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Found 5 results

  1. (This is a 100% fictional history of the steam engine type and the rotary plow it pushes) In late-1929, Thomas Carter was Chief Mechanical Engineer for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), and on vacation to visit family in New Zealand. He was about to get on the train in Christchurch, when he was passed by a new NZR "G" class 4-6-2+2-6-4 Garratt steam engine. Remembering how he was having problems getting the next "big thing" built back in America, and that he was having a steam power crunch when it came to rotary snow plow duty up in the Rocky Mountains, he contacted the engine's manufacturer, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and talked about a possible contract in America using the New Zealand "G"class as a starting point. Once he got home to BRS company HQ in St. Louis, Missouri, he got the upper management's final okay, and began final design on the new "DM" class of Garratts. (DM standing for Double Mastodon, as it is really just two Mastodon 4-8-0 type loco wheel-set's back-to-back with one boiler.) All in all, six of these (assigned numbers 4922 - 4928 by the railroad) were made as a trial run in 1930, but the Great Depression worsened in 1931-33 so no more were ever ordered. (originally, 10 locos more were planned for general freight service but were never built, which would have brought the grand total up to 16 engines.) Six engines were permanently paired off of with a dual snow plow team: two DM engines on each plow, with each engine team working the two track main line, one team per track, one way, until they met at the halfway point of Continental Divide (also known as the town of Summit Point), which was a vital steam-era crew exchange and refueling point near a inter-state highway. The third team of two engines and it's plow (The one marked YO seen above) was used as replacement engine for the two crews already mentioned, and were only used if another rotary crew was down for regular maintenance or due to an accident. After diesels came on the scene to replace the steamers (plows and engines alike) in the mid-to-late 1950's, the only two steam engines left of the DM type in North America were pushing the spare steam rotary plow YO. One of these locomotives (no. 4928) was found to have a severely rusted water tank and front engine frame, and was thus kept for spare parts to keep the other loco (no. 4927) running. This severely impacted the surviving engine's ability to push the rotary plow hard enough to make it through the dense banks of Colorado snow. After a few unsuccessful modification attempts to keep the 34-year old engine going, it was decided to send the entire train (plow, engine, and caboose used for the train) to a railroad museum in Missouri. They would also be sent with all the remaining parts from engine 4928, as it might be prudent to re-steam the engine in the future. So, in 1963, the YO and 4927 were sent to National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, where it still sits today. (The following part of the story is actually true!) This steam powered rotary snowplow was inspired by the real-world Denver and Rio Grande's narrow gauge plow "OY", as now seen on the Cumbres and Toltec RR in New Mexico / Colorado. I've decided to name my plow "YO" in tribute to my inspiration, using this part from the original Toy Story sets on the model as the marker in four places. Oh, and yes, the front "blade" does spin around, but is not motorized. The rear of the plow features the coal tender with a ladder from the water tank-top down to the magnet. (Before anyone says anything about Garratt loco's not being ever sold into the North American market, I'll say this is not from our reality, this is my own railroad mirror-world and does not follow our history as it close it could. I mean, I've got steam loco's running into the 1970's on main lines hauling premier passenger trains for goodness sake!) The loco will have "BRS" (standing for Brick Railway Systems) on the rear coal bunker's three exposed studs, while the number 4927 goes on the four studs on the forward water tank in printed 1 x 1 tiles. This engine was originally inspired by two SRW locomotive works products. (Both were Garratt models made by @SavaTheAggie and formerly available on Bricklink until LEGO sadly removed his instructions) I reworked the engine to have working pistons and side-rods plus a longer frame. This made it from 4-6-2+2-6-4 to a 4-8-0+0-8-4. I also added the forward water tank and aft coal bunker from his 2-4-0+0-4-2 Garratt, and medium Big Ben Bricks drivers to make it from a fast passenger loco into a slow freight hauler. (or in this case, a snow plow pusher!) This "going through a curve" shot shows how flexible the engine is. A simple caboose, for the protecting the rear of the snow plow train. I used a pair interesting windscreen parts for the cupola windows. NOTES: Now the snowplow and caboose are built in real life but the new engine is not.... please be patient while I acquire the remaining 50% of the parts to finish it.
  2. Pdaitabird

