Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'steam loco'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • New Member Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE STARTING!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic, Mindstorms, Model Team and Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • The Military Section
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • Digital LEGO: Tools, Techniques, and Projects
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 5 results

  1. "Sometimes, late at night, you can hear the whistle wail with a spooky, screechy sound like a wheel gone off the rail; and up in the smoky clouds, you can almost recognize the ghost of a crazy engineer with fiery cinder eyes; I say, Whoo-whoo! Can't you hear the haunted train? Whoo-whoo! Waiting on a haunted train I'm gonna, crash that engine, you know, only sticks and stones and old conductors' bones remain..." This steam loco was from the first animated train cartoon I ever saw when I was very small (three years old, from what I'm told), and is one of my favorites, easily beating The Brave Engineer (1950's Disney cartoon) and only being bested by The Polar Express film! I got the basic looks for the model from a single screenshot of the 1990's Nickelodeon cartoon show "Hey Arnold!". The engine seem to be based on Norfolk and Western K-1 class 4-8-2, but is apparently owned by Great Northern as evidenced by the tender writing. You can read more about the haunted engine, it's known story, and even potential theories for why it crashed here on the Arnold wiki. (yes, that's a thing, and credit to Paul Welch on Flickr for bringing this info to my attention.) The following text is from the wiki page for the episode: "As shown in the episode of the same name (Haunted Train), the legend concerns the phantom locomotive, Old Engine 25. Forty years ago (from original broadcast date, so November 1956), during a movement from the train yard to Union Station, Engine 25's engineer suddenly went insane. Defying signals and warnings to slow down, he intentionally derailed the engine and its train which slid down a high embankment. However, no wreckage was found beyond the engineer's severed hand, still clutching a part of Engine 25's throttle. According to the legend, the engineer drove the train straight to the fiery underworld, and now once a year on the anniversary of the engine's derailment, returns aboard Engine 25 with the intent of collecting new passengers to return to the underworld with him." There is even a song used over the closing credits of the episode, sung by the ghostly crazed engineer who drove his train all the way to hell (see first portion of post for that song!) And yes, I know a steam engine is not a entire train... it may partially make up a train, but it itself is not a train. The rear of the engine. The engine's boiler is a highly modified version of one seen on this Rebrickable MOC by @Plastic_Goth (only the boiler is partially reused, I designed everything else myself). Inside of the ghost engine's cab. I wanted to put the crazed ghost engineer with this model, but his parts got lost in the mail. ...Would you look at that! It's the anniversary tonight of the wreck! Won't you go on a lovely train ride with me? Notes: It's BAAACK! The Haunted Train never finished it's journey to real bricks, so I decided to give it a new lease on life rather than just haunting my computer. I was inspired to do this by a kid at a recent train show I displayed my models at, who asked me if I had heard of the TV episode and it's train. (and why I didn't have a model of it on display!) I took this as a sign from forces beyond my comprehension that I needed to build this engine, pronto. EDIT 12/24/23: coaches added! I have four kinds of cars on this train, with all having removable roof sections based on the 2013 Inside Tour set (Villy Thomsen Truck - set 4000008): - baggage - coaches (x2) - dome car - observation car (As you can see, a number of parts are missing from this train because LDD doesn't have them.) The baggage car. It's actually totally empty inside, but the roof still comes off to get at the inside. These two passenger coaches have seven seats apiece, whereas the dome has five and the observation has seven seats. Also in this picture, you can see how the roof looks once removed from the car. Needless to say, these were the easiest cars to design. The dome was the hardest car to design. After a number of efforts, I elected to borrow from set 4547 - Club Car and use panels for the dome. even though the bottom floor is empty and inaccessible, I daresay this car looks pretty good. The extreme rear of the roof of this observation car was a pain to get right. There just are no parts that slope inward and down at the same time when used sideways. So I made the best of bad situation and used the next-best part I could find. Thoughts welcome!
