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Found 18 results

  1. Hi everyone, Finally, I have finished a project which I was building since last September. It is the scale model of the Intrac 2011 snow blower which is/was often used in the swiss alps by the army and other communal parties. It was the aim to create another working snow blower after the success of the snow blower from last winter. The blower is powered by three buggy-motors which are all controlled by a separate Sbrick. Each track is driven by two PF XL motors. The snow blower shoot direction is controlled by two 9-volt micro motors and the height of the snow blower by one PF L motor. As power source I used two Buwizz as battery or a custom lipo battery. After a certain time in the cold I had the replace the Buwizz with the custom lipo battery. Cheers FT
  2. I would like to present a 1:24 scale model of one of the largest bulldozers in the world, Caterpillar D11T. Features of the model: - Planetary subtractor for simple control of driving and steering; - Automatic track tensioning; - Remotely controlled driving and steering, blade and ripper operation plus motorized access ladder; - Complete set of lights. The whole mining crew so far: Thank you for your attention!
  3. Hello Everyone, this is my first post here, so apologies if I made any mistakes! I was going to post this model on Lego Ideas, but (not surprisingly) Game of Thrones is not suitable content for them, so I decided to post it here and see what you guys think. This is a (not so small) scale model of the castle of Winterfell from George R. R. Martin's epic fantasy novel series A Song of Ice and Fire, and more specifically, a model of the castle as it appeared in HBO's award winning tv series Game of Thrones. In the series, Winterfell acts, (most of the time) as the home of house Stark, one of the main noble families in the fictional land of Westeros. Winterfell is seen often throughout the series, and stood out to me among all the other places in Westeros, not just because of its prominent role, but because of its unique design and architecture. Many of the castles we see in movies and on tv look amazing, with their numerous gold turrets, towers, large windows, and vast balconies, but all these features make the castles relatively unrealistic in an actual medieval setting. It is because Winterfell lacks these common features on fictional castles that it stood out to me so much. In the real medieval era, most castles were not very opulent, and had pretty plain, utilitarian exteriors. If you think about this, it makes quite a bit of sense, as putting all your wealth on the outside of your castle meant it could be damaged or stolen if you are attacked. I know, I know, most fantasy tv shows and movies aren't going for historical accuracy, including Game of Thrones, (I love seeing dragons flying around as much as the next guy) but that doesn't mean I can't appreciate when the creators do make things look as though they actually might in the given time period. I based this model off of the scale desktop model of Winterfell you can buy online (just search google for: Winterfell sculpture, and you'll see a few pages with it), and it includes all the main features of the castle, including the Winterfell Godswood, with the Weirwood tree and broken tower. I am quite pleased with the way the Weirwood tree turned out, its a new design that I haven't used before, maybe some of you have, but I hadn't, and so was quite pleased when I came up with it. Despite my best efforts, this is a large model, measuring approximately 2 feet by 1 foot, and comprised of 3046 pieces. If any of you want to build the model, a link at the bottom of this description will bring you to a folder with the full size images of the model, a bricklink parts list, a .io model file for the Stud.io lego design program (my personal favorite), and a .ldr model file for use with Ldraw. I do not have a .lxf file for use in Lego Digital Designer, as this model uses some newer bricks not in that program, so I apologize for not being able to offer that to those of you who use LDD. If you do build the model, please send me some pictures of it! As with my Hogwarts model, I don't have enough pieces to actually build it, so it would be awesome to see a real model if any of you are more fortunate with your LEGO collections than I am :). Also, feel free to share this with anyone you want and post images of it, as long as you remember to give credit to me as the model's creator, and provide a link back to this post. I will most likely be posting this model on Rebrickable as well, but I need to create instructions for it before I can do that, and that's the boring part of model making, so I'm procrastinating it :), A link to my Rebrickable page where you will eventually be able to find it will be posted beneath this description as well. And finally, here is the link to that folder with all the files mentioned above: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1pb0hN4USgPyKzkSvDyXeKFhb4Nkczwxq?usp=sharing and to my Rebrickable MOCs page: https://rebrickable.com/users/EthanBrossard/mocs/ and here are the images! winterfell lego with logo3 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #0 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #1 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #2 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #3 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #4 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #5 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #6 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #7 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #8 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #9 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #10 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #11 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #12 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #13 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #14 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #15 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #16 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego #17 small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr winterfell lego - winter small by Ethan Brossard, on Flickr Thank you in advance for any feedback/advice! Ethan
