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Found 11 results

  1. Originally built in Sand Red by my father in the early 2000's, this building is one of my dad's biggest creations. I modified it and brought it up to my specifications... okay, I whinged it from looking at the model. I took some liberties, (& made some mistakes) with the original model. For example: the first version had a smaller smokestack, (diameter wise) and had a different Railroad loading dock. (His dock was made from the '90's 16 x 16 old dark grey sections, with two slopes and 4 middle sections.) plus I used parts not available in Sand Red. He did this factory without using Brick-link.... just a ton of Sand Red parts packs ordered via the phone from LEGO. I have redone the model in easier-to-buy red, with white window frames. The tracks side. This end of the factory has a ladder to the top of the smokestack. Their is also a small water tower on top of the roof as well. The factory was originally built in sand red, not regular red. Since this color is extremely expensive and hard to find, I used regular red with modern white window frames. Inside view, with the detachable roof removed. Dad never finished this part, and probably never will. The loading doors do open, and were modified from the original arched doors as they couldn't fit a forklift... then again, these doors might not either! I hoped this factory would be of some use for some people, as the original always has been gathering dust in the basement since it was built, as seen below: This is the original factory that was by my Dad around the years 2000 - 2004. it was built with parts from several Sand Red supplemental packs available at that time. It does not feature any interior, nor does it have a removable roof. But this thing is built STRONG: you have to really put your weight on it to press the roof together. It has never been determined what this factory made in-universe, though for my own purposes in my younger years, I pretended it made beverages. What beverages, you ask? Why, Dr. Leg O. Brick's Root Beer of course! My factory produces automobiles, and they are loaded onto three-level auto racks for transport around the country or around the globe. This three level auto rack was originally found on LGauge .com as seen here. I redesigned that model and added tiny automobiles to fit into the racks. There is but a single plate worth of clearance between the automobiles and the rack above. The automobiles are attached using 2 x 3 plates, put they are removable... if you take the roof of the freight car off first! These tiny cars can seat a single figure each, and have two opening doors per car. The vehicles come in three color varieties, (red, white ,yellow) though a fourth (blue) is possible but is sightly more expensive. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome, and if anyone wants the LDD file for my red version, here it is. The tri-level auto racks and the cars on them is ready to download at this link. EDIT 7/24/17: Recolored the smokestack to dark bluish gray and extended it's height. I also enlarged the water tower and have a more realistic appearance... LDD file updated! EDIT 7/26/17: Added auto racks and the loads on them to this page, along with it's accompanying LDD file. ENJOY!
  2. Historic Tram of Opicina

    This is the "historic version" of my previous moc:
  3. This RTG crane was built to give me a second intermodal option, one not tied to a specific location. In this case, I have it with the current rail yard setup, but it can be used anywhere. As seen in the rail yard pictures, it can load double stack containers, yet is still wide enough for two 6 wide trucks to pass underneath. It's based on the Kalmar RTG crane, but scaled to fit LEGO landscapes better. More information is available here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_tyred_gantry_crane
  4. Tram of Opicina

    Hi! I'm a new train LEGO fan, my new passion started last spring... But I think that a LEGO tram is missing, so I created in LEGO the tram of my little city. This is my MOC: Tram of Opicina #DSC_1058 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #IMG_2473 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #IMG_2496 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Tram of Opicina #DSC_1061 by Prison Brick, on Flickr Now I submit it on LEGO Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/158520 Please, support & share if you like it! Thanks! Every comment helps me to improve!
  5. Hi guys, Here's my latest MOC - Grand Central Terminal! Hope you enjoy the detail jam-packed into this MOC. It's up on Ideas. Dozens of photos and a time lapse video here Grand Central Terminal on IDEAS. PS - Why is the max total size for an image upload set at 100KB??? At that limit, I can barely get one thumbnail in.
  6. As a tram enthusiast living in Melbourne, I am currently trying to replicate each of the city's trams with lego. Deciding to experiment with low floor models, I built this 5 sectioned melbourne D2 class tram (PF operated: two powered trucks, one on the first section and one on the fifth). The second and fourth sections are suspended (no wheels), and the short middle section has an unpowered truck. Does anyone know of a coupling system that will minimize the gap between the sections of the tram? Also, if anyone else has experimented with low floor trams like this, don't hesitate to post pictures - I would like to see! Hope you enjoy!
  7. Track Electrification

