make your own (if you can work out how the colors.txt file is formattet). You can filter the shown colors using various filters. Here I have filtered out all transparent, old, rare and chrome parts from the color picker: - Change input picture directly to improve the mosaic. You can modify colors, size, building technique, dithering percentage, crop, and even a series of color filters in order to fine tune your mosaic. The changes you make are reflected in the mosaic almost immediately! - Full save and load functionality. You can even export snapshots of the mosaic like in LDD. - Automatic updating to latest version (thanks again to JWrapper) The software is written in Java and the full source is available at GitHub here. If there is anything you want improved, or if you have feature requests, then don't hesitate to either write in this thread or to me directly (lassedeleuran@gmail.com)
  13. I wrote a Java application to convert an LDraw model to Sunflow. Thank you to msx80 for giving me the idea with Blurender Thank Bublible I use some of your metallics materials in my application. It is not complete yet but I have tested on several models without problems. There are still things to optimize and probably bugs. Currently no progress bar, keep an eye on the console to see the progress of the work. Screenshot: Only the "render" button not "ipr" saves the image in the same directory as the stage Sunflow. (not true with the latest version) In the LDraw tab you can set : - LDraw path - Common used texterea is a solution to optimize the final mesh Examples : These models comes from here 3063 - Heartlake Flying Club 30210 - Frodo with cooking corner 30210 - Frodo with cooking corner Download : Version e - here Version d - here Version c - here Version b - here Version a - here
  14. HOW IT IS WORK: Manage your LEGO set collection, and build an inventory of the parts in those sets. This is remastered version of application with this same name that was brought to as by Jim Valavanis on SourceForge. Is focus on work without internet. Protect user privacy as much as possible. Connection with outside is used when images, price guides must be downloaded. Information about sets | parts can be imported from *.xml file /BrickLink order/ or from *.csv file /BrickLink or Rebrickable set data/. DISCLAIMER: Use at your own risk, i decline any responsibility for anything that may happen to you using the program. DOWNLOAD: Runnable version /Windows platform/ The LDraw images used as parts images GitHub repository 2018-02-18: Add LDraw support Update db_urls.txt Upgrade GUI Improved missing image file download Fix some bugs
  15. Some questions: Is there an Blender importer that can read LDraw models? Does the importer make use of grouped instances? How is the performance when modeling in Blender? Is the framerate when editing comparable to LDCad? Would it be possible to create a library of parts as grouped instances? Thanks!
  16. I was asked to put together a tutorial on rendering LDraw-produced models in POV-Ray in as clear and simple a way as possible. Although the following might seem a bit lengthy, I have tried to keep it clear, which is what caused it require a lot of explanation. I plan on updating things and changing things as time goes on and as people give me their input, so as to create a useful guide for everyone here on Eurobricks. NOTE: To give an idea of how long these images can take to render, I will be adding the render time of each image to the tutorial. As I don't rely on POV-Ray's anti-aliasing, I have rendered each image at 2880x1620 with AA set to off, and then crop and resize the image afterwards. For computer spec comparisons, I use an Intel Core i5 running at 2.67 GHz, with 4GB of RAM running at 1333 MHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 with 1GB of RAM. I'm also using POV-Ray 3.7, which can take advantage of more than one CPU core. Contents Introduction Requirements MLCad (including LSynth and SR 3D Builder) Special files LDView Setting up POV-Ray Rendering your model in POV-Ray (including lighting and effects) Downloads More information Version history 1. Introduction Unlike LEGO’s own Digital Designer (LDD), which can currently only output an image of exactly what you can see within the LDD window, LEGO models created using LDraw can be turned into high-quality and, in some cases, photo-realistic images. This brief tutorial covers some of the basics of converting files created in LDraw and other compatible programs into something that looks almost real. As an example throughout this guide, I will be using a model I made in MLCad of the tipper from 4201 Loader and Tipper, which can be found here. 2. Requirements Regarding operating system, I currently use Windows 7, so this tutorial will be written to mainly accommodate Windows users, and I shall assume you are using a 32-bit version of Windows with the default installation path for LDraw. For anyone using a 64-bit version, when referencing folder paths please use “C:\Program Files (x86)” instead of “C:\Program Files”. Firstly, if you do not have it