  4. Building Lego Technic creations and posting videos is a common bussiness for every MOC designer. Coming up with small and large inventions and sharing them is a continuing activity that never bores. However, there is one common dream, one ultimate goal that every Lego enthousiast silently dreams about: to design a professional Lego model. Several builders do what is called 'commissioned work'. Building a Lego Technic model and selling whatever it became to a company or private party. In general, Lego Technic custom models are loved by non-Lego enthousiasts because 'it works'. Several years ago, I got the unique chance to do commissioned work because a company CEO's brother accidentially saw my scale model. I first refused to sell my beloved Luctor, but two years later the one metre model was ready I got positive reviews about the looks, but the most comments were: "wow, it really works". Somehow this model must have been leaked inside 'CEO-land', as one year ago I was asked by the Hoeflon company (based in the Netherlands) to build a give-away Lego Technic model, to be used as a business gift. How cool is it to not receive the 32st boring USB drive, but a complete custom Lego Technic model.. The company builds mini cranes that go inside buildings to do heavy lifting. My task was to build a scale model of a machine that is already very compact in real life. As a result, I present a 1:14 scale model of the Hoeflon C6 crane. (please note I'm NOT paid by Hoeflon in any way, the whole story is just about how things happened and to explain the link with reality). The crane is my smallest MOC for a long time. It was really a challenge to fit all the functions inside the cramped body. The functions are: Track widening Boom rising/lowering Boom extension Fly Jib Rotating superstructure Friction winch Self-locking outtriggers Variable angle outtriggers with over 90 degree range These functions happen in a Lego Technic model of a smaller volume than the 9391 Technic crane set. Over the years I had lost some creativity to build small models so this one was a real challenge. I'm happy with the current setup but who knows.. The model is delivered with black or LBG tracks. LBG track links are slightly more expensive and this quickly adds up when 100+ cranes need to be made. To be fair, I find the looks of the 9391 stunning for the low part count. However, as I show in the video, it does not really work as a crane. The above photo shows the comparable sizes of both models. The front view. Please note the relative widht of the tracks: They are each 3L while the vehicle width is 7L. The resulting chassis is one stud in width! To widen the tracks, the crane has a shifting axle system with half bushes as stoppers. The final result is not the strongest system, but the crane at least has the function! The top view shows why this crane is called the 'Spider Crane': the outtriggers can be seen as the legs. The great thing about building such small models is that every part can be seen and every part has its function. There are very few 'unused studs'. This crane has a 3-section boom. In transport shape, this crane is 12 cm high so all of it should be folded. Therefore it looks like a proper mess when folded in. It is a common known fact that Hoeflon cranes will lift their own weight, because one crane should be able to lift another crane into a cellar. Hopes were low for the scale model as it is fully made from plastic Lego pieces. Under these loads, they will simply bend. Using the correct crane position and the winch, I got one crane to lift the other - just. On this small scale, I could not use the same strong structure from the real C6, so it was a nice result that my building resulted in something with the same strenght. The crane in full extended mode. The shape changes dramatically when the boom is unfolded. It reaches a maximum height of 42 cm. This model is meant as a business gift. This box was developed by a third party and it looks great. It is just big enough to contain the 425 parts and the A5-sized building instructions. I spent really hours drawing a 3D model and creating building instructions with lPub. By doing it yourselves, it becomes clear how much time goes into it.. The agreement with Hoeflon was: me delivering the PDF, Hoeflon doing the printing. I'm really pleased with the end result. To conclude, this MOC shows that you don't need a lot of parts to build a fun Technic model. I have many parts now compared to five years ago, but all of it is useless when someone knocks on the door to ask for a small scale model. This model also shows the problem of modern Technic sets from the store shelves. They are built large, very large. The 8265 Wheel loader is an example. It is enormous, while having less functions than this small crane that will fit into its bucket. Now the size may speak to the inner desire of the (hu)man to posess big things, but personally I like finesse and elegance over size. It is my big hope that TLG sees this in time, otherwise the awesomeness of new Lego Technic sets will fade away. The video
  5. I would like to present a 1:48 scale model of one of the largest hydraulic mining excavators in the world. This machine has been previously known as Terex O&K RH400 and Bucyrus RH400, and currently it is called Caterpillar 6090 FS. However, this model uses the preceding Bucyrus livery. The model has the following remotely controlled electric functions: Propulsion; Slewing; Boom operation and opening of bucket; Rotating cooling fans; Folding ladder; Retractable service station; Lighting. The model has a remotely controlled gearbox which distributes motor power between two sets of functions. The scale of the model is minifigure compatible. Thank you for your attention!