    [MOC] Spring Plowing

    It's almost that time of year again...time to bust some clods! I've been experimenting with different designs for a horse-drawn plow, and this is what I finally settled on. The field is just filler in my railway layout using whatever green and tan plates I had left. C&C welcome! Soli Deo Gloria
  3. This is Lego's 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set with some unique rallycross-inspired features I added making it the perfect sports car to drive in the snow. Features Suspension system raised to make the car about two studs higher Wheels and tires from the 42037 Formula Off-Roader Mudflaps LED light bar Front off-road lights Rear bash bars Optional snowplow that attaches to the front The lights are fake and don't turn on, and all of the other lime-colored pieces are from the 42037 set as well. I had a lot of fun making this. I just had to switch of the area of the springs to change the height for the rear without any pieces needed, but for the front, I had to remove the entire Porsche's body to make the lift there using a variety of pieces. Overall, I'm proud that a got the result I wanted, which was making the Porsche 911 GT3 RS higher (so it wouldn't bottom out) and equipping it with off-road features so I could have fun with this set in the winter. It does need to drive in snow only about an inch high so I could move it without getting stuck (and so the plow can move the snow too). I recommend to anyone who has the Porsche set to try these mods out for themselves this winter! Here's some more pictures of the car and a desktop wallpaper that I created wishing everyone at EuroBricks Happy Holidays!
  4. I was always inspired by the multi-functionality of backhoe's, and I always imagined ways to improve upon it and now I finally did. In this MOC I challenged myself to make the most multi-functional vehicle I could, using all the motors and sbricks I had, naturally I ended up buying more motors XD The final build includes 17 LEGO power functions motors (5XL motors, 6L motors and 6M motors), 4 LEGO power functions lights and 1 DIY LEGO laser! It's powered by 4 LEGO PF battery boxes, controlled by 5 SBricks and operated by a 20 channel SBrick profile. The drill/laser arm is operated by 5 channels 1 channel for rotating the arm (PF XL motor) 1 channel for tilting the arm out (PF L motor) 1 channel for extending the forearm (PF M motor) 1 channel for spinning the drill head (PF M motor) 1 channel for activating the DIY LEGO laser (TOPIC HERE) The excavator arm is operated by 4 channels 1 channel for rotating the arm (PF XL motor) 1 channel for tilting the arm out (PF L motor) 1 channel for extending the forearm (PF M motor) 1 channel for moving the bucket (PF M motor) the bulldozer scoop is operated by 2 chanels 1 channel for raising and lowering the scoop (PF M motor) 1 channel for tilting the scoop (PF M motor) The crane is operated by 3 channels 1 channel for rotating (PF M motor) 1 channel for extending the crane (PF L motor) 1 channel for operating the winch (PF L motor) The plow/ trailer hook is operated by 1 channel 1 channel for lowering and raising the plow (PF M motor) The drivetrain is operated by 3 channels 2 channel for driving forwards and backwards (2x PF XL motor) 1 channel for steering (PF XL motor) The lighting is operated by 2 channels 1 channel for headlights 1 channel for rearlights Weight: 4.6KG Length: 62cm With: 32cm Height: 31cm building time: 4 weeks A special thanks goes out to my friend Bas for helping me edit and my amazing girlfriend for her everlasting support.
  5. Hey Guys I've been working on a 4x4 with plow and a 4 speed box but im having trouble with the power functions and actually moving the vehicle. The 4 speed is geared super low to have torque to plow or rock crawl but it can still barely move in 1st and 2nd. the truck is pretty heavy and when the engines start to get enough torque to move it a set of gears starts to slip. i'm currently using to pf Xl motors to run the drive train both are newer versions. any solutions or ideas would be welcome and pictures soon to come.