installed already, you need to install the LDraw All-In-One Installer, which contains the following programs required for this tutorial: The LDraw parts library MLCad, used for building the models LSynth [optional], a system for building flexible parts within MLCad LDView, used for converting models into a POV-Ray file LGEO, a parts library built specifically for POV-Ray POV-Ray, a ray-tracer that can render 3D models in high-quality You can find the installer here: http://www.ldraw.org/ This will install everything within the "C:\Program Files\LDRAW" folder, although POV-Ray will get its own installation folder. More information on this installer can be found at http://www.holly-woo...w/aioi1-en.html At the moment, the installer seems to install POV-Ray 3.6, but if you're using a computer with multiple CPUs then it would be worth downloading and installing beta version 3.7, as this can make use of more than one CPU. This can be downloaded from http://www.povray.org/beta/ and is installed in the Program Files folder, but installs the "ini" and "include" files in your My Documents folder. Although it's still in beta, I've had no issues when using this to render images. 3. MLCad MLCad is a user-interface for the LDraw system, and makes it easier to create virtual LEGO models than hand-coding the location of each piece. It’s not as straight-forward to use as LEGO Digital Designer, but the parts list contains a greater number of “older” pieces, you ultimately have complete control over brick placement as LDD-style collision is ignored, and (if you’re feeling adventurous) you can even recreate LEGO elements yourself, if they have not been created already, and submit them to the LDraw parts lists. It is missing a number of more recent parts, but new elements are always being submitted and can be downloaded and installed fairly easily. There are many excellent tutorials on how to use MLCad, so I won’t cover that here. However, there are a few settings within MLCad that I use that you may find useful. Firstly, under Settings → General → Change... and then on the Step, Grid, Snap tab, I set the values as below: The coarse settings are left at MLCad’s default setting. The medium settings are changed to 1 unit per step, and the rotation angle is set to mimic the rotation of the new-style locking hinge pieces, which can be set at angles of 22.5 degrees. 11.25 degrees gives you slightly more freedom when using the old-style hinge pieces, but the correct angle is easily set for the locking hinges, which can be reproduced in sets of two rotations. Finally, the fine settings are set very low, so that I can accurately place items that have been rotated. Of course, if you find MLCad’s default settings enough, then they can be left as they are. I then set up the parts tree to something more useable, under Settings → Parts Tree → Tree Configuration…, although this can be quite time-consuming and if you accidentally reset the tree you cannot easily get the settings back, as the information is stored in your computer's registry. For ease of use, I have created a group file that automatically adds the values for you, an explanation of which is available in the “Downloads” section. 3.1. LSynth If this is installed alongside MLCad, it will allow you to render flexible elements, such as hoses, and store these within your LDR and MPD files. It has a bit of a learning curve (pun not intended), but once you’ve got the hang of it, it can really improve models that contain flexible parts. A modest example of what it can do can be found here in a Technic model that I’ve rendered. A good guide can also be found at http://www.holly-woo...utorial-en.html 3.2. SR 3D Builder A lot of people use SR 3D Builder as an alternative to MLCad, as it uses a system that is a little more like LDD. It uses a file format called L3B, which is essentially the LDraw format but with a bit more functionality. These files can also be opened within LDView, but certain special elements created within SR 3D Builder (such as rubber hoses) cannot be displayed using LDView, and therefore cannot be exported to POV-Ray for rendering. As far as I’m aware, SR 3D Builder does not recognise the LSynth library of parts. 4. Special files There are a few special files that are installed with the All-In-One installer which need some adjusting before rendering your model in POV-Ray. LGEO.xml This file contains all of the colour and element definitions for when LDView is exporting a model to the POV-Ray format. The default version is missing some colours, so I have created a more complete version, which can be found in 8. Downloads. Simply replace the default version with this one, and you will have more of LDraw’s colours available to render with. This needs to be saved to “C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LDView” lg_color.inc This file is installed into LGEO's program folder, in the "lg" sub-folder. It contains definitions to all of the colours of the bricks that POV-Ray uses, as well as information on element finish (transparency, reflection, etc.). The default one does not render