Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'loco'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Frontpage, Forum Information and General LEGO Discussion
    • Guest Section - PLEASE READ BEFORE YOU REGISTER!
    • Frontpage News
    • Forum Information and Help
    • General LEGO Discussion
    • The Embassy
  • Themes
    • LEGO Licensed
    • LEGO Star Wars
    • LEGO Historic Themes
    • LEGO Action and Adventure Themes
    • LEGO Pirates
    • LEGO Sci-Fi
    • LEGO Town
    • LEGO Train Tech
    • LEGO Technic and Model Team
    • LEGO Mindstorms and Robotics
    • LEGO Scale Modeling
    • LEGO Action Figures
    • Special LEGO Themes
  • Special Interests
    • Minifig Customisation Workshop
    • LEGO Digital Designer and other digital tools
    • Brick Flicks & Comics
    • LEGO Mafia and Role-Play Games
    • LEGO Media and Gaming
  • Eurobricks Community
    • Hello! My name is...
    • LEGO Events and User Groups
    • Buy, Sell, Trade and Finds
    • Community
    • Culture & Multimedia

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


What is favorite LEGO theme? (we need this info to prevent spam)


Which LEGO set did you recently purchase or build?


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


Country


Special Tags 1


Special Tags 2


Special Tags 3


Special Tags 4


Special Tags 5


Special Tags 6


Country flag

Found 5 results

  1. So I've decided to take advantage of the instructions provided by his book, but I've run into a colour issue. Which brown is it? I had assumed Reddish Brown, but the finger joint hinges simply do not exist in that colour (at least according to Bricklink). Is it meant to be the old Brown (which they do exist in, but I'd suspect some of the more modern parts don't)? Is there a suitable alternative to this without completely redesigning the ends (the modern ratcheted ones are too tall)? As is usually the case, I'm finding the building a parts wanted list on Bricklink frustrating as all hell (I'm not sure why the hell we need to identify what kind of piece we're looking for when we have the number already), and I want to get this parts list *right* so I can share it, meaning everyone else who has the book doesn't have to go through the same fart on.
  2. Update - she's built and pics added! These 4-4-0's were so popular in the US from the mid-1800's to the mid-1900's that they are referred to as a 4-4-0 American. They were a mainline work horse until the early 1900's when larger engines replaced them but they continued service on shortlines and spurs until the 1950's. My particular engine was inspired by #185 of the St.Louis-San Francisco Railway, nicknamed Frisco. It has 1050 bricks between the engine and tender and took me over 50 hours to make in LDD. It's 8 bricks wide and I tried hard to capture many of the important details without making it too super detailed. I focused mainly on scale and proportions. I did add good detail to the boiler in the cab and gave the tender good detail behind the cab to include the coal shoot and working coal doors. It's powered by a PF train motor under the engine with the battery and receiver housed in the tender. The very top of the coal heap serves as the button for the battery and you can look straight down and see the battery light glowing green. The cable for the motor runs under the floor of the engine and tender, but just above the coupler, keeping it out of sight. The .lxf file is quite detailed with over a dozen different groups making it easy to take the engine and tender apart allowing you to make modifications, change colors or just to examine my building technique. I have not run it through Bricklink yet, so there could be some parts in certain colors that are not available, like all the metallic gold in the cab for example. Here's a link to more history about the Frisco Railway... https://www.american-rails.com/the-frisco.html Here's a link to the .lxf file... https://bricksafe.com/pages/sed6/4-4-0-american-locomotive And here's some pics (click on each for bigger)...Hope you like!
  3. Description: Based on a tried & tested English Electric design, the South Australian Railways 800 Class locos were unique in that they were primarily used around Port Adelaide and in later years rarely ventured out of the metropolitan area. Seven of the class were allocated to the now defunct Gillman Yard and when not in use, were stabled at the loco servicing point at the western end of the yard. It was commonplace to see five or more 'on shed' on a weekend - the rest could usually be found at Mile End Diesel Depot. Their arrival meant the end of steam loco working from Port Adelaide depot and the remaining diminutive P class tank engines were consigned to the scrapheap. The original steam depot was closed to steam in July 1957, but used to house the new 800 class locos for a while longer. Afterwards it was used to store condemned steam locos before their disposal but by the late 1960s, the building had been abandoned and all signs of the steam era had been removed. The 800 class locos survived the state railway takeover by the Commonwealth, but were later considered obsolete and scrappings took place from 1988 to 1994, leaving only 801 to enter the National Rail Museum in Port Adelaide. (Source: 800 Class Profile by Steve McNicol from Railmac Publications, visit http://www.railmac.com) Loco 801 (first entered service on 9th June 1956) is periodically used for shunting on the museum grounds from time to time and was eventually repainted back into its original 1950s SAR colors in 2013 as part of the Rail Museum's 50th Anniversary Celebrations. Later, the 'waistband' was added and the side lights were mounted on the end deck railings. More about this model: This model features a display stand, a 60th Anniversary commemorative plaque, two Railway Museum workers; Dale Patyi and Bob Sampson and it can either be equipped with either the English Electric 6-cylinder diesel engine (if you want it as a display model) or can be motorized with the optional Power Functions for play! Also, you can take off the roof to reveal the inner workings and (only if it's not motorized!) even put the crew inside! To see more about the real 800 Class Loco: http://www.natrailmu...p?exhibitID=42 http://www.comrails....cos/p_800.html Dale & Bob in human: LXF Downloads: http://www.brickshel...s_motorized.lxf http://www.brickshel...onmotorized.lxf And last but not least... Happy 60th Birthday Locomotive 801! :laugh: The real locomotive (taken in 2013 before the stripe and side light modifications) Please Support this one on Ideas now! Thanks for reading!
  4. Redimus

