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Found 89 results

  1. Please read the guidelines! GUIDELINES Type the number, name and theme of the model (I prefer Brickset themes) at the top of your post. This topic only makes sense if you give a link to your model, so other people can download it Put a picture of the virtual model in your post. Say if there are errors, if there are, tell what the errors are. Not too big pictures, please follow the EuroBricks guidelines. One set in one file. So not one set in 2 files, or 2 sets in file. The set should be build using the original instructions. Exporting models from ldd is forbidden unless you have the permission from the original author. Pleas do check everything very, very carful (also the inside of the model), because the export is not very accurate. Models like Montly Mini Builds or Club models are allowed. software files/programs that are allowed MLcad SR3D Builder Leocad Bricksmith BrickDraw 3D LDCad
  2. As suggested by papacharly, here's a topic about LDcad to discuss and help each other. What is LDcad? LDcad is an LDraw cad program being developed by Roland Melkert. The current version is 1.4, which can be downloaded here. For more information about LDCad, visit the website (and make sure to read the quick manual!). The features are (copy/pasted from the website): Windows and Linux support. Multi-threaded (background) loading of parts. Fast detailed real-time 3D rendering. Basic part snapping on growing collection of (official) parts. Integrated portable flexible parts support (springs, hoses, bands). Script based animation. Full MPD Support. Part grouping. Part ghosting. Nested editing. Relative grids. Multiple file editing (open as many files you like). Instruction stepping support. Full undo/redo. Copy/paste from to other LDraw software. Highly customizable part and color bins. Growing collection of example models. From my own experience, LDcad is quite difficult for beginners and can be quite unintuituve. This may sounds harsh, but it is (from my experience at least). But, if you get through the difficult part, a wonderdful piece of software is available to you and when you know to do, it's actually quite easy. Almost as easy as LDD (if we use that as a benchmark for easiness). It feels a bit like SR3D builder, but it doesn't have the user-friendly way of animation. It doesn have other nice features. It's really worth to take a look at! Roland is most active on the LDraw forums, so if you want to directly talk with him, I recommend going here. Of course, you can post all comments, questions and disscustions regarding LDcad in this topic too. So, this is the topic on EB to talk about LDCad [continuation from the LDraw sets topic] LDcad is quite nice. I've been using it for the past few weeks and I'm quite happy with it. Btw, make sure to turn on part-snapping if you haven't already, in my experience it makes building a lot easier. I just tried to find this setting, but I can't find it anymore. Maybe it's turned on by default nowadays, I can remember I had to set it on... Oh, and if you set Anti Aliassing on the edges on (AA), it makes the view a lot better
  3. Hi everyone, may be you can help me: I am looking for the new LEGO Boost parts for LDD or LDraw. I would like to start with some projects and it looks like, there is no update available. Any ideas what i can do? Thanks, Michael
  4. I propose to keep here an up-to-date ldraw.xml, the file used by LDD to convert to and from LDraw files. Download: latest version On Windows: download and replace the one in “C:\Program Files\LEGO Company\LEGO Digital Designer\” On Mac: download and replace the one in the “Contents\Resources\” folder in the app (open “Applications” in Finder, right click on the “LEGO Digital Designer” package and select the “Show Package Contents” option to explore the pakage folders). (Thanks manglegrat!) If you have other modifications or additions, post them here or send me a personal message and I’ll include them to the benefit of all. If you need a part, feel free to ask here and I’ll try to add it (provided it exists in LDraw and LDD). History and Contents It’s based upon gallaghersart’s latest version (see this thread). It includes the modifications shutterfreak published in his thread. It uses some of the LDraw unofficial parts (mainly for new parts in LDD Brick version 2075). It includes some name corrections (because LDraw renamed or moved some parts, added new variants, etc.). I tried to more accurately convert the colors (now mainly according to Ryan Howerter’s conversion table). It’s not easy because all sources (Swooshable, Mecabricks, Ryan) don’t agree, and there are holes and overlaps. But as these differences, holes, and overlaps occur for rare colors or colors that aren’t available in LDD, it should be okay. In a megalomaniacal way, all the entries I have modified have an “SLS” at the end of their heading comments. New entries have an “SLS” at the front of the comments. So it’s easy to know when to blame me. As of 2016-09-16 and the big overhaul, I assume all the errors. Know Limitations As of LDD 4.3.9, flex parts (hoses) are not exported anymore (even unflexed). Minifig arms and hands are not connected in LDraw. I don’t know whose geometry is off (both?) but the shapes differ a lot. At least, hands are correctly connected to whatever they clip and arms are correctly placed in their sockets and somewhat wrap around the hands’s stems. Some variants are not recognized by LDD (e.g. clips, or tiles with/without groove, etc.) In those cases, I prefer to use the most recent variant in LDraw as it generally is easier to find and cheaper. Sometimes, several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part. Sometimes, the transformation is accurate for one variant but not for another. For example, the Flag 2 x 2 is known to LDD as 2335, 11055, and 60779, but LDraw only has the 2335 variant. 2335 and 60779 use the same transformation but 11055 is vertically offset. I preferred to badly convert 11055 to 2335 rather than not convert it at all or badly convert 2335 and 60779. ldraw.xml is used both ways (LDD to/from LDraw). It’s not something I do frequently (too many resulting collisions) so it’s not well tested. One problem I can see is that, when several LDD parts correspond to a unique LDraw part, the conversion that’s listed last is the one that will be used. The reverse (first written is the one used) is true for assemblies that use the same subparts, in the same quantity (like electric cables). A lot of LDraw parts are simply wrong. Almost all the parts that combine System (studs and anti-studs) and Technic (pins and axles, and their holes) are wrong in that they assume the technic holes are at the same height than side studs (on the picture below, the circles are concentric). LDD assumes the holes are 0.2 mm (0.5 LDU) higher. In ABS, the holes are 0.12 mm (0.375 LDU) higher (dixit Jamie Berard in his famous presentation). In order to limit the number and magnitude of errors, LDD is considered to be right. How to write a new transformation for a part in ldraw.xml What? ldraw.xml is an XML file that defines how LDD can export to (or import from) LDraw files. It does so by defining a match between the part’s IDs and how to rotate and translate the part from one geometry to the other. Matches are defined by “Brick” XML elements. For example, this one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 that it knows as 3005 is also known to LDraw as 3005: <Brick ldraw="3005.dat" lego="3005" /> (Note the “.dat” in the ldraw ID.) Matches are not needed if the part IDs are the same: the transformation element is sufficient for LDD to know the part exists. (So the example above is useless ) Rotations and translations are defined by “Transformation” XML elements. This one says to LDD that the Brick 1x1 just needs to be moved up: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> The