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Found 597 results

  1. Here is my review on 60266 Ocean Exploration Ship: THE GOOD: The ship does look massive. Love the new sting ray. Glad the Great White is back. Interesting new diving gears. Great use of stickers to make the aquariums. Great lab area. THE NOT SO GOOD: The scale of the main hall is a bit off. Look even a bit small for minifigure to stand in top level. Not indication on how minifigures can get to the lab. The pirate shipwreck's steering is a bit too modern. This set by no means is bad, it has it great parts and its own flaws. I particularly like its size when view from the size, the minifigures, the marine animals and the research lab. And I really like the use of stickers this time round. However, I really feel disappointed when there is no implication on how the minifigures are going to get to the lab. The scale is a bit off. This is indeed an expensive set but I'm glad I bought it 25% off which was a good deal. I will only recommend if you desperately need the great white or never own a lego boat before, otherwise wait for a clearance later this year.
  2. Here is my review on Monkie Kid's 80009 Pigsy's Food Truck: THE GOOD: Great interior details inside the food truck. Great opening mechanisms for interior access. I like the graphic designs on the stickers. Excellent Pigsy minifigure. Interesting build for the Pig Mascot Machine Gun. Several elements that feed some dark humours for corrupted mind like me XD THE NOT SO GOOD: Because of the size of the truck, you can't just put it into a typical Lego City setting. I wonder if there is a way to replicate the excelling opening mechanism without visible gap for the joints. Overall, I think this is a good set. I enjoyed the building experience, the outcome and the minifigures. Thanks to size, the designer is able to put a lot of interior details into the food truck. I do feel the weaponised look is a bit over the top and too Zombie Apocalypse type of truck but it's ok the good parts overcome the little shortcomings and it's my personal preference anyway. The Pigsy minifigure is just great, can't wait to use the head with the torso and legs of the Pig Costume Guy XD. And I really wonder what's the idea behind using sausages on the grill and decorations while Pigsy is obviously related to Pigs. Also the back of the Pig Mascot on top, what do you think it looks like? XD. Despite a few flaws, I will still recommend this to everyone. It's not as good as the Monkey King mech but this is also good. And the price is probably one of the better ones in the overall Monkey Kid theme, in fact I found this set with the most reasonable pricing.
  3. REVIEW - 42024 - CONTAINER TRUCK One of the first images of the 1H 2014 sets which appeared was the 42024 Container Truck. It's is what you'd call a skip truck. A skip is a large open-topped waste container designed for loading onto a special type of lorry. Instead of being emptied into a garbage truck on site, a skip is removed, or replaced by an empty skip, and then tipped at a landfill site or transfer station. As usual the first opinions where very divided, varying from great looking truck to looks unfinished and ranging from color vomit to I love the colors. My first thought was that the cab indeed looked a bit unfinished, but the color scheme, although having a lot of primary colors, did appeal to me. Luckily I had the opportunity of reviewing this set, so let's find out what it's all about! Note: Pictures where taken with a Canon EOS 600D (18-55mm kit lens). Every image can be clicked to show a high resolution version. 360 DEGREE VIEW For this review there is a 360 degree view available. Unfortunately I cannot embed it here on Eurobricks, so I've created a support page for this. Please note that this 360 view is experimental and not yet as I would like it to be. First I tried a big rotating home made turntable, but the results weren't fantastic. Then I came up with the idea to make a Technic PF stand, which works better. The bottom of the stand needs to be upgraded, probably using white studded Lego (with SNOT, studs not on top) to make it look better. And I am contemplating making an NXT version, so I can hook it up to a computer. When I manage to get my own software communicating with the camera, I can fully automate the process. There's even the possibility to do multi-row, so you can rotate up and down to change the vertical view angle. Anyway, check it out further in this review! Loading can take a while since it's 42 images, totalling 16MB of data. SET INFORMATION Set Number: 42024 Title of Set: Container Truck Theme: Technic Released: 1H 2014 Part Count: 948 Box Weight: 800 gr Set Price (MSRP): DE 69.99 EUR / UK 59.99 GBP / USA 79.99 USD Price per Part: DE 0.074 EUR / UK 0.063 GBP / USA 0.084 USD THE BOX The box measures 48cm x 28cm x 9cm. It's the same width and height as the 42023 Construction Crew box, but slightly thicker, 9cm instead of 7cm. The set does have more parts, so it makes sense. FRONT SIDE The front side shows the truck, loaded with the container and in the upper right corner it's shows some functions, like extending the outriggers and tipping the container to empty it. BACK SIDE The back side shows that the container can be emptied or it can be removed to replace it with an empty one. It also shows the optional Power Functions setup. B-MODEL ROAD GRADER The back side also shows a fairly detailed image of the B-model, a Road Grader. There's a 2-in-1 sign and a reference to the building instructions, which can be found online. CONTENTS OF THE BOX Opening the box reveals seven unnumbered bags, a sticker sheet and two booklets. The set doesn't contain a card board back for the instructions, like the flagship sets do. The booklets and sticker sheet are in near mint condition. The instructions are divided over two booklets. Opening the bags and collecting the liftarms provides the color vomit people have refered to. Luckily things where sorted out pretty quickly. This set contains a nice collection of liftarms, perfect for young or starting builders. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS The set contains some new 2014 parts and some existing parts in new colors. 49.5 x 20 TIRE Already mentioned in my Construction Crew review, which has these tires as well, and I quote: 2014 would be a year in which new tires would be released. Well, here they are. These tires are perfectly suited for smaller scale vehicles. They use the same rims as the Tire 43.2 x 22 ZR, but as you can see the diameter is 49.5mm instead of 43.2mm. This provides a more realistic proportion, especially suitable for trucks and construction vehicles. Basically they are small Unimog like tires. Big thumbs up for TLG! 5L Axle with Stop One of the new parts for 2014 is the 5L Axle with Stop (or Axle 5 With Stop), basically the same part as the 4L Axle with Stop only one unit longer and in dark tan (looks like normal tan in this picture) color. BIONICLE CHAIN LINK SECTION Not a new part, but never seen in a Technic set before, is this very nice looking Bionicle Chain Link. My guess is that these will sell a lot more on Bricklink, starting today. 1x6 THIN LIFTARM This is a very rare part since it has only be released in one set, the 8457 Power Puller from 2000. No more 3 to 6 bucks a pop for a new one on Bricklink. 1x5 THIN LIFTARM WITH AXLE HOLES Already present in some of the 2013 sets, but still this fairly new part is worth to mention. 5x11 PANEL PATE IN BLUE The 5x11 Panel Plate has been around for a while, but never in Blue! It seems blue is getting special attention this year, so here it is. Next to it is a picture of all the panels included in this set. PART LIST This set contains 948 parts and then some. THE BUILD The build starts with the front of the truck. A 1x7 Gear Rack is used for steering the front wheels, much like the 8109 Flatbed Truck. The front part of the truck, located below the cab, is starting to take shape. The axle for HoG steering is clearly visible. After the front section, the gear box will be built. This gear box is not used to drive a fake engine, but it's used for driving the two main functions (besides steering), and switching between them. The two functions are operating the boom and extending the outriggers. Here you can clearly see the two new 5L Axles with Stop which will be connected to the Linear Actuator in one of the next steps. The LA's are used to operate the boom, for raising/lowering and emptying the bucket. The Technic Cam is connected to the Technic Changeover Catch which will switch between operating the boom and operating the outriggers. Building the gearbox almost takes up every gear in this set. At the rear (which is on the left side in this picture) the Mini Linear Actuator is visible. This is used to operate the outriggers. Switching between functions is done at the front of the truck, near the cab. To transfer controls from the gearbox to the front, the mechanism shown below is used. Movement of the lever is limited by the 18x8mm wheels with fake bolts. This image shows the end of the first booklet. Stickers are applied on each side, to explain the functions and switching between them. The functions are activated by turning the Black 12T Double Bevel Gear at the right side of the truck. It's not the easiest way to operate, since turning the gear is quite cumbersome. And you need to turn it a lot to fully extend the boom. The second booklet starts with building the cab. The picture below shows the finished grill. It's your average joe truck grill, nothing out of the ordinary, but it looks okay. The license plate reads CU11014. As far as I know there aren't any designers with the initials CU, so it remains a mystery what this plate means. Some have suggested it might be the release date, See You in 2014 10th of January. If anyone knows the actual meaning, let me know! With the grill attached the cab, the truck is almost done. The seats are grey for a change, not the commonly used blue seats. The doors of the truck can be opened manually. This picture shows the steering wheel in a vertical position. Obviously it needs to be tilted a bit to have some angle. Otherwise, steering this truck would be quite a challenge. The next two pictures show the finished model, without the container. I must admit that the truck looks way better, than in the first box image. The cab doesn't look that unfinished anymore. It is a very simple can though. For starters, an extra liftarm could have been used to fill the gaps at the back sides of the truck, behind the doors, like in the 42008 Service Truck. So the cab is not bad, yet relatively simple. There is indeed a (yellow) 5x11 Panel Plate at the back of the cab, as some suggested. And there are two 4L Thin Liftarms which will be used to hold the battery box, when operated by Power Functions. MISCELLANEOUS BUILDING STEPS CONTAINER After finishing the truck, the skip (container) is left to build. Liftarm galore, if you will. The build is pretty straightforward, connecting pins to liftarms....and more liftarms. The back of the container shows two 3x3 L-Shape Thin Liftarms which are used to tilt the skip, when emptying. Here you can see the Bionicle Chain Links attached to the sides of the container. The chains are attached to an axle which is attached to the boom. That way the container can freely rotate when emptying or replacing it. The color combination of blue and grey, combined with the stickers, does make this container look very realistic. I like it!! PARTS LEFT I am still wondering whether I missed using two friction pins and two 3/4 pins. FINISHED MODEL Like most Technic models, this one looks better in real life than in pictures. The colors are very vibrant and having three different colors for the cab, loading bed and the skip is pretty common on a skip truck. The use of different primary colors actually improves this model. Otherwise it might look a bit dull. The yellow Axle Connector with Axle Hole is used to switch between operating the boom and operating the outriggers. The stickers show the corresponding action for the position of the lever. Looking at this picture, reminds me of a movie quote from Falling Down (1993) with Michael Douglas: "Can anybody tell me what's wrong with this picture?". Well, can you? Although being a simple compact cab, it does look good on this truck. At the back you can see the mechanism used to tilt the container when emptying it. The 4L axle between the two 3x3 L-Shape Thin Liftarms on the truck will be stuck behind the Perpendicular Double Split Axle and Pin Connector which will tilt the container when operating the boom. With the outriggers fully extented, the skip won't tilt when operating the boom. Instead the container can move freely and therefor be put on the ground behind the truck. Replacing the container takes a lot of manual turns. It's nice to have optional Power Functions, but I would almost say it's mandatory for having some playability in this set. This picture shows the bottom of the truck, where you can see most of the functionality in place, switch lever, operating gear, mini LA, part of the gear box and steering rack. Chck out this cool 360 degree view of this model. You can swipe from left to right to rotate. Loading can take a while since it's 42 images, totalling 16MB of data. MISCELLANEOUS PICTURES OF FINISHED MODEL SUMMARY So what do I think of this model. I am halted between two opinions. First of all this set does look great. It's vibrant colors do this model justice. Compared to the 8109 Flatbed Truck and the 42008 Service Truck the new tires are way better for building in this scale. Secondly, the new tires and some new parts are introduced. In my opinion these parts are not as interesting as the ones in the 42023 Construction Crew set. Unless your name is Conchas and you really need those blue panels for your Dunechaser. So it all depends on your needs. Besided opening the doors and HoG steering, this set offers two main functions: Operating the boom Extending the outriggers Operating both functions by hand is very cumbersome. It takes a lot of turning until the boom is fully extended and the container is on the ground. For having actual playability using Power Functions seems mandatory. I hate to start a Linear Actuator vs Pneumatics discussion again, but Pneumatics might have enhanced the playability. Obviously this would have been hard, since both functions use LA's but when emptying the container, the LA's aren't fully extended. So I do understand why LA's have been used. Somehow it feels that this set might have been better with pneumatics instead of LA's. So I do like this set, but it is missing a clever mechanism, like the 8109 Flatbed Truck to make it a great set. PROS Authentic looks New tires Lots of liftarms in different colors (great for starting builders) Power Functions optional (which reduces the price) CONS Operating the outriggers and boom is cumbersome without Power Functions Cab design is very simple New parts have very specific use No wow factor anywhere in the build SCORE Design 8: When fully built, it does look great. Build 7: Nothing spectacular. No wow factor. Functionality 7: Besides HoG steering, two main functions, which is okay. Playability 7: Operating the outriggers and boom needs Power Functions. Parts 7: Some new, yet very specific, parts. Does have new tires. Value for Money 7: Average value for money. Might be valuable, depending on your needs. 7,2 A Bit Too Average For Greatness Thank you for reading! And special thanks to Bonaparte and TLG for giving me the opportunity of reviewing this set Please rate this set at the top of this topic! All review images can be found on my Flickr page.