accurate LEGO colours, so a replacement for this one can be found in 8. Downloads. This needs to be saved to "C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LGEO\lg" 5. LDView Once you have completed your model in MLCad, open LDView and locate the model file (either an LDR or MPD file, or L3B is you have used SR 3D Builder). Depending on how good your graphics card is, you should see a representation of your model that looks better than the one shown in MLCad. As LDView also displays the LEGO logo on element studs, you can use this to check to see if they are set to your desired rotation, as this will carry through to the POV-Ray render. Settings-wise, there is little that needs tweaking here, as it is mainly just for visual effect. However, you can set a better default angle, as LDView’s default is more top-down than the default one in MLCad, and when you export the model to POV-Ray, it will use the angle you currently have your model rotated to. Select View → Viewing Angles → Specify latitude/longitude, and enter your desired values. As I said, I like the default MLCad 3D angle, so I use latitude 23 and longitude 45, although latitude 30 works well with some long, low models, such as cars. Click OK and then go back to View → Viewing Angles and then click Save Current as Default. Now, when you open any model within LDView, it will always be initially displayed at this angle. The model I will be using as it appears within LDView: Render time: N/A 5.1. Exporting to a .pov file Now that you have your file open in LDView, click File → Export. This will bring up a dialog box which allows you to specify where you wish to save the exported file. It also has a button called Options..., which allows you to define various parameters. This is where you can set the aspect ratio for your render, and gives you some specific options: 5:4, 4:3, 3:2, 5:3, 16:9 and 2.35:1. I tend to go with 16:9, as that’s the ratio that modern widescreen TVs and monitors tend to use. It’s important that you remember which one you use, as you will need to set up another file in POV-Ray to account for this. There are a few other options to choose from here, and I use the ones shown below: Once you’ve chosen your settings, click OK and then from the Export window click Save. This will create a .pov file at your chosen location, using your chosen file name (by default this is the filename of the model you were looking at in LDView). 6. Setting up POV-Ray 6.1. Image resolution presets The first thing to set up is the file that contains the default resolution presets. If you are using POV-Ray 3.6, this will be located within the “C:\Program Files (x86)\POV-Ray for Windows v3.6\renderer” folder and will be called “quickres.ini”, and this cannot be edited from here, so you may need to copy the file to your desktop first and then open it from there. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.7, this can be edited within the program itself, as it stores it in you user area, so you can just open POV-Ray and select Tools → Edit resolution INI file. Open this file with a text editor and you should be able to see a list of screen resolutions, listed in this format: [1280x1024, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=1024 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 The first line is the name of the preset, and this is displayed in a drop-down box within POV-Ray. The following lines are the actual settings themselves. Copy and paste one of these settings to another location in this file, so we can create a new preset. You can leave both Antialias and Antialias_Threshold alone, as these are best left at default. If you wish to create an image that matches the aspect ratio set within LDView, this is where you set it. As I prefer to render in 16:9, then I need to make a width and height that matches this. So, for example, an image that is 1280 pixels in width must be 720 pixels in height, so you need to change this for your new preset, resulting in something like this: [1280x720 16:9, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=720 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 I add the 16:9 comment to the preset’s title, just to make it easier to see the ratio. If you’ve had to edit this from your desktop, then just copy it back to the original location. 6.2. POV-Ray INI file (3.7 only) This file is the one that contains the paths to the LGEO pieces that POV-Ray utilizes in rendering. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.6 it should already have the right paths in it. However, if you’ve manually installed the POV-Ray 3.7 beta, then it needs to be set up. Open POV-Ray and go to Tools → Edit master POVRAY.INI, and this should open the file within a text editor. At the bottom of the file, you need to insert three lines to ensure that POV-Ray can locate the right files. These are: Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\ar" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\lg" Don’t forget that if you’re using a 64-bit operating system to make sure that the path uses "C:\Program Files (x86)".