  6. Dear Friends, I build this commissioned model for the Tug owner Fairplay in Hamburg (Germany) in 150 hour and just above 12500 parts and is 60 cm long x 28 cm wide and 56 cm high. Many thanks for the great reactions at the WIP stage and i hope you like the progress how to build. I have great fun to build her and their are so many SNOT techniques that 85% is build side ways, also create all the details and lighting at such small space, was great to do. Best regards, Edwin IMG_7384 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7395 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7398 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7397 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7401 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7399 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7382 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7369 by VFracingteam, on Flickr IMG_7362 by VFracingteam, on Flickr And for the complete build you find many more pictures. https://www.flickr.com/photos/vfracingteam/albums/72157690201589882
  7. Garhwilliams

    Lego Modulex

    My wife was given some time ago half a bin bag of what I understand is Lego Scale Model. The bricks have the Lego logo on every stud and pat pend on the underside. We know very little about it and no idea if there is any interest in it. I can find very little info on the internet. Would be very grateful for any insight. I have found that this line was discontinued in 1965.
  8. I would like to present a 1:42 scale model of one of the largest haul trucks in the world, Caterpillar 797F. The model has the following features: Full suspension; Transmission with planetary reduction; Remotely controlled propulsion and steering, body raising and lighting; Folding ladders. The scale of the model is minifigure compatible. Bonus video: Thank you for your attention!
  9. Similar to my thread of a year ago, wanted to share a couple more freight cars I've been building on the side: Conrail N6A I've shown this Conrail transfer caboose in a couple of my threads, but never formally, so here it is. The prototype is one of several classes of transfer caboose Conrail inherited from the Penn Central. The model was designed almost two years ago, and I got around to putting it together last year. The "skirt" that covers the tops of the wheels is typically the toughest thing to model on American freight cars: if you run on R40 track, the bogies usually need to pivot enough such that the wheels will scrape... this isn't a problem on the N6A because it's quite short; no fancy engineering is required to compensate! The geometry of the skirt and such are still similar to that of my earlier flatcar. And with stickers Brickshelf Gallery PRR G43 Like the caboose, this gondola might have shown up a few times, but never formally. The G43 is a 52' gondola built during the last decade of the PRR. Most of them went to PC and then Conrail. This model was designed and built last year. The dimensions are very similar to the aforementioned flatcar, and it's basically built the same way: the structural component (the sides) is studs-out, and the floor and trucks are studs-up. Once again, much of the work done to make the skirts work on the flatcar are applicable here. Thus, the hardest thing here was figuring out what to do about the shallow trapezoidal part in the middle - eventually I went with wing plates. Finally, this probably should have been dark red or reddish brown, but all three colors seemed to somewhat off, so I ended up going with the most common. I also looked at weathered designs, but its a little bit too difficult when there are a lot of large, exposed parts like the wings. Brickshelf Gallery Alaska Railroad 15800 Series This is a side-dump car, typically used for MoW work. Technically Wikipedia thinks its a type of gondola. As you can see, the specialized feature of this type of car is that it empties sideways: unfortunately the model does not have this feature! This car has actually never been posted: I only recently completed the design and model: Doing the textures on the sides was a little big challenging, especially trying to "blend" it with the ends. On the prototype there are a ton of funny angles that are hard to model in LEGO. Construction is otherwise typical: studs-out for the body, studs-up for the chassis. Those droid-body things are really good for the big pneumatic pistons. Brickshelf gallery Finally, this is a repost, but here is the gondola and caboose running with my EMD Model 40:
  10. Commander Wolf

    TTX Articulated Intermodal Spine Car

    This project started, in a wholly different form, several years ago in response to two thoughts I had: "How can I make a long train without making excessively expensive?" and "I really want some modern rolling stock". Originally the obvious answer was articulated well cars. Well cars have very little structure to build, and Jacobs bogies mean relatively few wheels and even fewer couplers per unit length (compared to a train of the same length made up of "regular" 4-axle, 2-bogie rolling stock), both of which are particularly expensive parts. I would need to build containers to "fill out" the train, but that did not seem to be a big issue. Unfortunately the articulated well car project got to something like 95 to 99 percent completion when I pulled the plug. The car looked fine, that was never a problem, but they turned out to have more operational and structural issues than I had hoped: most poignantly they couldn't clear switch handles right after turns and the bottoms would fall out after extended running. Furthermore, to make the car look "filled" enough, I would need to build something like 15 to 20 TEU worth of containers, which increased part count and weight. Double-stacking containers also decreased stability and made the bottoms more likely to fall out. So the well cars ran empty at like one BayLTC show, and then they were shelved while I tried to think of solutions that I never found.Fast forward another year and I found out about articulated spine cars. Spine cars are similar to well cars in that they are articulated and intermodal, but spine cars trade density for flexibility: they can't carry as many containers per unit length as well cars, but they can carry containers or trailers and can fit in a small loading gauge. From a modeling perspective, spines have even less structure than wells, and more importantly can be filled with half of the 15 to 20 TEU worth of container, saving more weight and more parts. So here's the model: The car itself is 214 studs long and comprises just 1018 parts, giving a part per stud length of 4.76. For comparison a relatively tame looking "regular" piece of rolling stock like my flat car is 33 studs long with 335 parts, giving a part per stud length of 9.85 - almost twice that of the spine car, so that gives an idea of how efficient the spine car actually is. Construction is very simple. Everything is studs up save for some of the trim. The center of each section is actually pretty strong since it's just stacks of plate, but there is still a bit of structural non-integrity around the bogies since the spines have to taper down to a single plate for clearance. The most difficult part was of course making sure nothing scraped or interfered with anything when the car goes through a full R40 curve: I mocked up three sections of the car before committing to the final build: And of course, the build would not be complete without containers. With the well cars, I built an ad-hoc collection of 20 and 40 foot containers, each with a slightly different design, partly because I didn't feel like it was the main part of the build, and partly because I needed so many. Since the spine cars would need much fewer containers to load up, I decided to make them good. There's essentially two kinds of containers here: a "detailed" type and an "efficient" type. The detailed type is actually what I call the "RailBricks Container", which appeared in issue 14 of the now defunct(?) publication. The efficient type is just made of panels and detailed with a sticker in order to be light, but all the containers at least have tiled roofs to clean up the lines. There is also a trailer mostly designed by @jtlan And all the bits put together: All the weight-saving seems to have paid off as the loaded car doesn't seem to be that heavy - even my EMD Model 40 can handle the whole thing just fine. Having run it at several local LUG meetings and a full-day event, I think I have run it long enough to verify that the cars don't develop structural issues after long periods of activity. There is of course video from these runs: 0:23: Test run with the Model 40 0:31: Clearing the switch handle 0:43: Running under 9v power Full gallery here, and have a nice day!