  4. REVIEW - 10242 - MINI COOPER Mk VII INTRODUCTION After the 10187 - Volkswagen Beetle in 2008 and the 10220 - Volkswagen T1 Camper Van in 2011 LEGO has released another brick built version of an iconic car. Now it's MINI's turn to be immortalized in the form of a LEGO Creator set. The model has been designed by British senior designer Andy Hugh Seenan, who allegedly can't work without coffee. He has been designing toys for LEGO since 2007 and joined the LEGO Creator department in 2011. He also designed the 31010 - LEGO Creator Tree House and 10525 - DUPLO Big Farm, which is his favorite self-designed model. We can judge by the Tree House that Andy is very creative in both implementing various features and maintaining aesthetics. Let's see if his creativity has founds it's way to the MINI. Review images can be clicked for hi-res versions. FROM LEGO PRESS RELEASE Take this MINI Cooper for a nostalgic drive down memory lane! Experience the iconic MINI Cooper first hand, with its classic lines, detailed interior and fun picnic theme. Take the iconic MINI Cooper for a drive! This beautifully crafted LEGO brick replica of the classic MINI Cooper Mk VII is full of authentic details, from the classic green and white color scheme with white wing mirrors and racing stripes, to the opening doors, hood and trunk, sporty fog lights, detailed engine and separate spare tire compartment. You can even remove the roof to access a tan colored interior with patterned seats, veneer-style dashboard, turning steering wheel, and moving gearshift and handbrake. And of course, no MINI Cooper would be complete without a picnic basket and blanket, the perfect accessories for a cozy day in the countryside! Features opening doors, bonnet and boot, spare wheel in separate compartment, detailed engine and 2 fog lights. Accessories include a picnic basket, bottle and blanket for nostalgic picnic theme. Authentic replica of the MINI Cooper Mk VII. Classic green and white color theme with white wing mirrors and racing stripes. Lift the bonnet to reveal the detailed engine. Remove the roof and access the detailed interior. Go on a countryside picnic with this iconic classic! MINI Cooper measures over 4” (11cm) high, 9” (25cm) long and 5” (14cm) wide. Available for VIPs from July 18th. SET INFORMATION Number: 10242 Title: Mini Cooper Theme: Creator (Expert) Released: July/August 2014 Part Count: 1.077 Box Weight: 1330 gr Box Dimensions: 37,2 x 35,0 x 8,9 cm (WxHxD) Set Price (MSRP): US $99.99 / CA $119.99 / AU $149.99 / DE 89.99€ / UK £74.99 / DK 799.00 DKK Price per Part: US $0.093 / CA $0.111 / AU $0.139 / DE 0.084€ / UK £0.070 / DK 0.742 DKK THE BOX The almost square box measures 37,2 x 35,0 x 8,9 cm and feels like it is filled with lots of parts. Holding the box and looking at the images, I immediately got the feeling that this will make a great present for young and old. The box is slightly smaller than the box of the VW Van which does have more parts. FRONT SIDE The front of the box shows the model in a countryside picknick scene. The age recommendation is 16+ which is a bit high in my opinion. The upper right corner shows the detachable roof. The box also states this model belongs to the Creator theme, Expert series. BACK SIDE The back side shows a variety of different smaller pictures, explaining most of the neat features. By the number of pictures we can see that there's a lot going on in this set. SIDES One of the sides shows a comparison between the model and it's real life counterpart. Most noticeable is the difference in the number of fog lights. And the rear of the real MINI is more curved than the LEGO version. The next side shows the front, side and back of the model. The front view is my favorite view. The combination of the grill, head lights and fog lights is well executed. The third side shows the part list, which is common for LEGO creator sets. What I like about the part list on the box is that you can see the variety of parts included in the box. Like most Creator sets, this set has a vast array of different colored bricks, which are very appealing to potential buyers. I would recommend including such an image on every larger box. CONTENTS OF THE BOX Since the box is not overly big, it feels like it's filled to the brim. It contains: 8 Numbered Bags (1, 2 and 3) 2 Booklets 2 Sticker Sheets 1 Brick Separator BAGS The set includes 8 numbered (1, 2 and 3) bags in varying sizes. The larger bags contain some smaller bag with smaller parts. The set also contains a brick separator. BOOKLETS The set contains two booklets with 64 and 51 pages for instructions, adding up to 76 steps. The booklets are almost identical. The only difference is the sequence number. STICKER SHEETS Not one, but two sticker sheets are included in this set. Two sticker sheets while there are a lot of printed parts?! One of the sheets has four stickers with metallic look. The other sticker sheet contains five different types of license plates to choose from. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS There are a lot of dark green parts in this set and some of them hadn't been released in this color before. Especially the first two common parts are very welcome in dark green! 1 x 1 PLATE Believe it or not, but this plate wasn't available in dark green before. 1 x 1 MODIFIED BRICK WITH STUD ON ONE SIDE Also a new part in dark green and a very useful one. 2 x 2 ROUND TILE & 3 x 2 PLATE WITH HOLE The round tile is new in dark green and the plate with hole hasn't been used since 2005. 3 x 4 x 2/3 PLATE WITH BOW WITH NOPS Not a very commonly used part, but from now on, it's available in dark green. 3 x 6 x 1 CURVED WINDSCREEN Like the previous one this part has a very specific use and is available in dark green for the first time. 1 x 4 x 1 1/3 MODIFIED BRICK WITH CURVED TOP This part is also new in dark green. It comes in two variants, one with and one without striped pattern. The stripes are printed on the part, so no hassle with applying stickers. 2 x 1 CURVED SLOPE A new flat silver curved slope. Introduced this year (2014) but not unique to this set. It has been used in several other sets. MINIFIGURE SKATE As we can see in the image below, the minifigure skate is a very versatile part! PART LIST Here's the complete list for all 1077 parts. BUILDING EXPERIENCE The set contains bags numbered 1, 2 and 3, which means the build consists of 3 stages. Each stage requires opening the corresponding bags. So let's start with the first stage! STAGE #1: CHASSIS The first stage requires opening the two bags numbered #1 which results in using the following parts. The chassis pretty symmetrical when it comes to the wheel base. Being a Creator set some oddly colored parts are used, like the blue Technic bricks. At the rear we can see the single fog light mounted on the right side of the fender. Here we can see the Neck Bracket with Technic Pin cleverly used as the exhaust pipe. The middle bottom section of the vehicle is where the front seats and rear couch will be mounted. The mounting points are already visible. The side skirts make sure the MINI gets it's sporty Cooper look. The shift stick is very simple and very well-thought-out at the same time. The base consists of a Modified 2 x 3 Tile with 2 Clips and a Technic Axle Towball, which results in a freely moveable stick. The floor of the trunk can be lifted to reveal the spare tire. Using the 1 x 6 x 5 Panel results in having room for the tire AND the entire picknick basket, which is quite an accomplishment for a model this size. At the end of stage #1 the chassis is complete. It already has the shift stick and trunk with spare tire. It's about 30 studs long and measures around 25 cm. STAGE #2: INTERIOR AND REAR BODYWORK During the next stage you will add the following parts to the model. A Curved 3 x 6 x 1 Windscreen is used as exterior wheel hump. The checkered upholstery looks fantastic and it's not even finished. The handbrake is one of the many great details! At the rear you see one of the stickers (MINI badge) you need to apply. funny enough, you need to apply this sticker to a part which has printed stripes on it. It's for the first time LEGO has printed a curved part like this. The dainty picknick basket is so cute! The details are remarkable. It even has two different types of cheese! Probably Gouda cheese The blanket is an actual piece of cloth, not plastic. The bottle and baguette are the icing on the cake. Being a right driven model, I have chosen the British registration. The MINI has an R registration, which means the year of registration is 1997/1998. Could this possibly be Andy's old registration number?! The boot is very efficient. It holds the spare tire and entire picknick set! STAGE #3: ENGINE BAY, FRONT BODYWORK AND ROOF During the final stage you will finish the front of the car and the roof. Lots of dark green parts will be added to the car. Under the hood the twin-carburetor 1,275 cc engine is mounted. I love the use of the Small Barb (Helmet Horn) as spark plug cables (or high tension leads). The dashboard is pretty detailed, with a glove compartment and several printed gauges. The steering wheel is a bit big, but the old MINI's did have a big steering wheel. Although the Cooper has a smaller sports steering wheel, I still think this one suits best. The seats and neck rests can be adjusted to a certain degree. The checkered upholstery looks amazing, much like the rest of the car. The door handles are actually Minifigure Iceskates. FINISHED MODEL It took me approximately 3 hours to build this model, one hour per stage. FRONT VIEW After finishing the model I really felt a WOW! Just WOW! Granted, the rear section should be a little more curved to resemble the real MINI better. In my opinion this is just a minor detail, since the model captures the overall look of it's real life counterpart very well! The front of the car with the grill, fog lights and bonnet, screams MINI Cooper! The white striping, mirrors and roof give this model it's iconic Cooper look. The sloping bonnet is very well designed. REAR VIEW The trunk lid with embedded license plate is another nice detail which adds to the recognizable MINI design. The tank filler cap is on the left side. Small details like this make the MINI an outstanding model. BOTTOM VIEW The bottom view shows the chassis of the car and in the front you can see the towball construction used for the shift stick. PARTS LEFT Most of the smaller parts have a spare one in every stage, so you end up with quite a few extra 1 x 1 plates and tiles. FEATURES This model some dainty details and exquisite features: Opening hood Opening bonnet Opening doors Detachable roof Storable spare tire Filled picknick basket with bottle Cooper-ish wheel covers Moveable steer Moveable shift stick Adjustable seats Should LEGO have gone the extra mile and include parts to turn this MINI into a convertible, like Dirk1313 did over here?! There's probably a good reason LEGO didn't, but it would have been a nice addition. On the other hand; you can easily do this yourself. SUMMARY Since the MINI has quite a few great details, building it is never boring. After every step it's getting better and better. When you have finished the model, you really get that WOW! feeling. Choosing dark green for the bodywork gives this model the characteristic British Racing Green look. Although it could have been blue or red, I think LEGO made the right choice with dark green. The model lacks a bit of playability when it comes to driving. Without actual steering it's hard to turn the car. Driving back and forth gets a little boring after a while. But then again; this model is probably not meant to play with. Maybe that's one of the reasons it has 16+ as an age recommendation. As a display model, this is one of the best cars LEGO has created...ever! Quite a few people will be having a hard time believing that this actually is a LEGO model. Andy has a great job capturing the essence of the real MINI in this LEGO Creator set. PROS Astonishing model Lots of dainty details Lots of features Lots of (new) parts in dark green Some silver/chrome parts Most of the decals are printed CONS Lack of steering Rear is a bit too square SCORE Design 9: The model screams MINI Cooper. Build 8: Fun build, never a dull moment. Features 9: Lots of nice features. Playability 8: Lack of steering diminishes playability. Parts 9: Great parts pack, if you like dark green. Value for Money 9: Iconic MINI Cooper for a reasonable price. 8,7 Instant classic! MEDIA I have included some extra content for your viewing pleasure! DESIGNER VIDEO PREVIEW VIDEOS Hope you enjoyed it! Thanks for reading and please rate this set at the top of this topic!
  5. Here is my review on 70437 Mystery Castle: THE GOOD: Looks awesome and very massive when view from front. Great Observatory! Nehmaar Reem is my new favourite minifigure, the lower part of this minifig is great. Rarely I like stickers but the decorative windows are great. Love the throne chair. THE NOT SO GOOD: A few areas a bit bland. May be a little bit more roof for the main part of the castle? Overall, this is an excellent set and definitely will recommend to everyone. The look of this is just stunning, it looks massive from the front. The back is a big shallow just like other facade type sets but the two towers gave this a lot more depth than most similar builds. The Observatory is one of my favourite part if the set. Smart design on the dome and the telescope. Even the set is heavy on stickers, the 2 stickers as a decorative windows look very good. Once again like other Hidden Side sets, the minifigures are excellent especially the villain. The lower body part is my new favourite part now. Although it's not without flaw (like interior a bit empty on several areas) the pricing is very good in my opinion, I thought this gonna be like close to $200NZD but no, it's $159.99 and I got it with 20% so I am a very happy man.