translation (tx, ty, and tz) is in centimeters (0.8 cm is the width of a brick, 0.96 cm its height). The rotation is given by its axis (the line passing through and ), and its angle in radians. And all the coordinates are in the direct (“riht-handed”), Y points up, coordinates system of LDD. The transformation explains what should be done to import from LDraw besides changing the axes (LDD’s Y is up and XYZ is a direct basis, LDraw’s Y is down and XYZ is an indirect basis; so changing the axes only means changing the sign of Y). So, in an LDD to LDraw point of view, the transformation is reversed: it says what happens to a part if you don’t do anything to its coordinates besides changing the sign of Y. In other words, the opposite transformation has to be applied to the LDD coordinates of the part in order to get the LDraw coordinates (with Y reversed). Why? Each part has an orientation (which way up? which way left?) and a center, point of origin, or reference point (we’ll use “reference point” from now on). But LDD and LDraw don’t always agree. To know the orientation and reference point in LDD, insert the part without rotating it nor attaching it to any other part. It will be aligned along the scene’s axes (LDD’s axes). The reference point is near the mouse pointer’s head. To know the orientation and reference point in LDraw, I find LeoCAD the easiest tool: just select the part and its axes are drawn (X red, Y green, Z blue), starting at its reference point. Okay, LeoCAD’s «X, Y, Z» is LDraw’s «X, -Z, Y» but what’s another little change of basis? Sometimes, their disagreement is trivial. For example, for the simple 1x1 brick (3005), both LDD and LDraw agree: the stud is on top and the reference point is on the vertical line going through the center of the stud. But they differ for the height at which the reference point should be: LDD says it’s at the base of the brick, LDraw at its top (but at the base of the stud). (On every picture, X will be red, Y green, and Z blue.) So the transformation for that part is straightforward: if the LDraw part is imported as is, with only Y reversed, it will end up 0.96 cm (the height of the brick) higher than it should. So we have to lower it by 0.96 cm: <Transformation ldraw="3005.dat" tx="0" ty="-.96" tz="0" ax="1" ay="0" az="0" angle="0" /> Sometimes, their disagreement is more profound and the transformation is therefore more complicated. For example, for the musket (Minifig Gun Musket 2561), LDD puts the reference point in the handle and “up” means the handle is vertical but LDraw puts the reference point in the barrel and “up” means the barrel is vertical. Even more, the stock is on the wrong side, so X and Z are different too. With an identity transformation, the part is rotated by an eighth of a turn (X to Y) (π/4) around the Z axis to put the barrel vertical, and then by a quarter turn (X to Z) (-π/2) around the Y axis. After that, it has been translated up and horizontally. After calculations (see below), we’ll end up with this transformation: <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> How? So, how do we find the right values to have the correct transformations? What’s the ID? Having the right part Check the ID of the part in LDD. Check the ID of the part in LDraw. Beware of variants, LDraw uses a letter suffix (a, b, c…) where LDD totally changes the ID or keeps the same ID for new variants. Don’t hesitate to look on BrickLink for the part ID: BrickLink keeps a list of alternate IDs (when the same part has several IDs) and links to variants and notes. If the IDs are the same. Nothing to do. If the IDs differ. We add a Brick element: <Brick ldraw="123a.dat" lego="456" /> Don’t forget the “.dat”! That was the easy part. Which way is up? Finding the rotation axis and angle We start in LDD. Up is Y, or Y is up. X and Z are a bit harder to see on the LDD scene unless you use LDD’s developper mode (which has the LDD axes drawn at «0,0,0» as red X, green Y, and blue Z lines). Or, if you’re sure you didn’t move the camera in a brand new model/file, X is pointing bottom right, and Z bottom left. We place our part among other parts that we know will be correctly converted (like 1x1 plates, or harpoons ) to have references. Using different colors greatly helps! We export to LDraw… … and look at the results: We decompose the transformation in multiple simple rotations, around the X, Y, or Z axis. If it has been turned around X, a quarter turn from Y to Z is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Z, a quarter turn from X to Y is a positive π/2 angle. If it has been turned around Y, a quarter turn from Z to X is a positive π/2 angle. To make it short, it’s a direct (right-handed) basis. If you can’t figure out the problems with an existing transformation, “clear” it by using an identity transformation: <transformation tx="0" ty="0 tz="0" ax="0" ay="1" az="0 angle="0"/> (All zeroes but one of the a_ which is 1.) You can try each simple rotation one by one to be sure of their angles (especially their signs ). Beware, combining rotations change their axes (e.g. turning around first X then Y is equivalent to turning around first Y then Z). So if you check that the Y rotation is okay, then the X rotation, don’t forget to combine them as Y then Z. For the musket, we need two rotations: an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z (blue) axis that puts the barrel vertical, and then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis. Or we can first make the quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y (green) axis, and then an eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the X (red) axis. Remember, “import”-wise, we’re trying to find what should happen to the part in the LDD scene to be like the LDraw one, with the LDD axes (the harpoons ). My head is turning. Combining rotations If more than one simple rotation is needed, we have to combine them. For that, we’ll use quaternions. Eh come back! That’s not that difficult! A quaternion q can be written as q = a + b.i + c.j + d.k, where i² = j² = k² = i.j.k = -1 (so i.j = k = -j.i, j.k = i = -k.j, k.i = j = -i.k). a is the real part, b.i + c.j + d.k is the imaginary part. A rotation by the angle angle around the axis «ax, ay, az» is the quaternion q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) Do note the 1/2 factor on the angle! To combine two rotations, we just multiply their quaternions and apply the rules above to end up with a a + b.i + c.j + d.k form (or, more accurately, a C + S.(ax.i + ay.j + az.k) form, where C and S are cosine and sine of the same angle and ax² + ay² + az² = 1 ). If we rotate first by q and then by p, the result is the rotation by p.q. Note the order: q then p is p.q. Multiplication is not commutative with quaternions: if you do it the wrong way, you’ll end up with the correct values but the wrong signs. There’re lots of fun to have with quaternions and rotations as quaternions. But what is said here is sufficient for our purposes. An example: Most of the times, we do π/2 rotations (quarter turns, 90°). angle = π/2 therefore cos(angle/2) = sin(angle/2) = cos(π/4) = sin(π/4) = √2/2; So, for a “horizontal” quarter turn (yaw, around Y): q = √2/2 + √2/2.j (as j/Y is the “vertical” axis). Let’s combine it with a half turn (π, 180°) around the X axis (IOW, upside-down): cos(π/2) = 0, sin(π/2) = 1, so p = 0 + i p.q = (0 + i) . (√2/2 + √2/2 j) = √2/2 i + √2/2 i.j = 0 + √2/2 ( i + k ) Now, let’s get the resulting angle: The real part of p.q, 0, is the cosine of angle/2. 