  17. Guide: create build instructions with LPub This is a guide to making your own instructions with LPub. There is a: Short Guide Walks through the basics of producing a set of instructions. Full Guide Provides more details on the main steps for making instructions and explains the main features of LPub. User's discussion You are encouraged to ask questions, provide constructive criticisms and suggest proposals to improve this guide and suit it to users' needs. This guide will be updated over time to reflect the frequently asked questions. A complete guide to using LPub can be found here. List of recent topics that are related with LPub and build instructions: Instruction Miner vs. LPub (-> Go) MLCad: hiding parts in instruction step but showing in BOM (-> Go) LPub and MPD Files (-> Go) Help to create digital instructions for a physical MOC (-> Go) LPub not showing my main assembly (-> Go) Better building instructions than LDD? (-> Go) Problem with MLCad and Lpub (-> Go) LPub tree step - how? (-> Go) ... Credits - Thanks to Kevin Clague, the creator of LPub. - Thanks to Jaco van der Molen for his complete LPub guide. Note: This guide was prepared using a Mac. There may be minor differences for the Windows version of LPub.
  18. I've just discovered an issue with instructions I have been making. I use LDraw/MLCad to design models, and then LPub4/3D to produce instructions, but have found that one specific part (26603 Tile 2x3) is not showing up in the BOM or PLI in LPub3D. The part shows up normally in LPub4, while in LPub3D (which I need in order to split BOM across pages) it is showing only in assembly images and is absent from PLI and BOM. Can anyone shed light on this issue for me? Is anyone else having the same problem with this part?
  19. It looks like the LDraw official parts library doesn't contain any of the Mixels-type parts that contain a towball socket (e.g. 14418, 14419, 14704) even though unofficial parts have been in there for close to 4 years now. Has anyone done any MOCs in LDraw using these unofficial parts? Any problems? I ask because the one time I tried installing unofficial parts I somehow messed up my parts library so badly that I had to reinstall LDraw entirely, so I am wary. Also, looking at the review comments for the unofficial parts, it looks like the part editors reeeally hate these sockets for some reason. Anyone know why that might be? These parts are dead useful.
  20. Hi folks, has anyone investigated what font was used for the old Technic logo: http://logos.wikia.com/wiki/Lego_Technic Unfortunately sites such as https://www.whatfontis.com/ didn't come up with a suitable result. Knowing the font type would help enormously converting the logo into a LDraw pattern. Thanks, Willy LDraw Content Manager
  21. I am pleased to share with all of you a brand new Ldraw-based digital designer for iPad that I have spent many hours over the past few years on! Masonry is a 3D brick creation app with access to Ldraw's 5000 part library and it supports freeform editing and step creation. I've got a video of it in action, and you can see more details at my website: https://masonryapp.com Thanks!
  22. BrickUtils NB: starting from october, 2015, this software become unmaintained. Sorry for that, but my time is limited and I don't see reasons to put effort in a project with really few users. From now on no updates, no bugfixes and no support. BrickUtils is an utility for builders that use LEGO Digital Designer and LDraw-compatible CAD for designing models. The main problem that BrickUtils tries to solve is the answer at the question: can I build this model with bricks I own? So, with BrickUtils you can quickly build your brick catalog and check if you can build a model. You can also export list of bricks you can buy on BrickLink, to complete your brick collection. Program main window Example of exported bill of material (HTML, printable) This thread holds all you need to know about BrickUtils Feature list: Imports LDD project file (LXF or LXFML) Imports BrickLink set inventory, store inventory, order inventory Imports LDraw file format (MPD or LDR) Manage your collection of bricks, sets and bulk lots Display brick shape in 3D (from LDraw part library) Checks if you can build a model (from LDD, LDraw or a BrickLink set) against your brick catalog, and helps you to find alternate bricks Exports BrickLink "Wanted Mass Upload" XML file, to buy bricks on BrickLink Exports lists in printable HTML to helps pick bricks from your collection (a bill of materials) Exports wanted lists in user-defined format via templates (see manual) New releases check at startup Database update via Internet Imports and exports your bricks and sets catalog in XML format, for backup and upgrades Faster full text search in BrickLink and LDraw databases “Can Build?” function now includes an “export” button to create a wanted mass upload file from missing bricks, accepted by BrickLink Complete user manual (PDF, english and italian) Program is totally free, Open Source (GPLv3 license), coded in Java, and do not needs any other program to run. Available on SourceForge: Program page on SourceForge User manual (english) User manual (italian) Python version remain as history, and will not receive updates. There is a mailing list and a complete manual. Let me know what do you think about BrickUtils! Thank you.