  6. Bob De Quatre

    REVIEW: 21031 Burj Khalifa

    Introduction Hi fellow EB members! I'm back with a review of one of the 2016 LEGO Architecture sets: #21031 Burj Khalifa. I must say that I have a love/hate relation with this building, since I'm very interested in architecture and how those skyscraper are build, but I also suffer from vertigo... So reviewing the (second) LEGO rendition of the tallest building in the world made me anxious before opening the box. Will this set take me to the top of LEGO Architecture or will it makes me want to jump into the void? Thanks to EB LUG Ambassador CopMike and the LEGO CEE Team and Designers for giving me the opportunity to review this set! Set information Name: 21031 Burj Khalifa (Dubai, United Arab Emirates) Theme: LEGO Model Making / Architecture Year: 2016 Pieces: 333 Price: USD NA, GBP NA, EURO NA Resources: Brickset, BrickLink Packaging The box is as classy as all LEGO Architecture's boxes. The front shows the build on a black background, with some blueprints under. In the top left corner is a big LEGO Architecture logo, and just under it the name of the set in both English and Arabic. Just under is a picture of the instructions booklet and an indication saying that the booklet is written in English and Arabic. Let's talk about it right now: Arabic isn't one of the usual languages we see on LEGO boxes, but this set is most probably made to be sold everywhere in the world, and particularily in the Arabic-speaking countries. The rear of the box has a nice picture of both the real Burj Khalifa and its LEGO rendition, and a comment about the tower in a few language. It also indicates the size of the final build: 95 mm wide and 390 mm tall. Content of the box The box contains the instructions booklet, 5 unnumbered bags and a brick separator. Sadly I lost the picture of those beautiful bags... Instructions booklet The 107 pages instructions booklet is very classy and well printed. There are a few pages with informations about the tower and its construction, with lots of pictures. The main problem with the booklet is that due to it using a portrait orientation and being thick, you can't have it stay open without holding it! That's why you can see my hand in the next pictures, and why I almost did all the building with only one hand. That issue ruined most of the building fun. The instructions are pretty clear and (too) easy to follow, with no fancy techniques, which is either a good or a bad thing, I'll let you decide. Build The base of the build is rather simple. It's the only time you'll see a fancy color with the two dark red 1x1 round plate with open stud. With the first levels of the tower in place, you can see the desert flower pattern of the building... And from now on will start building up and up again! First stop in the construction, we've reached the 124th floor and the At the Top observatory. You can see that the building to this point is very repetitive, and I even placed the 1x4 hinge plates at the wrong places, as building with only one hand isn't really easy. We'll then add some plating on the 3 faces, each different. As you can see the lower part of the outer plating is made of three to one layers of plates and 1x2/3 or 2x2/3 slopes. And the upper plating is only made of 1x2/3 or 2x2/3 slopes, each attached to a single stud, which may cause them to rotate slightly, which is quite annoying. Note that there is no (small) Tom Cruise attached to the surface of the tower, which is quite disappointing. And finally the last stories. The top of the tower is built with a totally diferent technique than the rest, using simple bricks with studs on sides and tiles. There are not much spare parts for a set of this size, but they are still welcome. Interesting parts The part selection isn't great, I could even say it is poor. We got lots of light bluish gray bricks, some with studs on sides, tiles and 2/3 slopes, and a few brackets and curved slopes. But we also get three 1x1 round plate with open stud, and three 4x1 curved inverted slope in light bluish gray, which are exclusive to this set. If you like gray parts, then this set is for you. Comparison with set #21008 Burj Khalifa The Burj Khalifa has already been featured in the LEGO Architecture theme. Back in 2011, LEGO gave us the tallest skyscraper in the world in the set #21008. If the height of the tower hasn't changed since then, its LEGO representation has evolved a lot. Built on the exact same base, the two tower seem to have the same scale. But the similarities between those stops here. The old Burj Khalifa was entirely built with round elements, while the new tries to be more accurate to the angles and proportions of the real tower. The new Burj Khalifa is definitely an improvement over the old one. Conclusion Design: 8/10 - Definitely an improvement compared to the previous rendition. The booklet design issue is quite problematic for a standard two handed human. Parts: 6/10 - No variety in shapes and colors, and too few rare parts. Build: 7/10 - The build experience is quite boring, with no difficulties. Price: --/10 - The retail prices aren't published as I write this review. I'll update that score when they are. Overall: 21/30 (64%) - A nice build and a great rendition of the original tower, but not very interesting to build. The part selection do its job, but isn't really interesting. And please LEGO, test the usability of your instructions booklet.
  7. It's wonderful to see that The LEGO Group's confidence in the Architecture Series has increased enough for worldwide landmarks to appear! In what might seem opportunistic timing, with the fast approaching 2012 Olympics being held in London, TLG has revealed that its latest Architecture set will model what is probably London's most iconic landmark: the clock tower of Big Ben. As has been pointed out innumerable times, Big Ben is actually the name of the huge bell which resides within the tower, itself forming the north-west corner of the Palace of Westminster; the tower itself is known simply as the Clock Tower. But if you say 'Big Ben', I imagine people from around the world will immediately picture this famous tower. This review is a team effort by Pandora and myself (with a little extra help from a certain someone at a crucial point ). The opinions presented here are ours; fortunately we agreed on pretty much everything so there was little need for discussion! Anyway, with further ado, Pandora and Rufus are proud to present.... Review: 21013 Big Ben Set Information Name: Big Ben Number: 21013 Theme: Architecture (Landmark Series) Release: 1 June 2012 Parts: 341 (our count) Price: US $29.99 | EUR 29.99 | CAD $39.99 Links ... Brickset ... LEGO Architecture We'll update the price information, links and the official set description as they become available. The Box The smart but rather austere box livery of the Architecture range continues with this set. I see no reason to change it! Big Ben sits atop a technical drawing which may well represent architectural plans of the Palace of Westminster, but who's checking. The eagle-eyed among you might note that this latest addition to the Architecture range is designed not by Adam Reed Tucker, but instead by Rok Zgalin Kobe, a Slovenian architect. The back of the box is more colourful, sporting a scale render of the model, with some pictures of the real building in atypical English weather: The text is a language lesson describing the enclosed booklet, which is in English, and mentions the two Architects of the tower, Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin. The narrow sides are well suited to a tall, narrow model, and allow the boxes to be stacked on shelves vertically. The left side features a beautiful low-down shot of the tower: ... while the right side, which forms the flap of the box lid, shows an interesting 'exploded' render of the model beside the 'Choking Hazard' warning in a vast array of international languages. A very small part-rendered picture graces the top of the box, and the bottom reveals that parts were sourced in DENMARK, HUNGARY, MEXICO, and the CZECH REPUBLIC. We suspect this represents different manufacturing sources for different regions. Interestingly, this set - despite being considerably larger - comes in a box no bigger than those of the smallest sets in the range. It is of identical size to 21002 Empire State Building, or 21000 Willis (formerly Sears) Tower, Chicago, pictured here: It is, as you might imagine, considerably heavier, and clearly requires two extra years of building experience to build it. Contents We love these Architecture boxes! There's a certain sense of nostalgia for the days of intricate packaging which heightened the whole LEGO experience. Admittedly these don't have the (expensive, we've no doubt) plastic inserts and lifting lids of the 80s, but it's clear that TLG have gone to some pains to make the box as collectable as the set. You can even flatpack the box for longevity without tearing or cutting! The box is almost as smart on the inside: This one is remarkably full, which helps to preserve the instruction manual. You are instructed clearly to 'Enjoy your building experience.' as you open the lid. It's a really nice touch, and emphasises the lengths TLG has gone to to maximise the ... um ... building experience. Out of the box are pulled four polybags, and two loose plates. As Siegfried/Sinner mentioned in the Sydney Opera House review, it's a shame that not all of the parts are bagged, but we can't really blame LEGO for this in this case. It's only two pieces, and would probably require much larger bags, which might in turn necessitate a larger box to allow automated packing. Looking at this picture, you immediately get a sense of the rather small parts variety - there are only 33 different pieces in the set, including different colours of the same part. Instructions Some serious thought has gone into this instruction manual. It is quite thick, and beautifully presented, being printed on high quality paper, like all the sets in the Architecture range. Aside from the difference in orientation, the cover is similar to the box front, but does reference the Architecture website. The rear cover of the manual features an alternative view of the tower from behind: but is otherwise rather plain. Most of the interest is contained inside the manual, where can be found ten pages of facts about the tower and its construction, an example of which is shown here: The text is superbly written. It is a potted history, packed with facts and interesting to read, without being a daunting mass of text. We learned quite a lot ourselves! Following the tower facts comes a double-paged biography of the architects: The pictures here are reprints of oil portraits of the long-departed designers of the tower. Again, kudos to LEGO for going the extra mile to add interest and value. The instructions themselves are clear, and nicely paced to avoid confusion without being patronising. About every eight or nine pages is a little inset depicting further little factoids about the building: It's easy to miss these, if you are concentrating on the building. We'd recommend taking your time when building, and enjoying these little tidbits of information when you encounter them! They are a really nice touch. Otherwise, there are some parts in similar colours (particularly black and dark bluish grey), which could cause confusion; however, if you follow the build order then there shouldn't be any problems. You would notice if you used a dark bluish grey 1x2 tile on the base, for instance (unless you're building in the dark ). Towards the rear of the manual is the now-standard parts inventory: Again, the small variety of parts is readily apparent, and belies the size of the set. Finally, we are treated to a discourse from the Artist himself, and an intriguing look at Architecture in the early days of LEGO (including the invention of the plate!) We're pleased to note that Rok Zgalin Kobe refers to SNOT (Studs Not On Top), implying it's the acronym used by LEGO designers themselves! We're easily pleased. The Parts But enough about paper, what about the plastic? We've arranged the parts according to the polybag they came in, which is roughly dictated by size. The largest bag contains the large tiles, including the unique printed 'Big Ben' piece, and a sea of tan. Most of these parts are commonplace; even the 2x2 clock face is often found at the Pick-a-Brick wall. Of note are the dark bluish grey 'Slope 45 1x2 Double', found in two other sets, and the 'Slope 75 2x2x2 Quadruple Convex' in DBG and the two earth green 2x3 Plates, each found only in one other set. Not rare, though useful, are the nine 1x1 bricks with four studs ('dalek pieces', as we've heard them called). Generally, part variety is small but quantity high: We're certainly not complaining about the 57 round bricks and 32 grille tiles in tan, useful for architectural MOCs. 2x1 tan plates were at the PaB wall recently, so we're not short of those... ... but jumper plates are always useful. Finally, we have the ubiquitous round 1x1 plates, and 1x1 tiles in tan are most welcome. Not a cheese wedge in sight! Overall, it's a part selection that won't get too many people excited, with only a small number of rare elements, although the quantity of some of the parts might make this useful as a parts pack. The Build Let's put these plastic blocks together! As you might expect, we start with the familiar Architecture base: Immediately, you can see by the jumper plates that the model uses a half-stud offset for the entire structure. This is presumably to centre the model, which is an odd number of studs in length. The jumpers make a surprisingly strong connection, meaning you can build the model whilst holding it, rather than on a flat surface, although it's worth noting that the two black plates at the base are only connnected via three tiles, giving them a tendency to separate slightly if you do do this. The 'trick' behind the SNOT wall detail is revealed in this shot: SNOT bricks - with 1 (white), 2 (light bluish grey) and 4 (black) studs on sides are used to attach 1x2 plate-grille tile pieces to give the sides their ridged detail. The 'gap' that remains under the grilles is filled with 1x1 tiles. This technique is a little fiddly, but surprisingly strong and effective, and is used throughout the model. For the second layer, rinse, and repeat... well, nearly. Here you can see that only black 'dalek' pieces have been used to add SNOT to the sides, rather than the two-sided stud pieces. Although this might at first glance seem odd - it prevents adding 1x1 bricks in between, which might weaken the structure - there are two reasons for this. One is that the side-facing studs are also used in some places - to hold SNOT tiling at the side, and the mysterious upward-pointing dark bluish grey tile you can see here - and the second is that the 'open stud' on the top of the dalek pieces is required to attach the roof at a half stud offset (similar to the use of technic 1x1 bricks in the White House, or Empire State Building) With the roof-pieces attached, the odd DBG tile fills a gap caused by the half-stud offset : As we add height to the tower, things get a little repetitive, with three identical layers to construct. As we approach the top of the tower, four single-stud SNOT pieces are added which will hold the clock faces: And here we can have a nice look at the rear of the building . Finally, the rather intricate roof is built: And we're done! The build takes about 30 minutes if you're rushing, or an hour if you're leisurely (and read the history while you're at it). It's a little fiddly in places (making sure the 1x1 tiles sit squarely is a pain, but this is always a problem), and gets a bit repetitive, but being a smallish model this is counteracted by the feeling of the tower taking shape. Some of the SNOT techniques, especially the roof, are a nice surprise. The Complete Set Now let's take a look at the finished article. Big Ben stands proud and erect in all his slightly phallic glory: This angle shows clearly how effective the half-stud