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  1. REVIEW - 42083 - BUGATTI CHIRON INTRODUCTION First of all, my apologies for bringing you this review so late. There were some logistical and communication issues, which caused a delay in the delivery of the set. The set was due to arrive before the LEGO Fan Media Days, but mine arrived after the event. Throw some personal obligations in the mix and you have a belated review. Also, this review won't be as elaborate as the one I did for the Porsche GT3 RS. Sorry about that too. Nevertheless, I hope will enjoy the pics and some of my insights. I was fortunate enough to receive an invitation to join the unveiling of the Bugatti Chiron on the 1st of June (2018), which totally rocked. For those of you who are interested, here's a link to the Bugatti page on the LEGO website and a link to the LEGO page on the Bugatti website. If you see this icon, you can click the image on the left or right side of the image, to cycle through alternative images. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefor, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42083 Title: Bugatti Chiron Theme: Technic Released: 2018 Part Count: 3.599 Box Weight: 5,9 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 57 cm x 37,5 cm x 15 cm Set Price (MSRP): £ 329.99 / $ 349.99 / € 369,99 Price per Part: £ 0.092 / $ 0.097 / € 0,103 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX As you have come to expect, the box is more luxurious than the regular LEGO Technic sets. The blue on blue effect of the vehicle and background is working for me. And I like the reflection underneath the car. The upper right corner of the box shows that this set is also built in a 1:8 scale, like the Porsche. Some people state that the box is a waste of money and they prefer a regular box. Since this will probably only slice a couple of euros of the price, I prefer having a luxurious box for the "UCS" models. Since you are paying top dollar already, you might as well get a nice box with your model. I throw away every other Technic box, but I wouldn't think of throwing this one away. The back of the box shows some key elements of the car. And it shows the sexy behind of the car. More praise for that later. Nope, these are not my left-over parts from the build. This the content of a bag I received at the unveiling event. The USB sticks contain media kit for both Bugatti and LEGO (click here to download the LEGO Media Kit and Bugatti Media Kit). And when I run a flat, I can at least change it CONTENTS OF THE BOX The side of the box shows the profile view of the car. Click on the images to show the inside of the box. There are six boxes, one for each step of the build. The box contains two books, instead of one. And since the Bugatti is built in two parts (before the marriage) this allows you to start the build together with someone else. The second book. And the sticker sheet. I would be nice to get a second sticker sheet with a set like this. My Flickr album has pictures of the numbered bags, used in the different stages. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS I skipped this section in my Porsche review, but I agree it's worth having the Highlighted Parts section. RIMS Let's start with the most unique and prominent part of them all...the rims. Specially designed for the Chiron. And man, this design is magnificent. Absolutely spot on. Since they are dark blue it might be difficult to use them in MOCs, but given the number of dark blue panels in this set, we will most likely see more dark blue MOCs in the future. A thing worth noting is that the pins are attached to the rims. Unlike other rims, which have holes (female), these rims have pins (male). This makes them harder to use with some of the previously used setups. On the other hand, this set comes with very cool brake discs and calipers, which can be used in MOCs as well. As you can see in the image below, all of the common rims come with holes, instead of pins. BLUE PANELS At first, I wasn't happy with the idea of this set being blue on blue, but then I found out TLG used my two favorite shades of blue. It's a public secret I am a big fan of dark azure and that's no different for dark blue, used in the 41999 - 4x4 Crawler Exclusive Edition and later in the 42064 - Ocean Explorer. I have compiled a list of modern panels in dark azure and dark blue. I think this list is complete, but feel free to check for accuracy DARK AZURE 2 x Panel Car Mudguard Arched 15 x 2 x 5 2 x Panel Curved 11 x 3 with 2 Pin Holes through Panel Surface (new in Bugatti) 0 x Panel Curved 11 x 3 with 10 Pin Holes through Panel Surface 0 x Panel Curved 3 x 6 x 3 (non-existent) 0 x Panel Curved 3 x 13 2 x Panel Fairing # 1 Small Smooth Short, Side A 2 x Panel Fairing # 2 Small Smooth Short, Side B 0 x Panel Fairing # 3 Small Smooth Long, Side A 0 x Panel Fairing # 4 Small Smooth Long, Side B 2 x Panel Fairing # 5 Long Smooth, Side A 2 x Panel Fairing # 6 Long Smooth, Side B 2 x Panel Fairing #13 Large Short Smooth, Side A 2 x Panel Fairing #14 Large Short Smooth, Side B 1 x Panel Fairing #17 Large Smooth, Side A (new in Bugatti) 1 x Panel Fairing #18 Large Smooth, Side B (new in Bugatti) 1 x Panel Fairing #21 Very Small Smooth, Side B (new in Bugatti) 1 x Panel Fairing #22 Very Small Smooth, Side A (new in Bugatti) 0 x Panel Plate 3 x 11 x 1 0 x Panel Plate 5 x 11 x 1 DARK BLUE 2 x Panel Car Mudguard Arched 15 x 2 x 5 (new in Bugatti) 0 x Panel Curved 11 x 3 with 2 Pin Holes through Panel Surface (non-existent) 0 x Panel Curved 11 x 3 with 10 Pin Holes through Panel Surface 2 x Panel Curved 3 x 6 x 3 6 x Panel Curved 3 x 13 1 x Panel Fairing # 1 Small Smooth Short, Side A 1 x Panel Fairing # 2 Small Smooth Short, Side B 0 x Panel Fairing # 3 Small Smooth Long, Side A (non-existent) 0 x Panel Fairing # 4 Small Smooth Long, Side B (non-existent) 2 x Panel Fairing # 5 Long Smooth, Side A 2 x Panel Fairing # 6 Long Smooth, Side B 2 x Panel Fairing #13 Large Short Smooth, Side A (new in Bugatti) 2 x Panel Fairing #14 Large Short Smooth, Side B (new in Bugatti) 1 x Panel Fairing #17 Large Smooth, Side A (new in Bugatti) 1 x Panel Fairing #18 Large Smooth, Side B (new in Bugatti) 6 x Panel Fairing #21 Very Small Smooth, Side B 6 x Panel Fairing #22 Very Small Smooth, Side A 4 x Panel Plate 3 x 11 x 1 0 x Panel Plate 5 x 11 x 1 (still unique to 41999) There are lots of new dark azure and dark blue parts in this sets, like liftarms and soft hoses. For a full list, I recommend checking the Bricklink Inventory or looking at the inventory pics in the next section. DISC BRAKES On Bricklink these are called Steering Wheel Hubs 3 Pin Holes Round, but I will simply call them disc brakes. I love how these turned out. 1L PIN CONNECTOR Both were already available in these colors in 2017, but it's worth noting that this part is getting more and more common in different colors. I do like this part a lot. CONNECTORS New in the regular blue color. Makes you wonder why TLG introduced the connector with hole in blue, since neither of the three sets which have them in blue are depending on this color. TLG tends to use new colors in multiple sets, but we might see the real reason for producing it in one of the future sets. The same goes for the perpendicular split connector btw. ROTARY CHANGEOVER CATCH This cool new part is specifically designed for the gearbox on the Chiron. It can engage gears by using a rotary movement, instead of sideways/lateral motion. I'm sure we will see cool new applications for this part in future sets. I heard something about it being used in one of the 2H sets already. DRIVING RING EXTENSION This new driving ring extension has 8 teeth inside, which results in less slack. 20T DOUBLE BEVEL GEAR WITH CLUTCH This gear is basicallyh the same as the regular 20T bevel gear, but it has a pin hole, instead of axle hole. And it has clutches on both sides. 3L AXLE PIN Most likely, following the "we need more colors" pattern we have seen lately, this part is introduced in red this year. We used to have dark bluish grey for this part, but now we have red too. I wonder if dark bluish grey will be phased out. 5 x 7 FRAME If you need 5 x 7 frames in black, this is the set for you. Besides buying them separately, this is your best choice to get lots (16) of 'em. PART LIST THE BUILD It looks like the build starts with a Monocoque, but that's not the case. This simply is the rear of the chassis. Lots has been written and said about the suspension in the Chiron. In the following video you can see that even without the springs attached, the liftarms don't move easily. However, with the springs attached, the suspension looks strong enough for the weight of the car. Later we will verify if that is indeed the case. The wheel hubs are connected to the new Steering Wheel Hub (a.k.a. disc brakes). I'm sure we will see these discs in future sets, as brakes or maybe as something totally different. Here's the front view of the rear suspension. The bottom view shows the new 20T bevel gear with clutch connected to the differential. No, this is not the marriage. And I don't think you can call it an engagement either. The first kiss, maybe. Part of the chassis is connected to the rear suspension. The gearbox uses a new type of axle connector, already used in some earlier sets. Where the white connector has lots of friction, the driving ring can move freely over the grey connector. The video below demonstrates the two axle connectors. And after the first kiss comes....okay, I won't go any further with this analogy. Anyway, the gearbox is connected to the rear of the chassis. Again from a different angle. W16 ENGINE Here's the top and bottom view of the W16 engine. The engine doesn't use a single crankshaft, but a construction with three axles and three 24T gears. Admittedly, I would have loved to see a custom built engine with other parts than the standard pistons and cylinders, like the MACK truck. However, I don't think this is a bad solution. The engine operates smoothly and it's fun the see all the pistons moving. It does feel like a beast of an engine. Let's mount the engine by attaching it to the chassis. Again from a different angle. FRONT CHASSIS The rear of the chassis is finished, gearbox is in place and the motor has been built. It's time to move on to the front of the car. The front suspension also uses two springs on each side. Again from a different angle. This is what the front chassis looks like when the front suspension has been attached. There is a single clutch gear in this model. It's in the center of the vehicle, near the mechanism for the gear shifter (Forward/Reverse). Since the Chiron doesn't have a center diff, this model doesn't have one either. In the real car, there's full control over the power sent to the front and rear axle. This is done electronically. Obviously, the LEGO model doesn't have this kind of advanced mechanisms. Therefore, a clutch gear is used to avoid straing on the drivetrain. One thing I noticed is that the clutch gear is not attached with a 5L axle with stop, but with a regular 5L axle. I wonder why?! Next is the mechanism for the flappy paddles. It's a rather odd but ingenious system. This pictures clearly shows the white 1L connectors, which makes this mechanism possible. The video below demonstrates the gear shifter. It's not so stable yet, because it's not enforced by the chassis. The paddles in the Porsche were attached to the steering wheel. However, the elastic bands were placed in a position where they limited the operability of the paddles. The Chiron uses a different mechanism, where the paddles are positioned in front of the driver's seat, under the steering wheel. The front of the chassis right before the marriage. You can already see some of the tan interior and the dark blue exterior. Here's a video demonstrating the gear shifter and steering. THE MARRIAGE It's time for the marriage of the rear and front of the chassis. This is the result of the marriage. It's actually starting to look like a proper supercar. At this point I tested the gear shifting sequence. Rumor has it that there once was a supercar with incorrect gear shifting sequence, so I was pleased that I could clearly see (and feel) that the sequence was correct This car has a proper 8 + R gearbox, which means that it has 8 forward gears and just a single reverse. Some of us expected the have 8 reverse gears as well, but TLG did a proper job getting the gearbox right. One minor gripe is that the real Chiron only has 7 forward gears, but that's something I can live with. From this point it's mostly exterior work on the body. The spoiler neatly aligns with the rest of the bodywork. The rear of the car is so f.... sexy. I absolutely love how this is designed. And actually, I really like the bright red, instead of a trans-clear variant. This color makes it really stand out. Allegedly, the reason for not doing it in trans-clear, is that the material of the flex axles (and panels) is not suitable for trans-clear colors. The tan upholstery is partially made up of system bricks. I like the way the chairs worked out, but I probably would have added some more system bricks to avoid the gap in the seats. Here you can clearly see the gap I am referring to. After the interior we continue with the duo-tone exterior. When I first heard that the car would be blue-on-blue I was a bit disappointed. I was actually hoping for black-and-blue. I figured TLG would use regular blue, but I didn't think of dark blue. Admittedly, I was immediately convinced when I saw the dark azure and dark blue combination. And let's face it, duo tone blue is a trademark of Bugatti, so it makes a lot of sense to use these colors. The doors are added to the vehicle. They do feel a bit flimsy and there's no door lock. They look nice, but using the stickers on the tiles instead of flex axles and the flimsyness leaves room for improvement. Bit of a cop out if you ask me. When the first picture was leaked, it only showed the front of the car. It immediately generated lots of negative comments. Since I had already seen the back (and the rest) of the car, I was convinced that it wasn't so bad as many claimed. And when I look at the picture below, I still think the front worked out nicely. What I especially like are the angles in the bodywork. We have seen some Chiron MOCs, but they are mostly square cars with flex axles. This car has lots of exotic angles, replicating its real world counterpart. I'm not saying it's perfect, but I absolutely like how it worked out. And I don't mind the gaps in the bodywork. After all, it's not a Creator Expert car, but Technic. And last but definitely not least....the rims! If the car isn't good looking already, these rims take the cake. Absolutely stunning! Of course we need some rubber to transfer the power to the road! All in all I really enjoyed the build. I liked it better than the Porsche. Partially due to non-rushed building, but also because the gearbox, engine and other key elements are more fun to build. COMPLETED MODEL Low and behold, a LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron! Looking at the real car, you can see that the lighter blue resembles regular Technic blue more than dark azure. However, I am very happy that TLG still chose to go with dark azure. It results in a higher contrast between the two colors, it's better for dark azure part availability and it's just a better color blue The spoiler isn't fully extended in this picture. It's halfway between neutral (folded) and extended. On the left you can see the lead designer of the Bugatti. Oh wait, that's not entirely correct :wink: For those of you not familiar with the history of Eurobricks; this is Kim Thomsen (@KimT), former (technically he is still a member) Eurobricks member and he is member of the Community Engagement team at TLG. He is our contact for most of the activities. The right picture shows the actual designers, from left to right: Jachin Schwalbe - Bugatti Head of Chassis and Tire Development Achim Anscheidt - Bugatti Design Director Aurelien Rouffiange - TLG Designer Andrew Woodman - TLG Senior Design Manager Here you can clearly see the different angles, which definitely must have been challenging for Aurelien. Almost as good looking as the LEGO version hehe. As I said before, the rear of the car looks absolutely stunning. I can't get enough of this view. Usually the front of the car gives it its distinct look, and the rear...is just the rear. This car has a very distinct rear as well. I like how the W16 worked out. The engine has been partially covered with system bricks to give it the "big engine look", but you can still see most of the cylinders, in contrast to the Porsche. In this image you can see that the door isn't entire closed. This could have easily been avoided by adding door locks. Other than that, the car looks magnificent. Another great view of the back. Looking at this image, I start to wonder how this car will look like when the bodywork is entirely made in dark blue, and possibly losing the grey rigid hoses. The profile view is also very beautiful, but two odd thing stand out. First is the flex axle and rigid hose combo comprising the front grill. I somehow feel this could have looked better using a single axle or hose. The other thing is that the flex axles continue as stickers. This just doesn't feel entirely right. Especially since we have seen some simple, but very good looking, MODs, using rigid hoses. Some of the negative or odd things aside, I absolutely love the looks of this car. The duo-tone blue is stunning and the rims are out of this world. If you look closely at the rims, you will notice that the tires are not mounted "correctly". The rims slightly protrude the tires. Apparently Bugatti designers found the rims to be too small when mounted correctly. This was a very simple solution to make them look a bit bigger. At first I wasn't convinced by this solution, but upon seeing the solution in real life, I was convinced that it indeed looked better. And look at those disc brakes ... fantastic! The real ones don't look too shabby either There are a lot of odd angles, which are implemented very well. It's obviously a matter of personal taste, but I do like the looks of this car better than the Porsche's. Maybe it's the sophisticated color scheme. Combine dark azure with the classy dark blue and you have an instant winner. But of course, it's not only about colors, it's about shapes as well. The bottom of the chassis looks really clean. The tan interior looks great, especially with the stickers on the dashboard and on the inside of the doors. The Frunk (front trunk) opens to reveal the Bugatti bag. Like the Frunk, the space in the bag will be limited too. Where we are going, we don't need trunk or bag space These are the left-over parts after the build and the brick-built key you can use to raise the spoiler. The real car has key which can activate ludicrous speed (Spaceballs anyone?!). Although I like the gimmick of the LEGO key, I would have rather seen a spoiler which was raised with a lever next to the seat, or a similar solution. Without the key inserted. SUMMARY Being a model of a supecar, there's only so much functionality one can expect. However, with a hefty price tag, one can expect the functions to work properly. STEERING Basic functionality is steering, which doesn't work that well. The weight of the car, combined with the lack of HoG (Hand of God) steering, makes this car virtually unsteerable. When you manage to steer at a maximum angle, the turning radius is even bigger than Yo Mama. SUSPENSION After the gearbox issues in the Porsche two years ago, the suspension developed to be the flaw of this set. When you push the bodywork down, it doesn't come up again. This goes for the front AND the back. Maybe TLG don't see this as a flaw, but I do think this should work better. I have seen a solution where some of the friction pins were replace with frictionless pins and the suspension worked better. Maybe TLG (and Bugatti) considered the suspension to be too wobbly with frictionless pins, but this being a LEGO model, I feel the model should return to normal state after pushing the suspension down. For me, it's not a deal breaker, but I wonder how much thought went into this. DOORS The doors are very wobbly when opening. Besides that, there's no door locking mechanism. We have seen some pretty simple MODs, which would have solved this problem instantly. I don't get why simple details like these are so often omited in Technic models. GEARBOX For me, the gearbox lives up to the expectation. TLG went all out and designed some cool new elements to make sure this supercar has a properly working gearbox. Of course, there are always people who can make a better version, but after gearbox-gate two years ago, I'm very pleased with this one. W16 ENGINE Also, subject to many debates...the W16 engine. For the connaisseurs, this isn't really a W16 engine. It's more like a stacked V8 or a V8 with two extra 4-cylinder blocks. I would have loved for TLG to design some new engine elements as well, but I reckon they will leave that for future supercars. I can also imagine that the Bugatti is unique with a 16 cylinder engine, so designing special elements might be unneccesarily expensive. And to be honest; I do think the current setup is a proper solution for the W16. The engine works like a charm. DRIVETRAIN Something which does slightly bother me is the slack in the entire drivetrain. I have tested the gearbox sequence, which is flawless. But when you look at the pistons in the completed model, they sometimes only start turning after 50cm of driving. So many gears need to be engaged, that slack is building up. So, after the closed engine compartment of the Porsche, we now get a semi-open engine compartment, but the pistons aren't very responsive. SPOILER Raising the spoiler with the key is a nice gimmick, but I'd rather have a lever in the interior. Or maybe, have it linked to a fake brake pedal. Or, as a middle ground, be able to insert the key somewhere else in the chassis/bodywork, instead of fiddling in the wheel arch. CONCLUSION Some people claim (or rather, shout on every social media they can find) that this model is overpriced. At a price of € 369,99 for 3.599 parts, I don't think it's overpriced. Is it cheap? Definitely not. But in terms of part count you get what you can expect of a Technic set. It's not that this set is filled with System parts, as was expected before the unveiling. Do I think this set is worth this kind of money?! I find this question difficult to answer. It all depends on your needs, financial situation etc. If you like to buy Technic for the functions and to build other stuff with, then this set is probably not for you. But if you are into cool looking supercars, then this set is definitely worth the money. Like the Porsche, I will probably pick up an extra copy, just to have a collection of MISB supercars. As with most things in life, it's all about expectations. When the Porsche was released, we didn't really know what to expect. Therefore, some of the AFOLs were disappointed. Admittedly, I was a bit let down too, in some aspects. Now that we know the concept behind the "UCS" Technic models, we know better what to expect. So, does this model live up to my expectations? Yes, it does! The new gearbox surpasses my expectations, while I am somewhat disappointed with some of the other features. Overall, I do like this model better than the Porsche. The build is slightly more fun, the gearbox works better and I do love the duo-tone color scheme. Oh, and did I mention the gorgeous looking rear of the car?! All things considered I do love this set. If you are into the Porsche, you will definitely love this set. If you think the Porsche is just an expensive display model, you can easily skip this set as well. On the other hand; this line of supercars is probably the best chance, for most of us, of getting a collection of supercars SCORE From now on I will omit the scoring section. Not all sets have the same criteria and not all people are looking for the same things in a set. What can be a good parts pack for one builder, can be a lousy one for the other etc. A set like this, is not built for playability, so it's useless to rate the playability. Therefore, I think it's better to have a written summary with my feelings and let you decide the score yourself. I will end with a "which one do I like best" list, which I will use for future reference, when reviewing supercars. This list reflects my current preference: Bugatti Chiron Porsche GT3 RS FINAL WORDS Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here. Since the poll is still broken, I haven't included it, but I still like to hear what you think of this set?
  2. Hello There! Yesterday, I went to my local Lego Store in Warsaw and... there were available new Lego Star Wars summer sets!!! Probably this is the first review of this set :) Price - 129 PLN in Poland, others should be 29.99 USD or 29.99 EUR. 355 pieces and 3 minifigures - Tobias Beckett, Enfys Nest and Weazel Check my full review with ENG subtitles: My opinion - 9/10!!! Great set and I recommend this!
  3. Bob De Quatre

    Review REVIEW: 75098 Assault on Hoth

    Introduction The battle of Hoth is maybe the most known conflict of the Star Wars' Original Trilogy. So naturally AFOLs were waiting for TLG to reproduce that battle in Lego. And they've finally done it! But... I guess everyone reading this review has something to add after that "but", so I'll try to ignore everything that had already been said about that set and to review it with an open mind. Thanks TLG for the opportunity to do this review, which will of course only reflect my own opinion. Set information Set Name: Assault on Hoth Set Number: 75098 Number of Pieces: 2144 Theme: Star Wars Year Release: 2016 Prices: £219.99 / $249.99 / €249.99 #75098 on Brickset #75098 on Rebrickable Packaging The box is pretty big. So big that I just couldn't take decent pictures of it... So I'll use the official images from TLG. The front of the box shows the whole set, except for the Tauntaun den, with the classic Star Wars logo and the Lego Star Wars UCS logo. On the top of the box you can see the 15 minifigures included in this set, as well as the Tauntaun and the Wampa. The back of the box shows the back of the set, with the Tauntaun's stable, and the numerous play features. Content of the box The box is 2/3 filled with 18 bags, numbered from 1 to 13. There is also some loose items: two 3026 6*24 white plates and two 6082 dark bluish grey BLURP. Two plastic bags contains the whole assemblies for the Tauntaun and the Wampa. The thick instructions booklet and the stickers sheet come packed together. The 21 sticker don't have the glossy look and stand out when applied, especially the white stickers on white parts. Instructions booklet The instructions booklet is pretty thick, with its hard cover and 280 pages. Inside you'll find pages about the Lego Designer team and of course the battle of Hoth. I found these few pages quite interresting. Instructions are clear to follow and shouldn't lead to any error. Unlike some reviewers, I don't think they are too simplistic or childish. Minifigures The set contains 15 minifigures and 2 large figures! Let's start with the named minifigs: R3-A2, K-3PO, Toryn Farr, Han Solo, Wes Janson, Wedge Antilles and Rebel Officer, who has the perfect name you can have to be an officer in the rebellion! Everyone here gets a backprinting, except for R3-A2. Rebel Officer gets a mustache, but no leg printings! Wes and Wedge are dressed as classic rebel pilots. What I miss the most is probably a hood for Han. Riding a Tauntaun without a hood will freeze his ears! Continuing with the named minifigs: Jeremy the Tauntaun, Luke skywalker and Bill the Wampa. Of course, when I took the picture above with all the named characters, I didn't forget Luke was still hanging in the Wampa cave... Luke has a double printed head, before and after meeting Bill. Sadly, no legs printing for him! Then we have 7 non-named characters: 5 rebel troopers, including 3 in cold resistant outfit, and 2 snowtroopers. the snowtroopers don't have any leg printings, but they have a skirt! Back printing for everyone, but no double-sided heads. Interesting parts The interesting parts of this set obviously include the Tauntaun and the Wampa. There are some rare parts, the only exclusive being the #64225 4x3 wedge in light bluish grey. 1x4 yellow tile with black stripes are nice, especially since I didn't own any! Build With bag 1 we'll build the left side of the trench and the whole imperial assault force, with its impressive E-Web blaster and a snowspeeder... Good luck guys! Bag 2 finishes the left side of the trench and brings the central part. We also build two canons and an 1.4 FD P-Tower. The trench is completed with bag 3, with which we build the right side of the trench, a loose snow patch, and two DF.9 batteries. In this bag, we also get 3 rebel troopers, who already outnumber the imperial forces. Bag 4 brings us the shield generator, with its four three round structures. With bag 5 we'll start building the T-47 airspeeder. And finish it with bag 6. Lots of stickers on that T-47. Bag 7 will start the Echo Base entrance, with part of the door opening mechanism. With bag 8 the Echo Base entrance is complete, with blast doors and lookout tower. With bag 9 we'll build the small control room. Bag 10 contains the Wampa's ice cavern. Luke can be suspended to the upper side of the cave and use the force to pull its lightsaber from the ice. I'm still wondering how a wampa can enter this cave... Bag 11 brings us a small moving crane, a small service vehicle and the Tauntaun stable. I always thought the Tauntaun was a carnivorous creature! The building of the v-150 ion cannon starts with bag 12... ... And ends with bag 13. Spare parts... Always welcome. The complete "outside" set finished. The "interior" parts of the set. Play features The play features of the set are simple but effective: the big door opens and closes, the studs shooter shoot studs and the lookout tower goes up and down... But let's take a look at what is, in my opinion, the nicest feature: the swapping elements. The two cannons, two DF.9 batteries, and the 1.4 FD P-Tower can be positioned at 7 different places on the trench part, the loose snow patch, and the Echo Base entrance. The shield generator also has a nice play feature as it can explode with a simple hit on a lever on the back of the build. But as you can see, when I was taking pictures, all my attempt resulted in the middle section always dropped down back in place... That may not have been the case with a four sections shield generator... Speaking of accuracy, the ion cannon firing sequence is really nice, as a pull on the back lever will pull back the "barrel" and shot the two darts one after the other. Toryn The ion cannon opens on the top to reveal nice firing and target control center that can fit a minifigure. The hatch can be closed with Toryn Farr inside. The 1.4 FD P-Tower has the same play feature, but there are no controls, and the hatch doesn't close. It seems pretty useless to me... Why? We have all read previous reviews of this set, and most of them were pretty harsh. I must say that I have mixed feelings toward this set. The minifigures, the lack of new elements, the use of older designs, etc... it's obvious that choices were made. What were the constraints that led the designer to make those choices? Sell price? Budget? Disney requests? All models look like they aren't finished, or at least needed a few more bricks. This is really visible on the ion cannon and the Echo Base doors. The name of the set, "Assault on Hoth", isn't well chosen too... The imperials are clearly outnumbered and have almost no firepower. How are they supposed to blow that 3 sections shield generator with just a snowspeeder bike? I would have sacrificed the wampa cave for an AT-ST. But what would have been the price to even the forces? While adding an AT-ST may have been possible, I don't see an AT-AT added to the set without a big price increase. And isn't that set already too pricey? Again I'm wondering what led to that lack of imperial forces... The Ultimate Collector's Series label. What does it mean? How is it applied to a set? Is that set worth of the label? I'm not in favor to give that label to playsets. To me a UCS is the Falcon, the Star Destroyer, the X-wing, not Assualt on Hoth or the Ewok Village. I think the UCS label is now only a commercial label that TLG applies to its Star Wars sets if they reach a given price tag. "Yes madam, it's an expensive box with lots of small plastic bricks, but it's an Ultimate Collector's Series box!" There is one last question that I'd like to ask: do we AFOL have some sort of responsibility? (Yes, you can start throwing rocks at me...) We expect a lot from TLG. And we are almost never happy. For years we wanted a Battle of Hoth set, and asked TLG to release one. Just take a minute to think at what would be your dream Hoth Battle set. Do you visualize it? Now try to fit it in a 250€/$ box... You'll have to make choices. And I'm sure your set won't appeal to me, but mine won't please you. And both won't please another AFOL... TLG tried to satisfy all of us AFOLs, with a product that is mainly aimed at children. They failed. But I'm sure kids will have a lot of fun with that set... Fun... Conclusion Design: 6/10 - The designs are simple and nice, nothing more. Parts: 6/10 - Not the best part selection I've seen, far from it (curved slopes!!) Build: 7/10 - Hours of good builds, but nothing complicated or with advanced techniques. Playability: 8/10 - A nice playset... for kids. Some good ideas. Minifigs: 8/10 - Saved by the number of minifigs, but they could have used some more printings and accessories. Price: 5/10 - Star Wars sets aren't cheap, and this one is way too pricey. Overall: 40/60 (66.6%) - A percentage score that may scare many of us! With reason... Too expensive, minifigures are ok but barely, almost no imperial forces... But still a nice playset. If you don't have oldest Hoth sets, I think you can enjoy the content of this set. Else, I think that Ben Kenobi could say "This is not the set you're looking for..."