  11. Greetings, Train Tech! Here's a model of the BR24 steam locomotive from Germany, built at my usual 15 inches / stud scale: The BR24 (or "DRG Class 24") were a standard class of German locomotives built in the 1920s and 1930s. As was the case with most standard German designs, plans were drawn up and orders were placed from various manufacturers. They served through World War 2, and continued to serve into the 70s in West Germany, East Germany, and in Poland (as the Oi2 class) Most photos of the locomotives show them fitted with the larger Wagner smoke deflectors (the "elephant ears") -- I've chosen to model the locomotive with the smaller Witte deflectors, which were fitted on a few examples later in their life. I was motivated to build this locomotive for two reasons. First, I wanted a suitable locomotive to go with the Umbauwagen I had built. Secondly, I hadn't seen many new takes on this model since Ben Beneke's version from the early 2000s! There are many builders who have modified Ben's design, often substituting BBB medium wheels for the rare large wheels from the set 7750. However, my typical scale is larger than the scale of Ben's model, and I also wanted to leverage some new parts that have come out since. Like most of my locomotives, this model features Power Functions. A single M-motor beneath the cab powers the drivers at a 5:3 reduction ratio. The locomotive is fairly light but pulls adequately, and there's room in the boiler for additional weight if needed. In a way, this model helps to understand and demonstrate how little weight and torque you can get away with; I see a lot of builders cram extra motors into their locomotive, when the torque can't be transmitted due to a lack of weight. The tender houses the Power Functions receiver and battery box. The 3-axle tender has a rigid frame, with the center axle sliding to negotiate curves (I used a similar geometry on the TP56 locomotive). The body of the tender lifts off for access. The battery box is mounted sideways to better take advantage of the shape of the tender. Coupled together, the locomotive has decent reception from all angles except the front, where the cab blocks the receiver. Incidentally, my model of the 2MT, which exhibited similar reception characteristics, happened to fall off the table during prototyping of this model. About 60% of the 2MT's parts wound up in the BR24, which is actually a pretty good recycling rate! I took the model to Bricks By The Bay 2017, where it spent many hours pulling the Umbauwagen around BayLUG's display. It also won "Best Machine" in the "Scale Models" category: Thanks to anyone who came by to see it, and the rest of the display! Here's the full Brickshelf gallery, along with some Work-In-Progress pictures. I've also brought you some footage of the locomotive in action: Thank you for reading! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- One final note: Ben was one of the builders who had been active around the time I first started buidling Lego train MOCs -- so in a way, this model is an homage to him. A few of the design techniques used in this model are based on techniques in his models -- the hinges angling the sides of the cab, the 11-plate-diameter boiler, and the way the smoke deflectors are attached. If you're still out there in the hobby, Ben, thank you for inspiring me and a whole generation of builders.
  12. StangMan302

    Lego Le mans prototype lmp1

    I have built a custom Le mans lmp1 class racing car. this car would race in the 24 hours of Le mans, held every year in June. Feel free to leave comments and feedback, would love to hear what you have to say. More pics on bricksafe here.
  13. TheMindGarage

    [MOC] Ariel Atom 500 V8

    This is my latest MOC: an Ariel Atom 500 in 1:9 scale! Technically it isn't a true scale model since I didn't use exact dimensions (I just build what I think looks best), but size-wise it's about 1:9. The real car is the fastest ever variant of the Ariel Atom, a street-legal car built for track racing. Released in 2008, the Atom 500 features a 3-litre transverse-mounted V8 made from two motorbike engines. It produces 500 horsepower (hence the name) and redlines at a rather insane 10,500 RPM. Other modifications include massive wings and the gold-painted exoskeleton. The car weighs only 550kg, giving it a power:weight ratio of over 900hp/tonne (higher than anything short of a Koenigsegg) - It recorded a 0-60mph time of just 2.3 seconds and could reach 200mph. It was the fastest road-legal car around the Top Gear Test Track for over two years. That record lap was on damp tarmac - had the track been dry, it would probably still be at the top. Only 25 of these cars were made, selling for around £200,000 each. My model features: Remote control drive and steering with Power Functions - 1 XL motor for drive and 1 M motor for steering 4-speed sequential gearbox operated with paddle-shifters Working steering wheel Full independent suspension with longitundinally-mounted shock absorbers Steering has zero scrub radius V8 engine replica with moving pistons The zero-scrub radius was a new idea for me. When playing around with suspension linkages, I discovered that mounting the links in a certain way would cause all four to move when turning (rather than just the steering link). The center of steering was further outwards, almost exactly in the middle of the wheels (I think it's where the suspension links would intersect when extended, but I'm not sure of this). The geometry I chose works almost perfectly for 68.8x36 ZR tyres on 56mm rims. Here's a picture of the steering links in their two extreme positions superimposed - the point where the wheel shafts intersect is the center of steering: The suspension is standard double-wishbone in the rear, but with a sideways lever converting the upwards motion of the suspension into longitudinal movement of the shock absorber: The transverse V8 was very difficult to fit in because it has even dimensions and the rest of the chassis has odd dimensions. It is connected directly to the XL motor The interior (or as close as you can get to an interior in an Atom) features two racing-style seats, a steering wheel and paddle shifters: The aesthetics were rather difficult at times. The framwork was very difficult even with the 42055 yellow parts (in fact, getting that set is the reason why I built this model), and at times I had to use some tricks. For example, the rear framework looks like it has two beams crossing in an X-formation when in fact the left and right halves of the "X" are two separate structures: I also replicated the exhaust pipes and gigantic rear wing. One of my favourite parts of the model is the side intake and its red stripe: The PF IR receiver is disguised as the air intake and roll hoop: For more pictures of the car, see my video below. Music is composed by me as well: [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhmgbCIpHT0[/media] This project is also on LEGO Ideas! I know the success rate is extremely low for such projects, but it would be amazing if this set because a reality! Please support my project here. Any support is much appreciated.