offset is at centering the tower. We like the use of the SNOT grille-tiles for adding the ridged detail which is crucial for adding realism, and the differentiation between the various levels of the building is brought about quite neatly and simply by the use of 1x1 bricks or round bricks at various points. It's highly effective. Now, let's get this out of the way: the major flaw of this set is the clock faces, which stand proud of the tower by two plates, unlike the real clocks which are if anything slightly recessed. This is a product of the designer's decision to make the entire building three studs wide, which is necessary to make the building affordable, keep consistency with the rest of the Landmark Series, and itself makes the build more interesting in places. Moreover, the design of the 2x2 round tile on which the clock sits - with a cross in the centre of the underside, rather than an anti-stud - necessitates the use of the extra 2x2 plate, therefore exacerbating the problem. A possible solution to this would be to build the clock section of the tower in four-studs wide, at a half-stud offset. One day we'll try this. Maybe the designer did, but chose this method in the end. Now that's out of the way, let's continue enjoying the view. Here's the rear: The tower (obviously) looks the same from every angle, but here you get a view of the snippet of the rest of Palace of Westminster. It's 'cut off' from the rest of the building; the blank tiles/bricks indicate where the building would continue: here, and on the left side. Note the 1x1 round plates instead of cones at the rear: this approximates to a real feature of the building, which doesn't have spires on the inward facing parapets. Side views (left and right respectively): The left side features a little dark green, representing a small lawn area in front of the tower where politicians and press gather from time to time. Note again the cut-off where the building would continue to the river edge. The right side faces Parliament Square, where the tower sits flush with the edge of the Palace. Finally, a shot representing the most common view of the tower: Another slight niggle, and again due to the use of the three-wide scale, is that the lower part of the roof doesn't slope particularly gracefully, but the use of round studs is probably the best compromise the designer could achieve. Comparison Now lets compare the set to the real thing. Being rather camera-shy, Pandora and I grabbed an unsuspecting random American tourist to help with these shots. The model is rather small (as is the LEGO set ) making direct comparison difficult. It's approximately 1:350 scale, after all. Still, you can see that the overall impression of the model is pretty accurate, which we think is as good as could be achieved at this scale. Getting both the tower and the model in focus together was nigh-on impossible. This is about the best we could do: The blocky roof isn't so noticeable here; unfortunately, the sticky-outy clock faces are. But the time is uncannily correct. Our contract with the Random American Tourist demanded more than just one picture: He made himself useful, and got us into the London Eye for some aerial views: Well, we'd love a massive Architecture set of the entire Palace of Westminster, but that isn't going to happen anytime soon... ... so here's a shot focused on Big Ben himself, from a similar angle as the last set picture: We should mention here an interesting observation. On the way out of the London Eye is a gift shop filled with souvenirs (many relating to the forthcoming Olympics). This (and many other souvenir shops around the area) would be an ideal place to sell this set - it'll appeal to chance customers who wouldn't normally even consider buying LEGO. The set makes a great souvenir - it is instantly recognisable, despite its flaws, and this market would perhaps be rather more forgiving than the average AFOL. We hope TLG have already thought of this. Conclusion Bus and Grenadier Guard not supplied with set. We were a little disappointed when we saw the preliminary pictures, but having seen the set 'in the flesh', as it were, we think this is actually rather a nice set. Sure, the protruding clock-faces aren't ideal, but they're certainly better than stickers, and the flaw is balanced by the level of detailing which is astonishing for such a small scale. Moreover, if the preliminary prices are correct, this set represents far better value than most of the smaller Architecture sets, and perhaps hints that the line is firmly hitting the mainstream. The Big Ben set, together with its attractive packaging and informative manual, makes a wonderful collectors' item, and indeed potentially a lucrative souvenir piece (if TLG takes our advice on this ). I'm sure they've already thought of this, as the timing of its release with the 2012 Olympics hints. A larger-scale model might allow more detail, solve the clock problem, and enable perhaps a bit of gold decoration on the tower; but would restrict the target market to the die-hard LEGO fans. Perhaps TLG have deliberately decided to accept the smaller scale compromise; we think that, overall, the set is pretty good for the scale. Design 8 Were it not for the clock faces, we'd give this 10. It's remarkably detailed for the scale. Build 9 A pleasing build, sometimes a little repetitive, but with some interesting features along the way. If you follow the manual carefully, it is an enjoyable experience. Parts 7 It's not really a set for rare part hunters, but might appeal as a parts pack if you need tan grille tiles or round bricks. Value 8 We haven't seen the UK price yet, but going by the US and European pricing, this does seem to be better value than many of the smaller Architecture sets. Overall 8/10 Big Ben might not appeal to die-hard sticklers for accuracy, but it's a detailed and recognisable rendition of what is perhaps London's most iconic landmark. We were rather pleasantly surprised. Thanks for reading! We hope you enjoyed the review. Many thanks to CopMike for making this possible, TLG for allowing us an early look at the set, and Hinckley for being such a good model! Pandora and Rufus. More pictures on flickr.
  8. REVIEW - 42090 - GETAWAY TRUCK INTRODUCTION The Getaway Truck is the "other" Pull-back Racer of 2019. Since TLG has introduced the "cops and robbers" theme again, this set is considered to be the antagonist, or bad-guy if you will. The picture below shows the previous Getaway Truck from 2016. That set looked Bad-ass with a capital A. The latest versions follows TLG's new design philosophy (for smaller sets anyway), which is using less parts and more panels. Check out the picture below to see all the cool details. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42090 Title: Getaway Truck Theme: Technic Released: 2019 Part Count: 128 Box Weight: 297 gram Box Dimensions: 26,2 x 14,0 x 7,1 cm Set Price (RRP): € 19,99 Price per Part: € 0,16 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX As usual this model can be combined with the other Pull-back to create a combined model. This time it is a rather unconventional tank-ish vehicle. You can see the image on the back of the box. The combined models are often odd vehicles, but this one is taking the cake. CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1x Booklet 1x Sticker sheet 1x Pull-back motor 4x Tire 2x Unnumbered bag HIGHLIGHTED PARTS The only interesting parts in this set are the dark bluish grey panels. The 7x3 Curved Panels on the left have been introduced in 2017, so they aren't new. But the #3 and #4 Panels on the right are new in dark bluish grey. The previous Getaway Truck also used these panels, but they were black with stickers. PART LIST The complete part list for the 128 parts. COMPLETED MODEL Granted, the completed model definitely looks better than the Police Pursuit. But like that one, this model also relies heavily on panels. It's basically six panels connected with some liftarms. Spared no expense? On the contrary. Spared all expenses and made it as cheap as possible. Where are the wheel hubs?! The mandatory bottom view. The pull-back motor is dark bluish grey, but it looks like old dark grey in this pic. The usual left-over parts. SUMMARY I will repeat here what I said in the Police Pursuit review. The pull-back models confirm my suspicion that TLG is drastically looking at ways to optimize profit, instead of delivering cool sets. One can argue that kids will hardly notice the difference when they get a pull-back set, but only using a couple of panels and liftarms is totally different than the setup of the previous Getaway Truck. That one had a very cool design and cool details. PROS The design is better than its Police counterpart CONS Mostly comprised of panels Simple design Way less detail than the previous version SCORE How do I rate this set? (most scores are copied from 42091 - Police Pursuit) 6 DESIGN Okay-ish. 4 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Done in a minute. 7 FEATURES On par with other pull-back sets. 7 PLAYABILITY I have rated other pull-backs the same grade. 4 PARTS 42 parts less than its predecessor. 5 VALUE FOR MONEY The low part count makes this set less attractive than previous versions. 5,5 AT LEAST IT LOOKS LIKE A NORMAL VEHICLE FINAL WORDS Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  9. A good-looking Technic bike with a transmission, unique new pieces and Ducati license? Sign me in!
  10. Here is my review on 76157 Wonder Woman vs. Cheetah. THE GOOD: Excellent Minifigures. The satellite dish panels are all PRINTED! Interesting way to build the vent. Very smooth rotation on the action feature. THE NOT SO GOOD: Very bland (close to none) interior. Re-use of head for Max. Overall, this is an interesting set. I do think the set building experience and exterior are a lot more sophisticated than most other similar price range super heroes themed sets but than the interior is really lacking. The satellite rotation and the printed panels are cool though. Especially the printed panels are good for other space crafts build. Minifigures wise, it's good. It would be better if Max looks a bit more like Pedro Pascal and a variation of wings for Wonder Woman. One thing I want to highlight is the availability of this set is very unclear at the moment. It is released in some retailers and LEGO certified store (where I bought it) but shop@home is showing 1st July, so keep an eye out if you are looking for this. I will still recommend this set if you are a fan of the DC movies and love super heroes in general.
  11. Introduction Hi fellow EB members! In this early spring, Lego takes us to a walk on the 5th avenue, New York. The Guggenheim Museum is worldwide known for its art collection as well as for its architecture. I'm not sure what LEGO thinks of art, but I'm sure they're very interested in architecture, and that's why they released the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum as their new set in the Architecture theme! Thanks to EB LUG Ambassador CopMike and the LEGO CEE Team and Designers for giving me the opportunity to review this set! Set information Name: 21035 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Theme: LEGO Model Making / Architecture Year: 2017 Pieces: 744 Price: USD 79.99, GBP 64.99, EURO 69.99 Resources: Brickset , BrickLink Packaging The box comes in the usual LEGO Architecture 's black livery, but in an odd almost square shape. It is also quite thick, as there's 744 parts to stuff in. The front shows the full set, proudly standing on blueprints against the black background. On the upper left corner is a rather big LEGO Architecture logo and just under is the name of the set and its location in the world and the set's sizes... Nothing fancy here, just the good old Architecture box! The back of the box has a front shot of the set and a picture of the real buildings and a short comment on the museum in a few languages. Size of the set is also indicated: 190mm wide and 125mm tall. Content of the box The box is almost full, with the instruction booklet and 6 unnumbered bags, one of which contains a brick separator for your collection. Instructions booklet The 167 pages instructions booklet is, as always with Architecture sets, very well done and good looking with the classic black background. There are a lot of nice pictures of the building and its interior, with lots of facts. The instructions are easy to follow and no color errors should be made. You can see here one the many pictures and facts that pop up in the corners of the booklet. You can also see that some steps need quite a bunch of parts, but I reassure you, many steps onl require a single plate! Build First steps passed. If you look closely, you may notice a big change compared to the other sets of the theme... The set makes a great use of the newly released rounded tiles to add details. The build uses lots of 1/2 studs offsets and snot techniques. Continuig with the building... The technique used to achieve the rounded sections is really nice and makes use of many new parts. The finished set in all his glory! My finger hurts of placing all those tan 1x1 tiles! As always there are some spare parts. Interesting parts The set comes with a nice selection of white curved slopes, and among them the rather new 3x2 white curved slope. Three 2x3 white tiles are also present. The set is also at the moment the best source for 1x1 quarter round tiles in light bluish gray. Parts in new or rare colors include the 6x6 round plate in white and black, the 10x10 inverted dish in sand green, the 2x4 wedge plate in sand green, a 3x3 cross plate in tan, a white 1x3x1 panel , and 4 of the new 1x1modified brick with 2 studs on adjacent sides in black! And of course two nice printed tile and curved slope with the museum's name on it. Conclusion Design: 9/10 - A really nice set in the Architecture theme! One of my favorite. Parts: 8/10 - Some very interesting parts in this set, and maybe more variety than other sets of the theme. Build: 8/10 - An interesting build, not too monotonous. Price: 7/10 - At 9.4 cent per part, this set is in the price average of the Architecture theme's sets. Overall: 32/40 (80%) - I really enjoyed building this set! I think it may be one of the best set of the recently released Architecture sets. If you're a fan of the theme, go grab it, you won't regret it.
  12. BaneShake

    Macku (2003) Review

    I have never done a Bionicle opening-and-review video, but the theme meant so much to me as a kid, I’ve decided to dip my toes in the waters and give one a try with the Mask of Light version of Macku. (If this is in the wrong section, please move or remove this post as necessary) https://youtu.be/iX2eO_Futx8
  13. Can't believe they make a new set based on the first movie, here is my review on 75941 Indominus Rex vs. Ankylosaurus: THE GOOD: The Gyrosphere Station is absolutely phenomenal. The build a very complete compared to most other Jurassic world. Very spacious area for minifigures to queue for a ride. So many little details incorporated into the build which you rarely seen in this type of sets. Great update to the Indominus Rex. All four key characters in the 1st movie in just ONE SET! THE NOT SO GOOD: It's still a mission to open up the gyrosphere as times. (too much force will surely break it if the joints were pressed to tightly) This is nip picking but I wish the park worker looks more like the actual character you've seen in the movie, this one looks a bit too old. Overall, this set is excellent. In fact, it's beyond expectation. I never expected to see a complete build with so many details in a retail licensed set. I'm so happy with the size of the Gyrosphere station. Getting an updated Indominus Rex and full set of key characters from the 1st moive in one set is just great. I think I got my money worth for this one. I do wish they improve the Gyrophese opening mechanism a bit, I'm so worried I might break it when I close it too tightly the first time. Anyway, I will totally recommend this set to anyone. This is definitely one of the best Jurassic World releases so far.