  4. Latest up in the fourteen-year cycle of remakes of the original Star Wars Ultimate Collector Series is the BTL A4 Y-Wing Starfighter. I reviewed the 2004 original back in 2010; it suffered for being over-long but scored praise for the use of gruelling on the ship's exposed innards. We’ll see here if the new offering has addressed the issues of the earlier version and how it compares to the movie original. Review: 75181 UCS Y-Wing Starfighter Name: Y-Wing Starfighter Number: 75181 Pieces: 1967 Figures: 2 Year: 2018 Price: GBP £169.99 | USD $199.99 | EUR 199.99 | DKK 1799.99 The Box A dramatic view of the Y-Wing in the obligatory Death Star Trench setting makes for a bold and attractive front. The box has the same frontal dimensions as that of the set’s predecessor 10134 - shown behind - but somewhat surprisingly it is deeper that the earlier version. The ‘ULTIMATE COLLECTOR SERIES’ designation has returned to prominence; it disappeared from the boxes quite early in the series’s run, around 2002 if I remember. Normally Star Wars sets share a box logo with all contemporary merchandise, LEGO or otherwise; this set’s logo is currently shared only by the new UCS Millennium Falcon, possibly indicating that it is expected to have a longer run than the regular sets. We shall see if this trend continues, and if subsequent UCS sets use the same livery. For a square-on frontal image click here. The ship is shown from a similar angle on the back, though the angle is reversed: There is less drama here. The ship sits on its stand in what appears to be a hanger, though the ground looks suspiciously like floorboards; I’m surprised that more wasn’t made of the Y-Wing’s return to prominence in Rogue One. A few features are demonstrated in insets. It’s a smart-looking box, and understated, with minimal clutter; on the top is a line-drawing of the ship with dimensions and a photograph of the figures, but there’s little on the sides worthy of comment. Contents I was surprised to find a smaller box inside the outer carton, and very pleased to find this delightful line-drawing of the set gracing the front and extending to the bottom and sides. There is a further outline sketch on the bottom, this time showcasing the ship's underside: Whilst it is not unheard-of for larger sets to contain inner boxes, I've never seen one with decoration before - a nice touch, though I suspect fans would rather pay a little less for a plain box, or at least one that doesn't require destruction with thumb-tabs. Accompanying the inner box inside the outer are eight polybags - numbered 2 to 6, 8, 12 and 13; insider the inner are a further seven (1, 7, 9, 9, 10, 10, 11 - 9 and 10 are duplicated) and the large black tile for the stand. There doesn't seem to be much logic to the packaging, and you need to open the inner box to start building. Instructions Also in the outer box can be found the single instruction manual wrapped in plastic with the sticker sheet: The front view is a cut-down version of the box front, though they have managed to avoid cutting off parts of the ship. There's no cardboard backing, which seems no longer to be a thing, but the Perfect-bound manual has remained reassuringly crumple-free without it. Inside are some four double-pages of information not unlike the manual that comes with Architecture or Ideas sets. It opens with a foreword from the head of the Star Wars design team, Jens Kronvold Frederiksen, who I believe designed the earlier 2004 version. There follows a double-page spread of trivia about the Y-Wing itself: I'm not sure of the value of list of fictional statistics, but the schematics and cutaways, and Ralph McQuarrie concept art on the facing page are nice. The model shown bottom left in the picture shares several features with this LEGO version and I'm sure was used as a reference. Next follows an interview with set designer Jordan David Scott in which he is asked the question, 'How accurate is the LEGO Y-wing, compared to the real in-universe vehicle?' I will not spoil his answer, but will attempt to answer it myself during the review. There is also an interview with graphic designer Madison O'Neill, part of which is reprinted below: Mostly I showed this page for the further reference models; I will make reference to the top right picture later. The studio models (bottom right) appear to be in the process of being painted; they are largely coated in (presumably) a primer which looks to be a lovely sand blue colour: sand blue features quite prominently in this and the current System versions. The set construction is modular with two or three polybags per module, counting the engines separately, and a single bag for the stand; there are two pages demonstrating the modules so you can plan your build accordingly. The instructions are clear with call-outs and sub-builds (example), and I encountered no colour-differentiation issues. I felt it important to show that real starfighters wear pink, or at least contain pink as filler. I like the plain grey background, with white for the module header, blue for part call-outs and tan for sub-builds: smart and clear. The obligatory decal sheet isn't too terrifying this time, and unlike 10134 there isn't a large and fiddly cockpit canopy sticker - the sand-blue decals go on the cockpit sides, but the top and front are printed. The console is unfortunately stickered too (12 and 13). The information sticker contains similar information to 10134's, though rearranged somewhat, and it's a little less fussy. Parts The spread of parts is shown below in thumbnail form; you can click each for a close-up. They are divided according to module, which corresponds to polybags 1, 2, and 3; 4, 5, and 6; 7 and 8 respectively: I haven't found any parts which look new or especially rare; there are however a larger number of sand blue plates in 1x3 and 1x4 which I am pleased to see. There is a useful quantity of jumper plates, and some 80 1x1 round plates in flat silver, along with 22 grille tiles in the same colour. I like flat silver - it is an inexpensive way to make something look metallic when bluish grey won't cut it. There are also 26 light bley ingots, used to good effect here and useful for paving. Disappointingly, there are fewer pieces of flex-tubing than I would like (or expected, after the multitude of copper and long dark bley tubes of 10134); here there are only 6 in reddish brown, and most of the pipe-work is achieved with 3, 4, or 6L bars. Bags 9 and 10 are duplicated; one of each is shown here, along with bag 12: bag 11 is the same as 12 minus the figures. I wonder why they did that. The 6x6 round brick is new in light bluish grey and sand blue; it is previously available only in 2015's 60080 Spaceport. The corresponding 6x6 round plate is common but this is its first appearance in yellow. The large Viking Wagon Wheel is new in light bluish grey. The right-hand picture features bag 13 which builds the stand; of note here is only the four black 1x2 - 1x2 SNOT brackets; only two are necessary so you can easily pilfer two if you need to. Figs Two unique figures are included: a flat silver and dark bluish grey Astromech droid, and Gold Leader. The droid is unnamed in the manual, but the box top reveals him to be R2-BHD ('Tooby'), and who featured in and was created for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. His body is, I believe, the same as that of the droid R3-S1 who features in the latest System 75172 Y-Wing Starfighter, but the head is unique. Gold Leader, aka Dutch Vander, has a beautifully detailed torso with leg printing to match - vastly superior to the previous generic Rebel pilot torso, and the helmet is a thing of beauty with olive green printing on the top, crest, and even sides. No wonder he's grinning! He also has a scared face on the rear; his head also sports a detailed visor and microphone. The torso rear-printing is also an improvement over the older design, with a more detailed tabard and a buckle. He comes with a small blaster, not shown here. Here is Dutch (centre) next to his earlier incarnation from 9495 (left) and Jek Porkins from 9493 X-Wing fighter: I'm sure you will agree the new design is much more detailed and a great improvement over the older torso; whether it will remain unique and exclusive to this set remains to be seen. I'm still unsure whether I like minifigures in UCS sets, but they make nice extra collectors items, and in the case of this set you can actually seat the figure in the cockpit. Whether you should remains unanswered. Build Rather than an exhasutive trawl through the build process, I have selected a few pictures to demonstrate important features of the construction or interesting techniques; for a more complete set of pictures, see my flickr album. Like her older sister 10134, we start by building the main body of the ship. Here, midway through module 1, the large Technic block is lined with cross-axle bricks (green), and flanked with further Technic bricks; this will form the main receptacle for the wing pylons: Some greebling and an axle connector is left dangling at the front. Already some detail is added to the underside; the square hole will of course receive the stand, and some flat silver Technic connectors at the rear look like they should have some function, but they don't. Maybe they are bomb doors (it's a bomber, after all). See their construction here. It is not until module 2 that we start to add the serious greebling to the top of the body. The reddish-brown whip piece will fold forward and clip into two of the grey clippy tiles to make an interesting feature. Note the Ingots of Bley which are used instead of 1x2 tiles to add texture, and to good effect. Also note the 4x2 bley SNOT area at the side towards the front ... ... this is built on sideways to add bulk, with some nice usage of various SNOT parts: It is nothing ground-breaking, but adds interest to the build, and reflects the build-process in general which is never dull. You can also see here where the whip got clipped. Next we see how the wing pylons are attached: slotting into the Technic bricks on long axles and secured with pins: To see inside the pylon, click here. Much like 10134, the pylons are a sandwich of bricks inside plates, but the attachment with Technic axles is much more secure in this version. They are stop-end axles, so they will stay in position if you want to dismantle the set. Removing the pylons from the body will however not be easy, because the join gets built on. Under the dark tan jumper plates and dark red grille tiles at the rear are several long 1-wide plates placed over the join: The jumper plates are used to good effect to add features to the top. The 1x3 double-inverted slope in the inset will be attached upside down into the centre jumper plate, using a 1x2 round tile with bar and pin holder as a stud reverser. Just in front of the centre jumper plate is a shield under an inverted 2x2 round tile with hole, attached via a clip in a technique similar to the headlights of the CREATOR Mini and VW Beetle. Every so often you have to flip the body to add details to the underside, and this is done gradually so that you're building on a flat, stable surface ... ... at least until you add the two 1x4 arches via SNOT bricks to make yet another interesting feature. This is not done until the end of module 2 - and it's a good thing, as this little add-on is somewhat fragile. Module 3 builds the cockpit section. The angled sides of the head are attached via hinge-plates at the rear, and skeleton arms at the front, to make a reasonably secure connection. The sudden appearance of some minor Technic here surprised me; the axle at the rear will insert into the dangling connector we met at the beginning. Note the brown and yellow double-headlight brick constructions, which produce some downwards-facing studs ... ... allowing the whole underside to attach, studs-down. This leaves only a few available connections on the top surface; the 2x3 white slope attached to only one stud on its base, but it will be secured with a tile on top. The engines are formed from a central stack of SNOT bricks and green cross-axle bricks, to which will be attached some side panels; note the use of headlight bricks to reinforce the connection on the sides with the green bricks. The clever part is that the engine needs to be rotated through forty-five degrees relative to the pylon attachment for the long axles to sit correctly, and this is achieved using a large 4x4 turntable at each end - a wonderfully simple solution; see here for more detail. At the end of the long engines, the Viking Wagon Wheels are attached using pneumatic T-pieces pushed into the little holes in the front, and marrying up to Technic crankshaft parts which allows a half-stud offset. The remaining point of the T-piece is used to attach a curved slope to neaten the join, though it remains rather flimsy. Note the flag pieces, which form the 'thrust vectrals': the instructions are very specific about placing the pole half-way into the upper clip (inset) - the free end of the pole needs to be long enough to insert into the centre holes of the wagon wheel. The construction of these thirst victuals seems rather inelegant, but we'll see how well it works later. Finally, some panels will add detail and texture to the sides of the engines. Panels 2 and 4 in the picture below sit higher on four 1x8 plates; these connect to the headlight bricks on the green cross-axle brick faces of the engine centre: the sides that will connect to the wing pylons. Panel 4 has a hole ready for the attachment; panel 3 has the landing gear. There now just remains the stand, and we're done. I thoroughly enjoyed this build; little details and surprises abound, and keep it interesting at every stage. Even the repetition of the engines isn't particularly tedious. On a personal note, I found the construction of the side panels of the engines and the SNOT underside of the cockpit reminded me greatly of building the Bullfrog all those years ago. The Complete Set First impressions: the set looks smart, which is no mean feat for a ship with all her innards on display. The colour scheme works well; the flashes of white, yellow and sand blue stand out against the grey, with pipework nicely picked out in brown. The shape is good, and looks about right, but we'll compare in more detail later. Incidentally, the stand can be attached in-line (as here) or transversely, and has two positions: upright - as here, although it doesn't lock in this position - and tilted to about 20 degrees. From the front, and slightly above - the ship almost disappears when viewed directly from the front - we can admire the shapely head, although I am not sure the shape is quite right, and should perhaps be two studs wider - compare to the reference picture I pointed out in the manual earlier. I'm also conscious that the wing pylons are a little fatter than they ought to be, though that may have been a compromise necessary for strength; I do like the use of 1x4 groove bricks to make a stripe at the front of the pylons. Perhaps my favourite angle is what I might call 'Darth Vader's view': Like the 2012 X-Wing, the ship's exhaust is (correctly) pinky-red. Here we get our first look at the thirsk victories on the rear of the engines, which seem to have come out quite well, but we'll look more closely later. I was looking forward to see if this set had addressed perhaps the biggest issue of her predecessor: the length of the engines. I am pleased to find that it has: they look about the right length. The smartness of the colour scheme again stands out in this view; note the sand blue stripe along the side of the cockpit. From the top, the relative proportions of body, pylons, and engine look pretty good: Compared to the schematics, the proportions seem about right, though the head still looks too small. The front of the engines should perhaps be more conical (I think they are parabolic in cross-section) rather than flattened hemispheres as the are here, but that's a minor point. I don't think I've ever seen so much detail on the underside of a set before: Hats off to the designer for going the extra mile here, and acknowledging that it's nice to have something that looks good even on the top shelf! You can also see that the landing gear sits unobtrusively when folded. Take a moment also to appreciate the smooth SNOT of the cockpit underside, seen more closely here. Here is the 'real thing' for comparison: Picture from starwars.wikia.com You can see here that the overall shape is good. The engines in LEGO's version should perhaps be a little fatter, but the length is about right; as you can see the wing pylons should be thinner and mounted towards the top of the engines rather than on their midline. Features Let's now take a closer look, starting with the head. No LEGO UCS ship would be complete without cockpit detail, though not much is possible at this scale; there are stickered panels, a seat back cleverly made from a flag piece, targeting computer, and I love the bucket handle control stick: And it will seat the figure! It shouldn't, of course; the scale is all wrong. The cockpit should also open sideways rather than backwards; no official LEGO Y-Wing has tried to correct this. There should ideally be more of a curve to the cockpit canopy, but this would be difficult to render with existing pieces. As it is, the cockpit comes out a little boxy - but the sand blue colour works well. There's a little surprise in the turret, which is otherwise similar to the System version. Remember the surprising Technic in the head section? It connects to the turret: Turning the turret moves the little 8-tooth gear in the neck; or, you can move the gear with your finger and the turret turns. It's not much, but I appreciate the little extra. The silver droid gets a little lost in amongst all the grey; and like all UCS ship droids he's still too small. However, let's not focus on him; as we move back, the greebling detail becomes quite impressive. The pipework steals the show here, but there are some small features at the side of the neck, and even the rear of the head section gets some greebling via a hinge brick sandwiched between two white flags. The flags don't quite line up with the slopes, but I can forgive this. Note the droid body forming some extra detail at the back of the neck. Now we come the really good bit. The use of various parts to form arcane equipment on the body of the ship is superb. I've taken guesses as to what it might do. Moving backwards from Tooby, there's a couple of bley ingots (battery?). Behind this, a couple of wheels on a Technic pin sit within some tan wall elements (starter motor), all a few layers deeper in the model. Behind this are two dark tan bucket handles sitting in corner wall elements, which look like switches or circuits and between them bley binoculars on a round tile with stud (distributor cap - you can see where I'm going with this). Over all of this runs the brown whip piece (HT cable); this passes rearward past a hinged grille tile (carburettor) and between an inverted ice skate (oil filler cap) and what looks like a cylinder head from a two-stroke engine to the shield-disc (air filter). I'll dispense with the lame analogy now. Moving ever-rearwards, you can admire the inverted double-slope, in front of a wheel hub and two binocular pieces sandwiched in. Either side of the flywheel are two mechanical claw parts best seen in the picture above, and another shield-disc behind. There is an incredible amount of detail covering every part of the body with barely a stud left exposed, and what is more, the height/depth of the features varies considerably: it is not simply a plate with lots of small parts stuck on. Round the back are two frames constructed from handlebars and fire hose nozzles, resembling rear-end bull bars; I hadn't noticed them on the real ship, but they are supposed to be there. Notice the vertical brown 4L pole on the right - there is space for one on the other side, but the instructions don't have you place one there. This is an opportunity to compare again to the 'real' ship, this time in the form of the Bandai 1/72 model: Looking towards the rear of this model, you can hopefully recognise several of the features I have pointed out on this LEGO version: the shield-disc, binoculars, flywheel, inverted double-slope, cylinder head, oil filler, carburettor etc. are all there in as much detail you could render in LEGO pieces. A splendid effort. I bet the Bandai model doesn't have landing gear. LEGO's does! It looks totally flimsy, but it is really quite sturdy, and does the job well. I don't recall any other UCS set having retractable landing gear; I'm sure I will be corrected if I'm wrong. The ski parts work well ... ... and the gear sits at a slant which looks better than the vertical stanchions you tend to see on System sets. As I have already shown, they fold quite neatly and are unobtrusive when folded; click here for a further picture. Now let's look again at the thrush vegetables, er, thrust vectrals: Despite the rather Heath Robinson construction, I think they work quite well. The curved slopes at the edge of the wheel are a little flimsy and easily knocked out of alignment, but the flag pieces are reasonably sturdy. I believe those parts are like rudders and should tilt around 'y' and 'z' axes rather than rotating around the long axis of the ship, but I can live with that - certainly a better solution than any other LEGO Y-Wing set. Comparison to 10134 I dug around in some boxes and rescued 10134 from retirement especially for this moment. The senior UCS Y-Wing was notable at the time for the extensive use of greebling, but when I reviewed her before I worried that the proportions were out. Principally, 10134's engines are far too long; 75181 gets it right here: I was surprised to the new set had used grey rather than white for the long engine struts, but I think this gives a smarter finish; they are attached more neatly to the nacelles too. The engine greebling on 75181 better resembles the original ... ... as does that of the body, and by a country mile: 10134's detailing is very much parts-stuck-on-a-plate, and there is minimal attention to accuracy; 75181 is the winner hands down ... ... as she is again on the underside: 75181's belly is remarkably detailed, almost pretty. Little effort was made on 10134 where plain plate undersides are all that is to be seen. Note also the colour schemes; again 75181's smart livery is a vast improvement over 10134's blocky, almost random colours. If there is one way in which 10134 edges it slightly over her younger sibling, it is the shape of the engine cones - closer to the real thing, though still not perfect. There isn't so much difference in the cockpit design, compared here without stickers. I prefer the tapered outline of the newer set, and the sand blue canopy, but if anything the scale is worse, going from a three stud to a two stud wide seat. Compare to this movie still (featured in the manual of the set): I think the System version is a better representative of the ship's size relative to a minifigure, and I would rather have had a wider cockpit on this UCS set and forego the figure altogether. Conclusion I confess I didn't have particularly high expectations for this set, mainly because the Y-Wing itself isn't the most interesting ship, but what 75181 lacks in functionality it certainly makes up in style and detail. The designer has gone to extraordinary lengths to recreate every mysterious lump or bump on the surface of the original in as much painstaking detail as possible with LEGO bricks, and for the most part has done a fantastic job. The colour scheme is smart, and attractive, and going by the various models around is close to the original; the scale of the LEGO version is much closer to the real ship than the older set, and it's a thousand times better overall. There remain some issues: some fixable, some less so; it may be difficult to render the thrust vectrals better, and the nacelle cones aren't perfect but probably optimal with the parts available; however, I would have traded in the new figure for a new side-opening cockpit mould, and I think the head shape could be better. Design & Accuracy 8 A great-looking set that is for the most part a faithful rendition of the original, with some wonderful detail. I remain uncomfortable with the scale, and I think the cockpit needs to be bigger; the shape of the entire head section isn't quite right. Build 9 An entertaining build process with minimal repetition and no frustration and several interesting techniques; it is well-structured allowing for you to pick up and leave off with ease. Parts & Figures 7 I don't think there are any new parts in this set, but there are older parts in new colours. The selection is all generically useful without being exciting. Some may be excited by the unique figures; they look great, but that's not why I buy UCS sets. Display & Function 8 The ship looks great on the shelf; it's one of those set that is a little tricky to tell from a distance that it is LEGO. There are a number of display options, with two stand orientations and two configurations; thanks to the landing gear, you can dispense with the stand altogether. The ship is well-balanced, sturdy, and reasonably swooshable; of course, there's also the turret function! Value 9 The older set 10134 cost £109 in 2004; that equates to about £165 now - for some 500 fewer pieces than 75181. £170 for 2000 pieces in a licensed set seems like good value; throw in a smart and informative manual and the price starts to look very good. Overall 41/50 (82%) This is an excellent rendition of the Y-Wing, good value, and a great addition to the collection. I wouldn't say it's a must-have, though sadly that's the problem with the Y-Wing herself - not perhaps the most sought-after of Star Wars ships. Thank you for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the review. Comments welcome! Rufus With thanks to the LEGO Group for the review set. My flickr
  5. Travel the LEGO® galaxy in the ultimate Millennium Falcon! Ten years ago, the 10179 - Ultimate Colletor's Millennium Falcon made its appearance. For one whole year it was the biggest official LEGO set ever. Unfortunately, only a year later the 10189 - Taj Mahal was released, deposing the beforementioned Falcon. Of course, it still remained the biggest Star Wars LEGO set ever, packing a whopping 5197 pieces. At the time I just came back from my dark ages (more info in my 75144 - UCS Snowspeeder Review) and the thought of forking out 500 euro for a LEGO set didn't even make it to the consideration phase. Two failed scam attempts later (in hindsight, they were too good to be true), I still didn't own the pinnacle of LEGO Star Wars vehicles. Around 2013 I resented not getting the 10179 so much, that I decided to start Bricklinking the parts. Several (a lot) of orders later I got most of the parts. Obviously, I skipped the riggings (80 euros each), the radar dish (60 euro) and the light bluish grey levers (1 euro a pop). I did buy black riggings for a couple of cents though. You never know what can be achieved with a little spray paint. Collecting the parts was actually half (possibly more) of the fun. After I stored the inventory in boxes I never got around to building that hunk of junk. I started working on it a year or two ago, but I never got passed the chassis. It has been taking up spacein the LEGO room for quite some time. Until recently. When I got word that I would be getting the new UCS Millennium Falcon, which is simply called 75192 - Millennium Falcon by the way, I felt the need to finish the old one, so I could do a proper comparison. Since my parts were stored with other LEGO parts it took forever to find all the pieces, so the build was actually quite tedious. Let's say I was glad that it was done. I will go into more details about both builds later. The Millennium Falcon from the saga has changed owners more than a few times, so you must be wondering how I obtained the Corellian Freighter. Well, we played a game of Sabacc and when another player thought he was winning, I countered, "Not so fast, it appears I have an Idiot's Array". I had a good feeling about that! For those of you still thinking "What the hell is an aluminum falcon?!", I recommend consulting the Wookiepedia. "This amazing LEGO interpretation of Han Solo’s unforgettable Corellian freighter has all the details that Star Wars fans of any age could wish for, including intricate exterior detailing, upper and lower quad laser cannons, landing legs, lowering boarding ramp and a 4-minifigure cockpit with detachable canopy. Remove individual hull plates to reveal the highly detailed main hold, rear compartment and gunnery station. This amazing model also features interchangeable sensor dishes and crew, so you decide whether to play out classic LEGO Star Wars adventures with Han, Leia, Chewbacca and C-3PO, or enter the world of Episode VII and VIII with older Han, Rey, Finn and BB-8!" PICTURES Normal pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. Whenever you see this icon, you can click the image (or swipe your mouse (or finger) from left to right) to change the image. Clicking on the left of the image will show the previous pictures, while clicking on the right side will show the next picture. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. Pictures of the official press release can be found in this Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. 75192 Millennium Falcon™ Ages 16+. 7,541 pieces. US $799.99 - CA $899.99 - DE 799.99€ - UK £649.99 - DK 6999.00 DKK *Euro pricing varies by country. Please visit shop.LEGO.com for regional pricing. Number: 75192 Title: Millennium Falcon™ Theme: Star Wars Released: 2017 Part Count: 7541 Box Weight: 14,4 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 53,5 cm x 45,5 cm x 38,5 cm Set Price (MSRP): US $799.99 - CA $899.99 - DE 799.99€ - UK £649.99 - DK 6999.00 DKK Price per Part: US $0.107 - CA $0.112 - DE 0.106€ - UK £0.086 - DK 0.928 DKK Links: Brickset, Bricklink How do you start a review of a set this big?! Well, just like any other review, with the box The main difference between this box and most other boxes is that this one is ginormous! Weighing over 14kg (14,4 kg according to the freigh letter), this is by far the biggest official LEGO set box you will see for a long time. It's not very likely that TLG will produce a non Star Wars set this big and it's not likely that TLG will produce an ever bigger Star Wars set in the near future either. Of course, this is mere speculation, because you never know what TLG will come up with. Most likely, there will be a new Taj Mahal in the near future and I will have made a fool of myself with this comment, but let's wait and see how long it will hold. The box measures 53,5 cm x 45,5 cm x 38,5 cm. The width and height are slightly less than some of the other big boxes, but the tremendous depth makes up for it. I need to find some good usage for the box, since I don't want to throw this away after building the set. Maybe pack some parts and/or other LEGO inventory in it. FRONT AND BACK SIDE The front of the box isn't cluttered with marketing gimmics or any other distractions. It shows what this set is all about...The Millennium Falcon! Granted, there are some Tie Fighters flying around and in the back you can see a Tibana gas mining colony floating in the clouds of planet Bespin, but other than that it clearly shows the star of the set. Showing Cloud City leads to believe that the front art is depicting a scene from The Empire Strikes Back, arguably the best movie in the saga In case the front image doesn't convince you, the rear side of the box emphasizes on some of the key characteristics of this new UCS version. It shows several interior sections, interchangeable radar dishes, removable gunnery station and a brand new cockpit canopy element. The rumors about an interior were true after all. Albeit not a very big interior, but an interior nonetheless. At least, there's more interior space than in the previous UCS MF. If you are not paying attention, there's a fifty-fifty percent chance you will end up opening the box on the wrong side. You need to open the side with the top and side blueprint images of the Falcon. Red and green icons have been printed to show you where to cut the sealings. In one's excitement, they can be easily missed though. To be honest, I totally missed them. I was simply lucky to open the box on the right side. The other side shows a partial bottom view blueprint, along with an action scene near the Death Star and a flavor text explaining in eight different languages why this is a must have set for all LEGO and/or Star Wars enthusiasts. It says: "You missed out on the 10179, haven't you? And you have regretted it ever since?! This is your chance to bring balance to the Force. This is the prophecy. You really need to get this set. No matter what it takes. You could sell a kidney. Or one of your kids. Maybe your wife. What are you waiting for?!". If you open up the box on the right side, you will be welcomed by the instruction booklet. Correction, the enormous ring bound instruction manual. As with other luxurious products, it starts with the unboxing experience. When you pick up the manual you realise the uniqueness of this set. Not only the size of the manual, but the weight as well. It weighs almost 3kg, which is unprecedented. Most LEGO sets don't even weigh 3kg, let alone the instruction manual. This is something you probably don't want to see when unboxing a luxurious UCS set like this, a sticker sheet. Unfortunately one has been included, which means that not all parts are printed. Even though I would prefer to have printed parts, I have come to peace with sticker sheets. It's simply not feasible to turn every stickered part into a new element. One can argue that for a set like this, exceptions could or should be made. Looking at the time it took for TLG to completely sell the initial stock, I don't think that it makes much of a difference. The outer box packs four inner boxes, containing a total of 66 bags. Four bags are unnumbered and the other bags are divided into 17 stages. Cool thing about the inner boxes is that combined they show a cool blueprint-like image of the Falcon. Each of the boxes shows a quote related to one of the movies. Box 1: She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts, kid Box 2: I've made a lot of special modifications myself Box 3: It's the ship that made the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs Box 4: She's the fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy UNNUMBERED BAGS These are the four unnumbered bags, containing special parts. I will include thumbnail images for the bags used in each step in the building sections. The book contains no less than 466 pages with 1379 building steps, divided over 17 stages. I expected the build to be divided over more than 17 stages, but some stages contain multiple subassemblies. I have taken pictures of some of the pages. Of course, I haven't included all the goodies. That would spoil the fun. Click on the images to scroll through the pages. These pictures were taken after building the set, which explain some dents and bruises. The dark pages are easily smudged by the way. Or click on one of the thumbnails to view a high resolution picture. For some people the sticker sheet is even more annoying than Jar Jar Binks, but I have accepted the fact that not every part can be printed. It would be cool to have a printed UCS plaque though. That would probably be feasible (TLG pretty please). I really do like the hallway stickers though. I have read that some people don't like 'em, but I would go as far to say that I love 'em. They way they give the flat parts a more or less forced perspective look works really well in my opinion. Given the part count, this set doesn't contain a lot of very special parts. However, it does contain some cool printed trans clear parts, and not to forget the re-issued 10179 radar dish and boat mast riggings. CANOPY ELEMENT This part was first seen in the Ninjago Ice Tank from The LEGO Ninjago Movie. Upon seeing this new part in that set, it was immediately trans-clear (hehe, pun intended) that this part would also be used as a canopy element for the (at that time) rumored new UCS Millenium Falcon. Looks like one of the Apollo capsules, doesn't it? Creating a Saturn V in this scale would definitely make it an even bigger set than the Falcon. PRINTED TRANS-CLEAR 6X6 DISHES Besides the printed canopy part, this set comes with two types of printed 6x6 Radar Dishes, one with and one without handle. TRANS-LIGHT BLUE RIBBED HOSES Instead of 1x2 tiles, this version of the UCS MF uses six Trans-Light Blue Ribbed Hoses to comprise the hyperdrive engine. BOAT MAST RIGGINGS Here they are, back by popular demand. RADAR DISH While it does look like the original radar dish, it's actually a different part with a different print. Thanks to @LEGODrongo01 for pointing out the different print. All the new parts can already by found in the Bricklink Inventory. The part list is spread out over four pages. The previous UCS Falcon had only a two-page part list, which shows that the variety of parts in this set is way higher. Click on the image to scroll through the pages. Or click on one of the thumbnails to view a high resolution picture. The side of the box shows the array of included minifigures. Not counting the two Porg and