  14. I've wanted to write this since last summer, when I picked out a model as a "demonstrator". I don't expect that all the material will fit in one post. This post covers part of my process for building scale models. I previously presented some of this material in a talk at Bricks By the Bay 2016, titled "How Do I Train?". Introduction I built Lego trains prior to heading off to college, but didn't take my bricks with me when I started school. I started building again when I returned. Seeing the high-quality work of the early train builders inspired me. In particular, Ben's works served as inspiration both before I left for college and after I returned. Like many builders, I base my models on real trains. I got started with my current building process when I wondered why my models didn't really look like the things they were baed on. Clearly, building a model while looking at references helps. But continually checking against known dimensions of the real thing will yield even better results. Scale Models The models I build now are scale models of real trains. A scale model is "a proportional replica of a physical object" (Wikipedia) The original object the model is based on is called the "prototype". The model reproduces the features of the prototype at a smaller size and also maintains the correct positioning of those features relative to each other. The amount of reduction is called the scale of the model. For example, a 1/6 scale model of a 6-foot tall person would be 1 foot tall. Here are two images from a pamphlet that illustrate the idea of "scale". This image shows the same plane modeled at different scales: The planes have the same proportions as each other and the original plane, even though they are all different sizes. This second photo shows models of different planes built at the same scale. As the planes are all scaled down from their prototypes by the same amount, the models accurately depict the difference in sizes between the real aircraft. Widths Are a Distraction Many train builders describe their models as 6-wide, 8-wide, etc, corresponding roughly to the width of the primary portion of the model. These are not scales. They are *sizes*. Widths are NOT scales! The width of a model is useful for explaining roughly how big it is, but the same width may reflect different scales depending on the size of the prototype. A Big Boy built at the same width as Stephenson's Rocket would be built at a smaller scale, because it is wider to begin with and has to fit in the same amount of space. Conversely, building at a fixed scale can result in models of different widths, reflecting the difference in sizes of the prototypes. Picking a Scale The first instinct when deciding to build at a fixed scale is to try to build at "minifig" scale. That approach is doomed to failure, or at least inconsistency. Minifigs have very different proportions than humans: A minifig is about twice as wide as a human the same height would be. Because of this fact, a minifig will seem either short or wide relative to a model of a real vehicle designed for real humans. The scale I choose to build at is 15 inches per stud (381mm / stud). This works out to about 1:48 scale. At this scale a minifig represents someone about 6 feet (183cm) tall. American and most continental European rolling stock is about 8 studs wide; British rolling stock clocks in at 7 or 8, depending on the size of the prototype. Constraints Generally, I avoid modifying parts or using third-party parts in my models. I make an exception for wheels from Big Ben Bricks. Ben offers a variety of wheel sizes which are helpful when building steam locomotives. His small wheels are slightly thinner than the official Lego ones and have no webbing between the spokes. On the other hand, the official Lego wheels feature grooves traction bands, which is important for making powered locomotives (more on this later). I also try to make sure that my models are able to run smoothly on standard Lego track. This means all arrangements of R40 curves and switches, or at least the ones I am likely to encounter at shows. Ideally the models can also handle some unevenness in the track. Planning