  14. Creator Expert Harley-Davidson Thanks to Lego and EB for this review set - it's a new entry in the line of Creator licensed vehicles (Mini, VW Beetle, Mustang, etc) and I was excited to check it out. I've admired those sets but never owned any of them. More importantly, when it comes to this HD set, I had not seen any images online or had any ideas about it before it arrived - I literally only knew that it was a Harley in the Creator Expert line. Name: Harley-Davidson Set Number: 10269 Pieces: 1023 Price: unknown as of review date (July 9, 2019) but I'm guessing $100-ish (edit: confirmed to be $99.99 US, $139.99 CAD, 84.99 GBP) Minifigs: 0 Theme: Creator Expert The Box Front When I opened the shipping box and got my first look at this set, I couldn't do anything but think WOW. At a glance, this set could easily pass for a model rather than a Lego set. There's so much detail packed into this and it just looks right. The Real Thing Before we move on, here's the real 2019 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy from their online gallery. Like I said, Lego appears to have nailed the design. The dual exhausts with their taper in the middle... the solid wheels... and of course the V of the engine. (and oddly, the photo Lego used inside the manual of the real bike isn't in the "Wicked Red" color. It's "Industrial Grey Denim" instead which looks too bland on the page IMHO.) The Box Back Wait a minute - this thing has functional pistons like a Technic set? I like! And it looks good from this side too. It feels a little more Lego-ish from this side for some reason, but it's still very good looking. The Scale This will be a pretty good-sized model. It's over a foot long. And apparently they liked the 107 logo for the 1:1 image, but were afraid people couldn't put that in context, so they added the engine as well. The New Parts The only new molds that I saw are for the wheels. The front tire is the existing "Racing Tread" motorcycle tire that's been used since 2010 in Technic, Hero Factory, and Ninjago sets. The wide rear tire is new though, as are the solid wheels. And in a clever design to save on mold costs, the read tire just uses 2 of the rims instead of needing another custom part. Molds are expensive, especially for large parts like these, and since these rims are such an iconic trademark of the Fat Boy bike, I suspect Lego won't be allowed to reuse them elsewhere. It is a bit of a cheat though. The real bike doesn't have a rear tire twice as wide as the front (they're 160mm wide fronts and 240mm wide rears), and the real rear rim has a deeper recess. The Age Designing a set takes a long time. Both new molds are copyrighted 2018, even though the set isn't being released until mid-2019. The Stickers The set has some printed pieces and one small sticker sheet. It's a very chrome sheet so that the "mirror" circles are reflective. The rest of the stickers have the usual Lego hidden meanings in them. 107 is the engine size (and really printed on the real bikes). WGDLN1990 stands for Willie G Davidson and Louie Netz, who designed the Fat Boy in 1990. 41 is the highway number that runs through Milwaukee, WI, where HD is headquartered. The 1974 on the odometer is the year that Bill Davis started designing the softail style frame. (thanks to the friendly people over at /r/harley for the help getting my facts right on these!) The Build, part 1 The parts for this set come in bags numbered 1-4. Stage 1 begins with building this frame that will become the bottom of the bike. They're already using some "advanced" build techniques - that black perpendicular connector (which, believe it or not, is a new color for that part!) is not connected to an axle like it's designed for. It's connected onto an arm so that it can swing outwards to become the kickstand. The Build, part 2 I'm not doing a ton of build photos - this set is a joy to assemble and I don't want to spoil too much. The build process is very modular. There's surprisingly little building directly onto the bike. It's mostly assembling a module and then attaching it as a chunk. Here is the engine. I paused partway through to show that yes, there are pistons inside there and they really do move. It's a fun piece of building, even though it's hidden completely in the finished model. The Build, part 3 At the end of bag 1 the finished engine mounts onto the frame. Thankfully, the two stickered discs are mounted onto pins, so they can be rotated freely to be level. There are also interesting part choices that make little sense. You can see the ends of blue 3L pins there. Below them are grey 3L pin with 1L axles... but why? There was no need. There are some locations where they chose the ones with axles because they didn't want blue showing, but there are other places where there was no need for the axle version. The set also has the 2 stud Technic axles in both red and black. There's nowhere that the red is needed visually. The Build, part 4 When you reach the end of bag 2, it now looks much more like a motorcycle. Perhaps the one tedious part of the build is connecting those 43 chain links. And then you have to feed them through the frame and around the gears. I found picking the whole thing up in the air and letting gravity do most of the work was the easiest method. Again though, there's a few odd part choices. I wonder if they are trying to model something on the real bike that isn't visible - for example, there is a spot on the side that uses a 1x1x1 corner panel that is completely hidden. It's the only one of that part in the whole set, and it could easily have been replaced by a standard 1x1 brick (which are already in the set) with no visible change. Likewise, the set has a couple white Technic 2/3L Pin Connectors, but they're buried inside. It already uses black and light grey ones, so why complicate the production process that way? The Build, part 5 At the end of bag 3, a lot more of the detail has been added. Be careful putting on the speedometer sticker - its disc is attached to an axle, so the angle is fixed. Mine will now forever be slightly crooked.... Also of note is the dark red of the gas tank. In real life it doesn't look as unevenly colored as this photo. The actual color is close, but the curved pieces are glossy while the slope in the middle is a matte texture. That difference stands out in certain lighting. The exhausts have a great part usage - they use aircraft engines to form both the taper between sizes and an attachment point to the body of the bike. On the other hand, you can see the most annoying piece of the set in this photo. Just behind the engine, there's a black cone with a 1x1 round grey tile on top (it represents the suspension adjustment knob on the real bike). I find that's right where my thumb hits when I pick the bike up from above, so I've knocked that cone off so many times making this review. And once the second exhaust pipe is in the way, it's a bit of pain to reinstall. The Build, part 6 And it's complete. Bag 4 adds the second exhaust and the front wheel and fork assembly (and a simple grey stand). I personally think the front fork is the one area that feels badly out of proportion. The real bike is beefy there, but not quite this thick. Unfortunately, Lego doesn't have any 1.5x1.5 round parts. I also think the front fender is a little too short. The Front IMHO, this is the weakest angle on the set. Granted, the headlight/fork/handlebar assembly is complex and difficult to recreate, but I still think the headlight is too big and the forks too thick. I wonder if a 3x3 dish would have made a better headlight. I'm betting they went with the 4x4 though because there's no 3x3 plate to put behind the dish. I do appreciate that the handlebars attach with clips, so they're simple to pop back off if you need to store the set in a box. The Comparison Here is the Harley next to 2010's Technic 8051 set (which uses the same tires as 10269's front tire, so it's theoretically around the same scale). I built it as the B model which is closer in proportions to the Fat Boy. 8051 was a $40 set with 467 pieces, and the B model uses only about 350 parts. You can clearly see what a difference 1000 vs 350 parts makes! The Big Brother I stopped by a large Harley Davidson dealer to get their thoughts. The staff there were blown away by how good the set looked and were amazed that it actually had functional pistons and chain drive (even though the real bike is a belt drive). They couldn't point out anything that looked wrong - sure, there's minor details (no side reflectors on the front fork or at the rear, the shallow dish of the rear wheel, etc) but overall they loved it. The number of little details are what caught their attention. For a small model, it has lights, hand controls, shift and brake pedals, etc. The Size Comparison The Lego set fits nicely on the footrest of a real 2019 Fat Boy. It does show the one visual drawback to the Lego version - its not all chromed . How long until we see some custom chromed versions showing up? I think they'd look fantastic! The End This is a well-designed set and truly a joy to build. I LOVED the build process on this. It blends Technic and System magnificently both visually and in build techniques. Mike Psiaki had a tough challenge, translating the angles and curves of a modern motorcycle into Lego, but he met it. Even the staff at an HD dealer said they were looking forward to picking the set up! If you don't have around twenty thousand bucks to drop on the real thing, get the Lego version for about half a percent of the price.
  15. Looks like I'm first. Ah, the things you can achieve by abandoning sleep :)
  16. Recently I purchased LEGO Technic set 42101 Buggy. From the LEGO Website: “Children get double the fun with this super LEGO® Technic™ (42101) Buggy set. Let young imaginations run wild as they recreate the thrill of powering over sand dunes in their Buggy. And the fun does not end there! The toy Buggy cleverly rebuilds into a sleek toy Racing Car for kids to bring even more adventures. A LEGO set with lots to discover Hot colour scheme? Check! Skull stickers? Check! Working steering and suspension? Of course! If you are looking for feature-packed action toys that kids will love, this awesome set has it all. Buildable toys to help kids develop new skills LEGO Technic building kits are ideal for LEGO fans ready for a new challenge. These vehicles look and drive like the real thing, so kids will love building and playing with their creations. Each set comes with printed instructions but there is also a new way to build this car toy with Instructions PLUS, available in the free LEGO Life app. This interactive guide has zoom and rotate viewing tools to help even younger children build this cool engineering toy. Here is a fun building challenge for kids who love racing toys! Build the Buggy and recreate an off-road adventure. Then rebuild into a Racing Car for even more building and role-play fun. With working suspension and steering, this action toy set (42101) creates an interesting building challenge. It promotes problem-solving skills, and there is plenty of opportunity for imaginative play too. The 2-in-1 design means twice the fun. Kids can build the Buggy, then rebuild the model into a sleek Racing Car. Once built, kids will love playing with their creation, or enjoying it with other buildable toy vehicles. Kids who love action toys will have plenty of fun building and playing with this Buggy. This educational engineering toy makes a great LEGO® gift for boys and girls aged 7+ who enjoy racing toys. Once built, the Buggy car toy measures over 5” (13cm) long, 2” (7cm) high and 2” (7cm) wide, making it ideal for role-play and a super addition to any existing car collection. No batteries are required for this Buggy car toy, so the fun starts straightaway and never slows down. Printed instructions are included for the Buggy plus an online PDF for the Racing Car. This model toy set also has Instructions PLUS, available in the free LEGO® Life app. LEGO® Technic™ building kits are ideal for kids who love to build and are ready for a new challenge. With a range of buildable toys, the LEGO Technic universe is loved by kids and adults alike. LEGO® plastic model kits meet the highest industry standards. They are consistent, compatible, and easily connect every time – it has been that way since 1958. LEGO® Technic™ pieces are tested to the max to ensure every one of the model toy sets meets the highest global safety and quality standards.” The build process was short, 15 minutes and it is finished. The Buggy is a very nice set. For $15.95, it is great value and a great first step into LEGO Technic, bridging the gap between normal LEGO and Technic. It looks cool (which is important for the target market) and has some basic Technic functions such as steering and suspension, it is the perfect way to bring in these concepts. I really like this set; it feels like a modern-day version of 8832 which was the first LEGO Technic set I ever purchased.
  17. I recently received 42050 Drag Racer as a gift. This set apparently is from 2016, which is already 4 years ago. Feel old yet? Or nostalgic? I had some spare time, so decided to build it, and write up a short review. For some nice pictures, I'd like to point you at the review of Ted, I mean Jim, also available in this forum. The Build This is a quick, and mostly boring build around a very small chassis consisting of mostly beams. It's roughly devided into two stages: the chassis and the shell. The chassis is so small that there isn't even a differential between the rear wheels. Looks I'm not familiar with this type of racing vehicles, but I think it looks terrible. The shell is mostly panels, and someone with a chainsaw made the holes for the wheels. It looks very rough. The color combination of Medium Azure and Black is great, and the stickers enhance some of the looks. I have two problems here: Apparently, the color used here is Medium Azure. I made a reference picture for all the Shades of Blue I own. I had to look up the name that's used in this one. So, from the front it looks very cool and aggresive. And that's where the coolness ends. There are a total of 18 Medium Azure parts used in this set. 18. The color Medium Azure is only used in one other Technic set, 42059 from 2017 (12 medium azure parts). It almost feels like a scam. Short Quiz: name all the shades of blue The second problem is with the Stickers. They look cool, and increase the presence of Medium Azure with another 50%. It's a real pitty that the looks depend way to much on them, and it's even more forthcoming when you don't apply them (which I never do). 50% more Medium Azure with this simple trick Functions There are no surprises here: Steering with HoG V8 engine Lifting shell Lifting the car into a wheelie stand (42111 anyone?) Parts So, let's start with the Good: The Rear Wheels are awesome. To bad it's only two of them. That's it. The Bad: The amount of Medium Azure For the rest, it's a bunch of liftarms and panels. Nothing interesting. All the left-overs The Verdict My two daughters wanted to race this car immediatly, so after the last part was added to the build, they went to play. The first thing I noticed was a scraping noise on the floor. Turns out that either the exhausts, or the wheelie stand is scraping over the floor. It kills the fun instantly. Floorscraper Installed The exhausts contain 8 corrugated pipes, which are terrible to secure. The lack of Medium Azure is such a big miss. This could have been a mean looking Drag Racer. Even the chassis would have looked great with it as well. There are some other rough areas, like the mount of the windshield, the front wheels touching the shell when steering, and apparently, this set is prepared for power functions, which lead to some weird unused parts sticking out. Is this even legal? If the chassis was any wider, it would have allowed to have a working steeringwheel I rate this set a solid 'Missed-opportunity-to-introduce-a-cool-new-shade-of-blue'. I know I sound very negative, but I just don't like the set... It feels like this set would have grown if some more details went into the engine, had proper colours and didn't cut so many corners. Thanks for reading, and now back to TC18 and waiting on more Lambo news...