BB-8, you get seven cool minifigures. Chewie and C3PO have been around for a while and they don't appear to be aging Even though a relatively new design on both figs, we have seen these before. The other five minifigs are divided into two crews. One for The Empire Strikes Back version of the Falcon and one for The Force Awakens. Cool thing about the crew for The Empire Strikes Back is that Han and Leia both have respiratory masks, used when they venture outside the ship, looking for Mynocks. Younger han is looking as slick as he does in the movies. Leia is ever so stylish, even in her thick jacket and gloves. The second version of the crew is the one we have seen in The Force Awakens, and it's comprised of older Han, Finn, Rey and good old Chewie. Chewie has taken a liking to Rey, which provides some continuity after certain events in the movie. We will probably see more of that duo in the upcoming installments. For certain in The Last Jedi, which will air in a couple of months. The picture belows shows the line-up of the actual figures. Except for Chewie and C3PO all of the figs have a double side head, revealing another facial expression or setup on the back. This picture shows the alternate faces. It isn't really sharp, sorry about that. As I mentioned earlier, I have built the previous (10179) Millennium Falcon recently. I didn't really enjoy the build. Part of this was because I had to lookup every part in a bigger inventory, which was very time consuming. Another issue was that I didn't really like the way the model is built, loosely attaching the panels to the frame. All in all, I experienced it to be a tedious build. I sure hope the build is better executed in the new version. STAGE 1: FRAME Bags: 6 (and the beams from the 2 unnumbered bags) Build duration: 2 hours (approx.) The frame is reminiscent of the old (10179) chassis. The designer more or less copied the way the 10179 was built. The reason behind this is explained in the instruction manual, but it basically boils down to "never change a winning team" or winning design in this case. The main difference between the two versions is that the new version uses more colors than the old one. I was expecting the chassis to be a complete color vomit, but that's not the case either. Using colors like tan, dark tan and brown, the chassis has a Steampunk feel to it. The 10179 used a lot of 3L Pin with Bush in red and I was surprised to see them included in light bluish grey. I was expecting them in red again. It somehow makes sense, also because red 3L Beams are used in red. It doesn't really matter since you won't be seing the pins anyway. A relatively new part, which hasn't been used in the 10179, is the 3L Pin Connector with 2 Pins and Center Hole. This part is used to keep the Technic Beams tightly together and provide rigidity to the frame. Click on the image to see a comparison between the old and new frame. STAGE 2: LANDING GEAR Bags: 3 Build duration: 45 minutes (approx.) During this stage six of the seven landing struts will be built. The last one will be built during a later stage. The image below shows the subtle differences between the new (left) and old (right) landing gear. The main difference is the 6x6 Webbed Radar Dish, instead of the 4x4 Round Brick. Looking at the actual Falcon from the movies, you can see that the 6x6 Dish is a better representation of the right scale. Comparing the old and new landing gear, it's clear that both models are built using the same scale. The size of both struts is identical. When you click on the image below, you can attach the landing gear to the frame. When you look at the attached landing pads, you can see that the vehicle is actually resting only on the middle axle. Turning the model in the upright position reveals the frame with six of the seven landing struts attached. STAGE 3: DEJARIK CONTROL ROOM AND FRAME ADD-ONS Bags: 5 Build duration: 1 hour 45 minutes (approx.) This stage introduces the first minifigures. Chewie, C3-PO (human cyborg relations) and two porgs make their appearance. Unfortunately they are in a bit of a predicament. The porg can't reach the Dejarik table, Chewie wants to blow it up and C3-PO needs to do some construction. Always wear your helmet by the way, safety first! CONCEALED CANNON The starboard bow bay of the ship contains a concealed blaster cannon. The guns pops out when you slide the panel to the side. The two pictures below show the mechanism. MAIN HOLD In contrast with the 10179, this model features several interior areas. One of them is the main hold which features a seating area with a Dejarik holographic game. This game was introduced in Star Wars IV - A New Hope. The main hold also features an engineering station with turning minifigure seat and a doorway with passageway decoration. Sorry if you have a bit of OCD, like me. This picture is killing me. My fingers are itching. The designer chose to add the Dejarik table early on, so when you need a break from building, you can play a game of holographic chess The fact that you add something of an interior early on in the build is really joyful. The 10179 was a rather dull build and adding these little rooms to the model, makes the build lots more enjoyable. I absolutely love everything about the main hold. The seating area is very cleverly built, the turning seat is properly built and not just the standard minifig chair. I also love the passageway decoration, with the forced perspective. It gives you the feeling that the room is bigger and that it's connected to other parts of the ship. It even has the combat remote training helmet, which Luke was using during his training. He failed miserably, until Obi-Wan put down his visor and let Luke use his senses to counter the combat remote. Thumbs up for the main hold. The main hold is actually hanging underneath the frame. This is a very practical solution to have an interior, while maintaining structural integrity. After adding the forward landing strut, the model looks like this. STAGE 4: REAR COMPARTMENT AND FRAME ADD-ONS Bags: 4 Build duration: 1 hour 45 minutes (approx.) After building the main hold, we continue by building the rear compartment, which is the engine room. Even though this room isn't very big, it packs all the important details, like the hyperdrive, computer consoles, two doorways and two hatches leading to the escape pods. The room also contains the hidden floor compartment where Rey and Finn try to hide from Han and Chewie. The compartment is hidden underneath the 2x4 Technic Plate with 3 Holes. Unfortunately, Han knows his own ship like no other, so they were easily found. Like the main hold, this room is attached to the frame using 3L Pins with Bush. Basically the compartments are hanging underneath the frame. This proves to be a proper mechanism, since they are well secured. I am very happy with both interior compartments. Some of you might feel disappointed that it's not one big interior, but given the size of the model, the frame should be very rigid. There's a trade-off between rigidity and playability. The designer managed to pack a lot of iconic details from the movies into this model. Han and Leia have joined the party. They are already inspecting the Millennium Falcon for Mynocks. Han is sure he heard one near the bottom of the ship, but they can't seem to find it. Makes you wonder where it is hiding. STAGE 5: SRB42 SUBLIGHT DRIVE Bags: 4 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) During this stage the stern section of the vehicle is built, including the sublight drive. The SRB42 was a sublight drive manufactured by Girodyne that equipped the CECYT-1300 light freighter. The engines formed a long strip on the stern of the vessel that became known as a "wide bar" engine. I have never been a fan of the Boat Mast Riggings used to build the grill for the wide bar engine. It feels like a cop out. So I was very surprised that the new versions uses the exact same solution. There's only one good reason for using the riggings again and that's giving the fans the opportunity to get a hold of another set for their Bricklinked 10179. If so, thanks TLG, I really appreciate it. If not, I would be very interested to know why these parts have been used again. STAGE 6: FRONT MANDIBLES Bags: 4 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) The ship is slowly taking shape. We are still missing the iconic front mandibles, which are used to lock the cargo payload. The mandibles hold various sensors and an anti-concussion field generator. There is also the freight barge clamp so the YT-1300 can act like a barge or tugboat and push around large cargo. Also on the port mandible there is the shield generator and projector. On the inner side of the mandibles there is a freight loading arm. At this point it's getting increasingly more difficult to take a proper photograph. STAGE 7: MANDIBLE BOTTOM PLATING Bags: 3 Build duration: 45 min (approx.) When building the 10179 this was the point after which it was mostly building panels to cover up the frame. Something tells me that's no different for this model. I have a bad feeling about this STAGE 8: DURALOY PLATING Bags: 3 Build duration: 45 min (approx.) Plating, plating and more Duraloy plating, rated 102 RU (Resistance Units). The bottom panels are quite hard to attach. The pins don't easily align with the hole, so it needs some pushing and pulling. In hindsight, one of the center panels was not entirely in the right position, giving the grey minifig baseplate not enough room. Problem solved, however the ship took some damage from lifting it and bumping it into the slanting cealing I have. Nothing the Falcon can't handle though. Roughly half way the build and we have spent around 10 hours building. So the estimated building time at this point is around 20 hours. STAGE 9: MANDIBLE TOP PLATING Bags: 3 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) After building the bottom mandible plating, building the top mandible plating feels somewhat repetitive. Even though there are subtle differences, you are more or less building the same panel four times. On the bright side; the plating and mandibles do look a lot better than the previous version. So, when you are done with the repetitive section, you will be filled with joy. The hunk of junk is starting to take shape. The front side is mostly done and the greebling looks very cool. STAGE 10: BOARDING RAMP AND BOTTOM LASER CANNONS Bags: 5 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) The boarding ramp features a neat little Technic mechanism, which allows the ramp to be lowered and raised. Other than that it's a pretty basic ramp. You are clearly looking at the bottom side of a plate. It's not a big deal, but it would have been nice to see a more studless solution. This section is fitted underneath the vehicle and it packs the bottom Quad Laser Cannons. The shape is definitely rounder than that of the previous UCS version. Apparently, we did make some progress over the last decade STAGE 11: ESCAPE POD CORRIDOR PLATING Bags: 3 Build duration: 30 min (approx.) One of my favorite improvements over the older version is the hull plating of the escape pod corridors. There's some confusion about the number of escape pods and where they are positioned. The floor plan has changed several time during the course of quite a few years by now. With lack of a definitive conclusion, I assume that the Falcon has two escape pods, located at port and starboard side of the vessel. Let me know if you think I am an noob, making this assumption One thing that was slightly bugging me after finishing the complete model is the visibility of the tan plate. You will cover up the model with several panels, but the tan 1x2 part of the plate (the actual plate is bigger) is clearly visible. It wouldn't hurt to cover it up with a dark bluish grey tile, or even making the plate ifself dark bluish grey. STAGE 12: REAR PLATING AND HEAT RADIATING VENTS Bags: 4 Build duration: 45 min (approx.) Since it's the fastes hunk of junk in the galaxy, the engines will get rather hot. To prevent extreme temperatures, the Falcon has heat radiation vents at the back of the vehicle. Here you can already see four of the six vents, installed by no other than Big Deal himself, with a little help from BB-8. This picture also clearly shows that there is ample room for another engineering or cargo section. STAGE 13: MORE REAR HULL PLATING AND MORE HEAT RADIATING VENTS Bags: 2 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) Closing up the starboard stern section of the hull. The port stern section of the ship will be covered by a removable panel, allowing you to show the engineering section. The same goes for the panels covering the main hold with the Dejarik table. The hole covering the main hold is fairly small, so it's hard to be able to appreciate all the details in the room without having built the model. Of course, your friends and relatives will already be impressed by the rest of the model, so it's not that big of a deal STAGE 14: FRONT CENTER AND SIDE HULL PLATES Bags: 2 Build duration: 45 min (approx.) During this stage you will use the parts from two bags to make the front cross-shaped hull plating. I forgot to take a picture when I had built it, so here's one from a later stage. STAGE 15: ESCAPE PODS AND HULL PLATING Bags: 3 Build duration: 1 hour (approx.) One of the most significant changes, compared to the 10179, are the escape pods. Using several modern pieces allows for making shapes, which were impossible back in the days. While these new pods look way better than the old ones, I do think that the actual pods should be a hybrid version of the old and new ones. The new versions omit the tapered shape of the pods, clearly shown on the "actual" Falcon. That being said, I do love this design, together with the attached corridors. STAGE 16: COCKPIT AND CORRIDOR Bags: 4 Build duration: 1 hour 15 min (approx.) Nearing the end of the build, it's time to create the iconic cockpit section. Some of might argue that having basically two parts to represent the entire cockpit is not what LEGO is all about, but I beg to differ. Having such a detailed model requires a well formed cockpit. And these new parts allow for that. And the trans-clear one is printed, unlike the one used on the X-Wing. All things considered, I think this is a great solution. Did you know the cockpit is actually made of a material called Transparisteel? The cockpit canopy can be detached, which allows you to seat the crew in the otherwise very basic cockpit. No fancy stuff going on in there. No sign of the faulty compressor, Rey expertly circumvented. The cockpit allows four people to be seated. However, occupying four seats is only possible when you don't have any objections of someone invading your personal space, it's quite cosy. The better setup would be to have someone "riding bitch", like Chewie for example. As you can see the cockpit can actually be closed with a crew of four. The rounded corridor to the cockpit is nothing short of magnificent. This is arguably the best improvement over the old version. The shape is so much better than the plates and hinges solution. I am still not a big fan of the way you need to slap on all the panels though, but given the circumstances, the ones on this model do fit way better than the ones on its predecessor. STAGE 17: FINAL PLATING, GUNNERY STATION AND RADAR DISHES Bags: 4 Build duration: 1 hour 15 min (approx.) And now, the end is near. And so I face the final curt....building stage! The last stage is used to finalize the model, building the top quad laser cannons, operated via the gunnery station. One of the two 6x6 trans-clear printed radar dishes is used to provide some visibility. The inside of the gunnery station is very plain. Since this section is easy to open and it gives you a wide view of the interior, it could do with some extra greebling or decoration. You will also be building two versions of the radar dish. After Han was captured on Bespin, Lando took command of the Falcon once more to search for him, and later flew the ship at the Battle of Endor, where it entered the Death Star II and destroyed it from within. During this battle, the starship's circular military-grade sensor dish was knocked off as Calrissian piloted it through the Death Star's interior. Other than that it's cool that you can switch between the two versions, it's extremely kind of TLG to include the old style dish. This is a nice gesture, whether on purpose or not, towards the ones who have Bricklinked the old Falcon and skipped the unique parts. Be aware though, that it's not exactly the same part. It's a new part with a new print. As it turns out, Han and Leia were looking in all the wrong places. The Mynock is hiding behind the UCS plaque. FINISHED MODEL There she is...the new and improved YT-1300 492727ZED. Isn't she an ugly beauty! It measures a length of (approximately) 84 cm, it's 56 cm wide and 21 cm high. Total building time was approximately 17 hours, which is way less than I anticipated. Having numbered bags makes a world of difference. For Technic I usually account for 250 parts per hour and I know I do more with "regular" LEGO bricks. Having numbered bags result in doing around 450 parts per hour, not rushing things. I still like to take my time and try to enjoy the build, even when I am writing a review. And let's be honest, you don't want to rush building a unique and expensive set like this. Take your time and enjoy. Speaking of enjoying the build; even though this model is constructed in more or less the same way as the 10179, I found this build much more enjoyable. Part of it can be ascribed to not having to look ages for some of the parts, although some people actually love this. The interior sections are quite fun to build and they do add some identity to the model. Other than that, it is still mostly building panels. Building this model is definitely not as much fun as building a Modular Building for example. However, the end result is very rewarding, which kind of makes up for that. The combination of studded and studless design is spot on. At first sight I wasn't very enthusiastic about the design. I figured it looked to much like the old version and it should have been more studless. I even remember being a tad disappointed when I saw the first pictures. I wasn't even sure it was the real deal. However, when the press release images appeared and I looked at it in more detail, I realized that the design is actually very good. There's a great balance between studded and studless, which accounts for the Falcon still being a hunk of junk and not a very modern sleek looking spaceship. FRONT MANDIBLES Like the radar dish, the front mandibles can be altered to depict the later version of the ship. And by later I don't mean the one in The Force Awakens, but the one in The Last Jedi. Apparently, something is going to happen and the mandibles play an important role in it. Will it be tugging another spaceship? Who knows?! Well a lot of people do know, but I am not one of them. So, like most of you, I need to wait until the movie comes out. Part of me was hoping for a different engine setup, but this is not the case. Well, the 1x2 trans-dark blue tiles have been replaced by trans-light blue hoses. At first I thought it used 1x1 trans-light blue rounded bricks, which would immediately explain the high part count, but to my surprise only six hoses were used. Here's a picture of the entire crew posing in front of the ship. Old Han must feel weird, looking at the younger version of himself. In one of the most recent trailers there was a Porg in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon. I have a Jar-Jar feeling about it. I don't mind some comic relief, as long as it's not overdone. Let's hope for the best. Porgs were an avian species native to the planet Ahch-To, where Jedi Master Luke Skywalker made his exile in the years following the Battle of Endor. The creatures, who dwelled on the cliffs of the island where Skywalker lived, could build nests and fly. Baby porgs were known as porglets. LEFTOVER PARTS As you can see, the leftover parts mainly consist of the usual smaller parts, with the long tubing as the exception. Yes, it's normal to have a spare. If you have any other spare parts than these, you should probably check the manual to see where you missed a part. COMPARISON WITH 10179 Inevitably, this model needs to be compared with the 30 year anniversary edition. I have already done some comparisons in this review and now we will take a look at both finished models. Upon glancing the images, one might think it's the same model. Some people didn't even realize the second version was the older model. Of course, there are some things that definitely give it away. First of all, the new version is a bit more colorful. The dark tan and green parts, placed on the hull here and there, provide some appeal to the design. I do like the fact that it's a bit less dull to look at, but from an accuracy point of view, one can debate whether it isn't too much?! Unless, the falcon will be covered in mud in The Last Jedi. Then it would perfectly depict some of the mud still attached to the hull. I do admit that the overall look is way better with some color on the model. Another difference is the use of more studless and more rounded elements. This provides for a more modern look, while still maintaining the characteristic scruffy look of the Falcon. And of course the cockpit section, with the molded canopy part, is significantly different and way better looking. While the old version does have the tapered forms for the escape pod corridors, I do like the new design better. In 2027 we will probably get a version combining the two designs to make the perfect shape Another difference is the way the engine exhaust vents are made. The new flat round tiles provide a nice smooth surface, while the old one was more studded. It's also clear that there has been a major improvement in the greebling. First of all, there's more variation and secondly, it's better executed. The holes in the mandibles are slightly smaller, but they aren't round anymore. So, the hole size is more accurate, while the shape isn't. All things considered, the old Falcon didn't look bad at all, but the new version is more up to par with the contemporary building techniques and looks. It's the logical evolution. This review is already very picture heavy, so I have chosen not to include a gazillion pictures of the old version as well. But if you are interested, you can click this link to open my Flickr album with some additional pictures, also of several building stages. COMPARISON WITH THE MOVIE VERSION It's nice to see a comparison with the 10179, but that's actually not as important as a comparison with the movie version. After all, it's modeled after that. Having discussed the cockpit and escape pods already, I like to focus on the top view, representing the actual shape of the vessel. By clicking or sliding the images you can reduce the opacity, revealing a blueprint I found on the line. I am not sure who made it and how accurate it is, but I have compared it to several other blueprints and models, and it seems to be accurate. Thank you unknown internet user for letting me borrow your picture The overall shape and size do match quite nicely. The mandibles have a slightly different angle, but there's only so much you can do with LEGO. Given the fact that LEGO basically only has a couple of angles, I'd say it's a job well done. The shape and location of the gunnery station is spot on. The engine vents and the equipment access bays aren't placed in the proper position though. The equipment access bays aren't even round anymore. The openings are smaller than in the 10179, but the shape isn't very accurate. To be clear; for me this is considered nitpicking, but I wanted to point it out anyway. Other than some minor inconsistencies, I do like to express that nothing in the design seems way off or is bothering me beyond belief. Well, except maybe for those tan plates I mentioned earlier hehe. Admittedly, at first I was somewhat disappointed and thought the new Falcon was underwhelming. Using the boat mast riggers again and being the same scale, I figured it was more of an evolution than a revolution. However, upon closer inspection of the hi-res press release images, I soon figured that there was more to it than I initially figured. The rumored and highly anticipated interior was indeed present. Albeit not a very big interior, but an interior nonetheless. The sheer size and fantastic looks of the model are nothing short of spectacular. This set being more of an evolution instead of a revolution actually makes sense. But in terms of building the model, I was hoping for a somewhat different setup than the previous version. Of course, it didn't help that I had built the previous version only days before this one, which emphasized the similarities. That being said; I did enjoy this build much more than building the 10179. The two interior sections were a very important aspect of enjoying the build. TLG managed to pack a tremendous amount of detail in both rooms, depicting lots of iconic aspects from the movies. I also like the sticker simulating the depth in the hallways, a forced perspective if you will. This gives you the sense that you can actually walk around in the ship. Well, that a minifig could walk around, of course. I know the part count is already very high, but how cool would it have been to have two rooms on the other side as well. Possibly two simple storage bays. The set is well built, but like the older Falcon, it's mostly a matter of slapping panels onto the frame. The finished model feels a bit more sturdy than the previous one, but the panels are still loosely connected, so they are not actually attached to the vehicle. They do seem to fit better, but you still can't hold the model upside down without panels falling off. Not that it's necessary to do this, but if you want to hang it on the wall, you will need to come up with a solution. There's always lots of debate about which minigures should have been included, instead of the ones TLG decided to put in the set. For me personally, I couldn't be happier with the setup in this set. The possibility to switch crews is very cool. I'm really taking a to the new crew, so I will definitely display it with the new ship setup and new crew. Maybe I will even put it in a display case and build a Jakku setting around it. For now, I have decided to like the two Porgs. Maybe I will revise this statement after seeing the new movie. The color vomit is actually not too bad in this set. I expected a lot more different colors used in the chassis, but the designer kept it nice and clean, using different shades of tan, combined with some bright accents. For me the tan color works really well in the chassis. Except for the two plates that is I never imagined I would bring this up in a review, but the size of this set can actually pose a problem. Usually, I disassemble my sets, especially the Technic sets. I do like to keep some of the UCS Star Wars sets built and I do have some display space behind my desk. This set will fit that display space, but if I use a display case, I need to find another place for it. But where?! I have the big Technic Porsch on my desk at work and I was contemplating on putting this there instead. That way I can look at it for approximately 40 hours a week. That's more time than I see @Kitty Not to mention the second (old) UCS Falcon I need to store/display somewhere. First world problems, I know. But it can seriously be an issue to give the model the proper display space it deserves. I have tried sneaking it into the living room, but somehow she noticed. Not sure what gave it away. Let's not pretend that we don't need to discuss the most important aspect of this set, the price! For some people price isn't an issue, but the majority of the fans will scratch behind their ears a couple of times before forking out this kind of cash. On the other hand; seeing the queues at the LEGO Brand Stores at midnight, makes you wonder if price really is an issue. There seem to be lots of fan willing to part from their cash in favor of getting this unique set. Not all of them are genuine fans, but this review is not the place to discuss that. Fact of the matter is that TLG sold out quickly, even at this price. Obviously, I was lucky to get it for the review, but otherwise I would have definitely purchased this set. This might sound a bit stupid, but this set isn't more expensive than the Snowspeeder, when it comes to price per part. Yes, it is expensive, but it's a huge number of parts. It's not an overpriced set. At least not more overpriced than other Star Wars sets. TL;DR To conclude this review I like to point out that this set is a must have for every Star Wars fan, even if you are only a casual LEGO fan. The biggest LEGO set ever released respresenting the most iconic ship of the Star Wars universe! I absolutely love the looks and the inclusion of the interior sections. The range of minifigs is spot on and the set is an absolutely eye-catcher. I rate it: 9 out of 10 MINI CONTEST Escaping from a fleet of Imperial ships, Han Solo, Chewbacca, and Princess Leia fly the Millennium Falcon into an asteroid field. Landing inside an asteroid, the crew wear breath masks to brave uncertain atmospheric conditions outside the Falcon. Soon they discover mynocks, energy-feeding parasites, chewing on the ship's power cables. As the asteroid begins to rumble, they quickly find that they are actually inside the gullet of a huge space slug. This is a scene from The Empire Strikes back. The picture below shows the Space Slug as seen in the movie. TLG has released a promotional LEGO set depicting this scene. You have a chance to win one of these rare promotional sets. What do you need to do? Tell us what you think of the new Millennium Falcon and post a mini build in this topic of your version of a space slug. It doesn't need to be this space slug, it can be any space slug. We're not taking this too serious, so by all means, go for a fun build. You will have at least two weeks to post your build. After two weeks I will choose a lucky winner, possibly two POLL Unfortunately, It's likely that the poll still isn't working. I would be great if you can express your opinion in a post in this topic
  6. While cleaning an old hard drive, I found this review I never posted. Sure, the pictures are crude, I even forgot to take a shot of the entire set, but it reminded me of why I liked writing reviews so I wanted to share. Bandit's Secret Hideout (6761) - Wild West •Original Retail Price: $40.00 US •Figures Included: 1 Cavalry Soldier, 1 Calvalry Lieutenant, 3 Bandits, 3 Horses (black, white, brown), 2 grey Birds, 1 Skeleton head •Mini-fig Accessories: Playing Cards tile, 4 Golden Coins, Dynamite Tile, Golden Trumpet, Yellow Chair, Cavalry Flagpole, 2 Saber Swords, 8 Rifles, 4 Pistols, Pick-Axe, Cannon w/Cradle, 2 Saddles (brown, black), 1 extra brown Cowboy Hat for the Sketeton Head Helpful Links: Peeron / Brickset BUILD Due to the subdued color-scheme, this set looks like an unimpressive pile of bricks right out of the baggies. There aren't any flashy colors, like there are when working with neon Aquashark or Ice Planet pieces, but with some imagination, the end-result is still enjoyable. This Hideout is a mid-sized set, building it won't tax your skills, but it's still entertaining because of the neat features. It's fun to invent booby-traps, just ask Wile E. Coyote! You can test the traps as you make them, fine-tuning the way that barrel bonks the guy standing under it. Even though they're simple to use, the traps are effective, and consistent too. Most notably, the falling barrel from the roof lands in the same spot every time, so you can actually aim it. The rails, the tipping water-barrel, and the interesting way the rifles on the roof are connected give us a look at some of the more unorthodox ways of building useful tools and features. The black sloped roof is another place to grab ideas from as it shows us how we can make buildings with roofs that flip open. DESIGN It looks like the bandits found a crumbled granite hill and built around it with bits of wood and stone. A shabby, dirty, lonely place is what I picture a secret hideout in the wild west to be like, this set captures that drab essence. Isn't it funny that these bandits have a big GOLD MINE sign on the hideout but there isn't a mine anywhere in sight? Well, maybe it's not that funny, it's kind of disappointing actually! I'd love to have seen a real mine released with these Wild West sets (maybe there was one made for the Rock Raiders line?), but this set is exactly what the description on the box says it is, a bandit's hideout! There are a few areas where the minifigs can hang-out and play cards, along with a small storage area where the cannonballs are kept. I think it's about time to update the "cannonballs", they don't look like cannonballs at all. Unfortunately I can't suggest any practical designs for them. If they're little balls then there won't be any way to add a little indent so they can plug onto normal studs, because they would have to be much smaller to fit inside the cannons. The storage-room has a small ledge against the rock-wall where the bandits can put the rifle-box if they manage to steal it from the soldiers. They can't reach up there, so they'll have to bring-in the ladder from the big rock outside. There's plenty of room below for the safe and any other equipment they manage to get. I think this storage area could have been made to look like the opening to a deep mine-shaft. All it might require is a small black tile to simulate a dark hole in the floor, some fence-pieces, maybe a DANGER sign? The stairs lead to a narrow ledge behind the window where a bandit can sit and be a look-out. The fire lighting the door is dangerous though, I mean, look at it! It's just bursting out of the wall! It would definitely look more realistic with a clear yellow cone, to simulate a lantern, but I have to admit, the fire makes the whole hideout seem more wild and rugged. I'm not sure why the chair behind the window is bright yellow, it's obvious that it's in there when the window is open. Maybe subconsciously the bandits want to get caught. There's room on the roof for a bandit to sit comfortably, where he can either take a nap or talk to the birds. FUN Something I don't understand about these thieves is, that even though they're smart enough to create useful and hidden traps, they're not smart enough to make people STAY AWAY from their secret hideout. They have a big sign up top that says they're in a Gold Mine, that's a good way to ATTRACT a lot of attention! I think the skull on the "Keep Out" sign and big cannon on wheels is a step in the right direction for these bandits, but that sign on the roof needs to be changed, or taken down completely. Any suggestions? I think at some point every Lego fan covers a car or building in guns and swords and stabby bits. The 3-rifle contraption on the roof of the hideout is a goofy weapon because it looks so hard to use. How can the bandit even aim that thing? Or more importantly, how can he reach the triggers without falling off the building? It's going to take some major creativity to make it work! Is there anything more effective at stopping your enemies than collapsing stairs? They stop soldiers, wolves, salesmen, dragons, anything! The cannon rolls-out when the ramp is lowered after the trip-cord is pulled, but it doesn't fly-out like the drawings in the instruction-booklet show, it simply glides out smoothly because of how well all the pieces fit together. Legos are precision-made, and most of the time that's a good thing, but in this case the Lego pieces are limited by their own awesomeness! How many other toys can you honestly say that about? I see this set as a place for the bandits to drop-off their stolen goodies, like a big closet, and then run off to steal more stuff. It would have been nice to see a little cooking-fire included, some pots and pans, maybe even a chicken leg, to make the bandits more comfortable, but you can always buy the smaller Western sets for that. Can't say I'd pay the $40 retail price for this set, luckily it seems inexpensive nowadays. And not to toot my own horn too much, but I like the alternate model I built a lot more, it shows the kind of fun features you can create just by playing-around with the bricks a little. I also like the Cavalry Fort shown on the back of the box, it looks like a strong, solid model. ALTERNATE BUILDS The Hideout has a nice enough design, but building on a more detailed baseplate, like this desert-version, helps us think of things we normally wouldn't. For example, if you want to use the whole base, then you'll have to find a way to work around the road running through it. How about building a toll-booth? Maybe a bridge? That's all for now, folks! Something I'll try to include with every review is an alternate model that can be built using only the set's pieces, like this neat little box I made for the Golden Trumpet. Feel free to post links to the cool stuff you've made using this set! Notes: -The Skull I used for the sign-post is a modern one, the one this set is supposed to include is the "friendlier-looking" version. -The brown Horse's ear and the black Top-Hat were chewed-on by a Budgie that will remain unnamed. Thanks to my neighbor for letting me borrow this set to review.