Process Generally the first thing I do is pick a prototype to base my model on. Once I've done so, I locate references using search engines, Wikipedia, and more dedicated sites like RailPictures.net. If I find an interesting image I'll look at the site it comes from, which often turns up relevant information. Searching in other languages can yield additional information on foreign prototypes. I try to get photos of the prototype from a variety of angles, or at least pictures of other models of the prototype. Both of these can be tricky if the prototype is rare, exotic, or unique. The most important thing is to find an engineering drawing or blueprint. These images show the prototype from a few different angles, with critical dimensions labeled. They are helpful for constructing accurate models. Scaling The next thing I do is scale the technical drawing. To do so, I choose a labeled length, convert it to inches, then scale by the chosen scale. For example: The scaling equation yields the size of the chosen length in studs. I then overlay the drawing on Lego graph paper. The paper has vertical lines separated by the width of a brick and horizontal lines separated by the height of a plate. It's useful for building models that are primarily studs-up. The paper was previously available on Lego's website but has since disappeared. I've uploaded a pdf here. Here's what the drawing looks like overlaid: I usually colorize the drawing to make it stand out against the grid. Adjusting Numbers and Selective Compression From the earlier equation, you might remember that the distance between wheels scaled to 4.72 studs, which is not a whole number. In cases like this, I round to the nearest whole number (in this case 5). This process introduces some distortion in the model, but it's usually small and hard to detect. Here's another example where the dimensions didn't quite work out: Here, the distance between the center wheels and the two outside ones is ~5.5 studs. It would be inconvenient to place the middle wheel in that position if I wanted to implement working drive rods. For this model, I used a technique called selective compression. Selective compression is a modeling technique where certain features of the prototype may be reduced or omitted to reduce the size of the model. For example, a model-maker might omit some windows on a building while retaining their size and spacing, resulting in a smaller model. For the above model, I shortened the distance between the first and last driving axle by 1 stud: This yielded a more usable spacing of 5 studs between axles. Conclusion I hope you've enjoyed this look into my planning process for train models. Let me know your thoughts. If there's interest, I'll continue this series with some posts on building and motorizing models. Cheers!
  15. India Mill Chimney - Darwen, Lancashire India Mill chimney was the tallest and most expensive in England when it was completed in 1867. India Mill Chimney stands 303' in Darwen, Lancashire. The Lego version stands 5'6½". Back then, mill owners had more money than they knew what to do with ... so when they built their new mill, they'd want it build with fancier brickwork, a taller tower, etc, than the mill owned by another guy in the next town. This means that many of those old buildings were great architectural works of art. Many were demolished in the 1960s and 1970s, but fortunately not all were. The ones that remain are now listed buildings. India Mill Tower is a Grade II* listed building. This building had its debut at the Amherst Railway Show in West Springfield MA on Jan 30-31, 2016. This rendition of India Mill Chimney in Lego is the latest in my series of Real Life buildings. Detailed view of top: Close-up of the upper section showing detail in Lego & real-life. Note the bare brick top. When originally built, there was about 20 tons of ornate wrought-iron atop to crown the building nicely. This was removed during World War II to be melted down (along with railings from houses, parks and other sources) to be used in the war effort. My rendering brings a semblance of this ironwork back! View of base & a perspective from bottom looking up: Enjoy!