  18. It's been four years since the last classic European car graced the CREATOR range, and I said then I'd be delighted to see more of them. Since then we've seen the handsome Mustang and the sleek Aston Martin DB5 - technically a European classic car but I haven't counted that one! The range's latest offering, the Fiat Nuova 500 ('Cinquecento'), fits neatly into the category of small cute classics previously epitomised by 2014's 10242 Mini Cooper and 2016's 10252 VW Beetle. I was delighted to see the widespread use of a rarer colour (dark azure) in the Beetle; now Bright Light Yellow takes centre stage for the Italian classic. The Fiat 'Nuova' 500 was launched in 1957 as a successor to the 500 Topolino and was designed as an inexpensive, practical city car with a rear-mounted engine following the style of the successful Beetle. Its 479 cc engine boasted a stunning 13 horsepower (my lawnmower is 430 cc). Just short of 4 million were produced until the model was succeeded by the Fiat 126 in 1975. Earlier models featured rear-hinged 'suicide' doors; these were replaced with conventional front-hinged doors with the release of the 500F in 1965. Review: 10271 CREATOR Fiat Nuova 500 Parts: 960 Price: £74.99 | $89.99 | €79,99 | AU$139.99 Like the Beetle and Mini, the LEGO Fiat no steering, but aims at a realistic body for display with authentic features. Coming in at the same price as the VW Beetle (in the UK; the latter is pricier in most regions), the Fiat consists of over 200 fewer parts. Let's see if that price hike is worth it. Box I confess that at first glance at the box i thought this set was ordinary LEGO yellow, and it was only in looking at the little painting on the box that I noticed the paler tones of Bright Light Yellow - it's particularly noticeable when you compare to the yellow round tile on the artist's palette. The box art mimics approximately the scene of the painting, with the car posed attractively in front of Rome's iconic Flavian Amphitheatre, or Colosseum. I was disappointed not to see a tiny easel in the painting. Some lens flare adds sparkle. Cobbled streets abound. The box rear shows off the car's attractive rump, along with the set's other features which exceed the bounds of their respective insets. The car stands out beautifully in the otherwise nondescript and unidentified back street; a pronounced sepia filter provides a warm which contrasts but complements the dark blue of the CREATOR Expert range box trim. Sadly, thumb tabs are the designated means of opening - disappointing for an adult-oriented set such as this. I am pleased to see some schematics along with real set reference images on the box top: This saves me the job of sourcing my own reference images! They've even produced a LEGO schematic. The box contains some nine polybags - three modules with three bags each, the instructions, and a separately-packaged fabric part, which you can see here. Instructions The manual comes in a separate polybag which also contains the sticker sheet. There's no cardboard backing but the wrapping has in my case done a good job of preserving the booklet. I love this! The square manual evokes an old Polaroid photograph, and if that weren't obvious enough there's a rotated panel within the picture like a photo within a photo. The faded colours and dress provide the perfect 60s vibe and (even though I'm not that old) have me pining for family holidays long-since passed. Interestingly the car featured in the picture is an older model with rear-hinged doors. I think this is the first time I've encountered a LEGO instruction manual that doesn't feature the set on the cover. A downside to the cute square booklet is that it doesn't stay open, and I wasn't about to go breaking the perfect-bound spine just for the sake of some photos. The instructions are clear against a duck-egg blue background, with suitable callouts, and extra guidance for the few tricky bits. Some four double-pages at the front provide some interesting history into the car and the FIAT company. I'm a big fan of these educational instructions - what a fabulous way to preserve our cultural heritage. Also in the instruction pack is one of the prettiest sticker sheets I've ever encountered. The decals for the car are reasonably easy to apply, though the smaller square ones all go onto curved parts. They are well colour-matched. The 5x5 square painting is gorgeous. As is customary, a variety of nationalities are featured in the car registrations. The Danish (DK) and German (PN) plates both feature the set number formatted to a realistic registration number (although in Denmark, 10.xxx numbers were for motorcycles I believe). PN is not an obscure region of Germany but instead refers to the set designer Pierre Normandin. The Italian plate is worthy of note. 'TO' is the area code for Turin (Torino; the 'T' in FIAT and the firm's city of origin); 'F01965' can only refer to the 500F model which was released in 1965 and was the first to feature front-hinged doors, as does the LEGO version. Parts The three modules' parts are shown in the thumbnails below: click the pictures to see larger versions. I didn't identify any new moulds in this collection, but the headline is the shear number of parts appearing for the first time in bright light yellow. This colour has been in the ascendency for a few years, featuring for example as panels and bricks in Friends sets, or as the secondary colour of the new livery of the CITY fire sets, but I have not previously encountered such a fine spread. This extends too to the SNOT parts; there are SNOT brackets and bricks of various conformations all in BLY - contrast the Beetle whose extensive SNOT pieces were for most part grey. Otherwise, the 10x4x1 windscreen and the 4x2 2/3x1 trans-clear curved bricks are found only in the Old Trafford set, and there are three (one spare) 1x1 round tiles with a lovely FIAT logo - see later. The four medium dark flesh arms-with-pins in the centre photo took me a while to identify; they are originally Nexo Knight parts found more recently as ice cream cone limbs. Build I won't go through this exhaustively; instead I'll just try to give you a feel for the build and highlight some interesting bits. We join here fairly early in module 1. Of some interest is the construction of the chassis: In the centre are dark grey 2x4 plates with pins on each side, usually used as wheel axles, here connecting to the technic beams on either side. The centre beams are connected to the outer beams and the black 2x2 plates with technic hole via 3L pins. The result is a strong floorpan only a brick high. The underside is reinforced; see here. The rear bumper and lights is attached via SNOT plates, and also unusually with the 2x3 clippy-tile. I remain uncertain of the purpose of the two blue stud-pins on either side of each end of the chassis; they serve no apparent purpose except possibly to help put the axles into the right holes. If that's the case, I can't help but feel a little patronised. Next we build up the rear, at the start of Module 2. You get to see how the wings are attached at a slant using hinge-plates in a technique that will be familiar to anyone who has ever built an X-wing. See here for a part-assembled view. Above these slanted sections, SNOT-attached curved plates help define the car's double-curvature. Note the small 2x2 with corner cutaway, which attaches solely to the single stud of the grey headlight brick you can see mounted on its side - it's next to the turquoise brick if not immediately obvious. I always like headlight bricks used this way. You can also see the gearstick and handbrake, along with the bars to which the chairs will be attached. Up till now the build has been enjoyable, without being especially challenging. It starts to go up a gear at this point. r The dashboard section is a SNOTty conundrum that requires a bit of mental gymnastics to keep oriented correctly. This is made harder by the fact that a sticker needs to applied to one of the inverted 2x2 curved plates, seen here at the base of the dashboard but will face to the rear of the car when mounted - and it will be all too easy to set it upside down. The black block seen here is the fuel tank, which will attach to the visible forward-facing yellow studs of the dashboard section therefore reverting to studs-up. Towards the front are two black 2L pin joiners, the purpose of which is a little mystifying at this point. I (wrongly, as it transpired) assumed they were to attach the headlights. Next come the doors. I've part-deconstructed one here to show how it's made. 1x2 SNOT brackets - regular and inverted - hold some 1x2 clicky-hinges; these attach to 2x1 clicky hinges to produce a half-stud offset to which the contoured door upper is attached, delightfully smooth with curved plates on inverted tiles. Note the 1x1 corner panel brick just in front of the door hinges, and the 1x4 brick-with-slot at the base of the door - these are significant as will be explained later. On the right is the rear window made out of a door panel. The result is slightly asymmetrical, but it's barely noticeable. Moving into Module 3, the front panel is attached to the the inner studs of the 1x2 SNOT bricks, and the two 1x1 grey inverted brackets. You might think this would be a little weak, but the headlights help to keep it attached. Here you can also see that the black pin-joiners have nothing to do with the headlights, which instead will attach to the forward-pointing bars of the black 1x1 round-plates-with-bars (these things) sandwiched between 1x2 round-end plates. Why the round-end plates? And, for that matter, the heel-print tiles? Answer: they allow the wings to attach at a slant. Regular plates or bricks would interfere with the square front ends of the wings. Here, also, the purpose of the black pin-joiner part is made clear: the wings are seven studs long, and the 1x2 curved-top bricks require a 1x2x(4/3) curved brick to fill the gap. This has a protruding plate, and the black cylinders accommodate and also support this. Note the as-yet-unattached wing at the bottom of the picture. The free end of the hinge will be mounted on the black and yellow studs just in from the door hinge, and this reveals the reason for the 1x1 corner panel: it accommodates the rounded pivot of the hinge plate. Kudos to the designer for the problem-solving skills on display here . Finally, the secret of the folding roof is revealed to be more of those mini-frying pan pieces, this time in BLY. They leave a small visible irregularity in the roof edge, but I'm glad they are at least colour-matched. It is then a little tricky to attach the windscreen and the luggage-compartment cover without breaking it, but when it's done, plus wheels and the set's extra bits, we have a finished car. Overall, the build is deceptive. Apart from a few tricky bits, it is smooth and easy to follow, but enjoyable; it is all too easy to miss some wonderful design touches that help recreate the car's curvy outline. I'd rate the difficulty as 'Expert' (harder than Average but not Master or Legendary ) The Complete Set First impression: yup, it's definitely a Fiat 500. I think the LEGO version has the iconic double-curved bodywork down pretty well. I was pleasantly surprised by the slanted front and rear wings, which help to recreate the ovoid shape of the Fiat, and weren't immediately apparent from the box art or my brief look at the promotional pictures before receiving the set. It looks great in Bright Light Yellow which I think was the perfect choice: whilst the car would look stunning in a bright mid-blue tone, or dark blue or green, these have been used recently for CREATOR cars; possibly the only other colour I could see making such an impact here is the very rare Medium Green. The head-on view isn't the car's most interesting angle. The windscreen is perhaps rather obviously too rectangular, a flaw of the medium of course. There should be a curve to the top edge, and the screen of course should bow slightly. The front is nicely contoured, and I like the use of the unicorn horns to mimic the flashing here. I'm not quite so keen on the headlights, which I think might have been better made with inverted domes. You can see I've put on the Italian plated for the Italian car. A three-stud-long tile is used (3x2 at the back) which works well. The curvy rear has I think turned out nicely, helped by the stickers which are a reasonable representation of the vents for the rear engine. I'm not so keen on the flare of the wheel arches form these angles, but they are less obvious from any other viewpoint. Ideally, the lip of the wheel arches should extend all the way round, but no such part exists. You might also notice that the construction differs front to rear: Inverted slopes are used at the rear, but I think the SNOT-mounted cheese wedges at the front give a smoother more circular outline. The contour of the roof toward the rear is a little fussy from the side, with an obvious step between the roof and rear window. I do like the double-curve of the sides, but this comes with slight problems: notice the half-stud gap behind the door handle, caused by the upper bulge being offset, but this improves the front edge of the door, where the cut corner almost perfectly matches the rake of the windscreen. Ideally the top line of the upper curve would be continuous with the curve of the front luggage compartment; it's close, but not quite matched, and interrupted by the windscreen. The tricky curves of the rear have provided a significant challenge, which the designer has worked hard to overcome. The result is mostly successful: The convex engine compartment cover works superbly, and the light clusters look great and are instantly recognisable. The transition from the rear curve to the side is a little awkward: above the light clusters, there are two 45-degree slopes topped by a 33 degree cheese wedge, then moving to the almost-vertical bottom end of the yellow curved brick: the 33 degree cheese looks a little incongruous and I wonder whether another 45 slope would work better. I like the way the 45 slope echoes that of the cut-corner curved slope on the side, but below this the curved end of the rear wing ends a little messily. I can't suggest how to improve this though, and I am being super-picky here: the overall result is lovely. The birds-eye view really emphasises the car's ovoid outline. From here almost everything is smooth, and I hope you agree that the slanted wings are a triumph. I also like the minifigure skates as door handles. Here's a real one, in a similar colour, for comparison: The LEGO version has managed to reproduce the double-curved body sides pretty well, with only the step at the sides of the windscreen interrupting the curves. Missing are the tiny wing indicator lights, which i believe were standard on the 500F (correct me if I'm wrong), and the door mirror, which does not appear to have been mandatory and may even be a later addition. The lack of door mirrors does make the LEGO car look a little odd, conditioned as I am to seeing them on all cars these days. Features The luggage compartment cover lifts to a maximum of about 45 degrees to reveal a poky space taken up almost entirely by the fuel tank and spare wheel. No room for picnic baskets in this car. On the plus side, the spare wheel is the same size as the other wheels, unlike the Beetle's. I've switched to the German plates for this section. The inset shows a close-up of the 1x1 round FIAT tile, which is pretty and much nicer than the VW equivalent. You might notice here a slight quirk of