0 is also the cosine of ±π/2 (±90°). Therefore, the resulting angle is π (180°). Now the axis, «ax, ay, az»: It’s the √2/2( i + k) imaginary part. That’s the vector «√2/2, 0, √2/2». We need to remove the sin(angle/2) factor. That’s easy as the sine of π/2 is 1. So our axis is «ax = √2/2, ay = 0, az = √2/2». Written in ldraw.xml: ax="0.707…" ay="0" az="0.707…" angle="3.1415…" Another one, a quarter turn around Y and then around X: q = √2/2 + √2/2 j = √2/2 (1 + j) p = √2/2 + √2/2 i = √2/2 (1 + i) p.q = 1/2 (1 + i) (1 + j) = 1/2 + 1/2 (i + j + k) We rewrite it as p.q = 1/2 + √3/2 (√⅓ i + √⅓ j + √⅓ k) to have a unit vector (ax² + ay² + az² = 1) in the parenthesis and to clarify the cosine and sine: 1/2 and √3/2. They are the sine and cosine of π/3 (60°). Therefore, the resulting angle is 2π/3 (120°). In ldraw.xml: ax="0.577…" ay="0.577…" az="0.577…" angle="2.094…" Back to our musket: An eighth of a turn (π/4, 45°) around the Z axis that puts the barrel vertical: q = cos(π/8) + sin(π/8).i = C + S.k Then a quarter turn (-π/2, -90°) around the Y axis: p = cos(-π/4) + sin(-π/4).j = √2/2 (1 - j) p.q = √2/2.(1 - j)(C + S.k) = √2/2.(C - S.j.k - C.j + S.k) = √2/2.C + (-√2/2.S.i - √2/2.C.j + √2/2.S.k) Wow! Hum, okay. So √2/2.cos(-π/8) is the cosine of half our angle. Get the calculator out… angle/2 = Acos(√2/2.cos(-π/8)) = 0.8589 Our angle is 1.7178. We “remove” the sine of angle/2 from our vector, so that p.q = cos(angle/2) + sin(angle/2).(ax.i + ay.j + az.k): ax = -√2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.3574 ay = -√2/2.cos(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = -0.8629 az = √2/2.sin(-π/8) / sin(0.8589) = 0.3574 As an exercise, you can verify that ax² + ay² + az² = 1. So we did it right! Et voilà: ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016" One step to the left. Getting the translation right Now that the part is correctly oriented, it may need to be moved. The translation is in centimeters (cm). 20 LDU = 0.8 cm. Values are often multiples of 0.4 (half a stud) for tx and tz and multiples of 0.32 (height of a plate) for ty. Other, finer, tunings are often in multiples of 0.008. If the rotation is complex, all bets are off In LDD, we try to place the part so that its LDraw up axis ends up up in the scene, and we try to align its LDraw X and Z axes with X and Z of the scene (at least, that it is not rotated by a weird angle). That way, moving the part along its axes is also moving the part along the scene’s axes. It will be easier for getting the translation right. For our musket, that means the barrel up. (I didn’t align the X and Z axes here because, yeah, I’m a warrior, I don’t need that. Besides, you’ll see what happens because of that. ) Again, I find it easier in LeoCAD: the key bindings, the coordinates clearly shown in the status bar, etc. The thing is, LeoCAD uses a direct Z up basis. So if you move «dx, dy, dz» in LeoCAD, you’re moving «dx, -dz, dy» in LDD (and vice versa). Confusing? Noooh. Anyway, choose your own poison but beware of its little quirks. To help fine tuning, using transparent colors greatly helps, especially for clip-bar connections. Now, we note the coordinates of our part in our LDraw editor and move it so that it ends up the way it should. We look how much we moved it. That’s it! Just convert it to cm (= LDU × 0.8 / 20) and we have our translation. Well, mostly, the signs are wrong. Remember: the transformation is what should happen to the LDD part to end up like the LDraw part, we just did the opposite and moved the LDraw part to be like the LDD one. Besides the signs, if you didn’t correctly align the axes, you’ll have to find which is which For our musket, we need to go up and sligthly to the “left” (from bottom right to upper left when your LDraw view is oriented as a new LDD file, as are all the screenshots here). That means negative dy and dx. But as the part is not aligned on X and Z (but still not badly rotated), the negative dx becomes a positive dz. Et voilà! <Transformation ldraw="2561.dat" tx="0" ty="-1.72" tz="0.336" ax="-0.3574067443365933" ay="-0.8628562094610169" az="0.3574067443365933" angle="1.7177715174584016"/> (So, okay. I had to try first tx then tz, both negative and positive, before I found the right one. But I didn’t want to have to remake the pictures! There: I’m not a warrior, I’m just lazy.)
  5. Hello LEGO® fans, I like to post my latest research test. I started 2014 with Modo and LDRaw and passed my ideas and results to Nicolas 'SCRUBS' Jarraud, the french genius who gave us Mecabricks, and he developed a very nice Blender addon what gives us access to high-end renderings out of the box. A long time I ignored Blender but since last year we switched to this impressive open source application for my animation studio pipeline. Therefore I started to learn Blender and it's worth any minute because this is really a serious competitor for all other commercial 3d applications. Just the fact that Blender is a 108MB ZIP archive and starts in a second makes it very special. It has everything you need for animation and visual effects. I am not a Blender professional yet because I am running my studio as a CEO and actually I started an upcoming professorship at a private university. And I have a family with two kids. So it's a miracle that I am posting here. :-D Rendering Digital LEGO® is my personal project called Renderbricks what brought back all my passion for 3d. I wished the day had 48 hours. Due to my activities with Renderbricks I try to post constantly work starting with Facebook, updating flickr, posting on Twitter and adding to ArtStation to get as much attention and followers as possible. This is a time consuming process what needs a lot of patience and energy to keep the project running. And three years later now I will have a call with The LEGO Group next week because an Innovation Director is interested in my work. I am excited. :-) With Renderbricks I am also in touch with a lot of nice people. Actually a programmer is developing a Modo importer for LDRaw what looks very promising. I am also in chat with GitHub user TobyLobster who developed ImportLdraw for Blender. This addon is really fantastic. And I have a lot of contacts to MOC designer but of course I can't render everything. Researching LEGO® never ends. Here's another stress test with Blender. And I am impressed again about this open source software what beats most commercial competitiors in many aspects. This amazing LEGO® ISD Aggressor model by Matthew 'raskolnikov' Benner has 14.531 parts with instances and 56.489.080 triangles in Blender. The scene size is compressed saved only 91.306 MB. The render size is 15.360 x 8.640 pixel (15K). CPU Render time on a Dual Xeon 12 core is 2h 13min only with the latest Blender build and the Denoiser. This is really insanely fast. The key here is the new Denoiser technology in the latest 2.79 release what helps to keep samples low at 64 in Branched Path mode. The performance of the Blender scene is amazing. Compared to Modo much faster overall. No refresh issues. Real time handling here on my DELL with GTX 780. Fast loading and saving. And here all bricks have real bevels. In Modo they use a rounded edge shader. I guess the plastic material needs a bit more SSS because the Modo results look a bit better actually. I have ordered two GTX 1080Ti Founder's Edition to speed this up :-) Here you can download a wallpaper for your specific screen. Click on the picture and click again too zoom at 100% to enjoy the 15K details.
  6. I'm in the middle of learning Blender, but I stumbled upon Poliigon and was blown away. I'd really like something to aspire to once I've got a grasp on the basics, so has anyone tried applying a Poliigon texture to a Lego render of any sort?
  7. I've just discovered an issue with instructions I have been making. I use LDraw/MLCad to design models, and then LPub4/3D to produce instructions, but have found that one specific part (26603 Tile 2x3) is not showing up in the BOM or PLI in LPub3D. The part shows up normally in LPub4, while in LPub3D (which I need in order to split BOM across pages) it is showing only in assembly images and is absent from PLI and BOM. Can anyone shed light on this issue for me? Is anyone else having the same problem with this part?