    [MOD] Modding a Knock Off.

    A couple of weeks ago, I was browsing eBay and noticed several knock off Lego trains by a company called Ausini, some with wagons or coachs very clearly based on old Lego designs, some with random new design coachs, all with locomotives that are different to existing Lego designs. One in particular actually looked rather good, and being very cheap (£25 inc postage), I thought why not? I received the set, and was happy to see that, while the bricks were far from Lego quality, they were more than good enough to blend in with proper Lego, and that the set was a fun build. It wasn't, however, perfect. The main problems were the asymmetrical cabs, naff under loco detail, stunted pantagraphs, doors that were too far inset and lack of motive power. I briefly mulled over just using what I had, but I knew I'd need a lot more of certain green and blue bits, and that proper Lego versions would stand out for not being the same shade. So, I decided to buy a second set (irritatingly, it had gone up £5... but still a bargain, considering I was getting another couple of wagons too, oddly enough, I looked after I ordered, and sure enough, it had gone up again by £5... strange strategy by the seller). I already had most of the general Lego pieces I needed to add, and the PF battery box and receiver, but needed a couple of motor bogies (which I duly ordered). Before. Cheating! I like my locos to have 2 motors because I like big heavy trains. Unfortunately, I have yet to pluck up the courage to open up the motors and reverse the polarity, so have generally had to resort to having one end riding on it's wire, causing the loco to wobble at speed. I decided to try something different... I cheated! I left a gap in the floor of the slight overhang the cab is built on at one end, and cut a bit of plastic off of the middle of the end of the (not-Lego) trainplate, to allow the wire to pass into the loco without anything resting on it. Other than that, the construction was a fun and easy process that happily took up an otherwise rather useless morning. The Finished Loco. Notice the use of dark transparent studs to indicate lights that aren't lit, both on the cab ends, and next to the currently not in use pantagraph. I also needed to come up with a way to fit in the sensor and the on button into the roof, which took some modifying of the original design (a shame because I liked it). I fashioned a free floating block of Lego with the round and rounded upside down plate at the bottom to act as the switch.
  5. Redimus

    Wheel arches.

    I've been looking around for my next loco to tackle, and I've run into a bit of a problem. What ever I model, I want it to be from the Southern Railway, but the vast majority of the nice looking and/or recognisable ones suffer from the same problem, large wheel arches. There *are* a few Bulleids I could do, but seeing as I'd inevitably just copy the rather nice ones someone else has done, I'd like to do my own thing first (I know I'll break down and build at least one eventually). So, do any of you guys have any techniques for dealing with arches too big to get away with slightly undersized wheels/slightly too high footplates?