the construction: the front panel sits half a plate height proud of the main body; the 1x8 tile on the top therefore half a plate behind. The latter lines up perfectly with the compartment cover when closed. It's barely noticeable, and if anything helps to smooth the contours. I'm not so keen on the black bars to which the headlights are attached, and wish they'd used light bluish grey. The doors open wide - really wide. On the inner aspect of the door is some dark red to match the seats, a telephone handset for the inner door handle, and an antenna to mimic the window handle (not a winder: it rotates the quarterlight window). Recall that I mentioned the 1x4 brick with groove at the bottom of the door: here you can see the reason for its use: it allows the door to close around the protruding pivot of 2x2-2x2 hinge plate at the rear (second panel). Again, an ingenious solution. The front seats flip forward, as you can see, using the ice cream cone arm pieces. True to life, the dashboard is rather Spartan body-coloured painted metal, and the steering column features an indicator lever and a single speedometer. You may just be able to make out some cheese wedges under the steering column to represent pedals. Compared to the real thing, the LEGO version is reasonably accurate. There's even a white round-end plate behind the speedometer, which would a more impressive nod to accuracy were the steering wheel also white. The wheel should probably be larger, but having seen the problem of the oversized steering wheel in the Mini, I think too small is better than too big. I've taken the roof off to give a better view of the interior. The decal does a good job of imitating the real dashboard switches, though there should be one more and some indicator lights. Here too you can admire the handbrake and gearstick, the latter crudely but effectively realised from a flick-fire pin in a ball joint. There's a surprising amount of space for such a dinky car; you could even sit two adults in the back, provided they have short legs and don't mind getting intimate. I'm not sure how authentic the white tops of the seats are; I can't find a reference image to a car which has them, except for this model. The rear engine is also given a bit of detail. True to life the cover opens downwards; the cover is perhaps a little thicker than necessary, but the effect when closed is pleasing. Here the engine looks like a rather randomly thrown-together collection of parts, but when compared to the reference image below, you can see that the designer has gone to some effort to make it accurate: Bonus points for the gold flower piece to match the oil filler cap! Finally we should look at the accessories. There's a sturdy travel case, emblazoned with national stickers of Switzerland, Sweden, Italy, Denmark, Poland, France, Germany, and Somewhere; there's a tall easel on which can be mounted the really quite beautiful artwork on a 5x5 grey tile. The accompanying artist's palette sports four paint colours only one of which (red) features in the painting: the yellow is regular yellow. Only the palette and brush fit in the trunk, requiring the easel to be stowed in the passenger footwell and poking out of the roof. The automotive masterpiece, meanwhile, must be thrown unceremoniously onto the back seat like grocery shopping or children. The trunk mounts easily onto the rear luggage rack, where the combination of reddish brown and MDF colours complement nicely the light yellow of the car. Comparison So how do the European small cars compare? Bear in mind that while the Beetle and Fiat and built at approximately the same scale (the VW Beetle is a metre longer than the 500), the Mini should be the same size as the Fiat. I now notice that somebody, probably a small child, has tipped both the Fiat's seats forward. I'm really quite positive about the Fiat, but I can't help feeling that it looks a little bland compared to its older siblings. Perhaps it is because the front is relatively featureless. The (intentional and authentic) lack of door mirrors is particularly noticeable here. All three look amazing from the rear. The Mini again has an unfair size advantage, and I am perhaps not doing the Fiat justice by showing it straight on where its narrow profile makes it seem that much smaller. However you feel, I think you will agree that the three make a great collection. Conclusion I really like this car. The slanted wings and double-curved bodywork help to capture the essence of this automotive classic, working well despite the constraints of medium of LEGO. The bright light yellow livery helps emphasise the car's playful nature, whilst bringing yet another peripheral colour to the LEGO mainstream. Realistic features abound and add to the display potential, and it will sit happily on the shelf by itself or in the illustrious company of any of the CREATOR Expert cars, including the Mustang and Aston Martin. The selection of BLY pieces will delight any parts-collector or MOCer, especially given the array of SNOT pieces. The build process is satisfying, and in the latter stages both entertaining and somewhat challenging, with interesting techniques from which I've certainly learned a thing or two. And now I find I have a conundrum. I reviewed the Beetle in 2016 and was quite critical; it is for the most part a great set, and an interesting build. It is currently still available, and in the UK is the same price as the Fiat, despite some 200 more parts; it is perhaps more interesting to look at, and not just because it is physically larger. On paper, the Beetle is the better set of the two. However, there is something about it which didn't sit right with me, and still doesn't: mostly it is the steep rake of the windscreen which resembled more a 2CV than a Beetle, but also the chunkiness of the wheels and wheel arches always felt a bit off to me The Fiat doesn't really suffer any of these issues. Aside from a few minor cosmetic substitutions, I don't think I would change anything about the set as it is, with the currently available parts, and I don't have any major criticisms of this set. And yet, if you asked me which of the two you should spend your hard-earned £75 on, I would have to say ... the Beetle. If you can afford it, get both. The Fiat is a better rendition of the original car, and has a wonderful informative instruction manual usually the preserve of Ideas or Architecture sets. Design 9 There's very little I would have done differently. Build 8 A little mundane at the start, but gets interesting from Module 2 onwards, with some mind-screwing SNOT work and some fascinating solutions to tricky problems. Parts 8 Lots of useful SNOT parts, and a ton of parts that are new to Bright Light Yellow. If you need BLY, get this! Play/Display 8 The car's small size and narrow profile might make it look less imposing compared to the Mini and Beetle, but its colour and curviness do make it stand out. Value 7 Parts per pound, it is still great value, although perhaps not compared to the Beetle. Whether this difference is due to licensing (TLG has a long history of licensed VW products) or the extended manual, I don't know. If the latter, I will just quote myself: Overall 80% My score 9/10 I love this set. Fiat or Beetle? Follow your heart. Oh, and TLG? More classic cars please! Rufus's 10252 Beetle Review Fiat 500 on Wikipedia
  19. Review - LEGO 40187 Flower Display INTRODUCTION My girlfriend sent me a picture of this set, labelled with "Could this be Review material?". Isn't it nice when you have someone reminding you that you should do another review now, because that last one was soooo long ago? She found it at a local second hand store, but seals on top and bottom were still intact and the contents thus untouched. So my thoughts were "Hell, why not, it's about time for another review indeed". And what a better opportunity to do it now, when you need to #StaySafe and #StayHome anyways . The picture on the box shows us two cute flowers, a red Rose and a white Daisy. Both can be built and displayed at the same time. The set itself is quite small and comprised of exactly 100 pieces. The box measures 12 cm in height, 9 cm in width and is about 6 cm deep. Originally released in 2018, it can still be ordered from most LEGO Online Stores, thought availability varies from country to country. LEGO had it originally labelled unter "Miscellaneous", it goes along the Seasonal theme. By the way: Left click on a picture takes you to the bigger resolution on Flickr, as usual. SET SPECS Number: 40187 Title: Flower Display Theme: Seasonal Released: 2018 Part Count: 100 pieces Retail Price: DE - 5,99 € GB - 4,99 GBP US - 5,99 $ DK - 50,00 DKK With 100 pieces, the retail price of 5,99 € equates to a price of 0,06 € a piece (rounded to the second digit). This is pretty good and a way better parts-per-price ratio than most other sets. For comparison, 31078 Treehouse Treasures from my last review had a price of 0,12 € per piece. According to Brickinsights this set's ratio is way better than the average for System sets of 2018. LINKS 40187 @ brickset.com 40187 @ rebrickable.com LEGO PRODUCT SUMMARY Say it the LEGO® way with these 2 buildable flowers, featuring a rose and a daisy with interchangeable pots—perfect for Valentine’s day, Mother’s day or just because! THE BOX The 100 parts are packaged in a plain and simple box with flaps, not much text is found on the front of it. Pictured are the two flowers that you can build, the red Rose and the white Daisy in their pots, put on a digital backdrop featuring a window sill with a view into the countryside. Recommended age for this set is 7+ according to the front of the box. No set number on the front. The daisy is also featured on the right side with the set number, while the back shows us the usual warnings in countless languages and information about where this product was manufactured as well as distribution partners. The left side features the red rose, while the top of the box presents a 65° slope in red in 1:1 scale for size comparison and both sides also feature the set number. Finally, on the bottom we have trademark informations, the barcode and the internal item number for this product. As we can see, this box is recyclable (for those who tend to throw away the boxes after stripping them of their innards ). THE PARTS Inside the box, we have two unnumbered bags with parts. One is a little bigger, holding the pot parts for the Daisy. After unpacking both and spreading out their contents, this is what we get. The parts are nothing special by todays standards. Colours are mainly Green, White and Red (Viva Italia ). A few Yellow parts for the Daisy, 2x Bar 6l with stop ring and 2 round 1x1 plates in Reddish Brown as well as 4 macaronis in Pearl Gold are also there. The few Dark Blueish Gray and Black parts mostly hide away inside of the flowers or pots, only the 1L bars with clip will be visible later. Back in 2018, when this set was released, the Green Barbs (Part No. 16770) had only been included in Set 10255 Assembly Square before. Today this part comes in 5 sets, one of it being Set 30555 Poppy's Carriage, which is a polybag from the new Trolls theme. MINIFIGURES Well, there are none. Zero, niente, nada. But I think you didn't expect any, given that this set is called "Flower Display"? INSTRUCTIONS The instructions are kept as simple as the box was. Plain folded paper, nothing fancy. They fold up to the size shown in the upper left on the picture. Two instructions are provided, one for each flower. What I found interesting is the fact that there is no parts list, neither on instructions nor box. MAIN MODEL - ROSE AND DAISY Simplicity continues. Building the two flowers is as simple as the box and the instructions, nothing fancy here as well. Even if the builds are indeed pretty simple, there is a certain amount of SNOT on the Rose. Building the Daisy uses clips with an Octagonal plate with bar handles, the pot is a ridiculously simple build. And then you're then, Rose and Daisy are finished and ready for the shelf. Not many spare parts are left after building the flowers. PLAY FUNCTIONS Errrm, yeah.... Nothing much to say about the "play" functions because this is clearly labelled as a display model. You can swap out the pots between Rose and Daisy, but that's about it. B MODEL Well, no instructions for a B-model. However, given the range of parts in this set, I think it would be quite possible to create several other types of flowers with a little bit of imagination - which I am completely lacking at the moment... but maybe I'm not the only one with that problem. Doing a short search on the Internet didn't reveal any alternative builds so far. That shouldn't stop you from having a bit of fun with this set, it's LEGO after all . Flowerpot Girl is clearly happy about her new neighbour, and Cactus Girl made first contact with another thorny lifeform. (Minifigs are not included with this set, of course) SUMMARY & RATING I had a hard time judging this set, as the play functions are practically non-existing and there are no alternative or B models. The fact that it is a pure display model and the price per parts ratio is astonishingly low both compensate for these issues. But still I could not give this set a better rating than 7 out of 10 points (translating to a 4 - Above average in the EB rating poll). Maybe that's because I do have a problem with pure display models. Given that the parts are quite usable, I would still recommend this set, even if it was just as a parts pack. On the other hand this turns out to be a rather nice gift for your beloved ones, even if they are not at home in the world of bricks. Be it for Valentine's, Mother's or any other day you have an opportunity to bring a lovely present, this set really is a pleasing surprise to gift. Unfortunately, due to Covid-19, I missed the deadline with this review for Mother's Day, but some people say every day of the year is a Mother's day If you bought this for yourself, because you are a bit into flowers, you should definitely look at 30404 Friendship Flower from the Friends series. It uses similar techniques as for the Daisy and goes nice along with the two flowers from this set. Design: 8 / 10 - Pleasent looking builds Build: 8 / 10 - Instructions are clear and easy to follow, building did indeed make fun despite the low part count Playability: 2 / 10 - Only meant as display models, so no play value whatsoever (besides switching the pots ... *cough*), no B-model or alternatives Minifigures: no rating Price: 10 / 10 - Price per part ratio pretty good, lots of reusable parts too because of the simple colour palette Overall: 7 / 10