  8. Year by Year I take many lesson, when developing LICreator. But I go to this software in the end. It is written in Java. So will be platform in-depended, what is in Java technology nature. But I testing and build LDraw Instruction Visualizer only on Microsoft Windows Seven with 64 bit architecture. Source: ldivisualizer_source.zip Executable: ldivisualizer_bin.zip What this tool can do: %APPDATA% for Windows platform or User Home Directory for others as Storage Can hide | un-hide selected parts Display part description Rotate on selected axis Exports steps as single images and many more ... A use JLDraw as starting point of my journey. It is Simple LDraw models viewer, written and abandoned by Mario Pascucci in 2014 year. I try get new life to this software, and make them better... that software, I currently stop working on... for many reason. At the current level of development, this program can calmly serve as instruction player. Everyone, stay tuned for updates. EDIT 1: This software strongly depend on LDraw file format standard. If model do not have STEP command. You can see, only one step on the list. EDIT 2: LEFT BUTTON for selecting single part RIGHT BUTTON for context menu SHIFT + LEFT BUTTON for select more parts CONTROL + LEFT BUTTON for toggle section ALT + LEFT | RIGHT BUTTON for rotate all parts in currently displayed step MOUSE WHEEL for zoom out | zoom in
  9. I was asked to put together a tutorial on rendering LDraw-produced models in POV-Ray in as clear and simple a way as possible. Although the following might seem a bit lengthy, I have tried to keep it clear, which is what caused it require a lot of explanation. I plan on updating things and changing things as time goes on and as people give me their input, so as to create a useful guide for everyone here on Eurobricks. NOTE: To give an idea of how long these images can take to render, I will be adding the render time of each image to the tutorial. As I don't rely on POV-Ray's anti-aliasing, I have rendered each image at 2880x1620 with AA set to off, and then crop and resize the image afterwards. For computer spec comparisons, I use an Intel Core i5 running at 2.67 GHz, with 4GB of RAM running at 1333 MHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 with 1GB of RAM. I'm also using POV-Ray 3.7, which can take advantage of more than one CPU core. Contents Introduction Requirements MLCad (including LSynth and SR 3D Builder) Special files LDView Setting up POV-Ray Rendering your model in POV-Ray (including lighting and effects) Downloads More information Version history 1. Introduction Unlike LEGO’s own Digital Designer (LDD), which can currently only output an image of exactly what you can see within the LDD window, LEGO models created using LDraw can be turned into high-quality and, in some cases, photo-realistic images. This brief tutorial covers some of the basics of converting files created in LDraw and other compatible programs into something that looks almost real. As an example throughout this guide, I will be using a model I made in MLCad of the tipper from 4201 Loader and Tipper, which can be found here. 2. Requirements Regarding operating system, I currently use Windows 7, so this tutorial will be written to mainly accommodate Windows users, and I shall assume you are using a 32-bit version of Windows with the default installation path for LDraw. For anyone using a 64-bit version, when referencing folder paths please use “C:\Program Files (x86)” instead of “C:\Program Files”. Firstly, if you do not have it installed already, you need to install the LDraw All-In-One Installer, which contains the following programs required for this tutorial: The LDraw parts library MLCad, used for building the models LSynth [optional], a system for building flexible parts within MLCad LDView, used for converting models into a POV-Ray file LGEO, a parts library built specifically for POV-Ray POV-Ray, a ray-tracer that can render 3D models in high-quality You can find the installer here: http://www.ldraw.org/ This will install everything within the "C:\Program Files\LDRAW" folder, although POV-Ray will get its own installation folder. More information on this installer can be found at http://www.holly-woo...w/aioi1-en.html At the moment, the installer seems to install POV-Ray 3.6, but if you're using a computer with multiple CPUs then it would be worth downloading and installing beta version 3.7, as this can make use of more than one CPU. This can be downloaded from http://www.povray.org/beta/ and is installed in the Program Files folder, but installs the "ini" and "include" files in your My Documents folder. Although it's still in beta, I've had no issues when using this to render images. 3. MLCad MLCad is a user-interface for the LDraw system, and makes it easier to create virtual LEGO models than hand-coding the location of each piece. It’s not as straight-forward to use as LEGO Digital Designer, but the parts list contains a greater number of “older” pieces, you ultimately have complete control over brick placement as LDD-style collision is ignored, and (if you’re feeling adventurous) you can even recreate LEGO elements yourself, if they have not been created already, and submit them to the LDraw parts lists. It is missing a number of more recent parts, but new elements are always being submitted and can be downloaded and installed fairly easily. There are many excellent tutorials on how to use MLCad, so I won’t cover that here. However, there are a few settings within MLCad that I use that you may find useful. Firstly, under Settings → General → Change... and then on the Step, Grid, Snap tab, I set the values as below: The coarse settings are left at MLCad’s default setting. The medium settings are changed to 1 unit per step, and the rotation angle is set to mimic the rotation of the new-style locking hinge pieces, which can be set at angles of 22.5 degrees. 11.25 degrees gives you slightly more freedom when using the old-style hinge pieces, but the correct angle is easily set for the locking hinges, which can be reproduced in sets of two rotations. Finally, the fine settings are set very low, so that I can accurately place items that have been rotated. Of course, if you find MLCad’s default settings enough, then they can be left as they are. I then set up the parts tree to something more useable, under Settings → Parts Tree → Tree Configuration…, although this can be quite time-consuming and if you accidentally reset the tree you cannot easily get the settings back, as the information is stored in your computer's registry. For ease of use, I have created a group file that automatically adds the values for you, an explanation of which is available in the “Downloads” section. 3.1. LSynth If this is installed alongside MLCad, it will allow you to render flexible elements, such as hoses, and store these within your LDR and MPD files. It has a bit of a learning curve (pun not intended), but once you’ve got the hang of it, it can really improve models that contain flexible parts. A modest example of what it can do can be found here in a Technic model that I’ve rendered. A good guide can also be found at http://www.holly-woo...utorial-en.html 3.2. SR 3D Builder A lot of people use SR 3D Builder as an alternative to MLCad, as it uses a system that is a little more like LDD. It uses a file format called L3B, which is essentially the LDraw format but with a bit more functionality. These files can also be opened within LDView, but certain special elements created within SR 3D Builder (such as rubber hoses) cannot be displayed using LDView, and therefore cannot be exported to POV-Ray for rendering. As far as I’m aware, SR 3D Builder does not recognise the LSynth library of parts. 