  7. REVIEW - 42070 - 6X6 ALL TERRAIN TOW TRUCK INTRODUCTION It is that time of year again. The time when the most interesting new Technic sets will be (or already have been, in some cases) released. The flagship set is obviously builds loads of anticipation and expectancy. Interesting enough this year's flagship set isn't the biggest set, when we are merely regarding the number of parts. Even though the 42069 has more parts, this set is still considered to be the flagship. It's quite obvious when you see the size of the box or when you look at the price. At first sight the set looks as impressive as the box. Six big wheels, introduced in the Claas last year. Full RC, which means you can use a remote to drive the vehicle and to operate the crane and outriggers. There is only one remote however, so the functions need to be switched, using gears and levers. I am anxious to find out how the gear box works. Since several videos and reviews have been released, we already know that this set received a lot of criticism. One of the main complaints is the hefty price tag. It's as expensive as the Bucket Wheel Excavator, yet is has less than half the parts. There must be something in this set justifying the price tag. Why don't we start building, so we can find out what that might be. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42070 Title: 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck Theme: Technic Released: 2017 Part Count: 1862 Box Weight: 4,0 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 58,0 cm x 47,7 cm x 11,9 cm Set Price (MSRP): € 279 Price per Part: € 0,15 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX Upon looking at the box, it's clear that this set is this year's flagship. Obviously the lid/flap is a clear indication that we're dealing with the flagship, but the box itself is also pretty impressive. INSIDE FLAP The inside of the flap shows a single picture of the model, with the outriggers extended. Admittedly, it does look cool and appealing. According to the designers this is the truck that will tow the truck that was supposed to tow your car. If this bad boy doesn't get the job done, what will?! INSIDE The inside of the box shows the different functions, translated in no less than eight languages. At the bottom you can see an overview of all the Power Functions components. BACKSIDE The backside of the box also shows some of the functions, together with the B-model, a Research Explorer Vehicle. Not that I am particularly familiar with research vehicles, but it doesn't resemble anything I have ever seen CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1 Single book with stickers 6 Tires 18 Bags BOOK WITH STICKERS The way every bigger Technic (or LEGO set in general for that matter) should be packed, the sticker sheet combined with the book. BOOK The book is quite heavy and it contains almost 400 pages for 590 building steps. STICKER SHEET Since the sticker sheet is packed with the book, it's unharmed during transit. Hopefully the bear is unharmed too. The colors of the stickers are very vibrant, which perfectly match the Dark Azure look of the truck itself. TIRES One of the key elements of this set are the six big tires, introduced in the Claas in 2016. I am big fan of these tires, so I was delighted that the rumors about a 6x6 Truck with Claas tires were true. BAGS This set contains 18 unnumbered bags, containing a total of 1862 parts. The PF components are combined with the rims and are packed in two separate bags. By looking at the bags you can already see a lot of different bright colors. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This section describes the interesting parts. POWER FUNCTIONS This set contains the following Power Functions elements: Battery Box Infrared Receiver Infrared Remote Control M Motor XL Motor Compared to the Bucket Wheel Excavator this set does have the IR Receiver and Transmitter, while the BWE doesn't. And it has an M Motor, which the BWE lacks. So it has three more PF components. This is important for comparing the price. It's a nice PF Starter Pack for those of you getting (back) into the hobby. 24-16 TEETH DIFFERENTIAL Surprisingly, this set contains two old style Differentials. Upon close inspection, it seems that the mold has changed a bit, since the innards of the gear slightly protrudes, which wasn't the case with the previous versions. Admittedly, I would probably not have noticed if Sariel hadn't mentioned it. Actually it makes sense that this set contains at least one of these differentials. Since it's full RC and 6x6 we do need a center differential to prevent strain on the axles when powering all the wheels. DARK BLUE AZURE PARTS When we first saw the pictures of this set, we had to guess which color blue was used. This is because TLG has treated us with a wide range of blue elements in the Technic line. Compared to medium blue or medium azure, I definitely prefer this blue color. It would be great if TLG picked one (or two) shade(s) of blue and worked with that for a while though. They probably have heard enough complaints by now, so hopefully they will stick to dark azure as the alternate blue. Downside of getting new colors is the range of available parts. Over time the inventory will hopefully grow, but for now we have to work with this selection of dark azure. Currently there are 215 registered parts in dark azure, but they won't be very useful for building Technic. Unless you like to add Duplo to your truck 4x Liftarm 2x4 13x Liftarm 5L 13x Liftarm 11L 1x #1 and #2 Panel 1x #13 and #14 Panel 6x Curved Panel 11x3 3x Panel 11x3 9x Panel 11x5 4x Tapered Panel 11x5 CURVED PANEL 13x3 For the first time we get these panels in black, which is a very welcome addition to the parts selection. If we can get them in white too, that would be great, thanks CURVED PANEL 3x6x3 Earlier this year this transparent version of the curved 3x6x6 panel was intruced in the BMW R 1200 GS and Uwe conveniently used it as headlights in this truck. DOG BONE For the first time one of the frames (technically it's called a liftarm) is produced in a different color than light bluish grey. Six H Shaped Liftarms in red will be used in this set. One of my favorite parts and they perfectly fit the Mindstorms EV3 color palette. AXLE AND PIN CONNECTOR HUB This year the Axle and Pin Connector Hub is released in red. I already found these at the Factory Store in Legoland Germany and I wondered which set would use these in red. They are most likely not produced in red for this set, but for Baze Malbus from the Star Wars Buildable Figures. ROPE This set contains a new rope. It has kind of a metallic touch to it. It is slightly ticker than the regular rope. Thumbs up for this new version. It looks and feels a lot better. RED #3 CONNECTOR Last but not least, the rerelease of the red #3 connector, last seen in 2011. Lots of MOC-ers will be very happy to be able to use these parts for an affordable price again. I almost forgot that these parts were pretty rare, so I shot this picture afterwards. Four parts is exactly the number I have (or had before now) in my collection. So basically I doubled up! Whoop whoop. INVENTORY This set contains 1862 parts, which is not that many for a flagship these days. THE BUILD Let's build ourselves a 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck, now shall we! As with most trucks we start by building the center section, where the gearbox will be positioned. We immediately get cracking with quite a few gears, including the white safety gear (a.k.a. Clutch Gear). Early on the M Motor is attached to the gear box. This motor will be used to drive several functions, switched manually by two levers. This picture clearly shows that there are four switches to be operated. Eventually there are only two levers (one on each side of the vehicle), so let's wait and see how this will end up. So far the build is enjoyable. It's fun to add the gears and to slowly find out how they will be operated and which function(s) they will be driving. After building most of the center gearbox you will work your way forward and attach the front wheel steering linkage. As you can see the steering is operated off center and the second 12T Bevel Gear is only used to guide the rack. One of the things that also meets the eye is the different colored liftarms on the port and starboard side of the boat...uhmm truck. It seems odd at the moment, but it will prove to be useful later on...if you don't screw up anyway Talking about screw ups. I had quite a few of 'em during the build. It was late and I wasn't really sharp. An example of lack of sharpness is taking the XL Motor to the photo studio (I was building downstairs) and not thinking clearly about where the cable should be positioned. I can tell you...not this way. There is little extra length on the cable, so you will need every centimeter (or even milimeter). Connecting it this way will end up with having too little length on the cable. Lucky for me I was able to turn the motor around without taking too much of the model apart. I had a friend over who is interested in LEGO Technic as well. Obviously, he didn't want to be in spectactor mode during the entire build, so we alternated building every now and then. Since I misplaced the XL Motor, you can see what happened in the picture below. The dark azure liftarms were placed over the wire, which got us into trouble half an hour later or so. Let's talk a bit more about the different colors on the different sides of the truck. Since people tend to frequently make the mistake of misplacing the differentials in a 4x4 model, TLG provided a fool proof way of connecting the differentials. This way you almost cannot make this mistake. So, you would think. Unless you are building with a team mate and you incorrectly correct a mistake. That is exactly what happened during this phase of the build. My buddy had built both live axles. He had built them correctly, but he reversed the second one, resulting in the red liftarms being on the wrong side of the vehicle. I noticed the mistake, but instead of simply turning the second live axle around, I started rebuilding the second live axle. This resulted in both differentials being on the same side. Needless to say, that didn't improve driving performance. This was the moment that we called it a night. As you can see the wire is still incorrectly attached and the rear live axle has an incorrectly placed differential. Little did we know that we *cough* my buddy *cough* also missed a 20T bevel gear right smack in the middle of gearbox. As you can see in the picture below, there is no extra length on the cable of the XL Motor. This is not the most elegant solution, but after you finish the cabin, you won't see the cable anymore. At this point we still had the rear differential the other way around, so when I hooked up the battery box to test all the functions, we noticed the two rear axles turning in different ways...a clear indication you screwed up. I immediately realised that my buddy didn't screw up the build, but simple attached the rear axle incorrectly (or is this also considered a screw up hehe). We both had a laugh and fixed the mistake. Here you can see that the red connector is a tight fit. Not much margin to work with. The finished cabin looks cool. Although, I wonder why TLG keeps using blue panels as seats. I mean, this blue doesn't really match the rest of the truck. I'd say that any other color would have worked better than blue. Yellow would have been okay, or simply dark or light bluish grey, since the set is already very colorful. Come on guys, you can do better than that. The engine powering this behemoth is a powerful 4 cylinder engine. Wait a minute?! That can't be right. A 4 cylinder engine....hmmmph. I reckon its real life counterpart wouldn't use a 4 cylinder engine, but Uwe probably prefered a non-V engine over the correct number of cylinders. I would rather see a big 8 cylinder engine, even if that meant a V8. Even Dokludi used a V8 in his replica, so there is space enough. Other than that; the engine with the two black panels looks cool. The rear outriggers use more or less the same mechanism as the side ones, using an axle instead of gears to operate the stamps. Cool aspect about this technique is that it's quite rare for the outriggers to be operated by a motor. Usually you have to manually extend the stamps, which is rather cumbersome. Or be very patient when you have to wait for the 42009 outriggers to be extended. These outriggers are deployed in no time! Here's the attachment of the gearbox to the mini LA. The axle still needs to be pushed through the bracket. When you are done with the rear outriggers you move onto the crane. The crane looks rather flimsy for a truck this robust. Some panels could be added to make it look more sturdy and robust. It feels unfinished this way. At this point the model looks like you will be adding quite some stuff. On the contrary, you are almost done at this point. I remember my girlfriend looking at the parts I had left, looking at the model and saying "but you still need to build a lot". This is how your 98% complete truck looks like. The fenders and the side panels cover up the chassis and after that you are done. As you can see, the rear of the truck lacks a proper bed, which leaves you with an unfinished feeling, again. The rear and (the looks of the) crane are definitely not the strong suit of this model. The front of the model does look cool though. Unlike the cute bear, the front says "don't mess with me, I will ... you up". At the bottom you can see the 40 year anniversary brick (3L Liftarm), which is present in all of the 2017 sets. Several "Tow 067" stickers need to be applied, but what they mean still remains a mystery. Since set 42067 is missing from the line-up many of us figured the 42067 would be introduced as a new supercar (or something similar) being towed by this truck. The designers were actually quite surprised with this theory (or they acted surprised) and they said it wasn't related at all. It is supposed to have a meaning though, which we will find out later. FINISHED MODEL Without further ado, I hereby present this year's flagship.....the 42070 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck! Some basic observations when looking at the model. I didn't like the color at all when it was first presented. During the build I actually started liking Dark Azure. It works really well with red and the yellow details. There is quite a gap underneath the doors. It's a plus that TLG included the bigger panels, but I can't help but think that the gap could have been avoided. The yellow rims with the black dishes work really well. The overall look of the truck is rather impressive. When you start building and you see the six big tires, it's a sign that it's gonna be "yuge". And that the Mexicans are going to pay for it...oh wait now, that's something totally different. It is huge though. I am well aware that bigger doesn't always mean better, but I am a sucker for big models. The front of the truck with the bull bar definitely matches my expectations for this kind of truck. The chains and the Teddy Bear add nice touches to the exterior. The center of the chassis seems to be bending a bit, which isn't really surprising, given the size of the model. When I go on a cruise, the ship is bending all the time and that's not even a bad thing. I don't really mind this model bending a bit, although one could claim that it needs some reinforcement. Is it even road legal to have the tires sticking out of the vehicle?! I wonder how it looks if you position the panels 1L farther to the outside. This is how the vehicle looks from the back (sorry for the mirrors). As you can see I have attached both chains to the rear end of the vehicle, instead of one to the side. From the rear you can easily see the chassis underneath. The bottom shot of the chassis shows the old style center differential and the pendular axles. A couple of soft springs on each side would have been nice. Some extra pictures for your enjoyment. FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS Now that we have built the model and we know what it looks like. Let's talk about the functions. This model packs six functions powered by two motors. Steering Driving Rotate crane boom Raise/lower crane boom Raise/lower the hook Raise/lower the outriggers Unfortunately you can't switch functions with the IR remote, so you need to change the functions manually, using two levers. Each lever is mounted on one side of the model. The left lever (the one on the driver's side) switches between the Driving Functions and Operator Functions. When you switch this lever to driving mode, the position of the second lever doesn't matter. STEERING Instead of using a servo motor for steering, this truck is using the M Motor, which is also used for some other functions. Steering is very smooth and operates nicely. There is no return to center, but you hardly miss it. I really like the way this is implemented. Downside however is the turning radius. As with many Technic models, this model has a very wide turning radius. You need to go back and forth quite a few times to make a 180-degree turn in a somewhat confined space. Here are two video's demonstrating the steering mechanism. DRIVING Because of the weight of the vehicle, it's geared down using a 8T on a 24T gear in the portal hub. So, don't expect spectacular performance when it comes to top speed. It does have proper torque and it drives smoothly. Using an XL Motor instead of an L motor results in the model coasting when you release the "throttle", instead of abrubtly coming to a halt. All in all I am quite happy with the ability to drive (and steer) this model. Here's a short video of driving the truck: Since I am not really interested in Truck Trial and/or outdoor operation, I won't go into much detail about how suitable this model is for that. If you are interested in that, I can highly recommend watching the video review of our top video reviewer Sariel. What I do like to address is the inability of the IR system to be operated outside. I have never done truck trial or other outdoor PF IR related activities, but it just not possible to operate the model outside of your home. I never really realised that this was a big issue, but when you buy a € 279 RC set you probably expect it to work in your garden as well. Makes me wonder how many calls have been answered by TLG's customer service regarding this matter. It's time for TLG to step up their game and come up with a better solution. OPERATING THE CRANE AND OUTRIGGERS When you switch the lever on the driver's side to upper position you are engaging the non-driving functions of the model. That is operating the crane functions and the outriggers. When you are using this mode you are depending on the second lever to select the functions you want to operate. It's either the outriggers combined with lowering/raising the boom or rotating the crane and raising/lowering the hook. This takes a bit of getting used to, but I found this model easier to operate than the Arocs, which uses a similar approach. The following video demonstrates the operator functions: One thing that kind of bugged me during operating the outriggers is the fact that a 7L axle has been used and it has been stopped by two full bushes. This resulted in the outrigger getting stuck near the panel on the right side. I was surprised by this, since TLG usually makes sure that there is ample space for moving parts. I will be modding this by using an 6L axle and half bushes. MANUAL FUNCTIONS Besides the motorised functions, this model has some manual functions like opening the doors and the bonnet. And according to TLG's website, it has moveable lights. They have yet to be found though. B-MODEL The B-model of this set is what TLG calls an Research Explorer Vehicle. A polar vehicle comes to mind, but the big tires are more suitable for other types of environment. I am not sure what TLG is aiming at. Usually I don't really care for B-models and that's no different for this set. I would be happy to see someone build this vehicle and show us what it's all about. I will take a rain check. PRICE Now that we are almost at the end of this review you have probably noticed that I am rather enthusiastic about this set. Although we haven't found a clear explanation why this set has an MSRP of 279 euro. I was hoping we would find out during the review, but we haven't. Therefore, I am afraid we need to do some math to be able solve the mystery. The most logical way to determine the price of a set is to compare it with similar sets. Other than the usual Technic elements, this set contains PF components and six big tires. Let's look at the Claas because of the tires, the Volvo L350F for the Power Functions and the Bucket Wheel Excavator because it has the same price. Claas has 1977 pieces and has an MSRP of € 149. Four big tires, PF Battery Box and M Motor.. Volvo has 1636 pieces and has an MSRP of € 219. Lots of PF including 2 PF IR Receivers and 2 Transmitters, big tires and a big bucket. BWE has 3929 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. PF Battery Box and XL Motor. 6x6 Truck has 1862 pieces and has an MSRP of € 279. More PF than BWE, but way less PF than Volvo. So the BWE has over twice the number of parts, no PF Receiver or Transmitter and a single motor, but it still has the same price. You can argue that the BWE was actually cheap compared to other sets. Okay, let's call the BWE cheap and ignore it. Leaves us with the Volvo to compare to, since that set has a lot of PF components. The volvo has the entire range of PF components, including 2 PF IR Transmitters and Receivers. So it has a lot more PF components than the 6x6 Truck. The Volvo has approximately 200 parts less than the 6x6 Truck. At around 10 cents a piece, this would make up for a maximum of € 20. The Volvo is € 60 cheaper and it has almost double the number of PF components. The Claas isn't overly expensive, so the price of the tires probably don't add extreme costs to producing the set. When looking at the price of other sets, I simply cannot explain why the 6x6 Truck should cost 279 euro. Therefore, I can only jump to the conclusion that this set is overpriced. I'd say the price should be somewhere between the Claas (€ 149) and the Volvo (€ 219). € 149 + 2 tires and more PF components makes me feel like € 199, but no more than that, and definitely no € 279. SUMMARY When I first saw this set, I wasn't very thrilled about it. Even seeing it in Billund didn't change my mind. It's just a big truck which can drive and has yet another shade of blue. I do like big models and I do like the Claas tires, but it just didn't do it for me. Bright colors for a truck like this?! BUILDING EXPERIENCE During the first stages of the build it was clear that this set packs and interesting gearbox to operate some cool features. The set contains over 100 gears, so there obviously is interesting stuff going on. During the build we (I had some help during some of the building stages) made some serious mistakes. This wasn't because of the instructions. This was because it was late and we weren't paying enough attention. The funny thing is that this actually added some fun to the build. We had to take some stuff apart, and investigate where the problem originated. This was somewhat reminiscent of the good old days, where you sometimes had to puzzle your way through the build. So yeah, I really had fun during the build, even though I (we) made some very stupid mistakes. DESIGN Dark azure is a very nice shade of blue. It's way better than medium azure or medium blue. Now let's hope that TLG makes a pick when it comes to blue and add some connectors to the mix. Some parts of the truck look very cool and some look unfinished. Especially the rear of the vehicle and the crane look unfinished. It feels that some modding needs to be done to complete this model. I have very much come to terms with the bright colors though and I have started to appreciate them. What I don't get is the use of bright orange parts in the chassis. Why not throw in some dark azure if you need to use another color than grey. I can totally understand that TLG want to make the build process as understandable as possible, especially with the target audience in mind, but in some aspects they are overdoing it. PLAYABILITY Sometimes when I build a Technic model, the functions just don't seem to work properly. They look like a Proof of Concept, instead of actual working mechanisms. The good thing about this model is that the functions work properly. Steering, driving, operating the crane and the outriggers, everything works fine (except maybe the minor issue with the outriggers). Outdoor playability is virtually non-existent though. Don't expect your kids to have fun in the garden with this thing. They will get frustrated. FEATURES The main functions of the model are all operated by a remote control. Upside is that these functions work really well. Downside is that you still need to manually switch the functions, and you need to be inside. The outriggers are a blast to operate, they are so cool. PARTS In term of special parts this set isn't exactly special. You get six big tires, which you might already own four of, when you own the Claas. For existing PF users, it's mostly parts in new colors. If you are new to Technic or new to PF, this set is a pretty decent starter pack. VALUE FOR MONEY This is where things get ugly. The hefty price tag of € 279 is way too much. Around € 199 would have been reasonable, but € 279 is nowhere near reasonable. VERDICT After building the set and spending some time playing with it I can only come to the conclusion that I really like it. I am even thinking about modding this set and that is something I seldomly do. This set reminds me of the 42039, where I felt like the president of a fan club with very few members. Sometimes a set just works for me and this is such a set. And that's not because it's the best set right out of the box, but it has potential to have a lot of fun with it. Some sets are perfect, but you will hardly touch them after building. The real question is whether people will be forking out such an amount of money for a non-licensed set. 6,8 Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  8. Introduction: Thanks to @Jim the brand new Cargo Train has arrived early in LEGO City. Here a review of the set. I was very excited to get my hands on the set, not only because it offers a large potential but also because of the Powered Up system. Set Information: Number - 60198 Name – Cargo Train Theme – City (Trains) Year – 2018 Minifigs – 6 Pieces – 1226 Target age – 6+ (6 – 12) Price – €189.99, CA$ 269.99, $ 229.99, £ 179.99 Available from: July 1rst 2018 Links: Brickset - https://brickset.com/sets/60198-1/Cargo-Train Poll on the review: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GTQWQVX (suggestion: fill it in after you finished the review). LEGO Product Information Load up the powerful LEGO® City 60198 Cargo Train and deliver the goods on time! This cool LEGO City set features a motorized engine with 10-speed Bluetooth remote control, accessible driver’s cabin, a crane wagon with rotating and extendable boom arm, container wagon with 2 containers, and a log wagon, plus an armored truck with opening doors, and a forklift with opening roll cage and lifting forks. This cool LEGO train set also includes a full circular track with 16 curved rails, 16 straight rails and a railroad switch with lever, plus a control center with ladder and 2 buildable pallets with money bills, gold bar elements, a snow scooter and 6 LEGO minifigures. Includes 6 LEGO® minifigures: 4 train workers, a security officer and a crook. Features a motorized engine with 10-speed Bluetooth remote control, pantograph on the opening roof, and driver’s cabin with control panel. Also features a log wagon, crane wagon with rotating and extendable boom arm, and a container wagon with 2 containers with hooks on the roof for loading and space for pallets. Includes a control center with ladder and signal lights, a full circular toy train track with 16 curved rails, 16 straight rails and a railroad switch with lever, a