  20. Hello, I'm here again presenting my 36th review in Eurobricks. Let's have a look at Dom's Dodge Charger! Before that, I want to thank LEGO for providing us with this set for review. Overview Name: 42111 Dom's Dodge Charger Theme: LEGO Technic Pieces: 1077 pieces Minifigures: 0 Price: £89.99 / $99.99 / 99.99€ Box Square boxes are quite uncommon in LEGO. However, this is actually my first technic set in my life so let's move into it and I'll let you know what's inside. Like usual, the back of the box shows us the play features in the set and we get to see the actual car picture at the top corner. At the side, we can see the actual size of the tyre. The Content We get four numbered bags with smaller same numbered bags so there are 8 bags in total. The instruction booklet is sealed in a plastic bag together with the sticker sheet. The frame and the tyres are not sealed inside the plastics. I've scanned the sticker sheet here in high resolution. The comparison photo of the actual car and a dog. This is found at the back of the instruction booklet and LEGO is trying to tell you they are rebuilding the world. Different version of Dom's Dodge Charger. The parts list. This is quite clear and you can zoom in to see the parts numbers by clicking at the picture and zoom in. This is an 11x15 frame in dark bluish grey with the part number of 6265646. I suppose it is new and currently exclusive to the set. It is still not catalogued in bricklink yet. Tire 56 x 28 ZR Street. 6035364 is a tyre produced in 2001 as seen in the left one. Technic, Shock Absorber 6.5L - Hard Spring. 6027566 is an old part but it is considered a new piece to me as this is my first technic set. It contributes to the suspension of the car making it bouncy. After finish bag one, you will get a set of bones like this. It feels fascinating building technic for the first time. I feel like building a car. (What am I talking about? IT IS A FREAKING CAR!) There is a sticker underneath the frame. I suppose the license is a serious issue here. Technic, Engine Cylinder without Side Slots, 4234251. Going towards bag 2, this appears as the engine part. It is released since 2009 and it is new to me here, haha. Technic, Engine Piston Round, 4112203. This is even older and it comes in blue too since 1990. Okay, 6276854. This one is new and currently exclusive to the set. Quite a nice and versatile piece for some Star Wars ships I think. As I said, this is new to me and I find these pistons build very interesting. After building the second bag, you'll notice the 'steering wheel' is at the back of the vehicle and the pistons of the engine at the front are controlling the rear wheels. Technic, Steering Wheel Large, 4125213. Since 1988. This wheel is useless in the vehicle and it controls nothing. Haha. Technic, Panel Fairing # 2 Small Smooth Short, Side B 4566249 and Technic, Panel Fairing # 1 Small Smooth Short, Side A 4566251. This is an interesting part to me as LEGO is very considerate in putting numbers at the parts so that we won't be confused of the right and left side of the piece. I love this kind of small details LEGO put in. Bag 3 is actually wrapping the front part of the skeleton. I really love the trans clear boat studs coupled with that sticker with the word Charger. The front of the car really looks gorgeous. Bag 4 completes the whole build and this is the rear view of the vehicle. The white California 2JRI424 License Plate is produced as seen on the 1970 Dodge Charger driven by Dominic Toretto. More info. Side view of the Car. I wonder why the technic pin is not 'finished' sticking out the rims. Hmm... It is quite hard to pull the lever inside the car after the hood is installed. It is too narrow inside. The grey technic part at the middle is the lever. Easier when it is still the skeleton phase. The front hood can be opened to reveal the engine inside. I love the look of the engine but imagine if we get chromed parts for this! Okay wake up. The bonnet is filled with 2 bottles of Nitrous Oxide can. I am Groot. *Groot is not included in the set.* Review summary Playability: 6/10 - Yes you can play with the car and as the steering wheel is at the bonnet of the car, it is quite convenient to control the front wheel. Design / Building Experience: 6/10 - The design is very nice at the front and back but please don't view from the top. You'll only see a black rectangle. Minifigures: -/10 - At least give us a minifigure without any hairpiece. Price / Value for money: 6/10 - It is a nice display set for a Fast and Furious fan. Don't display it inside a Koi fish pond (If you know what I mean). Haha Overall: 6/10 - I think this set is only targetted for Fast and Furious fans as normal LEGO fan would only see this as a black car. However building this makes me feels like I'm a real mechanic especially when you build the spring part. Thanks for reading! I hope you like this review. Do share your thoughts in the comments below!  My reviews in Eurobricks. Review: 76060 Doctor Strange's Sanctum Sanctorum Review: 60134 Fun in the park - City People Pack Review: 70911 The Penguin™ Arctic Roller Review: 70818 Double-Decker Couch REVIEW: LEGO 76051 SUPER HERO AIRPORT BATTLE REVIEW: Short comparison of various sized Antman. Review: 9469 Gandalf Arrives Review: 31015 Emerald Express & 31054 Blue Express Review: 79018 The Lonely Mountain Review: 9474 The Battle of Helm's Deep Review: 21029 The Buckingham Palace [Review] 30611 R2-D2 Polybag Review: 9473 The Mines of Moria Review: 41103 Pop Star Recording Studio Review of City of Wonders Gift Sets in Malaysia. Review: 75030 Millennium Falcon Review of 76084 The Ultimate Battle for Asgard and 76088 Thor vs Hulk: Arena Clash Review of 76099 Rhino Face-Off by the Mine and 76100 Royal Talon Fighter Attack. Review of 76031 The Hulk Buster Smash and 76104 The Hulkbuster Smash Up Review: 75230 Porg [REVIEW] 5005254 - Harry Potter Minifigures (Bricktober 2018) [REVIEW] 5005255 - Jurassic World Minifigures (Bricktober 2018) [REVIEW] 5005257 - NINJAGO Minifigures (Bricktober 2018) [REVIEW] 5005256 - Marvel Infinity War Minifigures (Bricktober 2018) Review: 76105 The Hulkbuster: Ultron Edition Review: 70841 Benny's Space Squad Review of 76039 Ant-man Final Battle and 76109 Quantum Realm Explorers Review: 79003 An Unexpected Gathering The Fellowship of the Ring Collection. Review: 30452 Iron Man and Dum-E Polybag [REVIEW] 76048 Iron Skull Sub Attack [REVIEW] 40343 Spider-Man and the Museum Break-In [REVIEW] Four SDCC minifigures [REVIEW] 76144 Avengers Hulk Helicopter Rescue [REVIEW] 21313 Ship in a Bottle
  21. Alexander The Great

    [Video review] #8692 Vamprah

    Hello there! This is my latest review of the set #8692 Vamprah. It is in Russian, but I've added the English subtitles so you could check it out if interested. I'd gretly appreciate your feedback, whether on the review itself or the translation. Please, leave a comment if you'd like to support this review and potential next ones.
  22. Here is my review on the other minions set released: THE GOOD: Stuart and Bob are great minifigures. The rocket skates suit the minions well. THE NOT SO GOOD: Gru minifigure does not capture the character at all. Obviously haven't seen the movie so cant compare the motorbike but the bike just don't do it for me. Overall, I would have skipped this set if the other 3 sets released at the same time. No doubt this set would make lots of kids happy and with a very appealing price point but I just can't agree on the direction the designer took with the Gru Minifigure. I do like the Stuart and Bob minifigures though and this what drove me to buy this. If you planning to buy a Minions set and have a few extra dollars, I would suggest you get the Brick built Minions and skip this one.
  23. When it was revealed that the third of the three new Star Wars helmets would be the TIE Fighter Pilot, I was puzzled. Against Boba Fett and the Stormtrooper, a TIE Fighter Pilot is hardly that iconic. Pictures looked pretty good, though, so I was left curious about this one. 75274 TIE Fighter Pilot Helmet | 2020 | 724 Pieces USD $60 | GBP 55 | EUR 60 (variable) | CAD 80 | AUS$ 90 ___________________________ This is one of four review topics for the Helmets Collection: an individual detailed build and review for Boba Fett, Stormtrooper, and TIE Fighter Pilot, and an overview review looking at the whole line including the packaging, all three together, value and the concept in general. These sets were kindly provided by LEGO but all opinions are my own. Now, let's dive into the TIE Fighter Pilot! __________________________ Bag 1 Bag 1 has quite a colourful assortment for an all-black helmet, some of the biggest individual pieces to be found in the set, and plenty of foundations for SNOT. The only semi-rare part is the blue 1 by 1 and 2/3 brick with two studs on the side in blue, and you get 14 in this set. The core of the helmet, like the Stormtrooper, is comprised of two semi-hollow levels. That keeps the beginning build moving quickly, and doesn't feel like it's cutting any corners since there's really no need for a fully solid interior. At the end of bag 1 we're left with lots and lots of studs ready for SNOTing, and a teensy bit of the top of the helmet. With Captain Rex for size comparison, you can see the model isn't going to be very big. Rex will continue with us for reference throughout as it takes shape. Bag 2 Somehow I missed taking a picture of the contents of bag 2, but it would've been a bunch of black. The build starts with the stand, which is slightly different from the Boba and Stormie stands because it has attachment points for the gas transfer tubes. It's reinforced through the centre with technic beams. The rest of bag 2 has you attach the core to the base and build the back of the helmet, which is mainly just a lot of plate stacking and not particularly interesting. The height of the model has now nearly doubled. Bag 3 Here we've got a lot of black and a few bright flashes. Some newish parts like triangular tiles, but nothing rare. The eye portion has clever direction changes using the new-ish bracket with four anti-studs on the side, and clips for angling. It turns out well. By the end of bag 3, those eyes are attached as are the tops of each side. Bag 4 Here we've got - surprise! - a lot more black, for the mouth-piece and one side. The mouth includes two of the four prints in the set: two 2x2 tiles with black lines. Almost all the different sorts of small wedge plates also make an appearance. The mouth build uses more interesting colours for no particular reason, and is attached using a dark red riot shield, which has turned into quite a versatile piece - I wonder if the part designer could've anticipated that when it was first created. The side of the helmet entails a lot more stacking with just a few direction changes. Bag 5 Bag 5 simply builds the mirrored other side of the helmet. Here's where it ends up: Bag 6 Bag 6 contains the parts to finish off the tubes, the top of the head, the plaque, and the insignia. The chin section is a fiddly little build with a bunch of small slopes and SNOT, but it comes together nicely. But there's nothing as tedious as threading 18 little train wheels onto a flex tube - twice! And with the Imperial emblems attached and a bit on top, we're done! Here are the leftovers, not much to speak of: Completed Model - Without Stickers This set only includes two stickers, to extend either side of the mouth. I wondered what it might look like without those stickers, since they're quite small and not necessarily easy to apply in an ideal position. Given that the model is so black, to me it looks completely fine without those stickers applied. It doesn't look like something is obviously missing. Completed Model - As Intended Now here it is "all stickered up". The helmet looks quite menacing, like it should, and since it's all black any blockiness or awkward stepping of the parts kind of blends together in your mind when you look at it. Here's the back, in case you're interested. While it's complete from all angles, there's nothing to see back here. The side profile is quite good, though, and shows the interesting interplay between studded and smooth surfaces. In my mind the contrast between the textures makes the studded areas read as fabric, which of course they aren't meant to be, but overall the balance is fine and doesn't look messy, which perhaps is a risk. The stepped bows leading to the tubes are a bit abrupt, and don't look great close up, but from a distance they look ok. Final Thoughts and Rating I opened by saying that on face value, a TIE Fighter Pilot helmet seems like an odd choice for an inaugural line of three Star Wars helmets. As far as subject matter goes, it feels like something that would turn up in a second or third lineup, not the first one. However, having now built it and looked at it for a while on my table from a distance, like one would with these display pieces, I have to say it's a really good choice for the medium and well done. The TIE helmet in universe has a great deal of different angles, all very smooth and rounded, which is obviously going to be hard to pull off in blocky, angular LEGO with lots of little pieces working together. But like I said, since it's all black and there's nowhere for light to go, all of those little bits meld together and look pretty seamless. The proportions aren't perfect, of course, but unless you hold up a picture of a movie still or real-life prop next to it, it looks right. And, above all, it looks cool. Parts: This rating is too subjective to give. If you like slopes, black, and/or SNOT parts, there's plenty here for you, but otherwise it doesn't feel like what I'd call a "good parts pack". Build: 8.5/10 - The majority of it is stacking stuff, and there are (necessarily) tedious sections. Also, while all new pieces each step are outlined in yellow, I found it somewhat hard to keep track of what was being added at times (though I do have a hard-wired tendency to ignore the piece callouts, but I'm not holding that against the set). Design: 9/10 - Besides the areas with the bows leading to the tubes, for which there must be a somewhat more elegant solution even at this scale, the overall design looks great. Overall: 8.75/10 - This model is good. The build isn't the most fun or instructive, but it does the job, and the completed model looks excellent. Plus, it has the most parts of the three, so value-wise it's up there. In my review of the complete series, I'll talk more about value, as well as if I think people want a TIE Fighter Pilot helmet model anyway. Looking at it on its own, I would certainly recommend it for anybody who likes the source material, or wants a cool and mean-looking all-black thing to display. Up next: the Stormtrooper helmet.
  24. Here is my review on 75551 Brick-built Minions and their lair: THE GOOD: The brick-built Kevin, Stuart and Bob are excellent, I think just the right size and impressed how well the design captures the vibe of each character with known lego limitation. Distinct interior inside each minion. Excellent use of printed parts and stickers. Great Minifigures. THE NOT SO GOOD: Can only build 2 minions in one set. The stickers for Bob's interior is a bit difficult to apply. Overall, I think it's an excellent set. I know Minions may not for everyone but I really enjoyed the building experience and the finished product. Absolutely loving the minifigures too. I do wish they included/increase the piece count to allow BOB in the set too. Buying 2 sets may not be feasible for everyone and you end up with one extra Stuart (well, of cos you can easily customise it to a generic minion). Other than this, I can't fault this set at all. WIll totally recommend this to anyone even to those not really like the minions. Now I'm looking forward to the other 3 delayed sets next year.
  25. My first video after a long time and my first ever review! Here are my thoughts on the 42111 Dom's Dodge Charger. Let me know if you have any comments or criticism for my review. This is my first time doing this, after all, and it probably isn't great, but it's the best I could do given my limited knowledge of good review-making. Thank you! As well, I plan on making a MODs and improvements video for this set. I plan to include: A working steering wheel Improved suspension Better interior Better access to the wheelie bar A floor for the trunk Some general cosmetic fixes Let me know if there's anything else you want to see! Thanks for reading/watching! BbBT