4. Special files There are a few special files that are installed with the All-In-One installer which need some adjusting before rendering your model in POV-Ray. LGEO.xml This file contains all of the colour and element definitions for when LDView is exporting a model to the POV-Ray format. The default version is missing some colours, so I have created a more complete version, which can be found in 8. Downloads. Simply replace the default version with this one, and you will have more of LDraw’s colours available to render with. This needs to be saved to “C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LDView” lg_color.inc This file is installed into LGEO's program folder, in the "lg" sub-folder. It contains definitions to all of the colours of the bricks that POV-Ray uses, as well as information on element finish (transparency, reflection, etc.). The default one does not render accurate LEGO colours, so a replacement for this one can be found in 8. Downloads. This needs to be saved to "C:\Program Files\LDRAW\LGEO\lg" 5. LDView Once you have completed your model in MLCad, open LDView and locate the model file (either an LDR or MPD file, or L3B is you have used SR 3D Builder). Depending on how good your graphics card is, you should see a representation of your model that looks better than the one shown in MLCad. As LDView also displays the LEGO logo on element studs, you can use this to check to see if they are set to your desired rotation, as this will carry through to the POV-Ray render. Settings-wise, there is little that needs tweaking here, as it is mainly just for visual effect. However, you can set a better default angle, as LDView’s default is more top-down than the default one in MLCad, and when you export the model to POV-Ray, it will use the angle you currently have your model rotated to. Select View → Viewing Angles → Specify latitude/longitude, and enter your desired values. As I said, I like the default MLCad 3D angle, so I use latitude 23 and longitude 45, although latitude 30 works well with some long, low models, such as cars. Click OK and then go back to View → Viewing Angles and then click Save Current as Default. Now, when you open any model within LDView, it will always be initially displayed at this angle. The model I will be using as it appears within LDView: Render time: N/A 5.1. Exporting to a .pov file Now that you have your file open in LDView, click File → Export. This will bring up a dialog box which allows you to specify where you wish to save the exported file. It also has a button called Options..., which allows you to define various parameters. This is where you can set the aspect ratio for your render, and gives you some specific options: 5:4, 4:3, 3:2, 5:3, 16:9 and 2.35:1. I tend to go with 16:9, as that’s the ratio that modern widescreen TVs and monitors tend to use. It’s important that you remember which one you use, as you will need to set up another file in POV-Ray to account for this. There are a few other options to choose from here, and I use the ones shown below: Once you’ve chosen your settings, click OK and then from the Export window click Save. This will create a .pov file at your chosen location, using your chosen file name (by default this is the filename of the model you were looking at in LDView). 6. Setting up POV-Ray 6.1. Image resolution presets The first thing to set up is the file that contains the default resolution presets. If you are using POV-Ray 3.6, this will be located within the “C:\Program Files (x86)\POV-Ray for Windows v3.6\renderer” folder and will be called “quickres.ini”, and this cannot be edited from here, so you may need to copy the file to your desktop first and then open it from there. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.7, this can be edited within the program itself, as it stores it in you user area, so you can just open POV-Ray and select Tools → Edit resolution INI file. Open this file with a text editor and you should be able to see a list of screen resolutions, listed in this format: [1280x1024, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=1024 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 The first line is the name of the preset, and this is displayed in a drop-down box within POV-Ray. The following lines are the actual settings themselves. Copy and paste one of these settings to another location in this file, so we can create a new preset. You can leave both Antialias and Antialias_Threshold alone, as these are best left at default. If you wish to create an image that matches the aspect ratio set within LDView, this is where you set it. As I prefer to render in 16:9, then I need to make a width and height that matches this. So, for example, an image that is 1280 pixels in width must be 720 pixels in height, so you need to change this for your new preset, resulting in something like this: [1280x720 16:9, AA 0.3] Width=1280 Height=720 Antialias=On Antialias_Threshold=0.3 I add the 16:9 comment to the preset’s title, just to make it easier to see the ratio. If you’ve had to edit this from your desktop, then just copy it back to the original location. 6.2. POV-Ray INI file (3.7 only) This file is the one that contains the paths to the LGEO pieces that POV-Ray utilizes in rendering. If you’re using POV-Ray 3.6 it should already have the right paths in it. However, if you’ve manually installed the POV-Ray 3.7 beta, then it needs to be set up. Open POV-Ray and go to Tools → Edit master POVRAY.INI, and this should open the file within a text editor. At the bottom of the file, you need to insert three lines to ensure that POV-Ray can locate the right files. These are: Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\ar" Library_Path="C:\Program Files\LDraw\LGEO\lg" Don’t forget that if you’re using a 64-bit operating system to make sure that the path uses "C:\Program Files (x86)".
  10. When producing instructions from LDraw files using LPub4 I usually use the 'Treat as Part' function for minifigures, contained as submodels within the LDraw MPD file, so that they show up as single parts in the PLI and BOM. However, I sometimes get a parse error in LPub4 when doing this, with the result that the minifigure does not get drawn in the PLI or BOM. Does anyone know what causes this error, or how to fix or avoid it?
  11. The Black Pearl Project

    LDD/MLCad 15D The Black Pearl Project - A joint venture by Courleciel and Papacharly EDIT April 1st 2015: Black Pearl mpd-file is available now. Please also note the relevant post #15 below! End of last year I had been invited by Courleciel to join a project he already started. The goal of this project was to virtually build the Black Pearl from the Lego video game “Pirates of the Caribbean” and, in a second step, to “make great renderings”. At this time the ship had already been built by Courleciel in real bricks. Starting point for this project was an “old” lxf-file (Lego Digital Designer) by captainjack. The virtual model was significantly optimized by Courleciel so as to make it more accurate and complete. A lot of parts have been repainted, some new elements were added (such as anchors, bell, grating, cannons...), and some were adjusted or rebuilt (like the capstan, figurehead, lanterns, masts...). After the model was nearly completed, the LDD file was converted to the LDraw format and my job started. According to Courleciels conceptual work I added rigging, rails, ropes and strings by using SR3D Builder and MLCad/LSynth. Sails were directly created in povray. Additionally it was necessary to manipulate some original LDraw parts (e.g. # x1609 batarang, see stern) to make them authentic with regard to the video game. Finally we decided on all setups for being rendered. All renders have status “as rendered”. There was no “photoshopping” applied, aside from scaling down and anti-aliasing. I have not counted all the hours I spent working on this project. But doing all the work Courleciel and me had a lot of fun. So we hope that you also will enjoy our work and have some fun too. High resolution “technical renders” showing the conceptual work of Courleciel can be found here. For high resolution images of the movie scenes click here. And here is the outcome of our project:: First we have some technical renders of the Black Pearl. Then we show some movie scene remakes. For all those which are not familiar with “Pirates of the Carribean”, please find the original movie scene respectively an original video game screenshot below each rendering. Here comes a remake of a video game screenshot: Two movie scenes from part 1 "The Curse of the Black Pearl": Movie scene “Pantano River” from part 2 "Dead Man’s Chest" Two movie scenes “Locker” from part 3 "At World’s End" Last but not least we have an atmospheric and maybe kitschy sunset render which is not related to any movie scene.