money transport truck with opening doors, and a working forklift with opening roll cage. Accessory elements include a wrench, 12 gold bar elements and 4 money bills, plus 2 buildable pallets, 3 logs and snow scooter. Open the roof to access the engine car filled with cool details. Operate the cargo train with the 10-speed Bluetooth remote control. Lift and load logs onto the log wagon with the crane's rotating arm and hook. Push the lever on the railroad switch to drive the train to a different track for loading or unloading. Load pallets into the containers with the forklift before lifting them onto the container wagon with the crane. Set up the tracks in different configurations to load or offload cargo around your city. This product requires batteries (not included). Please refer to the product packaging for type and quantities. The included Bluetooth remote is not compatible with older infrared remote-controlled LEGO® train sets. Cargo Train in total measures over 4” (11cm) high, 32” (82cm) long and 2” (6cm) wide. Engine measures over 4” (11cm) high, 10” (27cm) long and 2” (6cm) wide. Log wagon measures over 1” (5cm) high, 5” (15cm) long and 2” (6cm) wide. Crane wagon measures over 4” (10cm) high, 8” (22cm) long and 1” (5cm) wide. Container wagon measures over 3” (9cm) high, 7” (18cm) long and 1” (5cm) wide. Armored truck measure over 2” (6cm) high, 6” (15cm) long and 2” (6cm) wide. Control center measures over 8” (21cm) high, 3” (8cm) wide and 4” (12cm) deep. Forklift measures over 2” (7cm) high, 2” (5cm) wide and 4” (12cm) deep. The Box: The box is huge, feels filled and heavy. This is the front of the box: and this is the back: They clearly mention that set is not compatible with older systems (read: Power Functions). They also promote the upcoming app(s) and the passenger train (+ the track sets). I found it a bit odd that they did not include the Bluetooth Low Energy logo and standard they use on the box. They mention Bluetooth but that could have meant Bluetooth Classic. Not too easy to see in the smaller resolution of the image, but they mention near the lightning bolt: "The Bluetooth technology is not compatible with older train products". For kids I think the box would be very appealing since they give a lot of hints on how to play with the set. Inside The Box: The box contains 12 numbered and additionally four unnumbered bags (three with tracks, train bases and a few other parts including the ladder, and then the PU train motor). Two stacks of four curved track sections and the PU controller and receiver came loose (interesting since the PF parts always came inside cardboard I think). The Instructions: The six booklets and the stickers came in a separate plastic sealed package, good thing since that keeps both stickers and booklets in much better condition of course: The Build: It is a massive set so I decided to take it on in a very structured way. Booklet 1/6: The Forklift The first pages of the forklift booklet contain some instruction on how to move forward bag by bag. It also explains the brick separator and scanning the QR code will even lead you to a tutorial video about the separator. Ok, well these are the parts of bag one: For the price of the set they really focused on money, so while you spend quite some money on the set, you also are rewarded with a lot of money related items. Some nice modern parts, a lot of familiar parts. They could have used the goldish version of the 'bars' (Piece 99563) but apparently they didn't (the piece was included in other 2018 sets though) and just used jumper and normal tiles. They have a lot of color variations, especially the jumpers, I thought that was a minor draw-back. At first I also found the "Bright Light Orange" parts looking somewhat poorly (reminded me of some clone bricks) but it worked out very well in the end. First one needs to build the minifig and the pallet. Here is what the figure and pallet look like. To the left the base of the forklift: Here is the final forklift together with the minifig and pallet full of cold uh, gold and banknotes. Here you can see for yourself that it wasn't a bad decision to make the forklift Bright Light Orange after all: Booklet 2/6: The Bank Truck Bags 2 and 3 are needed to build the bank truck. I guess they did this to make the set suitable for the 6 year olds. This is the heap of bag 2 after I structured it: Not that many special parts, really straight-forward. There was one interesting step: You build the driver seat / engine compartment as 'one piece'. The engine is place in the middle of the truck as it appears. I guess they looked at real car factories and their "Hochzeit"-moment (German for marriage) moment when the bottom of the car and the body are coming together. That is it for the first part of the truck. This pile represents the contents of bag 3. The left-hand corner is the finished first half from bag 2. I always build using 'heaps' but I must say restructuring the parts means one can build very fast so I would recommend it to kids from now on: I like these parts better then the base parts. They did a very neat job with the smooth nose of the vehicle: it is basically a four-wide car piece and integrates very well. No bulky 'Jack Stone'-era like parts, but still a smooth and very buildable truck. I thinks kids and T/AFOL's alike will enjoy building it! Here is what the truck looks like when completed. A really nice and easily accessible cargo bay, nice for the 'players', but they did in fact also include those nice doors at the back. So fortunately they did not save on details making the set also interesting for a more mature audience. As you can see the pallet with money and gold bars will fit right in! The only draw-back I could think of is when the bay is closed you can see the gaps on the top. Hope it doesn't rain in your LEGO city and the bank notes are water proof (well, they are made from ABS so I guess they are ;)). A view from the front: you see how smooth and detailed it is while still using relatively small pieces. I did not apply the stickers yet, later you'll see why (and a neat trick). I would advice that also for kids, wait till your have built everything and ask a 'pro' to apply your stickers. Booklet 3/6: A stopper, crossing and... Part one of the Locomotive! Finally, the first real train builds! First some 'battery management'. The set needs a staggering amount of ten AAA batteries! Four for the controller and another six for the receiver / motor controller. I did only have for when I started and the shops were already closed so you'd better prepare and get good deals on AAA batteries before you start your PU (Powered Up) adventures. You need to pair the Bluetooth devices first. The controller and receiver probably have some initialization periode where they are able to pair to each other. We will see how that works if we will power on more than one controller or receiver in the future :) Maybe they rely on the signal strength though and will only pair to the closest devices that just booted up, just speculation, we will need to see when PU parts become more readily available and further experiment with it. As Sariel showed, powering of is easy: The receiver will apparently (from the video by Sariel) also power down after one presses the controller momentous switch for +5 seconds. Hope the troubleshooting guide will appear there around July 1rst, for now it does not exist (https://www.lego.com/themes/city/trains). Here are all the PU parts together: From top to bottom: - the receiver / battery box / motor controller combination - the remote control for two motor channels - the PU version of the train motor Now we should have started building the loop with the 'dead-end' behind the switch. The set comes with 16 straight and 16 curved tracks, and a (left hand side) turn out. Interesting to see that they included quite some straight track compared to older sets, but also that they did not include an extra curved track to make the 'dead' section behind the turn out in line with former LEGO guidelines that suggested us to always add a curved piece right after the diverted section of turn outs and never directly connect a straight section. B.t.w. booklets 3 and 4 show a yellow / orange tile on the turnout so you can remember that train will react to what side of the controller, but they included a green tile and correctly show you to add that green tile to the controller for 60198. Maybe they should have included a sticker that looked like 60198 for that tile as well but they didn't. You then are instructed to build the (unsafe) railroad crossing, more or less just like the one from the winter village station. There is also a rail stopper for the end of the dead section. Here are the parts for both builds: This is the rail stopper: The crossing is plain but effective: They could have added barriers for even more playability but I guess in freight shunt yards like this, have a crossing without barriers is most common. Bag five contains the first part of the engine. The baseplate is 6 x 28 which is very common for recent trains (see: BrickLink). The inside of the train is very colorful. I know from designers that they typically do this for sets targeting a younger age, I don't mind it since the outside is still very acceptable. You see already quite some typical Train parts, so the LEGO Train story just continues with this set. The engine is very much symmetric as you can see, I value this very much since for children it helps them to better understand concepts like symmetry (I'm a beta teacher after all). Here is the half way built engine, I actually made a mistake with the yellow 1 x 4 panels, they should have been facing towards the inside of the train. The head is more or less a fusion between typical US and EU trains. We all know of course that the leaked initial images very much looked like typical EU engines, I think this way the train appeals to a wider audience (remember Jamie Berards recents comments on trains). Since the nose is SNOTted, it would be very doable to modify it without a lot of problems to suit one's taste maybe even better. The tile on the front will be fitted with a 'cargo' instead of the typical Train ('Northern') logo (<-O->). That was the end of booklet 3. Booklet 4/6: The rest of the Locomotive Booklet 4 lets you start with bag 6. You need to add the buffers and the motor as well. Here you see the parts from bag 6: Yellow bogie plates this time. The green train windows are not unique but after all most parts would also be reusable for MOC's etc. Here you see the finished bogies, one with the new UP motor, the other entirely brick-built: The buffers for the locomotive are of the snowplow variety. After finishing bag 6 we have this: The cockpits are easily accessible and the battery bay is very spacious: we don't have an IR receiver anymore of course :) There are two train parts in bag 7 that I have never seen before: the new pantographs! They look really neat I think. Here is the finished train with the controller next to it: You can see that the vertical part of the panels are now facing the inside. The 1 x 3 panels on top make a the entire engine very sturdy while it is still very easy to remove the entire middle section, just remove the four panels and one can lift the entire thing. It looks very much like a real cargo engine after all I think (although it appears a fusion between a continental and US train as we already discussed earlier). The roof section acts like a lever (comparable to what we have seen in e.g. the yellow and red cargo locomotives) for the battery box. Booklet 5/6: Crooked trees and a female operated rail crane Bag 8 contains the crook with the rail car and lumber. Not spectacular, but they did a nice job. I like the dark tan 1 x 6 fences. Looks like the crook is up to no good! Here the finished lumber rail car. The lumber fits very well and won't fall off that easy. Apparently this car is also the crooks ideal place he can observe from. Bag 9 contains the base for the rail crane. We have seen quite some rail cranes already (1972, 1975, 1977, 1980, 2006 and 2015 (I might have forgotten one or two), I already owned one (set 7814) when I was 2,5 years old, but I think (arguably) that only set 4552 from the 9V era tops this one. These are the parts, another (6 x 24) train base, the typical train railings again. The female crane operator has the same uniform as the train driver. Here you can see the finished base: The stabilizers are fully retractible as you can see and have a sturdiness to it as needed for performing heavy lifts common in railroad situations. This is also true for the bogies, very compact, really appropriate for a genuine real crane I think. This is what the crane base looks like after being but on it's bogies: Bag 10 contains the crane itself: I like the large round turntable. Also those technic parts. A good starter for engaging youngsters in Technics. This is what the finished crane looks like: M(r)s operator is now totally ready for every conceivable heavy lifting duty. B.t.w. those 'stamps' that you see connected to the hook are also used as joysticks for the operator. Behind the 'container' doors on either side are 2 x 2 tiles that will get a human machine interface / operator panel (stickers). Booklet 6/6: Rail yard control tower and container rail car. The final booklet contains the instructions for a duo container rail car and the yard control tower. First up is bag 11 that contains the rail car, containers and even a snow scooter. All the parts for the train car and the containers. No very special parts but nice color variations. First we build the rail car itself. A very straight-forward open rail car with a somewhat heavy duty base. Then the bank container that also doubles as a safe. Wondering why the crook only has binoculars, maybe he wants to steal the combination? I guess no explosives this time :). The container has a hook so the rail crane can easily lift it. The 'money pallet' will fit in just like with the truck. The second container comes with a pallet that can fit a snow mobile. The back of booklet 4 already promoted the arctic explorer sets so I guess they wanted to link the set also to the arctic theme enthusiasts! The snow mobile next to the car and both containers. The last bag! Number 12 contains the following: There is one peculiar item that was new to me: It fits a cross axle to the side and can fit a 20482 part to both other sides. Although the signal tower might not be that realistic, it adds extra playability and is quite fun. We can always MOD it of course work more like the real deal. Initially I though, did they finally reintroduce the yellow helmet again to a train set after about 40 years, but alas, although the female hairpiece of the operator also looks very neat. The back of the tower has a knob so you can signal the train engine driver that he can start / stop shunting in the rail yard. So that was it for building. Here are most of the left-overs: There is also an extra small chain piece (from the lumber car). This is what the entire set looks like from a 'helicopter' vantage point: The Minifigures: Here is the line up of the minifigs: Having some diversity in the LEGO train world isn't that bad I would say. I like the uniforms, a lot of details in their prints. All torsos also have a printed back: Apart from the 1 x 4 train cockpit, 1 x 2 money tiles and these torsos all other artwork is done using stickers. Stickers, love them or hate them?! I think without the stickers the train would not look that great at all, but we have them so we can upgrade the looks of our set by applying them. Here they are: The artwork was done quite well, I like the metallics in the bank logo's. Nothing too complicated but nevertheless making the set much more appealing. The sticker paper does then to curl better put it somewhere safe till you are ready to apply the stickers. I obviously have a lot of experience applying stickers, my wife always ask me to help out on e.g. her technic sets for applying them, so do my cousins and nieces. But that does not mean that I never fail at applying the stickers just perfectly. Fortunately I know a trick and used that trick to apply the stickers on set 60198 as well. The solution: adding some drops of (mild) dishwashing soap to some water: You then moisturize your finger and apply the solution to the place where the sticker(s) need to be applied. The thin film soapy water prevents the sticker from immediately sticking to the ABS. You can then readjust the sticker till you are satisfied, squeeze a little to make the sticker stay in place and just let it dry. Applying the stickers makes all the difference don't you think? I just wanted to finish off with a last view from the yard tower: What a job, a great view... and: Even your own coffee maker: I just love that they added this detail! Summary: Playability: 10/10 Design: 7/10 Price: 6/10 Parts: 8/10 Minifigures: 9/10 Overall: 7/10 Wrap-up and some final notes: Hope you like the review, I did not have my photography tent / spots up and running at the moment so sorry about the differences in colors / shading, hope it wasn't too disturbing in the end. At my flickr page you can see more pictures I took while building the set. Now I just need some AAA batteries to start the engine! And remember: don't forget to fill in your opinions on the set: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GTQWQVX The quality of the video could be better but at least you get the idea I hope. One more thing: I have started a Powered Up review that includes a tear-down here. Hope many more will contribute to that! I'll do that in a separate topic since it is of course not only about set 60198.
  9. Hello, you might be asking yourself "what's a Star Wars Regulator doing a review of a Ninjago set for?" Well, I'll tell you. I've been a fan of Ninjago since season 2. When Ninjago first came out I thought, "what do I need a bright blue ninja for? Hiding behind bright blue curtains?" But as more sets came out and I started to watch the tv series, it began to grow on me. I'm still catching up on the episodes and haven't quite gotten to the Sons of Garmadon arc yet. So I can't tell you how they've handled the alternate Ninjago universe that is the Lego Ninjago Movie. But that also mean this review will be spoiler free, apart from some of the obvious spoilers that you can't avoid simply by looking at the box art. When the newest Ninjago line was released, the set that stood out to me the most was this one, Temple of Resurrection. Even if you aren't a fan of the Ninjago license, most of the sets are great parts packs and this one is no exception. So without further ado, here is my review. 70643 Temple of Resurrection Hopefully you can tell from the picture how thick this box is. I didn't get a tape measure out, but it seems to be about 50% thicker than your average $30-$60 set. And there doesn't seem to be an obvious reason for this. There are no large base plates or pre-fab pieces to accommodate. And the bags and instructions could have fit in a smaller box, or even a thinner one that was a little larger in surface area. Maybe Lego just wanted it to take more shelf depth. The back of the box illustrates all the play features. But it also shows off one of the main reasons I wanted this set. Each Ninjago line (as all "Adventure" themed Lego lines tend to) has a set of pieces/objects to collect. Most of the time you have to buy multiple sets to complete your collection. But recently Lego has been putting all the collectibles into one of the highest priced sets. For example, the Hands of Time sets allowed you to collect 4 Time Blades by buying 4 different sets. Or you just just buy the 2nd most expensive set and get all 4 that way. For Sons of Garmadon, you could buy 3 different sets to get all 3 Oni Masks, or you can just buy Temple of Resurrection to get all 3. Now, its time for a confession. The main reason I wanted all 3 Oni masks is because I'm a big Jackie Chan Adventures fan. One of the seasons dealt with Oni masks and seeing them re-created in Lego forum makes me geek out! Opening the box you can see that there are 6 bags and a sealed set of instructions/stickers. It's always nice to see the instructions and stickers protected and I wish Lego would do that in more sets, not just the large ones. My first reaction when I laid out the contents was "NO! The large windows are stickers not prints!" I have a love hate relationship with stickers, but it's mostly hate. If the piece I want to use in generic MOCs is stickered then I can just leave the sticker off to allow for more versatility. But if it's a piece I want to use for its intended purpose, like a decorative Asian wall panel, then I want it printed! I'll point this piece out again when we get to it in the building process. Sorry for the poor quality on this picture. I didn't go back and check my pictures before moving on to each building step, so I missed that this one didn't turn out well. It shows what things look like after Bag #1, as well as all the extra pieces. There are some unique pieces in Bag #1. We get some of the new flower molds with 5 petals, the white modified stud with shaft, and 2 printed pieces. The compass looking piece gets hidden in one of the boxes on the ground floor of the temple. I'm not sure what it's significance is, but a quick Bricklink search shows it's originally a Minecraft piece. That helps explain why it looks pixelated. Bag #2 finishes the extensions to the ground level. My guess is the red path is supposed to look like a tongue. You also get a bunch of spare parts, most of them extremely useful. You get an extra Mr. T. mohawk in red, one of each bandana style in black, a red katana (a new color for this piece), and a spare espresso lever. I find it odd that 1 set would have both styles of bandanas. The skeleton wears the new style introduced for the Ninjago line a few years back. And one of the Sons of Garmadon bad guys wears the Wild West version. Bag #3 builds the main floor of the 2nd story and achieves its stability with a lot of technic beams. The instructions have you build the entire floor before attaching it to the rest of the build. If you look at the base of the building that was built from bags 1 and 2, you can see that the connection points are on 4 different levels. The floor also had to fit around bricks already set along the edges. It was hard to line up and fit. And I assume that if I had trouble with it, the 8-14 year old this set was intended for will have even more. Something else interesting in Bag #3 was the varying shades of pearl gold. I know some colors are harder for Lego to keep consistent with every batch. But finding 2 different shades in the same bag seemed odd to me. I'd love to see the sorting process that brought this about. Was there really only 1 piece left from the previous batch that ended up in my set along with a bunch of the new batch? Or did one fall off a conveyor belt and a worker found it a week later, adding it to the batch of new ones? Who knows. Bag #3 ends very few extra pieces and now we are ready to build the 2nd floor and roof. Bag #4 has some great pieces in it. We get the oriental fence piece in pearl gold for the first time, the grooved dark red brick, some window and door pieces which are very useful for Asian style building, and an extra gold tassel. The gold tassel is in the Lego Ninjago Movie CMF, so it's not super rare any more. But it's nice to have more anyways. The lanterns are built using a Speed Champions' wheel in white which I thought was an ingenious use of that part. And Bag #4 wraps up with most of the walls being finished for the 2nd floor. There are also only 3 extra pieces in this bag. Bag #5 holds the pieces that almost made me cry when I first opened this set. Those two panels are stickers. Thankfully I was able to get them on straight enough to keep the perfectionist in me happy. But what if I had messed up? I seriously think Lego should start adding extra stickers sheets to all sets. Or at the very least, any set priced over $50. In this bag you also get some gold ingots which are used decoratively with the Oni masks and a dark pearl gray lightsaber handle. I'm not sure when Lego started doing this, but they now tell you at the beginning of a step whether you're going to need to build multiples of it or not. This saves a lot of time and frustration and I'm glad they started doing it! These revolving panels use one of the most interesting techniques in the set. By utilizing the anti-stud that is only in the middle of the window frame, the designer was able to offset two 1x2 plates. You later attached a small turntable to this spot which helps stabilize them as they turn. Bag #5 finishes off the structure of the 2nd floor and starts the roof. There are a few extra pieces shown at the bottom of the picture. Bag #6 has some great pieces! The black "L" tile has been around since 2016, but never in large quantities so every extra one is a nice addition to the collection. The red connector pin may not seem all that exciting, but this is the first year it's been produced in red. I was really hoping each Oni mask would have a matching colored helmet base. So I was very disappointed to see that all the helmet bases where black. You can't even see the black with the mask attached, but it means fewer cool helmet combos for other MOCs. With the finishing of Bag #6, the set is complete! There are some nice extra pieces like the dark bley horn and machete. Now to explore the play features! With a name like "Temple of Resurrection" it makes sense that the main play feature involves resurrecting Garmadon. You can see from the back that this is achieved with a lot of technic gears. By lifting the red arm, the gears move the roof. When it's lifted, the roof reverses direction and Garmadon is revealed. The side view shows that the build has a lot of openings. The bottom floor I understand as it allows you to position minifigures. But it would have been nice to get more windows with white panels to fill in the opening on the 2nd floor. This view is also the least flattering for the roof. It has to have gaps to be able to achieve the play feature, but this angle makes it look the most unsightly. Here's the temple with all the minifigures displayed. And in case you were wondering, minifigures can stay standing on the 2nd floor even when the roof transforms. The back shows that when the trap doors are activated the intruders are dropped into the armory. Probably not the best thought out plan. But it makes for a fun feature. And in case you were wondering, the Oni masks do not fit with the samurai helmet. Or course for many people the highlight will be the minifigures. As far as I can tell, the only minifigure you can find in another Sons of Garmadon set is Mr. E, the racer in black. Harumi, the female in green, and Hutchins, the man in green, and Garmadon are all exclusive to this set. Chopper Maroon, the man with the red mohawk, can be found in the S.O.G. Headquarters set with short legs and with the name of Nails. Cole seems to be exclusive, but he is very similar to the Ninjago movie version. Lloyd is listed as exclusive, but that's just because the other version excludes his katana holder. All minifigures have back printing. The baby does not have the new baby body mold. Instead it uses two pieces to achieve a swaddled look. I'd love to have another baby body mold, but this swaddled look works so well I can't complain. A couple more things to note about the minifigures. Harumi has some interesting printing on her lower legs. Does anyone know why those extra green belts are around her knees? Chopper Maroon has some detailed biker printing that gets covered by his bandana. And Garmadon, while looking very much like his Ninjago Movie version, is unique because of the purple "resurrection ooze." My overall thoughts? Go buy it! Or rather, find the best discount and then buy it. I got it 20% off at Target which seems to be the new normal price for this set. The minifigure selection is wonderful, the build process keeps you interested throughout, and even if you just want a parts pack, this set is a winner. So there you go. I hope you enjoyed the review as much as I enjoyed making it!