  2. What does a railroad do with a tired, worn out (yet historic) steam loco from an earlier timeframe, when scrap prices are too low to make it worthwhile to destroy right away? Why, send it to some lineside municipality looking to fill out a park and get a tax write-off to boot! Such was the fate of a lot of older locomotives in the early 1900's, 20's, and 30's. (The 4-4-0 Texas of the The Great Locomotive Chase fame comes to mind in this regard.) Sadly, a lot of World War II scrap drives drove towns and cities to destroy historic engines and other pieces of our shared industrial heritage, causing irreplaceable pieces to be destroyed and untold damage to be done to others. In the decades following the 1940's, many engines were also destroyed by Mother Nature - left to rot in public parks until they were beyond saving and the cutting torch was brought in to put them out of their misery. Thankfully, not all was lost in these dark times! A lot were pulled from their pedestal and refurbished cosmetically, with shelters erected around them. Some very lucky few were even restored to working order for a new generation to enjoy the sights, sounds, ands smells of a living steam loco and a long-passed way of life. Now, onto the LEGO model itself. This modular-compatible plinth was born out of a idea to show off a western loco in a modern LUG layout without it looking odd. The locomotive portion of the model was heavily inspired by the famous C.P. Huntington 4-2-4T steam loco originally owned by the Central Pacific, which was at one point on a plinth very similar to this one. Thoughts? EDIT 7/19/23: Added new pictures, as I made the model modular-building compatible. Original pictures in spoiler:
  3. Hello I like to share the result of Spark Industries' new side project. The company produces modern locos and cars, but wants to salute the old times. So designed a steam engine with enthusiasm and love. She is a 4-6-4 Hudson type loco: There wasn't a particular real loco for modelling, but the main shape based on Canadian Pacific 2816 and Union Pacific 844. She looks best on bigger turning radius, but deals with the standart lego curve and switch. The built width is 7..8 studs. The loco is 54 long, and with the tender it's 83. The Big Ben Bricks' XL wheels fitted mostly for the desired scale. Some curiosity: The steam valve is a built in little pneumatic cylinder. PF cable used for pipeline imitation: The handrails on the boiler's two side made of the very old technic flex system's inner cable. Electric side: 2 PF train motor 1 PF L motor 1 PF IR receiver (v2) 1 PF battery box 1 PF extension cable (50cm) 1 PF polarity switch The tender contains all the PF elements, except the L motor and the extension cable. Two train motors are attached to one output of the IR receiver (of course, one of them with the polarity switch). The L motor is in the loco, connected to the other IR receiver out. That way, it's possibble to start the loco with full voltage, the big wheels slipping, and then turn on the main drivers in the tender. Some more pics: Hope You like it!
  4. The following creations were made with help from about five people, not including myself. Please see each model for more details. The steam switcher was originally a model by Scotnick, which had no working pistons and was colored white and red. I borrowed some pistons from one of HunterDobbs' engines, and now have added updated saddle tanks courtesy of Canvas Rails / TF Twitch. (Canvas made the original 0-4-0 design where the tank originated, which TF Twitch recreated, this leading to the adding of it to this 0-6-0.) Oh, and by the way: the gears on the steamer are standing in for six Big Ben Bricks medium steam engine drivers. (four flanged, two blind) The rear of the engine features warp-around stripe design. The number of the engine goes on the four studs, while BRS goes on the three studs. The diesel was designed by Flickr member "RIZING!" and modified by me to be little taller and come in tan. I also removed some parts that are unavailable in black. The diesel could be motorized with either 9V or PF motors and associated items. Also, I must say I really like the stairs at both ends of the engine that RIZING! designed. The rear of the switcher now has three tail-lights. The number of the engine goes on the four studs, while the three studs is reserved for the letters BRS. I will be building these locos sometime early next year.
  5. There were some fairly odd looking locos at work on the timber tramways here in New Zealand. Many were built in the tramway workshops using a boiler from here and a stationary steam engine from there. Chain drive over big coarse spockets made the wheels turn so they were very simple locomotives indeed. Generally they only travelled at walking speed, but could haul a big load over the rough and ready light trackwork used on the logging tramways. I put together this little loco over the course of an afternoon. At the moment it's unpowered, but soon I'm going to have a bit of a mess about and put a motor in it. In case anyone is wondering the tyre on the top of the chimney is meant to be the primitive type of spark arrestor that was commonly used on these locos.