  12. Dear All, it has been a very long time since my last “productive” post on EB – I have been lurking ever since from time to time - but no contributions from my side. It is time to share some of the stuff that has slowly accumulated over the recent years. These are some locomotive and rolling stock ideas/MODs/MOCs. Below is a short summary of what and why; the instructions were meant to go on the RailBricks repository but that seems to be no longer an option. Instead, I am using my cloud space at work; a click on the link below the images should get you to a corresponding folder with the MLCad/LDraw file(s) and the LPub instruction PDF(s). Note that there are 300DPI as well as low-res versions of the PDF files; the latter are much more bandwidth friendly. Also note that there may be numerous errors/faults – I am using these files as references and aid for my rather limited building capabilities. Generally, I am building in a rather weird way, I guess. Most of the parts I am using, particularly for rolling stock, are spare parts from LEGO sets I got as present or simply purchased for other parts. Rarely the sets I am buying survive as a whole. It may also be an excuse to regularly visit the local TrU or LEGO stores nearby … for some reason it is still very exciting to me to browse through their shelves – that is also the reason for not ordering sets or parts online that often. There are exceptions of course. BrickLink is more of a last (and beautiful) resort. I have simply more fun figuring out ways of using individual pieces that initially appeared to be useless even for a longer time. Also, I hardly use scaled schematics for building – it is just my personal look and feel that should be “right”. So all my models may well appear as inaccurate or unrealistic in some way or the other – but they are just that: LEGO MOCs and MODs … and I am sure, that many building ideas have already been shown – either here on EB, in the various BrickShelf galleries, or somewhere else. I have not checked thoroughly though – just let me know and I’ll add the references. There are currently no photographs of the real trains. I am planning on taking these along with some impressions of my expanded “home office layout” – hopefully sooner than in a couple of years from now. This a rather long post, I am sorry. But I simply did not want to open several threads on rather minor things. Locomotives/Trains 1) GP38 “BNSF” (#10133) MOD LDraw file(s) and PDF instruction(s) I personally believe that the BNSF GP38 is one of the most inspiring train models TLC ever made. It appears as if many builders have modded, extended, and (re)designed their models based – at least partly – on the layout of this engine. I have also merged some of the beautiful design elements from the SD40-2 “Maersk” train (set #10219; these are the cab lights, front section, truck elements with new discrete brick/plate pilot design) along with a new frame comprised of discrete plates, re-bricked the fuel tanks, and added front PF lights. The concept of powering the locomotive is either pure “9V” or “PF”. A PF version requires a controller of some sort; either custom approaches (e.g., Arduino) or plain vanilla PF controllers/batteries located in separate cars etc. When running on its own with onboard battery and controller, the color scheme suffers severely on the 4-wide body section of the locomotive, which could be covered by custom stickers of course. The modified SD40-2 “Maersk” train introduced further below may also serve for “controlling” purpose. On my layout an SD40-2/GP38 pair is hauling rather heavy loads: The SD40-2 as PF controller with onboard battery and two motors and the GP38 with just one additional motor hooked up to the SD40-2. The V2 version of the PF receiver is handling 3 motors rather flawlessly when fed with the rechargeable LEGO LiPo battery. The required building steps are included in the SD40-2 instruction section, see below. 2) SD40-2 “Maersk” (#10219) MOD LDraw file(s) and PDF instruction(s) The major SD40-2 changes are the discrete plate frame (this way it became possible to add the neat white stripes the original locomotive features), changes to the trucks (they are one stud shorter and have a discrete brick/plate pilot), changes to the main body behind the cab, which is now only 4 studs wide, and to the fuel tanks. The engine is PF controlled, runs on the LEGO LiPo rechargeable battery, which is in turn charged through power-pickup from the 9V rails using a modified 9V train motor, cf. this EuroBricks topic, PF V2 receiver, and second PF train motor, along with PF head lights. The additional second PF receiver output wired to the rear section may be optionally used to operate a third motor; the GP38 shown above is an example. The color scheme of the 4 studs wide section behind the cab is suffering from the dark/light grey sections of the PF elements; however, I pretty much like the “used look” that results from that though. I never really like the original LEGO design of the body, where the receiver etc. is covered by large plates – to me, it appeared simply too wide for an overall 6 studs wide model. Note: There is an additional PDF which shows the required modifications to pair the SD40-2 with the GP38 shown above 3) Cargo Train (#4512) MOD 1 (engine), 2 (battery car), 3 (box car), 4 (box car type2), whole set LDraw file(s) and PDF instruction(s) The “major” changes to this very classic 9V train are the addition of a PF “battery car” in the same color scheme of the original locomotive and box car, and some undercarriage changes to the latter. There is also a second version of the box car. I really do like the old-dark grey/green color scheme of this train. Fortunately, my father has given me his Sopwith Camel (set #3451) as “brick supply”; this way also the second box car version became reality in the grey/green color scheme. The front section of the locomotive is raised by one plate and the front handrail changed. 4) High Speed Passenger Train (#7897) MOD 1 (engine), 2 (coach A), 3 (coach B), whole set LDraw file(s) and PDF instruction(s) Ages ago the “real,-“ department store close by not necessarily well known for their LEGO set inventory had the RC high speed “ICE” like train set on sale … I got two for very little money. Well, the one-piece front cab of this train (part #55768) has been discussed “controversially” – carefully phrased – but nevertheless, as far as I am concerned, with some modding a more or less decent passenger train resulted from merging the two sets. Everything has become a little “longer”, particularly the coaches. Also, the coaches have discrete plate frames and their trucks are rather heavily modified – based on the design of James Mathis’ Santa Fe cars (sets #10022/#10025). The four additional white 6x8x4 cylinders with flattened upper half (part #45411) required for a train consisting of two engines and three coaches came from two City tank truck sets (set #60016) – I could not get hold of the white cylinders with flattened lower half (part #45410) so the third car has a modified lower section. [Note: Unfortunately the “RC train base” (part #55455c01) is not available as official LDraw part – and I guess it never will be. I simply assembled that part from bricks and plates for the instruction and treated it as part in LPub … no idea how to do it differently. Also the “ugly” front nose is not even an unofficial LDraw part, I found the LDraw.dat file at digital-bricks. Rolling Stock 1) 4 Axle Tank Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction The tank design is close to that of the #10016 tank car set; there are some additions to the top section. The frame is made rather conveniently mainly from Technic pieces. 2) 2 Axle Tank Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction This is a plain vanilla 2-axle tank car – I guess there were many similar designs posted in this forum. 3) TankTainer Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction This one is a result purchasing the #3368 Space Center set – I was looking for the #64448 support/fence part (or whatever it is called) in red for a bridge structure – and these were left overs – as were the (sloped) tank half shells … looks a little weird but this way the car is more or less 6 wide and the tanktainer is easily removable. The frame is again mostly comprised of Technic pieces 4) Flatbed Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction The flatbed car is entirely made-up … it started with the four #91176 support parts from the 2011 Red Cargo Train #3677 set – did not know what to do with them … the cargo is – hmmm – cylinders? Had too many of the round 2x2 bricks and round bright green 1x1 plates … 5) Spine Car (with girders) MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction I guess the 5 “Toy Story 3” sets I purchased one after another for €20 each at TrU. No idea why that was, they had them for more than a year somewhat hidden in the “bulk-brick” section and each time I was there I could not resist … lots of bley plates for another bridge and for a rather big train station … but also tons of the 2x2x10 girders … 6) Gondola Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction As already mentioned, for the high speed passenger car MOD shown above I needed extra white 6x8x4 cylinders. At that time, the original ICE-type high speed train set was gone for long; the City tank truck set #60016 featured two of these cylinders each though; white with flattened upper half and green with flattened lower half. The white ones were perfect for the passenger cars, the greens were “left overs”. Which brought me to the gondola car – again entirely made up and again with a Technic element frame. 7) Tipper Car MOC LDraw file and PDF instruction This car is the result of eight yellow tipper end sloped pieces (part #3436) from the #4565 Freight & Crane Railway set (which was my first train set after my Dark Ages). For long, I did not know what to do with those. Then I saw tipper cars on BrickShelf, looked them up on the internet and this is the result. I guess they are rather “European” if not “German” … small and compact. The yellow color is not appropriate at all, but that’s how it is. This is it for the moment. Thanks for reading! Regards, Thorsten
  13. This is a fictional space-themed LEGO shopping mall complex named "The Spaceship" due to the shape of main building resembling a spaceship. If that naming idea had come sooner I would probably have designed something that actually looked more like a spaceship, but the idea only came to me more than halfway through the project when I saw what shape the building was taking so I just used the idea to name and style numerous parts of the model. The model uses approx. 175000 parts and 258 custom sticker designs and measures 3810mm x 3493mm x 519mm (13.3m² footprint). It features 30 shops, 218 car parking spaces, 500 minifigs, bank, post office, library, cinema, amusements, restaurant, foodcourt, admin/security office, service access, maintenance areas, escalators, functional elevators, toilets, ice rink, gymnasium, boating pond, custom brick-built road layout, and real LEGO lighting in most of the main building and ice rink. The design attempts to be as functional as possible by providing convenient car access, separate rear public transport access, and separate rear service vehicle access to all shops on the first two levels, as well as multiple entrances and fire exits. It also attempts to be wheelchair/buggy friendly as much as possible using a mixture of stairs, escalators, ramps and a glass elevator. The main glass roof can be removed in two halves, as can the roofs of the gym, the wing shops, and the rear section, the latter of which reveals the battery packs for the LEGO lighting. There's also manual cable winders on both the customer and service elevators. I managed to get the water tank in too but had to forego the boiler room - despite the size of the build I found myself running out of space. The massive size of the model caused numerous problems, especially due to buggy software and PC limitations, so I had to reduce the intended length of the mall and forego a few other features too, but it's still by far the biggest model I've built. It probably should have taken around 6 to 9 months to complete, but due to personal and technical issues it ended up taking more than 2 years. This virtual LDraw model was built using MLCad software and rendered with LDView (sadly it's too big to render with POV-Ray), with additional construction, graphic and animation support via the use of PHP, LDraw Sticker Generator, LDraw txt2dat, LDraw LSynth, ImageMagick, Paint Shop Pro, GIF Movie Gear, IrfanView, PNGOUT, AviSynth, VirtualDub, and ffmpeg. Even had to use Excel to write macros to compute the precise angles needed for the curved window walls on the wings, which were too difficult to compute on paper. And no, I don't intend building it for real! Links: Flickr (lots more images) YouTube (looks better at 720 resolution) The video contains still images and many flyby sequences which give a better impression of the model by restoring some of the 3D visual cues lost due to the non-raytraced renders containing no shadows. Excuse the length of the video and number of images. It's a REALLY BIG model, and 25 images just wasn't going to do it... This is my first post here, and may well be my last! - during the uploads of the more than 200 images the PC terminally died and the remainder of the uploads and this post had to be done from a Raspberry Pi.