  23. Hi everyone, may be you can help me: I am looking for the new LEGO Boost parts for LDD or LDraw. I would like to start with some projects and it looks like, there is no update available. Any ideas what i can do? Thanks, Michael
  24. Hello LEGO® fans, I like to post my latest research test. I started 2014 with Modo and LDRaw and passed my ideas and results to Nicolas 'SCRUBS' Jarraud, the french genius who gave us Mecabricks, and he developed a very nice Blender addon what gives us access to high-end renderings out of the box. A long time I ignored Blender but since last year we switched to this impressive open source application for my animation studio pipeline. Therefore I started to learn Blender and it's worth any minute because this is really a serious competitor for all other commercial 3d applications. Just the fact that Blender is a 108MB ZIP archive and starts in a second makes it very special. It has everything you need for animation and visual effects. I am not a Blender professional yet because I am running my studio as a CEO and actually I started an upcoming professorship at a private university. And I have a family with two kids. So it's a miracle that I am posting here. :-D Rendering Digital LEGO® is my personal project called Renderbricks what brought back all my passion for 3d. I wished the day had 48 hours. Due to my activities with Renderbricks I try to post constantly work starting with Facebook, updating flickr, posting on Twitter and adding to ArtStation to get as much attention and followers as possible. This is a time consuming process what needs a lot of patience and energy to keep the project running. And three years later now I will have a call with The LEGO Group next week because an Innovation Director is interested in my work. I am excited. :-) With Renderbricks I am also in touch with a lot of nice people. Actually a programmer is developing a Modo importer for LDRaw what looks very promising. I am also in chat with GitHub user TobyLobster who developed ImportLdraw for Blender. This addon is really fantastic. And I have a lot of contacts to MOC designer but of course I can't render everything. Researching LEGO® never ends. Here's another stress test with Blender. And I am impressed again about this open source software what beats most commercial competitiors in many aspects. This amazing LEGO® ISD Aggressor model by Matthew 'raskolnikov' Benner has 14.531 parts with instances and 56.489.080 triangles in Blender. The scene size is compressed saved only 91.306 MB. The render size is 15.360 x 8.640 pixel (15K). CPU Render time on a Dual Xeon 12 core is 2h 13min only with the latest Blender build and the Denoiser. This is really insanely fast. The key here is the new Denoiser technology in the latest 2.79 release what helps to keep samples low at 64 in Branched Path mode. The performance of the Blender scene is amazing. Compared to Modo much faster overall. No refresh issues. Real time handling here on my DELL with GTX 780. Fast loading and saving. And here all bricks have real bevels. In Modo they use a rounded edge shader. I guess the plastic material needs a bit more SSS because the Modo results look a bit better actually. I have ordered two GTX 1080Ti Founder's Edition to speed this up :-) Here you can download a wallpaper for your specific screen. Click on the picture and click again too zoom at 100% to enjoy the 15K details.
  25. I'm in the middle of learning Blender, but I stumbled upon Poliigon and was blown away. I'd really like something to aspire to once I've got a grasp on the basics, so has anyone tried applying a Poliigon texture to a Lego render of any sort?