    Several years ago I posted about my project to build the Windhoff MPV. I updated the post last month with a few pics of the almost completed models. The models depict the electrification of existing train track for running of electric trains. The whole build project has been inspired by the electrification of the Great Western Trail Line in the UK using the Windhoff MPV. Last weekend I attended the Brick Event on the Gold Coast (Queensland, Australia). The table was a bit cramped but by talking to the public they were able to see the design and function of the machines. By the end of the first day talking to my table neighbour he convinced me that the 2 tables wasn’t enough for the display so to the floor I went. Originally I was going to build two MPV’s, but during the process I increased the build to three with the third having a container style build with some nice snot construction techniques for the drivers cabin. I was quite happy how this turned out. The Windhoff MPV’s were fun (even if it took me a while) to build, especially since I went 8-wide therefore creating the scale of 1 stud = 1 foot. This gives the models great detail and sense of scale. I coupled the MPV’s with a wagon using the same scale. The MPV’s feature ISO locking points at 10’ intervals and a small knuckle boom crane at the trailing end. The substructure detailing was fun to create, trying to get the detail right balance between ease of build (using the parts I had), Lego geometry and accuracy. I was able to get during the build a couple of 1x4 light grey tiles with a text on them looking like a serial number or build plate. At 70 studs long (buffer to buffer) I was unable to get the bogie set to rotate as it is fixed to the sub-frame structure, so running it around the track is a no go for me. The coupled wagons are 70’ (buffer to buffer) long at have ISO coupling points for 3x 20’ or 2x 30’ containers/pallets. I’m not 100% on the real world bogie spacing but again they are fixed and offer no rotation. As part of the display I had previous built MOW equipment (trucks and the work wagons created by other talented individuals) showing the electrification process. I designed my own catenary system and while I’m happy it has room for improvement. Stage 1 – footings The Robel Bullok and trucks prepare the site and the footings. Stage 2 - mast MPV #1 is configured for mast installation with a stylized cab, 10’ tool room, a frame for mast storage and a long reach crane. Stage 3 – minor structures MPV #2 is configured for minor structure installation with a stylized cab, 10’ tool room, a 30’ pallet with an elevated work platform, and knuckle boom crane. Coupled to this is a wagon which holds plenty of catenary structures and a knuckle boom crane. Stage 4 - Wiring MPV #3 is configured for wire installation with a snot container style cab, a 30’ pallet with an wire dispenser spindles and a knuckle boom crane, a 10’ section for more spindles and again a knuckle boom crane. Coupled to this is a wagon which has a 30’ pallet with an elevated work platform, and a 30’ pallet with a 24’ scissor platform. Stage 5 – testing The Plasser & Theurer MTW100 measure test and adjusts. As can be seen in the pics I used twisted wire. It was a great idea that didn’t pan out as I expected with too much twist and rigidity and the real stuff is held under tension which isn’t possible with my display. I have brought some other wire which will stay straight thanks to the youtube video hack.. There are plenty of small improvements to be made, but then no one is ever 100% happy….LOL None the less please enjoy the pics and let me know what you think. Video: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vU1z_H10LF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr 2016 Brick Event Gold Coast by Aaron Coghill, on Flickr
  8. 60051 Fleshed out