  14. Hi all, has anyone ever compiled a matching table between LDD decorations and LDraw patterned bricks (or stickers)? (Something like 95551 = 3005pf0.dat) There’re about 2000 decorations in LDD and it’s highly disrespectful to redo the gruesome work someone has already done
  15. Hi folks, has anyone investigated what font was used for the old Technic logo: http://logos.wikia.com/wiki/Lego_Technic Unfortunately sites such as https://www.whatfontis.com/ didn't come up with a suitable result. Knowing the font type would help enormously converting the logo into a LDraw pattern. Thanks, Willy LDraw Content Manager
  16. This is command-line tool for geometric shape manipulation and exporting as LDraw model. Typing this in command-line: LDShapeGenerator.exe --shape rectangular --geometry 1x2x5 --output C:\Windows\Temp\geometry-shape.ldr You got file with content like this: 0 Rectangular 0 Name: Rectangular 0 Author: LDShapeGenerator 1 27 20.0 24.0 20.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 24.0 60.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 48.0 20.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 48.0 60.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 72.0 20.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 72.0 60.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 96.0 20.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 96.0 60.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 120.0 20.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat 1 27 20.0 120.0 60.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 3003.dat This tool using only basic regular bricks. Thanks, to this is 100% compatible with LEGO Digital Designer, BrickLink Stud.io and other digital tools that understand LDraw format. Repository: https://github.com/Jeremy1980/LDShapeGenerator/ Support Center -- go here if you have know more: https://github.com/Jeremy1980/LDShapeGenerator/wiki/ This is example of Cylinder; Trapezoid and three version of Rectangular prism -- 1x2x5 /look at the code above/ , 2x2x2 /knowed as cube/ , 2x5x1 /longest horizontal rectangle/:
  17. I finally completed my most complicated LDCad animation to date It is a fully animated 8860 LEGO technic 'super car' set. You can watch it here (2:15 long). https://youtu.be/Ea1iHCSPbqo (Some how youtube messed with the quality though, the original x264 mkv is much sharper) It is an OpenGL export, I was originally planning to do a POV-Ray rendering (I've got the POV file) but it would take over 200 hours to render as it would need very high radiosity settings to prevent background flickering. This would result in 3750 frames of this quality: Fullsize img: http://www.melkert.net/img/mel/8860.png If anyone know of a way to reduce that flickering without having to crank the radiosity settings to 11 please let me know.
  18. Hi guys for all this time when I think of making a moc I never build digitally. Now I think that building digitally first before trying to build it in real life is a good method to start mocs. I have built in LDD once but that was 2 or 3 years ago. Now i want to know what Lego digital building program is the best. I want something to begin with. My choices are LDD or Stud.io or Ldraw . Ldraw seems to be a bit advanced but i don't know that if it is that advance. I might go with Stud.io but I'm slightly not sure if it has technic parts but I am most sure it has While LDD doesn't have some parts ex:- Pneumatics. Tell me your opinion. P.S. Sorry for the bad English
  19. Greetings,LPub3D 2.0.14 is released. LPub3D is an Open Source WYSIWYG editing application for creating LEGO style digital building instructions. It uses the LDraw parts library, the most comprehensive library of digital Open Source LEGO parts available and reads the LDraw LDR and MPD model file formats. LPub3D is available for free under the GNU Public License v3 and works on the Windows Operating Systems. Portions of LPub3D are based on LPUB© 2007-2009 Kevin Clague, LeoCAD© 2015 Leonardo Zide.and additional third party components. LPub3D can run under POSIX-compliant operating systems, such as Linux, Mac OSX, & BSD using WINE HQ. You can download from sourceforge.net or check for updates in your existing installation. LPub3D 2.0.14.838.2 Features and enhancements ------------ Fix: File reload after external source change breaks page drop-down combo dialogue(r837) * When a file is reloaded after being changed by an external source, the drop-down menu for selecting a page doesn't work until after navigating using another method. Fix: Image orientation does not conform when page orientation changed to Landscape (r836) * Image generation was not inheriting the proper page size values. Fix: Extra characters "%3" in margin meta and page size meta does not display the page size identifier(r835) * Oops, allocated the page size identifier variable to the wrong meta - should have been allocated to page size meta instead of units meta (units meta is used for setting the margin). Consequently, the page size meta is missing the size identifier (A4, Letter, etc...) because the place-holder to pass the variable is not there. This must have happened during the patch process from the maintenance branch because it did not present during my tests. Both issues are now corrected. Cheers,
  20. LDD to 3ds MAX

    Hello, I was trying to import my LDD file to 3DS max, but everytime when I render the object I get this. Can someone help me to get this right? Greetings, Tom
  21. Guide: create build instructions with LPub This is a guide to making your own instructions with LPub. There is a: Short Guide Walks through the basics of producing a set of instructions. Full Guide Provides more details on the main steps for making instructions and explains the main features of LPub. User's discussion You are encouraged to ask questions, provide constructive criticisms and suggest proposals to improve this guide and suit it to users' needs. This guide will be updated over time to reflect the frequently asked questions. A complete guide to using LPub can be found here. List of recent topics that are related with LPub and build instructions: Instruction Miner vs. LPub (-> Go) MLCad: hiding parts in instruction step but showing in BOM (-> Go) LPub and MPD Files (-> Go) Help to create digital instructions for a physical MOC (-> Go) LPub not showing my main assembly (-> Go) Better building instructions than LDD? (-> Go) Problem with MLCad and Lpub (-> Go) LPub tree step - how? (-> Go) ... Credits - Thanks to Kevin Clague, the creator of LPub. - Thanks to Jaco van der Molen for his complete LPub guide. Note: This guide was prepared using a Mac. There may be minor differences for the Windows version of LPub.