  10. 42055 - BUCKET WHEEL EXCAVATOR INTRODUCTION I never thought LEGO would make a bucket wheel excavator (BWE). First of all, the vast majority of Earth's population have no idea what it is (excepting the Germans). Secondly, such a model would have to be scaled around a bucket and therefore would be enormous even if made at the smallest possible scale. It just didn't seem likely, yet here it is. Bucket wheel excavators are among the largest pieces of mobile equipment ever created by humans. Whereas a standard hydraulic excavator removes material one bucket at a time and must empty each load individually, a BWE removes material continuously and transfers it via a complex series of conveyors to a fleet of waiting trucks. These machines are used in open pit mining to remove the over-burden: the loose soil and rock on top of the seam of target material. They excavate not downward, but forward. The machine is placed below grade, and then slews across a wall of material to bring the grade down to the level of the machine. Although they may have on-board hydraulics, these machines are electric and are tethered to the power grid via a cable large enough to run a small city. Though technically mobile, the machines move rarely and slowly and doing so is a major operation. They are constructed on-site at the mine since it is impossible to move them over long distances. Only the Germans have a unit large enough to describe the amount of material these machines remove: the scheisse-tonne. The LEGO model happens to include several scheisse-tonnes of overburden for your pit mining enjoyment. All BWEs share a common feature of a rotating bucket wheel, usually with at least 16 buckets. After that, the designs vary considerably. The largest and most familiar type of BWE is the gantry type. This type uses tall gantry booms and cables to support the bucket wheel arm. Set 42055 is clearly not intended to be a gantry type BWE, but seems modeled after a C-frame type like the Sandvik PE100. Even so there are clear differences. Whereas the LEGO model has the counterweight on the opposite end of the bucket wheel arm, the real BWE has the counterweight much lower for greater stability. Given the structural limitations of LEGO, this seems like a reasonable compromise. Although there has never been an official LEGO Technic model of a BWE before, the topic is not unknown among AFOLs. A couple of examples are shown below. The first, from Holger Matthes, is a gantry type built from traditional studded Technic. The second model by Desert752 uses studless building. Both models have many more parts and motors than 42055. SET INFORMATION Set Number: 42055 # of Parts: 3927 Main Model Weight: 3.5 kg Main Model Size: 83cm x 40cm x 30cm THE BOX This is a big box, roughly the same size as the UCS star destroyer and death star boxes. Unlike those boxes though, it does not have a cover that lifts off. Instead it has a top flap which shows the functions with a huge picture. The box opens to either end. Front Back Front flap CONTENTS OF THE BOX Instructions The instruction book is a massive brick nearly the size of the Porsche manual. It has 552 pages, 72 steps in the truck, 669 steps in the main model (not including callout steps). The manual is reasonably protected in a snug plastic bag along with the stickers but no cardboard. Mine was in good shape. Stickers There is an ample sticker sheet with all of these used for the main model. Quality is typical. Bags The parts are split into 8 sets of numbered bags which nearly fill the box. Some large bags contain smaller bags. 3x bags numbered 1 4x bags numbered 2 3x bags numbered 3 5x bags numbered 4 2x bags numbered 5 9x bags numbered 6 3x bags numbered 7 3x bags numbered 8 HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This set is a smorgasbord of parts, and not just because of the total part count. There are a huge number of useful and/or rare parts here including: 53x 5x7 frame 22x red 16-tooth idler gears 19x 20-tooth bevel idler gears 24x 90deg corner pin connectors The biggest obstacle to a model like this is the slew ring. The turntables in the LEGO parts palette were simply too small and weak to support a large overturning moment, so custom solutions were always required. LEGO has finally solved that problem with some new parts. These giant parts can be used as ring gears (like in the bucket wheel) or as huge turntable (like in the slew ring). 14 of them are included in the model. When four quarter segments are connected together, you get a complete circle with 140 teeth. There are also 8 new buckets. The 3 hole attachment along the back of the bucket was needed for this model. THE BUILD Bag 1 - The Truck The build begins with the mining dump truck in white. There is nothing special to say here except to note that it is NOT the same as the 42035 yellow truck. Although the scale and subject matter are the same, this truck does not have a moving engine. There are also a pile of rocks included for the BWE to dump into the truck. Bag 2 - The Carrier The second portion of the build is the main structure of the carrier. As you might expect, this needs to be really strong to support such a huge model. Looking at the picture, you can see that the entire thickness is supported with 5x7 frames making this thing a real brick. The corners are reinforced with 3x5L liftarms and 11L double angled liftarms. This assembly is mostly structural; the only moving parts here are the axles to drive the sprockets. The 4 red pins with bushing will be used to attach the superstructure. Bag 3 - The Treads The third bag builds the tread assemblies. These are two identical assemblies (rather than mirrored). I was a little surprised to see the black tread links here given that the conveyor uses DBG links. There is no suspension. Then the two tread assemblies are connected to the carrier, completing it. I was worried about the use of bevel gears in what is sure to be a highly loaded drive assembly, but the use of a gearbox bracket prevents slippage. Bag 4 - The Slew Ring The bottom of the superstructure is build next and sits atop the slew ring. There is a LOT going on here as you can see from this plan view. The only function that passes through the slew ring is main drive, but the smaller turntable also passes the power for the output conveyor. A few DBG wedge belt wheels can be seen positioned circumferentially. These ride on the slew ring to support the imbalance of the superstructure. The assembly is then connected to the carrier along with the linear actuators used for tilting the main arm. The three vertical axles seen in the front will receive power from the arm. Now the support towers have been started as well as the mechanism to control the angle of the output conveyor. Another 180 degrees worth of ring gears are used to support it and are concentric with the main slew ring. A pair (upper and lower) of standard size turntables are used to center the superstructure while the slew ring supports the weight and moment. Bag 5 - The Output Conveyor The relatively simple bag 5 is the output conveyor. It is just some sprockets, supports, treads, and a wall. This is suspended at a fixed elevated angle above the upper turntable, and a chute above it funnels the rock and earth from the main conveyor to the output conveyor. This is centered so that it works regardless of which direction the output is facing. Bag 6 - The Bucket Wheel Bag 6 represents by far the major portion of the build and makes up the main digging arm. We start with the support for the bucket wheel including the chute that funnels the material from the bucket to the conveyor. It is important that there be no gaps so parts can't into the mechanism and jam it. The bucket wheel itself is pretty simple. It uses 8 ring gear segments and 8 buckets. After the bucket wheel is attached, you can see the 6 pairs of 12-tooth double bevels gears which center and support it held by a radial spiderweb of structure. Now the main conveyor is built and a lot of structural reinforcement is added. This arm is cantilever a long way from the main frame, so it needs to be stiff not only in bending but also in torsion. The 5x7 frames and diagonal members you see help a lot with this. Here is a view of the completed bag 6 arm (bag 7 will build the back of it). The yellow axle protruding is used to drive the conveyor. Bag 7 - The Counterweight The back of the arm contains the counterweight. Why make it a boring inert mass when you can use batteries and a gearbox for weight instead?! The gearbox here is pretty intricate and is explained further later on. A single XL motor drives all functions and has plenty of power. At the stage shown, the gears are all present but nothing is supported yet. Now a bunch of structure has been added to properly support the gears. This view is from the bottom of the gearbox. After the gearbox counterweight is attached to the front of the arm you have a very long, but very rigid, beam assembly. The panels and labels for the switches effectively hide the awesomeness of the gearbox. I kind of wish the panels were transparent. The completed arm in a perspective view. Now the arm is attached to the main frame via a pair of small turntables about which it pivots. Then the top of the frame is added. The model may look complete at this point, but there are still a lot of aesthetic details to add. Bag 8 - The Operator Areas Box 8 adds the details needed for a human (or minifig) to actually operate such a beast. This includes railings, ladders, and the operator's cabin. This is what the model might look like to a mini figure for scale. Note however, that this model is much smaller than minifig scale. HOW DOES IT WORK? OK, we've built this thing and we know that it's huge, but what about the functions? Does it work, and how does it work? Is it just a big monster that doesn't do much? Hopefully this picture will answer that last question in the negative. There is in fact a lot going on here. In case you couldn't figure it all out from just looking at that cutaway, let's look at a color coded animation. This breaks the functions apart to make them more understandable. Blue is motor drive, orange is inside the gearbox, yellow is main drive, green is conveyors and bucket wheel, and red is rotation. Let's dig in further. Here is a view of just the gearbox, but it is still too hard to understand without some colors. You can see the 3 white clutch gears which are used to protect the gearbox from stalling. That's better. Blue is the motor drive. The XL motor is geared down 5:1 at the point that it rotates the center blue driving ring. If no driving rings are engages, nothing turns except for the blue parts. The center driving ring can engage either the orange or the green parts. The orange parts and internal to the gearbox and don't drive anything directly. The two orange driving rings rotate in opposite directions. The yellow driving ring outputs to the main drive, and can make the model go either forward or reverse depending on which direction is engaged. Note that the main drive is VERY slow, but I think this is probably scale accurate. Even if you desired the model to go faster, I wouldn't recommend trying to get any more power down that long gear train. If the green gears are engaged, they output to drive the conveyors and bucket wheel. The red driving ring can be engaged only if the red is already engaged. This controls the slewing and, like the orange gears, can reverse direction without reversing the direction of the motor. In fact, the battery box is blocked so the motor can only run one direction. Like the driving, the speed of the other functions is slow, but quite scale accurate. This shows the system for main drive, not counting the gearbox. The power has to go a LONG way to get down to those threads. As you can see, it has to run concentrically through the turntable and there are a pile of idler gears used along with an additional 5:1 reduction for a total of 52.1:1 (there was an additional 20:16 in the orange gears). I found that it works surprisingly well with no trouble moving the model on a level surface. The linear actuators for adjusting arm angle are as simple as it gets. I was surprised to see the the whole axle rotates even though it also supports weight. This is generally a bad idea, but in this case the arm is so well balanced that there is hardly any load here. Next is the slewing function. Note how the 20 tooth idler gear is used to pass the torque past the arm pivot axis. After than, it is just a pile of spur gears used to get us over the fixed internal ring gear. This shows the conveyor drive system. The sprocket for the main conveyor just tees off from the driveline. Note that the drive of the bucket wheel is actually powered by the tread links of the conveyor; there are no gears or axles running out the length of the arm. The main and output conveyors run off the same driveline so are always moving together. The gears for the output conveyor must pass through the upper turntable to allow the conveyor to pivot. Here is a close-up of the bucket wheel. The greatest inefficiency in the model happens here. The black double gears don't just drive the wheel, they actually support it. This means that the upper gears in particular have a lot of weight on the teeth which causes a bunch of friction. A real BWE would support the wheel with bearings so the gears only carry torque. With that said, the bucket wheel still works fine. I have not had any trouble with it but it can be a bit jerky because of all the compliance in the system. Finally, the output conveyor locking system is one of the more clever and unexpected functions in the model. The lower turntables rotates with the superstructure, and the upper turntable rotates with the output conveyor. If the driving ring is in neutral, then these turntables are independent and you can freely adjust the position of the output conveyor. If the right hand driving ring is engaged, then the conveyor is grounded to the superstructure and rotates with it. On the other hand, if the left hand driving ring is engaged then the upper and lower turntables are locked together and rotate in opposite directions. The effect of this is that position of the output conveyor remains fixed with respect to the ground while the superstructure slews. This is exactly what you want while loading a truck. Of course, there is plenty of backlash in the gears so it doesn't work perfectly, but it works well enough to demonstrate the idea. SUMMARY What can I say other than to utter lots of superlatives? This is the biggest Technic model ever in terms of dimensions and in terms of parts. It's complexity is right up there with the best, it works great, and it is a wonderful parts pack. Yes it costs a lot, but if you were starting a Technic collection from scratch this one model would provide everything you need for years of building (except, strangely, wheels). The main con is that many people probably don't know what it is. This may be a positive depending on how much you like to fool your friends. So just how big is it? It was hard to take a picture next to another big model, but I managed one with the Unimog. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of The LEGO Group. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG.
  11. Which project do you think will be LEGO's choice for the Second 2017 Ideas Review? Likewise, what do you think LEGO's choice will be for the Third 2017 Ideas Review?
  12. INTRODUCTION The smallest of the 2018 sets, is the Hook Loader. A hook lift truck is a heavy duty truck that is fitted with a hydraulic hook lift hoist system. The hydraulic hook lift hoist system allows haulers to quickly change various types of roll off containers, generally designed for the transportation of materials in the waste, recycling, scrap and demolition industries. Probably due to intricate loading mechanism, we have seen many instances of hook lift trucks being built as Lego models, both officially from Lego, in a form of LEGO Technic Container Truck (8052) ... and lots of nice models from mocers. My personal favorite, is a Hook Lift truck model, made by Jennifer Clark. Note: Most images can be clicked for hi-res versions. SET INFORMATION Number: 42084 Title: Hook Loader Theme: Technic Released: 2018 Part Count: 176 Box Weight: 265 gr Box Dimensions: 15,5 cm x 13,9 cm x 6,8 cm Set Price (MSRP): € 12,95 Price per Part: € 0,073 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX Being a small set, it obviously comes in a small box. The box measures 15,5 cm x 13,9 cm x 6,8 cm which is obviously not very big. The weight of the box is approximately 265 grams. FRONTSIDE The front of the box shows our Hook Loader unloading its container, standing on rough dirt surface, with some blurred buildings in the background. The box also states that this model is for the age of 7 till 14. More importantly, the 2-models in-1 logo is clearly visible, which means this set can be used to build two different models. BACKSIDE The backside shows a picture of the alternate model, which is the Airport Fire Truck. The conversion arrow and the 2-in-1 are printed to clarify that the main model can be converted into a secondary model. One of the sides shows a picture of the main model, and one of the wheels in actual size. CONTENT OF THE BOX The box contains: 2 Instructions Booklet 2 Technic Panels 3 Bags INSTRUCTION BOOKLETS The instruction booklet for the main model: (both booklets came folded in the box) The instruction booklet for the alternate model: EXAMPLE OF RANDOM INSTRUCTION STEP PANELS Dark Bluish Gray Technic Panels haven't been sealed in plastic bags. BAGS Three bags containing the rest of the parts. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This section describes the new and/or otherwise interesting parts. Axle Pin 3L with Friction Ridges Lengthwise and 1L Axle in RED This 3L Axle Pin has never been released in red before for general public and easily obtainable. This year, it was released in 8 sets in this color, and it was also released in one set in 2017, The Nutcracker (Lego 2017 Employee Exclusive). Technic Panel Curved 3x11 in DARK BLUISH GRAY This Technic Panel 3x11 has never been released in Dark Bluish Gray before. This year, it was released in 3 sets in this color: Hook Loader, Mack Anthem and Rally Car. TIRES These 30.4 x 14 Tires aren't very rare. They appear in 79 other sets. We got four tires in this set. PART LIST This set contains 176 parts, shown below. THE BUILD The build is not very fun, and is pretty straightforward. FINISHED MODEL Here is the finished Hook Loader! Since it's a small model, i was on the fence about its look and functions. Seeing it's functions in real life takes every doubt away, they work flawlessly. More on functions later. On the other side, look is not on par with functions. Given the fact that the model has small number of parts compared to average Technic set, visual aspect of the model had to be affected. Overall, look is satisfactory if you keep in mind how basic the set is. It does look like a truck, and even has some amount of detailing like black parts to simulate windshield or grill. I don't like low ground clearance in the front, due to the steering mechanism, and back tires could be placed a bit toward the front, it would look more balanced. The model does not have stickers, and as a simple truck/construction machine, it is probably better this way. The chassis is pretty basic, with steering system and hook lift mechanism occupying central part of the chassis. LEFTOVER PARTS A few common leftover parts. FUNCTIONS Here's a short presentation showing the model's two functions. STEERING Steering is done via the 12 Tooth Double Bevel gear at the back of the cabin, it does not have steering wheel. The gear is easily accessible. The turning radius is quite big, which slightly reduces playability. HOOK LIFT Hook Lift mechanism is operated by black 12T Double Bevel gear, marked on the animation. It turns three 8t gears, which in turn moves the hook and container. Operation is smooth, it has some friction, but that helps the hook to stop in any position. Container has "rollers" at its end, so it can glide on flat surfaces. It also has a nice trick to keep the container from sliding left-right when loaded onto the truck. Namely it has 2L liftarm at the back, which is secured on one point. When the container is loaded on the truck, the liftarm slides/drops between the chassis' main frame and keep the container stable. Being the main function of the model, the hook lift part is done very well. SUMMARY I think this is one clever small set. Its target audience, kids, will love this set. It does look like a truck, and even better, it looks like a truck that is drawn and imagined by a kid, in a good way. I have a luck that i have my young relative with me, and he is very excited about this set. His favorite part about it...the hook lift mechanism, ofc. He enjoyed filling the container with bricks and plates, and move them to other location, watching it unload etc... Be careful, though, 1x1 parts can slip through container's floor. Side plus: I enjoyed being asked to explain many things on real life trucks to him...this set clearly boosted his curiosity. SCORE 6 DESIGN Simple colors works nice. Looks like a truck, but very basic. Overall good given the amount of parts. 6 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Nothing out of the ordinary. 9 FEATURES For its size, it has two great functions. 9 PLAYABILITY Kids love it! 7 PARTS Common parts and colors, two parts in new colors. 8 VALUE FOR MONEY I would buy this set for my young relative in no time. 7,5 Hook on! Thank you for reading. Hope you will find it useful.
  13. I never imagined I would say this, but as of today I am the proud owner of a Porsche 911 GT3 RS. How cool is that?! Waiting for this set to arrive seemed to take ages, so I was definitely on cloud nine when the set finally arrived. The 911 is one of the oldest sports cars on the market. It's lineage dates back to 1963, which is quite impressive! Since the production of the 911 there have been lots of different versions, like the Carrera, Carrera S, Targa, Turbo, R, GT1, GT2, GT2 RS, GT3 and GT3 RS. The GT3 RS can be easily recognized by the race-inspired inlets in the front wheel arches. Due to legislation there's a grill in the inlets. It can be removed during track days, which will improve the downforce. The LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS is a 1:8 scale model and is 17 cm high, 57 cm long, and 25 cm wide. It has been designed by Andrew Woodman and Uwe Wabra. When TLG started the initial drafts in 2013, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS project remained top secret. Therefore TLG had to build the first LEGO version using photos of the camouflaged prototype of the original from the internet. The first LEGO prototype was ready in a matter of weeks. Like every sports car with the Porsche emblem on the hood, the LEGO version of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS also combines design, performance, and functionality. Still concealed in black-and-white foil as a mystery model at the Nuremberg toy fair late January, the color of the characteristic bodywork has now been revealed and shines in bright orange. Thus, it corresponds to the special coating of the original sports car in lava orange authentically. With the right skills you can get the GT3 RS around the Nürburgring in 7 minutes and 20 seconds. Factory driver Brendon Hartley took it for a spin on the Nardo circuit in Italy. The video can be found here. When you talk about a genuine sports car, you immediately talk about performance, which is pretty impressive, to say the least. Let's take a look at the specs: Horsepower: 368 kW or 500 pk (at 8.250 rpm) 0 - 100 km/h: 3,3 sec 0 - 200 km/h: 10,9 sec Top Track Speed: 310 km/h or 193 mph Price: around 250.000 euro (no extras, Dutch price) If you are interested in buying (or configuring) your own 911 GT3 RS, you can click here and indulge yourself. Instead of buying or configuring we will be building a Porsche 911 GT3 RS today. That's something not a lot of people could say, until now! Although I must admit that even though this version is a fraction of the price of the real car, it still has a pretty heavy price tag. Forking out 300 euros for a collection of ABS isn't something everyone will understand. Before we start I like to point out some of the questions which have arisen. For example; why is this set rated 16+ while the Mercedes is 12-16 year? Is the price tag of 300 euros justified? Does this model replicate some of the real world mechanics? Does the luxury packaging add any value to this set? These are just some of the questions I will be answering in this review. This review will have a different setup than my regular reviews. Since this sets focuses on the entire experience instead of the model alone, I will try to share this experience in my review. Instead of opening the box, discussing the parts and taking you through the build, like I usually do, I like to focus on the different aspects of the set and model. When it comes to the model, I will try to compare it with it's real life counterpart. TLG made a teaser for this set using the word Ultimate. There will be little discussion about the real Porsche's association with this word. But will it's LEGO counterpart live up to the expectations?! I think it's time to move onto the interesting part and find out whether this LEGO Technic set also deserves the predicate Ultimate. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefor, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. Number: 42056 Title: Porsche 911 GT3 RS Theme: Technic Released: 2016 Part Count: 2704 Box Weight: 4,8 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 47,1 cm x 37,3 cm x 14,7 Set Price (MSRP): € 300 Price per Part: € 0,111 Links: Brickset, Bricklink Will this be a Limited Edition set? No, it will be as limited as other Technic sets. Which is also stated in the press release: The exclusive LEGO set of the exceptional sports car, which has been developed in close conjunction with Porsche AG, will initially be available at shop.LEGO.com from June 1st, 2016, as well as in the 13 LEGO stores throughout Germany and Austria. It will be available in other stores from August 1st, 2016. This means that when you are reading this review, the set is already available, which is usually not the case with other Technic sets. The box is a key feature of this set. Instead of a regular Technic box, this set is packaged like the 41999 - Crawler Exclusive Edition. The term Exclusive indicates that we are dealing with a special set, which is obviously the case for the Porsche as well. The following question (asked by JGW3000) is more than justified: Since the box presentation is a key feature of this set, perhaps Jim can comment on packaging and outer packing used to protect the box, so we can determine if we should go to a LEGO store or risk mail order in order to purchase this. In my Review of the 42043 - Mercedes Arocs I explained that my box was severely damaged. Obviously that's something you don't want to happen when you are buying a 300 euro Ultimate LEGO Technic set, with exclusive packaging. Lo and behold; the box arrived in pristine condition. The set box snugly fits inside the outer box, which avoids taking damage too easily. I am very pleased with the condition my set arrived in. I don't think getting the set in a physical store will guarantee a better condition. Thumbs up for shipping it this way. I hereby present, the Porsche 911 GT3 RS...in a box! It's way more luxurious than a regular LEGO box. Black and orange obviously work very well together. The bright color, combined with some post-crop vignetting really makes the Porsche stand out. I can honestly say that the box makes you anxious to open it. A LEGO box has seldomly made me feel more exhilarated before opening it. This is definitely a plus. This box is pretty big and feels massive. Since it's filled with additional boxes it feels very sturdy and doesn't dent easily. Since it's filled to the brim, the box isn't much larger than the box of the 41999. The width and height are the same. It's a bit deeper though, which can be seen in the image below. FRONT SIDE The front side of the box shows the model itself, along with the Porsche emblem and the set information. In case you are wondering what the 18 means in the upper right corner; that's not 18, but 1:8, the approximate scale of the model. It also states that this set is 16+, which is rather unusual. Hopefully we can answer Allanp's question at the end of this review: What makes this set carry the 16+ symbol? It isn't the largest or the most complex set to date, so why the 16+ age thing? BACK SIDE The backside of the box shows a top down view picture of the Porsche, along with four key features (interior, suspension, engine, upholstery). INSIDE The reason the box feels so sturdy is that it is literally filled to the brim. I can't think of any other Technic set which was filled like this. In the old days TLG used an inlay, but they never entirely filled a box like they did now. Showing the rims instead of packing them inside the box is a nice touch. The way the book and rims are being presented, is an indication that you are in for a treat. Another bonus is visible on the inside of the cover. It shows the history of the 911 from the original 911 (911) to the 2011 911 (991). The box contains: 1 x Book 1 x Sticker sheet 4 x Box with parts 1 x Box with rims and tires Each of the smaller boxes depicts what you will be building during that phase. I sure hope we will be building more than just an engine, seats, hood and a spoiler After discussing the box, the book definitely needs our attention. It's presented as the center piece of the contents and it's an absolute eye-catcher. The book packs a whopping 580 pages (including the front and back cover), which is unprecedented (not having seen the 2016 2H BWE instruction manual). Being designed as a coffee table book, it doesn't simply provide the building instructions. It also contains an abundance of historic information about the Porsche 911 and of it's LEGO counterpart's design process. Comments have been made that this book makes the set more expensive, which is debatable. Around 40 pages have been devoted to this additional information, which boils down to around 7% of the book. Maybe I'm simplifying the calculation, but this means this book can't be more than 7% more expensive than regular instructions would have cost. While we are on the subject of a coffee table book, TLG could have gone the extra mile and provide a hardcover book. This surely would have increased the costs, but you would get something in return. I'm not saying they should have, I'm saying they could have. Personally I think this book is fine, since it only contains about 7% additional information (concentrated at the beginning). It would have been a different case, if it contained more information throughout the book. Riffling through some pages of the book, we even see the previously mentioned Brendon Hartley making an appearance (top right image). The first step in the construction of your 911 GT3 RS is to build the drivetrain, complete with dual clutch gearbox (PDK), paddle shifters, suspension and the heart of the 911 GT3 RS, the 4.0 flat 6 engine. When you have completed all the steps in box 1 you will be able to test out all the functions and see how they work. Reading this means we are working on the fun part of the vehicle. Which immediately raises the question; is all the functionality of the car built during this phase? The first box contains 11 numbered bags. It even contains the new fender pieces, two printed and four unprinted. Will we be using these already in the first phase? Below are two images showing the new (and orange) parts contained in the first box. New pieces are the orange fender pieces, flex axles, the 3L axle with stop (color coded brown), new wheel hubs, changeover catches, suspension with red finish, panels and a tile with a unique code (supposedly to unlock online content). Instead of taking you through the build, I will discuss the different technical aspects of the real vehicle and compare them to it's LEGO counterpart. The single most interesting part about this set is the gearbox, which you start building early on. The picture below shows where the lever, to change the selected gear mode (Drive, Neutral or Reverse), will be placed (between the two blue 3L pins). As you can see, selecting Reverse simply changes the direction of the gears. Does this mean we have the same number of gears in Reverse as we have in Drive? Yes, it does! It’s the year 1983. In the new 956 Group C racing car, Porsche is putting a double-clutch transmission – Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) – through the rigors of motorsport for the first time. PDK offers a crucial advantage: the driver can keep the accelerator pedal depressed and change