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Found 6 results

  1. Ambush, 1863

    "Well, looks like we caught them boys red handed, as it were. Should have been more careful with your fire, but just as well. You won't live to pay for your laziness." Haven't posted on Eurobricks in forever............did you guys miss me? If so, let me know, and I'll post here more
  2. This modular station was inspired by a long since expired Cuusso / Ideas project, (not mine), and set 2150 Train Station from 1996 while the clock tower is inspired by Big Bentley Bust-Out (from Cars 2 set 8639) from 2011. I added a removable six track long platform and put a luggage ramp from the street side for use by the wheelchair pieces LEGO recently made. By the way: the logo right below the clock is the official LEGO trains logo built in bricks, while the words in the center (just between the middle pillars) reads "Ironwood Union Depot" in printed 1 x 1 tiles. The street side of the station has been extended towards the edge of the base-plate, allowing for a more room (and more details!) inside the building. The year of the stations completion, 1928, is right above the main entryway. The lower floor has the central ticket desk, plus pizza restaurant (complete with opening oven!) on the right side with seating available on the left wing. These wings also allow for access to the platform under the twin canopies. The second floor has the switching control room and station managers office which floats inside the exterior walls on some tile-topped pillars. This assembly is barely connected to the build by two studs. (NOTE: No stairs to the upper floor were made because that's how the official CITY sets are, so I didn't include any as I was going for an official LEGO set feel.) This a closeup of the four-sided clock tower and brick-built LEGO Trains logo. The modular station features two platform sections, two lower roof sections, one upper roof section, and the removable second floor on top of a cafe (with seating) on the lower level. The station platforms fit via Technic pins while the other sections attach via a few studs. EDIT 10/16/17: Added new pictures of the revised station. EDIT: 11/20/17: added revised photos in preparation for real life pictures come Christmas morning. EDIT 12/31/17: I just need two more letters and to cut up a 48 x 48 base-plate into 16 x 48 strips.... plus I need to build the platform on those strips. EDIT 1/5/17: it's finally DONE in real life! EDIT 3/19/18: Added clock tower and brick-built trains logos, plus revised interior details. Comments, questions and complaints are always welcome!
  3. I was inspired by Dr_Spock_888 and his rotary snowplow to build my own. Needless to say, it didn't come out quite right. I don't think it looks very good, personally. The wheels should be Light bluish gray, but since I'm not made of money, that won't be happening. In fact, I probably won't build it in real life at all. Background: Here is Union Pacific rotary snowplow 900081- It was designed and built in 1966 at the UP Omaha shops. This rotary snowplow is the heaviest ever built weighing 367,400lbs and is 52’2” long and 17’ high. Three or four locomotives, which were controlled from the non-propelled plow, pushed it at four to six mph. The snowplow is powered by an EMD 16 cylinder 3,000hp turbocharged diesel engine that drives an electric generator, which provides power to turn the 12’ rotary blades at up to 150rpm. A steam generator provided heat to the cab and can thaw out the blades if they became frozen. This rotary snowplow was last used in Green River, WY in the mid 1980’s, and it was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri in 1994 by the UP. The rear of the plow. I put the door there, but now i think there is no door there on the prototype. Oops! The word "UNION PACIFIC" should go on the studs towards the rear, while "900081" should go on the studs in the center. The blades are actually part of Dr_Spock_888's design, but mine do not move with the train like his... these are not connected to the wheels on the track, and don not move unless you spin them with your hand. Inspiration: (Photo by Wampa-one from Flickr, not me) LDD file for the Lego model: http://www.mocpages....1411309594m.lxf Complaints & compliments are always welcome!
  4. For our second annual US Civil War Collaboration at Brickfair Virginia, we created a large display (4x8 of 32x32 stud baseplates) of the 1864 battle to commemorate the 150th Anniversary. John Rudy, Joshua Brooks, Patrick Taylor and I built 32 modules and invaded them with 179 confederates and 142 Federals: ---Click on the pictures for greater detail--- While we had to compress the battlefield to get the Railroad Cut, Ny Stream, Brock Road and Widow Tap's Farm in, we were very careful to recreate the battle on May 6th, 1864 at 11:00 am, when General James Longstreet sent his Chief of Staff Lt Col Moxley Sorrel and four brigades sneaking along the Railroad Cut to surprise the Federals with a flank attack. All four of us had a great time with this, and got to talk about history to those who otherwise didn't know about it. The display was popular with the public and AFOLs alike at Brickfair VA, and was nominated for the Best Historical award, but lost to another of my builds, the Battle of Rorke's Drift (post to follow soon). Cheers, Gary
  5. The Blue and The Gray

    In preparation for our second annual Civil War Collaboration at Brickfair Virginia, here is an introductory build, a mostly symbolic representation of the struggle between the two sides. Depending on how you interpret the build, there are 7 characteristics included that are symbolic of the real conflict. Can you spot them? For more details, click on the picture. If you are coming to Brickfair Virginia in August, stop by the Civil War collaboration and say hello! Cheers, Gary
  6. Defense of Little Round Top

    Hello, I'm new to Eurobricks, so I thought I'd start with one of my favorite builds, just to try out the functionality of posting and see if I have everything right. Let me know if I'm messing something up here! This is a historical US Civil War build of the 20th Maine Regiment's defense of a key position during the war's turning point, the Battle of Gettysburg. I built it for the 150th Anniversary of the actual battle, starting it on the anniversary of the very day the action took place. It was part of the Civil War display at last year's Brickfair and won Best Historical MOC for 2013. For the full story of this action, click on the image. Thanks for your comments!