  22. Finally, after a long hiatus there's a new official LDraw parts update. Here's the full 'press release':
  23. Shackleton's Endurance in Minifig Scale In August 1914, Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton started an incredible expedition to the Antarctic.This voyage is also known as the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Endurance was the name of the ship in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic. On board were 28 men and 69 dogs. Shackleton planned to cross the Antarctic on foot. But shortly before its arrival in the Antarctic the Endurance became locked in ice and was finally crushed. Thus the legendary survival of Shackleton and his crew began. Length 166 studs (131 cm) / Width 50 studs (39 cm) / Height 103 studs (81 cm) Built with LDCad 1.6 alpha 4 / Rendered with POV-Ray Shackleton's Endurance by Papacharly by Papacharly
  24. I am trying to import my LDD model to Bricksmith which uses LDraw database, but tire (tyre) 61254.dat is missing. I checked the LDraw database and I cannot find a correct file with the tread and all. Can someone point me to it? Much appreciated. Here is the Bricklink reference: http://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?id=84621#T=C Here is what I found: http://www.ldraw.org/cgi-bin/ptdetail.cgi?f=parts/61254.dat Apparently it needs the tread file 61254s01.dat somehow used along with it, which is linked from within the 61254.dat link, but I do not know how to use them in combination. I copied them both to my Bricksmith/LDraw parts directory, but it's not coming out right. I'd appreciate some help, hopefully a fully compiled 61254.dat file or a solution to my problem. Thanks in advance. Miro
  25. Greetings, LPub3D 2.0.13 is released. You can download from sourceforge.net or check for updates in your existing installation. Interesting fixes are the ability to switch part occurrence (times used) in the PLI between per step and per submodel on called out and submodel pages; the ability to insert one-to-many non-faded models (e.g. with alternate attachments/views etc...) when fade step is on; and new meta for pages size including the standard identifier - e.g. A4, Letter, Legal etc... and print/export performance improvements. LPub3D 2.0.13.834.2 Features and enhancements ------------ Fix: Logging options added to Preferences (r832) * Select logged attributes and logging levels. Fix: Prompt search directory settings reset (r831) * Prompt to inform that the search directories have been reset after the search directory reset button is clicked. Restarting LPub3D is not required. Also changed menu items "Reset 3D Viewer Model Cache" to "Change Temp File Cache" and "Reset Image and Model Caches" to "Reset All Caches". Fix: Inconsistency between part counts in submodels and part counts in call-outs where multiple instances are involved (r829) * For submodels, the PLI part counts reflect only one instance of the submodel, even if multiple instances are used in the same step. The instance count is correct, and the BOM has the correct total number of parts. With this update, sub-model pages displaying instance count now have a context menu option to display parts per step/page or not (total parts consumed by the number of instances indicated. Previously, for callouts, you have the options (see context menu) to display parts list per callout (one instance) or not. When you select no parts list per callout, the PLI will show all the parts consumed by the total number of instances in the callout. If you choose parts list per callout, the PLI is moved to the callout and only the parts for a single occurrence of the callout is shown. The idea here is if you have 5 occurrences of the called out assembly, you'll need 5x the parts total, but only 1x parts are shown to indicate what you need to build an instance of the called out assembly. On sub-model pages displaying the instance count, there is only one behaviour for PLI counts (the most intuitive) which is to display the parts list per step. This is intuitive because the primary role of the PLI is to show what you'll need to build an occurrence of the step shown - it is not the intention to mimic the BoM. Nevertheless, I added a context menu item to not display parts list per step and instead display total parts consumed by the number of occurrences of the submodel in the parent submodel/step. Fix: Page size and orientation processing update (r826/833) * Further industrialization of the print/export module. This update streamlines the process and realizes some performance gains. There are some key changes. Notably, page orientation and page size are now mutually exclusive. This means when switching from Portrait to Landscape, accompanying the orientation meta with a transposed page size meta no longer required or managed. Here is an illustration: Previous behaviour when editing a page size change required the following meta commands: 0 STEP 0 LPUB PAGE ORIENTATION LOCAL LANDSCAPE 0 LPUB PAGE SIZE LOCAL 11.0000 8.5000 Note that the page width and height have been transposed. Going forward, transposition of the page width and height when switching from Portrait to Landscape is automatically managed by LPub3D. NOTE: This update is NOT backward compatable. An accompanying transposed page size meta to indicate the switch from portrait to landscape as shown above will be treated as a new page size meta for that page. Consequently, using this meta to 'switch' orientation will actually result in NOT switching the orientation as LPub3D will automatically switch again the switched page size meta. If the user is only interested in changing the orientation, the proper meta command going forward will be: 0 STEP 0 LPUB PAGE ORIENTATION LOCAL LANDSCAPE To help with accurately displaying the page size identifier in the setup and context menus, the standard page identifier is now appended to the page size meta command. For example: 0 LPUB PAGE SIZE 8.5000 14.0000 Legal 0 LPUB PAGE SIZE LOCAL 8.5000 11.0000 Letter 0 LPUB PAGE SIZE LOCAL 5.8000 8.3000 A5 0 LPUB PAGE SIZE LOCAL 5.8678 8.3456 Custom Along with the width and height values, if the page size is non-standard, the identifier "Custom" will be automatically used. Additionally if an identifier is not present, the identifier "Custom" will automatically used. The page identifier is displayed in the Page Setup dialogue and Size/Orientation change context menu dialogue. Also, the LPub3D print/export function no longer needs to parse the model file to capture, in advance, page sizes. This capture is performed during the existing page parse and load functions and is exposed to the print routines during printing/exporting. This change was necessary to better enable mixed-size page export/printing where it is necessary to 'look ahead' to get the next page's size and orientation parameters in order to configure the printer engine before processing the page. Fix: Expand INSERT MODEL meta command behaviour (r825) * When using part fading LPUb3D will now process multiple INSERT MODEL commands rendering the CSI content at each command. For example, if the instruction document includes different model attachments, the editor can now include a non-faded image of the entire model with each attachment. Here is an example of he proper command sequence when used in conjunction with BUFEXCHG: 0 BUFEXCHG B STORE 0 //... default model content... 0 STEP 0 BUFEXCHG B RETRIEVE 0 BUFEXCHG A STORE 1 0 445 -46 -10 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 attachment1.ldr 0 STEP 0 LPUB INSERT MODEL 0 LPUB INSERT PAGE 0 STEP 0 BUFEXCHG A RETRIEVE 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 attachment2.ldr 0 //STEP These last 3 lines are optional when editing the model file. 0 //LPUB INSERT MODEL If they don't exist and fade step is ON, they will be automatically created by LPub3D 0 //LPUB INSERT PAGE Fix: The PNG output of a model with various page orientations is not correct (r824) * Cleared page buffer before rendering each page. Also corrected a typo causing page range to sometimes not work for image exports. Cheers,