gear easily by using buttons on the steering wheel, even in the corners. This is how it works. PDK is essentially two gearboxes in one and thus requires two clutches. This double-clutch arrangement provides an alternating, non-positive connection between the two half gearboxes and the engine by means of two separate input shafts. During a gear change, therefore, one clutch simply opens and the other closes at the same time, enabling gear changes to take place within milliseconds. Highly responsive and particularly sporty. More information can be found here In the picture below we can see how TLG implemented the double clutch mechanism. There's a clutch at the top and one at the bottom. This is obviously a simplified interpretation of the real PDK. How about making your own four wheel drive Porsche? Does the transmission have an output that could be sent to the front easily, like 8448's (asked by Lego Nerd)? The red changeover catch is probably placed for stability (you will connect a liftarm to it later on), but it also provides a possibility to turn this into a 4WD car. Of course, you would need two additional differentials, one between the front wheels, and one in the gearbox between the front and rear axles. What's the point of having clutch gear inside all this? (asked by Allanp) Unlike in a real car, there's no stop after the highest or lowest gear, meaning that you can switch the car from 4th to 1st gear and from 1st back to 4th. That's one of the reasons the clutch gear is used, since the axles/gearbox will generate a lot of resistance/strain at some point. Another reason is that it's there to prevent possible damage to the gears if two speeds get temporarily engaged at the same time while rolling it. Or possibly if rolling in neutral and engaging drive while in first gear. Here's a video of the gear changing sequence. I have temporarily attached an axle to demonstrate the gearbox. Obviously you will not be shifting gears by turning a gear. You will be shifting this car, using the flappy paddle gearbox! How cool is that! The paddles are integrated in the steering assembly, which is shown below. The right paddle shifts the car into a higher gear, while the left one switches down. Here you can see the steering and shifting assembly attached to the chassis. The video below demonstrates shifting with the flappy paddles. Bear in mind that the subassembly is not yet properly secured, so there's some movement, which will be gone when the chassis has been finished. How am I supposed to shift gears by the way? As you can see there's no convenient position to operate the paddles. You need to grab the bushes and elastic bands to operate the gearbox. I can hardly imagine there's no better solution for this. Extending the axle by 1L would probably have done the trick. This feels somewhat cumbersome. The best solution would have been to design custom flappy paddles, but I understand this decision can't be taken lightly. What I don't understand is that TLG didn't provide an extra set of elastic bands. The bands will wear out after a few years on the shelf, rendering them useless. Providing a spare set would have been a nice gesture. Onto a more delicate matter. Some of you might have heard or read the rumors about this set being potentially flawed. Before jumping to conclusions, let's take look at the supposed flaws of the gearbox. First of all, the gear sequence is incorrect. Instead of switching from 1st to 2nd to 3rd to 4th, it's shifting from 1st to 3rd to 2nd to 4th. Say what?! I talked to Paul (Boratko, Crowkillers) about this possible issue, and without seeing any picture he immediately figured out that some of the gears must have been switched. As it turns out, there's indeed a mistake in the building instructions, or in the design, but I reckon it's not the latter. The video below demonstrates the incorrect sequence: I can (more or less) understand why this mistake has been made. What I can't understand is that this has not been caught before production. Quality control guys most likely aren't petrol heads, like some of the AFOLs. Let's take a look at what's wrong. On the left you will see the assembly when you follow the building instructions. On the right you see how it needs to be built. The grey 16T Gear and the black 12T Double Bevel Gear need to switch sides. the center gears are placed correctly. Here's a short video of how to apply the fix. The mistake has been made on page 267, 268 and 269 of the manual. So make sure to apply this fix when you reach that stage. After this fix, the sequence of the gearbox has been corrected. The gearbox is now shifting in the proper sequence, which can be seen in the following video: So it's all good now?! Well, not exactly. There's an even more pressing matter which we need to discuss. Occasionally the gearbox seems to stall completely. Take a look at the video and see what happens: Since you are not supposed to hook up a motor near the fake engine, the white clutch gear can't do it's job to prevent stalling. However, the main question is; why does the gearbox stall completely? And why does it stall so often? One of the reasons can be that the fins on the new red driving rings are slightly too thick. This will increase the change of the gears getting stuck. However, it happens quite often so I am not sure whether this is the case. The majority of the people building this set will probably never notice this flaw, since the clutch gear will hide the gearbox issues. But this set being The Ultimate, you'd expect the gearbox to function properly. The gearbox being the single most important technical function in the car, I am baffled by the fact that the mistake in the building instruction has not been caught, and that the actual gearbox itself seems to be flawed. Next time TLG better contact Paul before releasing another supercar This issue has been communicated to TLG, so let's wait for them to come with an official statement. Comparing the Porsche to the 42039 - 24 Hours Race Car we can see that the width from the end of the wishbones (where the ball joints connect) is 23L versus 19L. The Porsche itself is actually 4 studs wider than the 42039, two on each side. Compared to the steering assembly of the 42039. You notice the gear rack is much smaller, yet the turning radius is better. Two of half pins are limiting the turning radius of the Porsche. Removing them will slightly improve the radius, but the wheels might slightly touch the inside of the chassis, especially when the suspension is compressed. Here you can see the steering linkage, a pretty straightforward mechanism. Fitted as standard, the new rear axle steering with sport tuning combines performance and everyday driveability. An electromechanical adjustment system at each rear wheel enables the steering angle to be adapted based on the current driving situation, steering input and vehicle speed. The advantage for day-to-day driving: during low-speed maneuvers, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction to that of the front wheels. This has the virtual effect of shortening the wheelbase. The turning circle is reduced to make it easier to park. The advantage for sporty driving: during high-speed maneuvers, the system steers the rear wheels in the same direction as that of the front wheels. Driving stability is increased by the virtual extension of the wheelbase and agility is enhanced by the simultaneous steering of the front and rear axles, especially during overtaking maneuvers on the racetrack. One of the coolest feature about the real 911 GT3 RS is the fact that it has rear axle steering. It even alternates between steering modes! At low speed it counter steers (to improve the turning radius) and at high speed it steers in the same direction (to increase driving stability). That's so incredibly cool. And it's definitely something we expect to see in The Ultimate supercar TLG is releasing. Unfortunately they haven't. I am very disappointed to conclude that there's no real axle steering at all. Not even counter steering rear wheels, which would have sufficed. Obviously having both modes would be super duper awesome, but at least give us the counter steering mode. Not sure why TLG hasn't implemented this feature. They might have felt the need to do both of them. But omitting rear axle steering altogether is a huge letdown for me. RECTIFICATION I need to rectify something. According to this interview on the Top Gear site, Porsche vetoed the inclusion of the rearsteer. Obviously Uwe was able to recreate this mechanism. Makes you wonder why it wasn't included. This electronic active damping system offers continuous adjustment of the damping force on each wheel based on the current driving situation and your driving style. At the press of a button, you can select between two different modes. ‘Normal’ mode is designed for sporty driving on public roads and on wet racetracks. ‘Sport’ mode is specially tuned for maximum lateral acceleration and offers the best possible traction on the track. To continue with cool features, or letdowns, the 911 GT3 RS has, what's called PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). This basically boils down to ride hight adjustment, which is another potential cool feature to incorporate into the model. Unfortunately, like the rear axle steering, this feature has been omitted too. The engine of the new 911 GT3 RS sits just above the tarmac. At the rear end, of course. With its low center of gravity, it was predestined for motorsport. Indeed, this water-cooled six-cylinder unit with four valves per cylinder, VarioCam and dry-sump lubrication with a separate engine oil tank could not be more ideally equipped for its role. The engine draws its power from a capacity of 4.0 liters. This equates to a power output per liter of 92 kW (125 hp), and acceleration that simply knows no limits: the sprint from 0 to 60 mph is completed in a mere 3.1 seconds. The real Porsche has been fitted with a 4.0 liter 6-cylinder boxer engine, while its LEGO counterpart is fitted with a flat 6 engine. The difference between a boxer and a flat engine, is the movement of the pistons. The boxer engine has horizontally opposed pistons (when one piston moves in, the opposite piston moves out), while the flat engine has pistons on each side moving in and out simultaneously. More information about flat engines can be found here. Edit: Techniccrack pointed out that it's exactly the other way around. So the boxer engine has pistons moving in and out simultaneously. Thanks for pointing this out. While the engine in the LEGO version isn't realistically correct, I certainly don't mind TLG choosing this solution. It would have been cool to see new engine parts, but it's perfectly understandable that TLG used the currently available parts. After 323 steps (of 856) you have finished 38% of the model, resulting in the chassis. If there's no additional technical functionality (which seems that way) this means that 62% of the build consists of adding body and interior parts. Constructing the gearbox is interesting, but the overall build of the chassis is a bit underwhelming. The engine has been completely covered by panels and other parts, which is true to the original Porsche. But it does prevent you from seeing the pistons move at different speeds when shifting gears. The calipers are looking rather rectangular. Makes you wonder if it would have been better to use black parts combined with a rounded sticker. This would have reflected the actual shape better. Another option would be to create a custom part, but we obviously TLG can't keep designing new parts. It's cool that they included the calipers in the first place. The rear side has double shock absorbers, while the front uses a single absorber (per side). The back of the car is very heavy compared to the front, so this is good decision. Another aspect which has been discussed is the color vomit in the interior. I don't really mind using colors in the interior (like UCS Star Wars sets), as long as the different colors aren't clearly visible. Clearly visible are the blue pins (especially two of them in the gear box (D/N/R selector). Shouldn't these pins be black? More on this later. During production of the real 911 GT3 RS there is a stage called 'the marriage', where the drivetrain is connected to the body of the car. In this box you build the floor plan of the 911 GT3 RS, complete with seats and roll cage, before placing it over the drivetrain in a similar way to the production of the real 911 GT3 RS. The second box contains 9 numbered bags. The orange parts, including a 11L liftarm and axle connectors, which I already spotted in the Maze set. For me this was an indication that the Porsche would be released in Orange. The floor plan of the car is built separately from the car, in a modular fashion. Note that the body can't be easily detached from the chassis after completing the model, so it's not a real modular build. Here's a video demonstrating the marriage: After the marriage, and adding the seats, the car looks like this. At this stage you have completed 531 steps (of 856) or 62%. I really enjoyed building the second box. Placing the floor plan over the drivetrain is gives you a sense of building a real car. Clearly visible is the roll cage behind the seats. In box 3 you start to assemble the body of your 911 GT3 RS. Starting with the rear of the car and then onto the build of the iconic hood, now with distinctive shaping. Then it's the roof, again with distinctive shaping indicating the lightweight magnesium design only found on the newest 911 GT3 RS. The third box contains 4 numbered bags. Since you will be building the body, this box mainly contains an abundance of orange parts, including lots of panels. This set contains the full range of available panels in orange, except the 5x11 Panel. If I counted correctly this set contains 31 black, 59 orange and 2 grey panels, resulting in a grand total of 92 panels! It also includes 18 frames, which is quite a lot. At the end of box 3 you have finished 79% of the car (679 of 856). It is starting to look like a real Porsche! I absolutely love the new-ish 13x3 Curved Panels. They work really well on this model. Thumbs up for the part designer who designed this part! Now you build the front before adding the distinctive wheel arches with air outlets only found on the 911 GT3 RS. Next you add the massive, motorsport inspired, adjustable rear wing before finishing off your 911 GT3 RS by adding the doors and the exclusive wheels. Like box 3, this box also contains 4 numbered bags. Also containing mostly orange parts and panels. This leaves us with a finished car...okay, almost finished. Next stop, wheels & tires. 20 inches at the front axle, 21 inches at the rear axle. For a wheel size combination, that’s a first in the 911 model range. The larger footprint makes another improvement to dynamic performance. The wheels are made from a forged alloy and feature a platinum-colored paint finish. The central locking device bearing the ‘RS’ logo is derived from motorsport. Compared with the conventional five-bolt wheel connection, it offers enhanced performance thanks to the reduction in rotating masses. And, of course, it ensures a faster wheel change, which is vital when you’re in the pit and the clock is ticking. The tire sizes on the new 911 GT3 RS are nothing short of impressive: 265/35 ZR 20 on 9.5 J x 20 at the front, 325/30 ZR 21 on 12.5 J x 21 at the rear. The last box contains the rims and tires (stored inside the box). As you can see the LEGO wheels have the same size for both the front and the rear wheels. I think this is a perfectly understandable choice. Different sizes would have been hardly noticeable, but it would have added significant costs. Great thing about these rims is, that they are custom designed rims for the GT3 RS. Another great technical specification is that the offset inside the rims reflects the real rims, resulting in a better steering geometry. The printed RS emblems on the 1x1 tile add a nice touch. What size of construction can fit inside the new wheels for when making custom steering and suspension geometries? 5x3? 7x3? 7x5? How deep are they? (asked by Allanp) Can you tell me if they fit on the portal hubs? (asked by Zblj) Hopefully the following images will answer both questions. The portal hub is touching the rims, so it's not possible to fit them without spacers. The image below shows how far the frame is protruding from the rim. Let's talk rims and tires! From left to right (links to Bricklink for easy reference): 42039 - 24 Hours Race Car (and 10 others) 42000 - Grand Prix Racer or 8146 - Nitro Muscle 42056 - Porsche 911 GT3 RS 8674 - Ferrari F1 Racer 1:8 42030 - Volvo L350F or 8110 - Unimog or 76023 - Tumbler 8466 - 4x4 Off Roader or 5659 - Power Puller This picture shows which wheels will fit nicely under the new wheel arch panels. Front view of all the rims. As you can see the Ferrari F1 tires are slightly wider and almost the same height. The Ferrari tires have a slightly higher profile than the Porsche tires. Hopefully this image will give you some reference as to how the different rims compare to each other. This clearly shows the depth of the different rims. After adding the wheels, you have finished your very own Porsche 911 GT3 RS! Let me start by saying that I absolutely love the looks of this car. It sure is a 911 GT3 RS, no doubt about it. I have read some criticism that the car doesn't look good from certain angles. I beg to differ. Taking in account that we are still talking about a LEGO model, I think this car looks magnificent. There's a gap between the headlights and bumper, which people have complained about. Admittedly, it would have looked better when the transparent dishes would be positioned half a stud deeper and half a stud lower, but I'm not too bothered with it. Here are several pictures showing how the model will look after approximately 10 hours of building time. I love the front view of the car, with the black gear racks in the front bumper/spoiler. And I love how the hood worked out, but that's because I love them curved panels Back of the car looks pretty decent too, although I am not really sure about the rear lights. On the other hand; these kind of shapes are hard to capture in a Technic model. EXTRA FEATURES We have spoken about the technical functions of this model, but obviously there are some extra features as well. These are depicted in the picture below: Open hood/bonnet Open trunk/boot Open doors Adjusting the spoiler (regulate downforce) A bag for storing your racing gear COLORS Take a look at the image below to see some of the color choices TLG has made. What's catching our eye, is that the decision has been made to use a Black 2L axle in the door handle, instead of the usual red one. Kudos for TLG! However, in the rear wheel arch they used a tan frictionless pin and a blue friction pin. Maybe I am missing something, but why did TLG use the tan frictionless pin?! There are no rotating parts in that assembly? Furthermore; wouldn't it have been a great opportunity to use black 3L friction pins throughout the model. This would acknowledge the fact that it's a 16+ set and it would have made bodywork look way better. This would also solve the blue gearbox pins issue. And while we're at it, throw in black axle pins, as the icing on the cake. I understand the regular color policy, but this set being a 16+ set, and the Ultimate, and blabla, well....you catch my drift. 16+ AGE INDICATION This is the right moment to continue the discussion about the 16+ age indication. Asked by Allanp: What makes this set carry the 16+ symbol? It isn't the largest or the most complex set to date, so why the 16+ age thing? To be honest; I am not entirely sure. The build isn't that complex to justify the 16+ indication. My best guess it has something to do with the set being more of a display set than a play set. If it were a real 16+ set, all axles and pins would have been black and the instructions would have had a lot less steps. There's probably a good reason for it, but at the moment I can't explain why this set it 16+. COMPARISON WITH 42039 The picture below shows a comparison with the 42039 - 24 Hours Race car. While it's only 4L wider, you can see it's much longer. The next two pictures show the entire bill of material. A lot of discussion has been going on about the price. It is pretty steep, there's no denying that. But does this set justify spending 300 euros? I have tried to come up with a fair calculation, without any prejudice. Basically it's the same car as the 42039 (24 Hours Race Car), only bigger. Meaning it doesn't have Power Functions, Electronics or Pneumatics. Nor does it have an abundance of very special parts (some new molds and colors, which I will account for later). Both cars use lots of panels to make them look nice (don't get me wrong, I love panels). In my opinion a comparison with the 42039 is justified. I can even add the 42000 Grand Prix Racer to the equation. Also a car, more or less same scale as the Porsche, no Power Functions, Pneumatics, whatsoever. So let's do the math. The 24 Hours Race Car has an MSRP (Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price) of 100 euro (same goes for the 42000). The Porsche has an MSRP of 300 euro, which makes it three times more expensive. The 42039 has 1219 parts (1141 for the Grand Prix Racer), so the Porsche should have around 3657 (or 3423 parts). Let's take the average, round it down and make it 3500 parts. 3500 versus 2704 parts. Something doesn't add up. Why am I missing around 800 parts?! Based on the 42039 and 42000, a Technic set like this should end up with a price per part around 8,5 cents (the average of 8,2 and 8,8 cents). Meaning the Porsche should have cost around 230 euro, but it doesn't. So, the conclusion of this little calculation is that you are paying 70 euro for added value. What can be considered added value? A nice book, special box (and packaging), new rims, and an official Porsche license. I don't think that counting the book as added value is fair, since any set of around 3000 parts will have a pretty thick book. The book actually contains around 40 pages without instructions. So around 7% percent of the book is added value. This seems negligible when it comes to printing costs. This leaves you with the box (including extra packaging) and the license. We've probably all seen the video where you see the packaging process, which is mostly done manually. Let's say the box and extra packaging adds another 10 euro. Still 60 euro to allot. For those of you who haven't seen the video; LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS Sneak Peek from LEGO Factory in Kladno: Some new molds have been created (rims, fenders, panels) and a lot of parts in orange for the first time. Imagine this this eats up another 10 euro per set. This leaves you with 50 euros for the Porsche license. Maybe I underestimate the new rims/molds, booklet or packaging. That could very well be the case. But it's a fact that this model is relatively more expensive than the 42039 or 42000. Simple mathematics, no more, no less. I'll let you decide whether the added value is worth paying the extra bucks Almost at the end of my review, it's time to summarize how I feel about this set. Usually I am not overly critical. I acknowledge the fact that at the end of the day, LEGO is a toy. However, this is a different ball game. Being a 16+ set and TLG calling it The Ultimate made it clear that this set means serious business. UCS TECHNIC First of all I am really pleased to see TLG venturing into the Technic realms of what's commonly referred to as Ultimate Collector Series in the Star Wars theme. We've seen hints about this being the first in a new series, so I surely hope to see more models like the Porsche. UNBOXING EXPERIENCE When the set arrived I was on cloud nine. This is more than your run of the mill Technic set, so I was really excited to get building. This excitement continued during the unboxing phase. The box has a deluxe appearance and it's filled with nicely packed goodies. All in black and orange, which absolutely looks stunning. THE BOOK The books which has been included contains some cool additional information about the Porsche. Mainly before the start of the build though. The vast majority contains building instructions. Being a coffee table book, a hardcover would have been cool. It's no biggie that it's not though. THE BUILD The technical part of the build is concentrated in the first box, meaning that after 38% of the build you are done with the functional parts, leaving 62% of the build adding cosmetics. This is somewhat underwhelming. I really enjoyed 'the marriage' phase though, which gives you the feeling that you are actually building a car. TECHNICAL FEATURES Unfortunately, when it comes to technical accuracy there's a lot left to be desired. No active suspension management or rear axle steering. So two of the most interesting potential features have been omitted. Being the Ultimate it would have been cool to see both, or at least one of, these functions implemented in the model. GEARBOX The flappy paddle gearbox is supposed to be the star of the show. It's absolutely cool that TLG has implemented this feature. However, the mistake in the building instructions leaves you with an incorrect shifting sequence. This issue will most likely be corrected in a later version and/or an errata will be provided. I am not sure whether TLG will address the gearbox locking issue. This being a display model, I don't think this issue will be noticeable for the majority of the builders. The fact that Reverse has the same number of gears as the Drive mode is not accurate, but for me this is an acceptable choice. The flappy paddles could have been implemented in a way that you can actually operate the paddles, without touching the rubber bands constantly. PRINTED PARTS The RS 1x1 round tiles on the rims have been printed, which is nice! Makes you wonder why the 1x1 tile on the steering wheel (with Porsche emblem) hasn't been printed. It's plus that the wheel arches have been printed. This ensures the model still looking good after a decade on the shelf. At that time the rubber bands will be petrified and will most likely break when operating the gearbox. Therefor, it would have been great if TLG provided an extra set of elastic bands, for future use. PIN COLORS TLG has used a black 2L axle in the door handle, which definitely looks better than red ones. However, they haven't included 3L black pins. Instead they still used the blue ones. If you decide to use black 2L axles, why not use 3L black pins in several places. WOW FACTOR I showed it to some friends (non AFOLs) and the only interesting thing to show is the gearbox. Which actually doesn't really present well, since you don't see what's happening. You don't even see the pistons moving faster. Basically there's not much to demonstrate, other than it's an impressively big model. A very good looking, yet slightly boring, model. PRICE I have devoted an entire chapter on the price of this model, of which the conclusion was that you pay around 70 euros for added value. It depends on the type of LEGO buyer or builder you are (and the size of your wallet) whether this is justified. The price tag of 300 euro seems a bit steep for what you get in return, so I can imagine some of you will wait for a nice deal to emerge. CONCLUSION TLG definitely brings a unique experience, and I really like the looks of the model. However, the feeling that this "could have been" a better set predominates. That being said, I still think it's a must have for every LEGO Technic car enthusiast. It looks cool when you put it on display. And it offers lots of possibilities to modify. Or like brunojj1 phrased it: Seems to me like the Porsche delivers a perfect base for MODing and MOCing variations such as B-models or PF upgrades to make it a real ULTIMATE. If you are looking for the perfect set, you better look further. If you are looking for a unique Technic set with great potential, this is the set for you! ...and with this bombshell it's time to end Leaves us with the scores. 9 DESIGN This definitely is a 911 GT3 RS! 8 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Build itself is okay, the total experience adds a point. 5 FEATURES It lacks two functions and the major function is flawed. 6 PLAYABILITY This being a display model, it's virtually non-playable. 9 PARTS New rims, entire range of orange panels and new orange parts. 7 VALUE FOR MONEY Depends on your budget, purpose to buy it and other motives. 7,3 COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER I really wish TLG would have been more clear about the embargo rules. Pictures and videos were popping up everywhere on the Internet, while the review embargo stated the 1st of June. Additionally, the set already seemed to be available at some locations. Other than that, I still enjoyed the ride and I'd like to thank TLG for providing me this set! Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found in my album.
  14. REVIEW - HISPABRICK MAGAZINE KIOSK INTRODUCTION Last year I was asked if I wanted to be the Eurobricks person to maintain contact with HispaBrick Magazine. I had never met Lluis or Jetro in person, but of course I was eager to maintain our good relationship with this great magazine. Due to some random events, I got to meet both Lluis and Jetro in Billund last year (2017) during the LEGO Fan Media Days. Turns out they are just as annoy...uhmmm.....friendly as they are online It's nice to meet people with the same, or even more, passion for the LEGO brick as myself or our own Eurobricks members. This month marks the 10th Anniversary of HispaBrick Magazine and they decided to design a commemorative set for this event. Being the contact sometimes pays off, because I was asked if I was interested in reviewing the set. Of course I was excited to see what the set was all about and do a little review. It isn't the most elaborate reviews of all time, but it's written with lots of respect for the team behind HispaBrick Magazine. Before you dive in the review, here's the link to the topic about HispaBrick Magazine 030. SET INFORMATION Set number: 1001 Set name: HispaBrick Magazine Kiosk Number of pieces: 249 THE BOX The box show that it's the 10th Anniversary Set and apparently I am one of the 50 proud owners of this unique set. Unless all the boxes show 38 of 50 The back tells us a bit about the history of the magazine in Spanish and English and it shows us the complete part list of the set. CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1x Big bag filled with most of the parts. 1x Disclaimer note 1x Green 16x16 baseplate 1x Green 16x8 baseplate 1x Stickers sheet I wonder how HispaBricks customer service is?! Lucky for me, the set was 100% complete! The sticker sheet contains all the covers of the past magazines! How cool is that?! I do see a lot of familiar MOCs on those covers. I really love the one with that cool life sized Mindstorms Robot made by Jim from Eurobricks. Yeah, that's probably never going to happen SPECIAL PARTS The set contains three very special printed parts: The first HispaBrick Magazine printed, with the alien from the arvo brothers on the cover HispaBrick Minifig Torso HispaBrick 2x2 Tile PART LIST Here's the complete part list of all the bricks used in this set. Which more or less boils down to these parts: THE BUILD You start by building the kiosk booth, which shows a computer screen for the register and a wonderfully designed coffee machine. You can't read a great magazine without a great coffee to go along with it The roof of the kiosk is made by using an interesting building technique. You basically lay the two windows on the top of the building as a roof. They can be easily removed. There's a fresh coffee waiting for you on the counter. How about getting the latest edition of HispaBrick Magazine and reading it on the bench next to the kiosk. The backdoor of the kiosk...."Employees Only"! This lovely set doesn't consist of the kiosk alone. You can also rent a bike. And you don't even need to go to a front desk, it's fully automated. Connecting the bike to the rack is very cleverly done, using the Technic plate with hole to connect to the headlight part of the bike. COMPLETED MODEL Taddaaaa....the completed model. I haven't used the stickers on the two magazines, because I wanted to keep the sheet as new. The photographer is reading the latest edition... ...while the girls is fooling around with her skateboard. Isn't this the cutest set ever. I really like it and it will definitely look good in a bigger LEGO city display. One final shot of the set. CONCLUSION I like to express my special thanks Jetro and Lluis for sending me this set. I absolutely love it and I am very proud own it, and to have contributed to the the 10th Anniversary of HispaBrick Magazine. I wish you guys all the luck in the future and hopefully I will be writing another review in 5 or 10 years. Take care!
