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Found 3 results

  1. Here's my 2nd engine, digital format only for now, but I'll order the parts soon. These 4-4-0's were so popular in the US from the mid-1800's to the mid-1900's that they are referred to as a 4-4-0 American. They were a mainline work horse until the early 1900's when larger engines replaced them but they continued service on shortlines and spurs until the 1950's. My particular engine was inspired by #185 of the St.Louis-San Francisco Railway, nicknamed Frisco. It has 1050 bricks between the engine and tender and took me over 50 hours to make in LDD. It's 8 bricks wide and I tried hard to capture many of the important details without making it too super detailed. I focused mainly on scale and proportions. I did add good detail to the boiler in the cab and gave the tender good detail behind the cab to include the coal shoot and working coal doors. It's powered by a PF train motor under the engine with the battery and receiver housed in the tender. The very top of the coal heap serves as the button for the battery and you can look straight down and see the battery light glowing green. The cable for the motor runs under the floor of the engine and tender, but just above the coupler, keeping it out of sight. The .lxf file is quite detailed with over a dozen different groups making it easy to take the engine and tender apart allowing you to make modifications, change colors or just to examine my building technique. I have not run it through Bricklink yet, so there could be some parts in certain colors that are not available, like all the metallic gold in the cab for example. Here's a link to more history about the Frisco Railway... Here's a link to the .lxf file... And here's some pics (click on each for bigger)...Hope you like!
  2. American 4-4-0

    Hello! Here is my first try on a locomotive and also the first one I completed. Some details like the bell are still missing but overall its pretty much complete. As for the moment I built this i had only a XL-Motor available to power it, so I implemented it into the drivers compartment. The headlamp at the front does light up with the Power-functions-LED. Was a bit tricky to hide the big transparent LED thingy in the headlamp design. Overall I am happy how it turned out, and I hope you will enjoy it aswell! When I got some time I will take some more pictures! Suggestions and critisism are welcome! Lego 4-4-0 Western Locomotive by Ragni Norgrimson, auf Flickr
  3. Fictional background: This 4-4-0 (also known as an American type) was built by Rodgers Locomotive & Machine Works for Brick Railway Systems (BRS) in 1870, and features a bright red-yellow-&-black paint scheme. Number 11 pulled passenger trains for 15 years before being reassigned to Freight duties in 1885. By 1890, the engine was worn out, and sent to a scrapper, who sold the engine to a museum for $100. Eventually, the museum was reorganized as the Imperial Rail Museum, where the engine rests today in non-operable condition. There were plans to get number 11 in working order for the US Bicentennial in 1976, but nothing ever came it, and the engine has remained cold and silent to this day. (This engine is the oldest surviving BRS loco in existence.) The model and color scheme was inspired by the steam engine from LEGO Toy Story set #7597 "Western Train Chase" (Link to Bricklink: http://www.bricklink...em.asp?S=7597-1 ) Here is the original model from the stock set. I've tried three times to get this engine right (working pistons and can go around curves + switches) and, twice I've failed. Let's hope the third time's the charm! The rear of the locomotive. Here is a better view of the side rods and wheels. The letters BRS go on the sides of the tender while the number 11 should go on the cab sides. One of these goes on the firebox door in the cab (Bricklink link: http://www.bricklink...asp?P=4150pb086 ) Other than that those parts, everything is where it should be. Here are the car's it's going to pull: (As a side note, the chains on the car ends have a glitch and refused to bend. They are supposed to sit on the 1x1 clip plates, and not the handrail / bar itself.) I was inspired by HunterDobbs and his red train cars to build my own versions. I think he got the idea from set 10173, Holiday Train. (link: http://www.bricklink...m.asp?S=10173-1 ) but his red versions look so much better than the plain white originals. I intened on using these with my 4-4-0 steam engine... once I build I get around to building it! (Here is a link to HunterDobbs' Flickr photostream: ) Here is the train with 4-4-0. I think it looks like a contrast to my dark green 2-6-0 and matching train. Here is the other train for comparison. The LDD file (for the 4-4-0 engine only) is here, if anyone wants it: http://www.mocpages....1428585286m.lxf The LDD file (for the 4-4-0 & it's train) is here, if anyone wants it: http://www.mocpages....1428593703m.lxf Comments, Questions, and complaints are always welcome!