    For my first post I'd like to share something I built a few months back. This is my first actual post so please do be gentle :P I decided to design a much more fleshed out version of the 60051 High Speed Passenger Train by adding various types of new custom passenger cars and locomotives. I implemented some ideas from the 10233 Horizon Express, which is quite noticeable from the pictures below (such as the all-black 10233 inter-car bogey). Firstly I wanted the design to be much more detailed and to use more advanced building techniques such as those seen in 10233 than what is standard for a City set. For instance, I wanted my passenger cars to be intermodal articulated (cheers Duq :P) to really catch that high speed train vibe. Additionally, it had to have functioning doors and fairly detailed interiors. However, common limitations prevented me from doing particular designs such as a restaurant car as an interior four studs wide simply would not be enough for me to create a bar/lounge that didn't look like it was being choked by the walls of the car. If anyone wishes to build/use the designs, I'm more than happy to upload relevant .lxf files for you all :) just be sure to credit me properly. So without further ado, have at it! 1. Inter-car bogey (10233 design in all-black) Express2 - Bogey by Bartybum, on Flickr 2. Short end coach Express2 - Coach End Short by Bartybum, on Flickr 3. Short coach middle Express2 - Coach Short by Bartybum, on Flickr 4. Short locomotive Express2 - Engine by Bartybum, on Flickr 5. Long coach middle (No end coach as of yet, as I'm yet to design one) Express2 - Coach Long by Bartybum, on Flickr 6. Long locomotive Express2 - Engine Long by Bartybum, on Flickr 7. Super locomotive (uses inter-car bogey and is therefore inseparable from the rest of the consist) Express2 - Super Engine by Bartybum, on Flickr At this point I asked myself, why stop at one storey? Why not follow the footsteps of the Metroliner and go double decker? Naturally I did :) 8. Two storey coach Express2 - Two Storey Coach by Bartybum, on Flickr 9. Two storey transition coach Express2 - Two Storey Transition Coach by Bartybum, on Flickr Obviously since this is Lego, you can switch around cars if need be, so you can make whatever configuration you want. Two examples: Express2 by Bartybum, on Flickr Express2.1 by Bartybum, on Flickr Since LDD doesn't do stickers the abrupt disappearance of red and dark grey from the nose looks just a bit jarring. Keep in mind that these designs are built with the implication of the stickers on the nose already being there. Now that all's said and done, just hit me up in the replies if you'd like .lxf files, more than happy to give them out :) EDIT: .zip files in reply section
  9. I made a MOW rail grinding LEGO CITY styled truck. It has one Power Functions M-motor driving the "grinding" wheel in the trailer. The trailer also has a foam sponge to clean the tracks. Rail Grinder Truck and Track Cleaner by dr_spock_888, on Flickr
  10. [ full gallery] As everyone knows, lego curves are very tight, so one has to build short rolling stock to make it around the curves without problems. Unfortunately, even at 6 wide many passenger train cars built to scale should be 50+ studs long, e.g., my Superliner cars were built with accurate length to width proportions and they are 52 studs long. They look HORRIBLE in the curves, with a single car spanning a quarter turn- notice that the ends swing out almost six studs (a full car width) past the adjacent car in the pictures below. These long cars on the short curves also have so much drag that it is hard to find a good speed that the engine can pull through one curve that will not send the train speeding away on the straight track to derail at the next curve. <<regular lego curves Over the past few years several folks have promised wide radius curves and I've grown weary of waiting for someone to actually produce a viable curve. So I set out to build my own. I contemplated 3D printing, but it would be way too expensive. After several initial attempts, I settled on using third party ABS rail stock glued to lego tiles (yes, "glue" is a four letter word, but so is "lego," grin... in any event, this exercise is definitely not for the purist). The tricky issues are the fact that the lego gauge does not split well into LDU, and worse, making nice smooth curves. <<new custom curves My solution was to make a rail gauge to ensure that the rails have the correct spacing. I am still revising the design, but once I've finalized it, I plan to offer the rail gauges for sale. For my prototype there were several things I had to decide upon. I personally like the look of one stud ties, but they do not provide a good opportunity for a rail joint on a curve. So I decided to use two stud ties for now, mimicking the look of the old 4.5v rails. I also had to choose the curve radius. I wanted to go wide. Until I prove this works, I want to do only two track segments per quarter turn. So with these constraints and my rail stock the widest I could go was twice the radius of regular lego curves, and so that is what I chose for my prototypes. After I finish one loop of track, I'll experiment with other radii. In fact one could even do variable radius curves, but it would be more work to figure out the transitions, so that is something to play with in the future. The rails are darker than lego dark gray, that shouldn't be a problem if the entire loop is the same color. The straight track went fairly easy, with a single segment coming in at 76 studs (4 studs short of 5 regular lego track segments). The curves took a lot more time to get right, but I think I've got the process figured out now (I'll need to make another quarter turn before I know for sure). This shot shows one segment of the new curve next to four segments of lego curve. My 52 stud long cars work so much better on these wide radius curves. Aesthetically, I think the 52 stud long cars would look better on even larger radii curves (perhaps my next project). Meanwhile, I think the curves look about right for my 42 stud long cars, as shown below. before after More to come, but for now, you can find a few more examples of my progress thus far here (including a transition piece to adapt to conventional PF track- primarily for switches- which I have no intention of making... at least not any time soon). Oh, and if you scroll back up to the top image in this post, you'll see the middle tie on the curve sticks out one stud. That's because I grabbed a 2x2 plate instead of a 1x2 to connect the rails. Also, my carpet has a little give, so I had to put a plate underneath the joints too to keep the weight of the train from popping the rail joints. I hope that will not be the case when I set it up on a hard floor, and I'll keep you posted when I test it. Worst case is that I'll need to add a layer of plates below, in which case I'll disguise it like ballast and then I can go to single stud ties. [ full gallery]
  11. Ever thought that the price for the 'stop' rails was a little too high? I did, so I thought to modify a stock straight rail. As you can see from the picture below, I have made a good approximation in my first attempt. I used a Mk I rail, but you can see in the picture on the left there is a Mk II rail. Belatedly I found that these come with two plug contact points, so making them easier to convert:-)! Differences to note: The square plastic piece that sits in between the break in the rail. And the extra plastic directly underneath the plug socket to accommodate the hole. The rail was cut using a dremel, and the plug contact was formed by making small cuts and then folding with pliers. The hole was drilled with my dremel mounted horizontally on a piece of board in lathe like fashion. A piece of plastic was temporarily MEK'd to the top to minimize burring. The plastic pieces were measured and cut from a doner piece of track, and then welded in place with MEK mixed with a small amount of plastic shaving from the cutting. The end result is not bad. Next time I will seek out the Mk II's with plug holes, as these already have the two plug contacts formed! You could use this technique to replace your original stop rails that have gone rusty. Take care not to mix Mk I and Mk II rails as they are slightly different, the male connecting pin on a Mk II has plastic reinforcement. see pictures above. And make sure you use the plug holed variety, ogeL did make rails without connection points!