  16. Commander Wolf

    [MOCs] Various American Freight Cars

    Hi EB! I haven't posted in a long time, but I have actually been building stuff. I promise. I had been looking to put together an american freight train for some time now: I originally thought I could get away with building a long articulated well car (which would make up the entire length of a practically sized lego train), but the well car has proven to have more restrictions and less reliability than I would have liked, and as such it was time to build some regular freight cars. Tank Car All of these freight cars were actually designed in maybe 2014, but at the time I did not actually intend to build them, preferring the aforementioned well car instead. This tank car was completed first because I was able to acquire almost all of the parts through my local LUG. The only expensive parts were the 8x8 dishes on the ends, which are apparently quite rare. As much as I hate to be imprecise, the car is a little bit of a freelance: I did work off a drawing to get the proportions, but I apparently could not find a photo or model of the thing in the drawing, so the greeble around the the dome and platform is a bit of a guess. The ladders are also a bit disproportioned, but that is more of a convenience. This car probably has the most interesting construction of the three here: I wanted to use the various 8-wide circle parts, but I did not want them to make up the load-bearing structure (so you can't pull the car apart). Therefore the load-bearing structure is actually a Technic frame that kind of moves up and down such that the top and bottom set of circle parts can connect at alternating bulkheads. Flat Car Like the tank car this is a little bit of a freelance, but I really wanted a flatcar such that I could put random stuff on it, and modern flatcars at our scale are far too long to run on R40. I found two models for reference, and I believe my drawing is for the bottom one, but the car itself really takes more from the top one. This one was actually the toughest one to build. As I designed it in 2014, there wasn't nearly enough structural integrity and the wheels would easily rub on various other parts in curves. It took me quite a few iterations to increase the structural integrity to an acceptable level without compromising the overall appearance of the car (mainly not making it too tall). As you can see the details of the final design look nothing like the details on my original LDD build. Build-wise, the key to making it structurally sound was to make the studs-out sides the load-bearing element, and the difficulty was doing that while still giving the trucks enough clearance to pivot fully in an R40 curve. If you press on the car in a turn there is still a but of scrubbing, but for now I consider that acceptable. Hopper Car Unlike the other two, this car is actually based solely on a specific model! It is the latest one to be completed, and I think it is actually my favorite of the lot. It took me a while to get around to it one because I thought it would need a lot of parts, but it was mainly just the 1x2 rails (something like 100 of them) and they were relatively cheap. Construction is mainly studs up for the chassis and studs forward/backward for the sides. Each side is a studs forward and a studs backward section held together with rails on the top and bottom with some additional SNOT needed to go around the ends. It's probably the sturdiest of the three cars, but also the heaviest. Well that's it for now. There is a full gallery with a few more pics if it ever gets moderated. I do have a new locomotive in the works too, and it will be interesting.
  17. It has been a while since I've introduced you to my early history of Model Team scale and type MOCs I have built years ago. I have to appoligise to the ones who have been looking for more, because there is a lot more to show. Let me correct this mistake and present to you the next page in my LEGO car building history booklet.It's Jeep Wrangler Rubicon - three door version. This was the first MOC I've built using exatly zero white bricks. Maybe it is a bit hard to tell from the sunny background, but the color is dark red. Back in those days we didn't have the new tires in this diameter, therefore I didn't have any other choice than to use those bubble tires. Hard to tell now, which ones would look better for this offroader. Anyways. To tell the story further - it is a three door version. Everything opens. Doors, trunk, hood - all were functional. And of course, as for these cars - the black roof can be detached. It actually consisted of three parts, which you could detach independent. There was one bit on top of the driver, similar one on top of the front passenger. And then the biggest part at the rear. Oh yea.. now, when I see the pics, it was quite a challenge to build the nose, the part which gets narrower. Aaand... the front grille. But all legit. Nothing glued or stressed.Yep... that's it for now. Hope you like it. Feel free to leave some comments or ask any questions about it if you have any. I hope I still would remember the details about it.See ya soon. Hopefully sooner that in two years from now :)Rolic
  18. Last week, I've finished my new scale model: It's a John Deere 75G excavator. I've chosen built it in in the Model Team style. The chassis and boom were the easiest part of the excavator. The cabin and rest of the upper part were challenging. It was a nice challenge to get the excavator in the correct shape. It took four month’s to complete the excavator with display. The 75G scale model has several functions from the real one: · Dozer blade · Rotating 360 degrees · Cabin door opens · Yanmar Tier 4 engine · Engine doors opens Pictures: 01_John_Deere_75G by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr 02_John_Deere_75G by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr 03_John_Deere_75G by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr 04_John_Deere_75G by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr 06_John_Deere_75G by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr 13_overview_functions by Mathijs Bongers, on Flickr Many thanks to JaapTechnic for making the custom stickers for this John Deere 75G scale model. More pictures at my Flickr page: https://www.flickr.c...157665389978183 I hope you like this scale model