  15. Lego City. It's a dangerous town. It may seem all happy and colorful at first glance, but if you've lived there as long as I have, you'd know that it's a dirty cesspool of crime and corruption. It seems like there is a bank robbery, jail break, or fire every day. The police refuses to use guns and seems to be more concerned about getting haircuts than fighting crime, so they're not really helping. And ever since candy got outlawed, several smuggling circles have cropped up all over town. This city has gone to the dogs, and that's why I decided to become a private eye, to solve the crimes that the bumbling police force can't. It was a cold afternoon. I was sitting in my office, lost in thought. Only a few rays of light entered through the windows into the dark and dusty room. There were various letters and documents scattered across my desk. I was working on a case that I had been working on for months. I was trying to find a criminal who had been eluding authorities for a while. The wanted poster hung on the wall behind me, but the description on it was very vague and since everyone has the exact same face and body type in Lego City, it was nearly impossible to find him. I was getting hungry, so I reached into my own secret stash of cookies and started eating one. "Who could outlaw something that tastes so good," I thought to myself. In that moment, there was a knock on the door. I quickly hid the cookie under the desk and said: "Come in." The door slowly opened and a woman in a red dress and long, wavy hair entered the room. The dim light from the window glistened on her smooth yellow skin. She had a big smile on her face, but by the look in her dark, round eyes, I could tell that she was troubled. "Are... are you Oky Brickman, the private detective?" she asked hesitantly. "Yes, I am, ma'am," I responded, "please, have a seat." The woman in red closed the door behind her, walked across the room, and sat down in the chair in front of me. There was a moment of silence, then I said: "So, what can I do for ya?" She paused as if to think about how best to start, then replied: "Well, you see... There is a new Lego set coming out soon, 10246 Detective's Office, the 10th addition to the modular buildings series, and I am very interested to get it, but I am not sure if it lives up to the standard of the other modular buildings. So, I was wondering if you could review it for me and find out if it's worth the price." I was perplexed. This was not what I was expecting to hear, but I was intrigued. "I see," I said slowly, "that is quite a tough situation you're in." I paused dramatically, then I said, "Alright, I'll do it." "Oh thank you, Mr. Brickman! I will see to it that you get a copy of the set and will reward you handsomely if you succeed." She got up and left, and sure enough, one week later I received a package at my doorstep with the Lego logo on it... Set Number: 10246 Name: Detective's Office Theme: Advanced Models Subtheme: Modular Buildings Year of Release: 2015 Pieces: 2262 Minifigures: 6 Price: $159.99 USD S@H description: S@H Bricklink Brickset Box The box is about the same size as the other modulars, but it has a slightly new design. Note the new five-brick "Expert" logo in the top right corner as well as the three small images underneath it showing the back of the building, its sections, and its width. These are quite useful for seeing more views of the set without having to look on the back of the box, although they do take away some of the space for the box art. Like with the Parisian Restaurant, there are several small close-ups of the set on the back as well as a large picture with the Detectives Office displayed next to the last two modulars. I especially like the pictures of the pool room and the rooftop where Ace Brickman is peeking around the corner to spy on people. The rooftop picture is particularly humorous as it seems that Ace has climbed on the outside of the railing in order not to be seen. This detective will apparently do anything to solve a mystery, no matter the risk! This modular building is unique in that there is an actual story going. This set is set in the prohibition era, but since TLG doesn't want to promote alcohol, they replaced booze with candy, which is a pretty clever idea, even if a bit unnecessary considering this set is aimed at adults. I recommend watching the for this set to learn more about the story from the designer himself. The top of the box features a parts inventory and a 1:1 picture showing the newspaper vending machine for scale. On the bottom of the box, there is just a small version of the picture from the front of the box, a Lego Club ad, and the usual fine print. Nothing interesting here. As you can see, the right side of the box I received got a bit damaged on the way from Denmark unfortunately, but it's not too bad. Here you can see a picture of all the minifigs with various accessories. Quite a nice little scene that shows you what items are included in the set. On the other side, there is yet another instance of the box art with the name of the set in six different languages. It's interesting to know that the word "detective" is more or less the same in most languages. Contents Inside the box there are 18 bags of varying sizes, each numbered 1, 2, 3, or 4, with the larger bags having more, smaller bags inside of them. That's a lot of bags! The fact that all these pieces are split into only four sections is what makes this an advanced build, I assume. Unfortunately, the box wasn't the only thing that was damaged. The large bag with the number 2 and one of the small bags inside of it had a small rip right across the middle of them, so there were three loose pieces inside the box. Fortunately, nothing was missing, but it is disconcerting nonetheless and I hope this is an isolated incident. How this happened is a mystery that only a detective like Ace Brickman could solve. Also included in the box are the instruction booklet, an dark gray 8x16 plate, and a 32x32 baseplate in reddish brown which is the first appearance of this part in that color. That's right, no stickers! Following the example set by the Parisian Restaurant, all decals in this set are printed! Let's hope they continue this trend in future modulars. Here is a picture of a random instructions page. The part call-outs usually feature several different pieces at a time. There is a new feature where all the parts that are added during each step are outlined in red. Some may say that this makes the build less challenging, but I think it is quite helpful on such a large and complex model. I hope they use this feature in future sets, at least the big ones. Minifigures There are six minifigures in this set, all with the classic smiley head. First, there is Ace Brickman the detective. He comes with a fedora and a magnifying glass. His torso is J. Jonah Jameson's with yellow hands. Then there is Al the barber. Him and Ace are the first two named characters in the modular building series! He comes with the new scissors which also appear in some 2015 Friends and Elves sets. We have seen his torso in other D2C sets before, such as the Palace Cinema and Fairground, but they suit him very well. Next, there are the dart player and pool player. The dart player comes with a red baseball cap and cleverly uses Indian feathers as darts, while the pool player uses a 4L bar as a pool cue. Then there's the female cop who comes with her police hat. She uses the same torso as Ma Cop. I like to think that this is Ma Cop when she was young. And then there is the woman in red who doesn't really come with an accessory. As you can see, only half of them have back printing, and very minimal ones at that, but that's ok. Build The first section of the build focuses entirely on constructing the pool hall which is apparently called "The Highlander", so there are a lot of tan, gray, brown, and green pieces. This set is clearly inspired by film noir movies (hence my intro story), so it makes sense to start with one of the most common settings of that genre. Here are some of the notable pieces from these bags. We get two 4x4 domes in dark green and one of those little clip pieces in pearl gold. There are also a few printed pieces such as the two windows with the name of the pool hall, a new dart board, and one of those 2x2 tiles with a red star and a golden brick on it which appeared previously in the Palace Cinema (and an exclusive Legoland set). There is also a new round tile in white with a stud in the middle. There are two of these pieces in this set, both of which are used as table cloths, and they will undoubtedly be useful for sets and MOCs in the future. At step 6 of the build, most of the sidewalk and pool hall floor is finished. The mix of dark colors for the floor looks great and I like how they included dispersed studs among the tiles so that you can position minifigures around the room. Or maybe they just didn't want to include any dark tan tiles other than 1x2s and 1x6s. Ten steps later, the pool table, dart board, and trophy cabinet are constructed. The pool table is not quite as good as some MOCs I have seen, but I do like the SNOT technique they used and it looks decent enough. At the end of section 1, the pool hall is complete. Please ignore my building mistake on the awnings. I only realized after taking this picture that they should be built one stud more outward. This is the first time the Mixels joints have been used as decorative elements and they work quite well. Unfortunately, this is just a pool hall and not a pub, so there is no bar which is a shame, but I guess it makes sense with the whole no-alcohol thing. Some minifigures might be upset about this though. The bags with the number 2 contain the rest of the pieces for the ground floor. There are lots of nice dark blue bricks along with some gray, white, and black parts. You get two cookie and three swirly mint tiles in these bags which have appeared in Seasonal and Friends/Princess sets before. There are also three of those cupcake tops in dark pearl silver and a fez in white which are rare in these colors. I was happy to see that you get three of the new scissors piece in this set! The white rectangle on the right is the new mirror element. It's on a sturdy cardboard and has protective sticker. Now we begin constructing the barbershop. At step 31, the tiling is finished, and you can already see the barrel of candy hidden under the stairs. A few steps later, the interior of the barber shop is taking shape. There is a cabinet, a sink, an old-school barbers chair, and two manikin heads with different hair styles on them. Now we know where Luke Skywalker and Doc Ock get their hair done! By step 45, most of the barbershop is done, and it seems that young Ma Cop couldn't wait her hair done. I don't blame here; after all, this is the first Lego barbershop we've ever gotten! And as you can see in this picture, the mirror is fully reflective. It's not a sticker, so it just held in place by those grooved plates. It's the best mirror that we've ever gotten in a set and I'm sure mirrors like this would be very popular in other sets, especially ones aimed at girls. At step 57, the ground floor is nearly finished. Only a few objects are missing on the side walk which will be added later. After this section, the step numbering starts over at 1 for some reason. The barbershop looks great, especially the cleverly constructed sign with the scissors and the brick-built lettering. The little bench and the barber's pole are nice details as well, even though the stripes on the latter are horizontal instead of diagonal. On the back, there is a grate with some foliage and a trash can. Also, a partial roof has been added to the pool hall which is separately removable. In the bags for section 3, there are tons of great nougat-colored brick-bricks and bricks in two shades of light blue. If you're a collector of rare bricks, this is worth getting the set for right here. There are also several printed pieces here. There is the window with the Ace Brickman writing, a wanted poster which is so humorously vague that it could be about pretty much any minifigure, the usual Lego newspaper which is apparently still running the story about "the greatest LEGO hero ever", a street level map which first appeared in Shredder's Dragon Bike set (which is fitting since the map in that set depicted a part of New York City, which could very well be the location of the Detectives Office as well), a painting with a sail ship, a $100 bill, and several letters, one of which is the old-school kind with a heart stamp. We also get the paint roller handle in black for the first time and an unprinted white R5 head. The second half of the build begins with the floor for the 1st floor. Then you start constructing the staircase and bathroom. The R5 head is used as the toilet bowl. As C-3PO would say: "How perverse!" At step 28, the bathroom and hallway section of the building are finished. The paint roller handles have been cleverly used as curved lamp posts. Now we finally get to the most important part of The Detective's Office - the actual detective's office! At step 32, most of the furniture has been constructed, including a messy desk, a file cabinet, a safe, a coat hanger, and two chairs. There is also a flower pot on the fire escape balcony with three differently colored flowers. At the end of this section, the first floor is complete, minus the Pool sign which will be added at the end of the build. The detective's office looks great. It looks just like something out of a film noir flick or something like Who Framed Roger Rabbit. The back is a bit plain, but there are still a few details to keep it interesting such as the flowers on the window sill. Then we add it to the building and the build is 3/4 complete. The last few bags contain the pieces for the kitchen, rooftop, and anything else that's still missing. Most of the parts are gray, but we also get a few more of those nice light blue bricks. We get three more newspapers and cookies in this section, as well as a printed clock. Also included are the 2x2 L-tile and round tile with center hole in red which are used for the letters on the Pool sign. There is also an inverted 2x2 dome in red and two more unprinted R5 heads, one in orange brown, and another one in white. The most unusual parts here, however, are four dark gray Unikitty tails and that stud with a hole that usually holds her horn in black. Don't worry, no Unikitties were harmed in the making of this building. With the new red tiles, you can spell all kinds of words! Mostly silly ones though. The build of this floor starts out very similar to the last one, except this one has an extra hole for the skylight. The numbering of the building steps resets again. I guess they wanted to have separate sets of steps for each floor. At step 15, most of the interior of the kitchen is done and the cat is already after those cookies! It's interesting to note that the banister of the staircase is built the same way as the one on the first floor. Nice consistency there. Four steps further into the build, the blue part of the walls is finished and topped off by a bunch of gray jumper plates. The rest of the walls is built at a half-stud offset to create the protruding arches. At step 30, the kitchen is done and the construction of the detective office's rooftop begins. Ten steps later, the third floor is finished. There is a very clever use of Hero Factory hands as roofline decorations. Once again there are flowers on the window sill on the back, and it's nice to see the watertower is brick-built using tank treads. Next, you build the roof of the kitchen. This is a fairly simple and quick build, although is still some neat SNOT building going on with the Unikitty tails. When we add them all together, we are almost done! It's already looking quite impressive. Once we add the Pool sign, newspaper vending machine, the tree, and the lamp post, the set is finally complete. And what a fine set it is! Like all modulars, the building stands quite tall and is gorgeous to look at from most angles. Looking at it from the front, there are many great details to look at. It definitely looks like the type of building you would see in one of the large American cities such as New York or Los Angeles which are typically the setting for detective stories. All the different colors make it look fun, but still realistic and aesthetically pleasing. The left side of the building, however, is admittedly not that nice to look at. there are two gray and two black spots on the wall that stick out like a sore thumb, but are necessary for the interior. However, if you connect this building to one of the other modular buildings, I suppose you won't see them anyway. The back of the building looks nice and colorful like the front. I especially like how the profile bricks add some nice texture to the walls of the hallways and detective's office. The right side of the building looks a bit better than the other side, even though there are some white, gray and black spots here too, but those can just be chalked up to flaking paint. Spare Parts After the build, there are quite a few pieces left over, mainly the usual bits and bops, plus the obligatory brick separator. Play Features Since there is a story being told, there are lots of play features in this set. It begins in the kitchen where the smugglers make the candy. There is an oven with a stove, a rolling pin, and a cupboard with a pot. The only problem is that the rolling pin is much too big for the small 2x2 tables in the kitchen, but oh well. Then, they can bring the barrel with the candy down to the back alley where they can open the grate with the foliage and push it into the barbershop. By the way, the instructions tell you to put the red hat into the trash can here, so perhaps this is meant to be a clue for the detective to find. In the barbershop, the stairs can be lifted up to play inside. Here, Al can open the secret passage behind his cabinet, take in the candy barrel, and open another little secret door under the stairs to move the candy to the pool hall. The stairs in the little alleyway between the barbershop and pool hall can be removed in order to easily move the barrel from one room to the other or to simply hide it there. Lastly, the minifigs in the pool hall can slide the black board under the trophy cabinet aside thanks to a clever SNOT technique and bring the candy inside through the secret hole. Brilliant! On the other side of the pool hall there are clips for holding the cues and darts. There is also a well constructed ceiling fan that uses snowshoes for blades and can swing to the side to access the interior. I really like the rooftop as well. It looks just like the type of rooftop you'd see on a building in New York or some other big city. In fact, I could easily picture some of the superheroes from NYC leaping across it, like Spider-Man or the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, so this set has some re-usability in those themes. The skylight can be fairly easily removed to look inside the detective's office. This is where the smugglers check to see if Ace is in his office or not. The newspaper vending machine can be opened to take one newspaper out. There is another one in there, but it's stuck to the back of the machine. The detective's office itself is not without play features either. There is a secret hiding spot behind the painting which can be swung to the side to reveal it. On the other side of the room, there is a coat hanger for Ace to hang his hat on and a safe to hide money in. There is also a fire escape ladder on the side of Ace Brickman's office which can be lowered by pulling a tab that holds it in place, but it only reaches down halfway and makes it impossible for anyone on the second floor to climb down when it's lowered. Not the best design, but I appreciate the attempt. In the hallway outside of Ace's office, there is a potted plant. Not really a play feature, just a neat little detail in my opinion. The bathroom is confined to a 3x4 studs space and isn't even fully enclosed, but they managed to cram a lot of details in there. Aside from the pull-chain toilet, there is also a roll of toilet paper and even a tiny sink. That's about it. Now that I have fully examined this set, it's time to write my report for the woman in red. Ratings Design: 5/5 - The building looks absolutely fantastic. It is very reminiscent of those old detective movies as it has many of the typical elements from those films. The colors are fun, but still somewhat realistic, and the walls have a nice texture to them. There are lots of clever details all over this set. Build: 5/5 - The building is so asymmetrical that the build never gets repetitive. There are some uncommon techniques and the fact that the bags are split into only four groups makes it challenging. And the new red outline for newly added pieces in the instructions are helpful. I had a lot of fun building this. Minifigs: 4/5 - The minifigures are nothing all that special, but that's to be expected. They do come with some rare torsos and hairpieces and there is a relatively high number of them, so as far as minifigures in modular buildings go, they are pretty good. Playability: 5/5 - This set has more play features than any of the previous modulars. I love the fact that they came up with a story for this set and designed the building and play features around it. This set has so many hidden compartments and moving stairs that it could rival any Hogwarts castle! Parts: 5/5 - Like every modular, this set has many bricks in new and/or rare colors such as light blue. It also has a brown baseplate, lots of those brick-bricks, and even some new molds like the scissors and that 2x2 round tile with only one stud. Plus all of the decals are printed! Price: 4/5 - 2262 pieces seems a bit low for the price considering the Parisian Restaurant had over 200 pieces more, but I'd still say it's a fair price for a model of this size. Overall: 5/5 - This is my first modular building, so I can't really compare it to any of the nine that came before it, but on its own it's great in my opinion. In fact, it made me want to start collecting this series. I would recommend anyone to add this to their collection right away, whether you already have the other modular buildings or are a newcomer to this line like me, especially if you are a fan of mysteries. So there you have it. I hope you enjoyed this special Academy review as much as I had fun making it. Big thanks to Lego and the EB ambassadors for giving me this opportunity. The Detective's Office is now available at S@H and Lego Brand Stores, so go and get your copy today! By the way, Homer Simpson is not the only minifigure who is upset about the pool hall...
  16. Review: 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Name: BMW R 1200 GS Adventure Number: 42063 Theme: Technic Year: 2017 Pieces: 603 Price: Euro 49.99€, AUD $89.99 Brickset: Extra Info Technic Early 2017 Review Series Welcome to the fifth in my batch of 2017 Technic reviews! I was offered all the small sets early 2017 for review late last year... but I ended up getting them all! Thus I have a lot to review. I've been doing them in parallel and changing my process as I go so hopefully the latter ones will end up being the best. On that angle I'll probably retcon some of the earlier reviews if I improve my process. Due to this remember that I'm happy to take extra photos or provide extra info on request, and anything especially good will be added to the main body of the review. Do note though that sometimes the model may no longer exist if I have have made an alternate. On the subject of alternates, I will be making the alt model, if I have the instructions, think the model is worth making, and I have the time. Also I'll show mid stage construction only if I think it's relevant. Thus don't ask for construction photos or alt models if they aren't part of the review.... I am prepared to extract parts for detail photos though. Photos will all be hosted on Flickr so larger versions are available, and relevant videos will be on YouTube and linked to from here. I don't edit photos much; very rarely I'll crop one and almost never will "correct" them so the photos should be as natural as possible. I will try to not be repetitive; thus it's worth reading my other reviews. For example I'm not going to complain too much about the digital instructions; I'll try to complain about new things, or maybe not complain at all! Here's all the other reviews of H1 2017 Technic... 42057 Ultralight Helicopter 42058 Stunt Bike 42059 Stunt Truck (and 45058/42059 Combiner) 42060 Roadwork Crew 42061 Telehandler 42062 Container Yard 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure 42064 Ocean Explorer 42065 Tracked Racer Mucho multi thanks to the EB LUG Ambassador CopMike and the LEGO CEE Team and Designers for allowing me to review these sets for Eurobricks. So onto the review! Packaging Front.... ...back.... ...top. The combiner is interesting in this one so I did make it. Unboxing Standard punch box. Instructions and wheels were loose. Instructions are provided for both models, and the quality is excellent with thick bound covers. The build is not sectioned. Aside from the anniversary piece there isn't anything new here, but the panels used for the side and the windscreen are new colours, and more importantly the wheels are in black at last. Parts list. Random instruction page. Build This is the lower frame with the engine and driveshaft joined. This is the bottom of the bike; the anniversary piece and the central gear are viewable in the finished model. It's done! Spare parts. This 600 part set, vs the 250 part 42007 (orange bike), but obviously it's not that much bigger. ('cos it's got the same wheels.) All those parts are just to make the bike better! (Black bike is a MOC. Not being reviewed.) Ahhhgh! Someone dropped my bike! While it's down you can see the frame shown earlier. The gear is there partially so you can spin the drivetrain, although it is functional as well. (Be careful to pick it up with your legs not your arms; these things weigh around 250kg.) Unflattering cam. Even with the extra parts it still suffers the curse of most Technic bikes; near transparency. Doesn't bother me, but it's a common complaint. What does however bother me is the exhaust; it's on the rear swingarm and is thus suspended. This was probably a compromise due to the already complicated rear, but it's just weird. (And incorrect.) The front suspension is mostly correct; telelever or something close anyway. What am I on about? OK.... ..look here. Most motorcycles have a shock either side of the front wheel, but many (not all) BMW ones have what they call Telelever, which put simply is a variant of double wishbone suspension. It has many advantages on paper but this discussion is beyond the scope of this review. Now look here! I'm no expert (not modesty!) but it's in the ballpark. The first time in an official set I believe. OK, let's put the stickers on now... on a side note I find it funny how the designers needed to widen the cylinder head to give it the correct BMW look that causes so many debates about leanability... but I digress again. Each box gets branded, but the model doesn't use the stickers for shape or even panel blending. You can also see here how relatively compact the shaft drive is. (First time in a set also?) Lack of rear brakes is disappointing though. No controls this time. The Technic front fairing is simple but it works well IMHO; these kind of fairings are rather hard to do well. (I cheated and used system on my own MOC.) Going nowhere fast it seems. The boxes come off without too much damage... which highlights that the rear suspension needs better pre-load adjustment (haw, haw, haw) as it's really not strong enough for this model unless it's going luggage free. (I think it's OK in the front.) Maybe it's time LEGO made a really hard spring... To my surprise they open too, which took some creative pin usage. Functional video. Future Bike Concept (B Model) Well for a start, it gets full points for building something very different in a licensed model! To be honest I didn't want to make this, but.... ...I then saw how nice the presentation of it was in the instructions. So I ended up making this first. It uses most of the parts... ...and even gets it's own sticker! (The un-used one.) I didn't realise this until I finished the A model. On a related but negative note, it assumes you have not used the stickers yet, but I don't think it would look bad if you had already applied them The functions are a rotating and angling rear thruster, steering vanes and folding wings. It's best to watch a video. While I do think it's a cool model with decent functionality... I just don't get it. Internal combustion engine in a flying bike? That kinda negates the possibility of Star Trek style tech so how does it take off? The thruster is too far back.... Nor does it lift enough to be an effective force in forward flight. Looking at the art and the front I suspect they wanted to work in the second wheel, but ran out of parts. The steering vanes are pretty cool though. The landing function is good however. The stand makes heavy usage of the pannier parts, which leaves me wondering if the panniers were added to make the B Model better! (I'm out of stuff to say about the B model, but there's plenty more photos on Flickr.) Ratings Function: BMW bikes are a good choice for LEGO as they are very different and give a chance to make a different model. (I hope though that they'll do other licenses.) As bikes go this is an excellent set, adding panniers and an interesting B model pushes this set to top gear. 10/10 Parts: A good blend of parts, although the panniers are not terrible exciting. 9/10 Price: Yeah, it's more expensive than I'd like, but it's licensed and would have taken a lot of work. 8/10 Accuracy: Ignoring the B model, the only flaw is the exhaust placement. 9/10 Fudge: Motorbikes + Technic? What a winning combination. 10/10 Overall: Ride out and get one! 9/10
  17. REVIEW - 42069 - EXTREME ADVENTURE INTRODUCTION It's time for yet another review. This review will handle the second most expensive set of the 2H 2017 wave, the 42069 - Extreme Adventure. It represents a Land Rover like vehicle with a modified undercarriage. This vehicle has link treads instead of wheels. I am not the biggest fan of link treads, unless the vehicle is full RC. This is because treads limit the playability, especially on smooth surfaces. This is actually the first Technic set with rubber inserts, so I am eager to find out if they will improve playability. I couldn't help but think how this model would look with wheels on it. At the end of this review I will be attaching several different types of wheels, so you can check out for yourself. PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by the CEE Team of TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 42069 Title: Extreme Adventure Theme: Technic Released: 2017 Part Count: 2382 Box Weight: 2,79 kg (approx) Box Dimensions: 58,0 cm x 37,4 cm x 9,8 Set Price (MSRP): € 139 Price per Part: € 0,058 Price per kilo: € 49,8 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX The box is as wide as the box of this year's flagship (42070 - 6x6 All Terrain Tow Truck). Since it is less deep and high it doesn't look a lot smaller. You can't judge a book by its cover and sometimes you can't judge a set by the box! This set contains 520 more parts than the 42070 (2382 versus 1862). The part count obviously isn't the most important factor, but it doesn't happen often that a non-flaghip set has the most parts. The snow does a good job of making the model stand out. BACKSIDE There is barely enough space to show all the functions of the main model. The B-model looks more like a Research Exploration Vehicle than the one used in the 42070. It is called Mobile Base Vehicle though. The base seems to be detachable and it even packs a crane. It does help when the designer of the main model is one of the best B-model designers CONTENTS OF THE BOX The box contains: 1 Book and Sticker Sheet (packed together) 20 Bags (unnumbered) BOOK AND STICKERS THE BAGS No loose parts, just 20 unnumbered bags. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS PURPLE PARTS A modest collection of new purple parts. We already got some 3x13 Curved Panels in the 42048 - Go Kart in 2016 and now we can work with the parts below as well. Hopefully TLG will release sets with the bigger panels in purple, so we can all start building a purple Porsche SILVER RIMS Eight Wheel 18mm D. x 14mm with Pin Hole, Fake Bolts and Shallow Spokes in metallic silver have been provided in this set. That is quite a few, considering the fact that they only have been released in two sets, where you got one and two of 'em respectively. Sorry for the unsharp picture btw. 6x3 PANEL IN DBG For the first time this panel has been released in dark bluish grey. 40 YEAR ANNIVERSARY BRICK This set also contains the 3L liftarm, also known as the 40 Year Anniversary brick. PERPENDICULAR 3L CONNECTOR WITH CENTER PIN HOLE It has been a while since we have seen this in yellow. As a matter of fact I only owned two of these from last year's (2016) Volvo EW160E. Always funny that some common parts are actually not so common at all. Glad to see these making another appearance, much like the red #3 connector. RUBBER TREAD LINK ATTACHMENT These attachments already appeared in two Nexo Knights sets and now they make their first appearance in a Technic set. You get 52 attachments. In the Factory Store in Legoland Germany you can buy bags with these attachments, where each bag contains 28 of 'em. This is how such a bag looks like. SUSPENSION Not a very special part, but I still wanted to highlight the fact that you get six shock absorbers, four soft ones and two hard ones. Two of the soft ones will be used to dampen the door opening mechanism. ROPE This set contains a new rope. It has kind of a metallic touch to it. It is slightly thicker than the regular rope. Thumbs up for this new version. It looks and feels a lot better. (ctrl+c, ctrl+v from the 42070, which contains the same rope) 11L AXLE LBG Seemingly ordinary, so I almost forgot to shoot a picture of it, but this set introduces the 11L Axles in light bluish grey. Also found in this year's 10257 Carousel and 75172 Y-Wing Starfighter. Strange enough TLG introduced the 11L Axle in yellow first. DARK GREEN JUMPER PLATE Also a quite common part, but released in a new color, a dark green 1x2 Jumper Plate. PART LIST This set contains 2382 parts, spread out over two pages. THE BUILD Time to get building! This set contains 10 u-joints and in case you are wondering where they are going?! You already need four of 'em early on, in the middle of the chassis. After some additional building steps, you will be attaching the V8 engine to the chassis. It's very cool that this model has V8 engine, instead of a V6. Or even worse...a 4 cylinder engine. Thumbs up. You can also see the first few purple parts invading the model. As opposed to All Terrain Tow Trucks, we actually do find a winch at the front of this vehicle. How on earth would you go on an Extreme Adventure without a winch?! It has a cool lock which is made, using a simple Rubber Double Axle Connector. It has enough leeway to unlock the winch and it bounces back into place upon release. A very simple, yet very effective mechanism. The front of the vehicle shows the initials MR, which stands for Milan Reindl. Milan is one of the members who made the switch from Eurobricks to TLG, so it feels extra special to be reviewing one of his sets. I sure hope that Milan isn't in charge of designing the stickers though, because there are quite a few MR stickers on this model Here you can see the start of the door opening mechanism. The rotating axles will be connected to springs, to provide some cool damping when opening the doors. The axles are connected to the soft springs. This results in the need to apply some pressure when opening the doors, but when you have passed a certain point, the doors will ease out. Yet another thumbs up for this mechanism. Have we lost count of the thumbs up already?! Another cool feature is the roof that can be tilted up and down. It is operated by the mini Linear Actuator, connected to the liftarms. I will show the entire mechanism in a bit. Several steps further the doors have been attached and you have created the rear side compartments. This model has a ton of cool little details... ...which you see in the image below. Both side compartments contain a fire extinguisher and one the compartments even contains a medkit with a syringe. Adding these kind of "LEGO Sytem details" really add appeal and playability to the model. I will elaborate on that in the Features and Functions chapter. Here's is view from the other side, where you can also see the fire extinguisher. The following two pictures show the two states of the folding tent. I especially like the white color of the panel to emphasize that this is a different material. Another thing I really like about the tent is that it actually looks like a tent, even though it's just a simple panel. I am not really sure you would want to sleep in the vehicle with arctic temperatures though, but that's a totally different discussion The compartment under the tent holds a shovel, so you can dig in the snow or maybe even dig a hole in the ice to catch yourself some fish. You can also see the door lock which prevents the door from opening while you are driving. At this point we are almost done with the bodywork, except for the roof rack and the bonnet. Now it's time to build the undercarriage. The rear axle doesn't have a rack for steering, but it does have a differential. The front axle does have rack-and-pinion steering. Both axles are live axles, so they don't have independent suspension. At this point the bottom of the chassis looks like this. Two axles going to the front of the vehicle, one for steering and one for driving. One axle going to the rear of the vehicle, which is obviously for driving. There's no center differential in this vehicle, but it is 4x4...or 4WD...or AWD. There are subtle differences, and there will be discussion by the purists, but most of the time it boils down to marketing mumbo jumbo. For the average Technic enthusiast this is considered a 4x4. Voila, undecarriage complete. Live axles attached and we can hit the snow!! Let's not be hasty and get ourselves a proper bonnet and a roof rack first. Maybe we can throw in some jerrycans while we're at it. That's more like it. The roof rack has three different type of jerrycans, so be careful mixing them up. You don't want to be drinking fuel and driving on water (unless it's hydrogen powered). Luckily the cans have been color coded for our convenience. The roof rack even holds a couple of spare link treads, in case we ruin some of them. If you do actually need them, you must have had a pretty rough (and enjoyable) ride. The first time I laid eyes on this vehicle, my intial response was "yuck, what is that supposed to be. And what's with the color scheme?!". This was obviously after seeing some preliminary images. When the images from the toy fair popped-up things had changed for the better. And when looking at the following image, you can only say...WOW! I know some people aren't too fond of the black and purple color scheme. They think it's too dark, and while they might be right about it being dark, I personally think TLG nailed the color scheme. There's that typical Ken Block Monster vibe going on. FINISHED MODEL Unlike the All Terrain Tow Truck this model actually is a finished vehicle! The level of detail is extraordinary. There's so much to look at and to play with. Of course there will always be debate about purple and/or the color scheme, but I really love this purple color. Hopefully we will get more panels, liftarms and connectors, so the AFOLs can make better use of this color when building their own creations. The 3L printed liftarm is prominently placed in the front bumper, near the winch. Here you can see that Milan takes pride in his work...MR stickers all over the place. Narcissistic personality disorder maybe?! Just kidding of course. Milan is a great guy. Recently I had the pleasure of talking to him for a couple of hours and I am sure he will stay as friendly as he is now, even though his LEGO star seems to be rising! Enough with the praise, because this picture also shows a minor concern. The weight of the vehicle results in the treads slightly bending. It's not a very big problem, but it is noticeable. The rear of the vehicle, with the quadruple metallic silver exhausts, has been designed as beautiful as the rest of the vehicle. I do like the use of the yellow connectors and half bushes to add some yellow details. Yellow and purple make a nice color combination. Orange and purple works nicely on the Go Kart, but yellow and purple works even better. The tread wheel on the rear door provides a lock to prevent it from being opened. You have to turn the wheel before you can open the door. The side view shows the fake dampers in the suspension. All these cool details add value to this outstanding model. For the chassis lovers Milan didn't take the easy way out when creating the chairs. These aren't simple panels, but actual chairs. And last but not least....the icing on the cake....the jerrycans! 360 DEGREES VIEWER Back by popular demand, the 360 degree viewer! Okay...nobody actually asked, but I will throw it in anyway Swipe the picture to rotate the model. NOTE! In some browsers or in some cases the 360 degree viewer doesn't seem to work. I have yet to figure out why. Sorry for the inconvenience. FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS This set contains so many cool features that I don't even know where to start. ACKERMAN STEERING GEOMETRY This vehicle has HoG (Hand of God) steering. It works okay, but the vehicle is a bit too heavy to operate the steering when you are not driving. Other than that; the gear easily comes off. On the bright side; this model uses Ackermann steering geometry, which is something we hardly see in Technic sets anymore. 4x4 Four wheel drive has been realised with a differential in both axles, without a center differential. SUSPENSION The suspension is comprised of two live axles, which is done nicely. There's no independent suspension. WINCH Missing on the 42070, but present on this vehicle is the winch. Works like a charm and has a cool locking mechanism. The winch is operating by turning the 12T gear on the shotgun side of the vehicle. FOLDABLE ROOF/TENT By turning the gear on the driver's side of the vehicle, the roof can be lifted and the tent will pop-out. OPENING BONNET The bonnet can be opened manually, nothing out of the ordinary. OPENING DOORS What is out of the ordinary though, is the mechanism for opening the doors. Using a spring for each door, there's damping when you open and close the door. The door opens by moving the upper side up and the lower side down. This is a unique mechanism which we have never seen before and which will be hard to trump. OPENING REAR DOOR The rear door can be opened manually, by pulling the tread wheel. REAR DOOR LOCK The rear door has a lock to prevent it from being opened. You need to turn the tread wheel to unlock the door. OPENING SIDE COMPARTMENTS Both side compartments can be opening manually. SLIDING REAR COMPARTMENT The rear compartment slides out and contains a shovel. There's a mechanism in place to prevent the compartment from falling out of the vehicle. ADDED EXTRA DETAILS Something I like to emphasise is the added extra details, like the jerrycans, medkit and fire extinguishers. Not only do they look cool, but they actually add playability to the set. I highly recommend that TLG designers do this more often. Here is a video demonstrating the functions: PLAYABILITY I like to go into more detail about the playability of this set. One of the reasons this review has taken some more time is that I had my nephews visiting for a couple of days. They are aged 4 and 6, so they like to be entertained. And they brought a 7 year old friend LEGO-lover and his 4 year old sister. This is my chance to be the cool uncle. And a cool uncle has cool LEGO! This gave me a perfect opportunity to see how kids enjoy Technic models. They are too young to be building these models, although the 7 year old would probably be up for the job. Anyway, they all started with "WOWs" when I brought the sets downstairs. They have seen big Nexo Knight sets, but never any big Technic sets. Score one for the cool uncle. They definitely like RC vehicles, but they tend to operate the functions manually....at least they try to. After some time they asked for paper towels to make artificial snow and they were actually playing with the Extreme Adventure vehicle. It is so cool that this set includes new Technic figures, because the kids love to add them to the mix. Ohh, wait a minute....those were my 30-odd year old Technic figures. Come on TLG, bring back these guys. Kids really don't matter that they don't have the proper scale. Just sell them as a separate set if you are concerned about that, but how cool would it have been to include a Technic figure in this set. I can see the guy carrying the jerrycans, using the fire extinguisher, etc. You have done an outstanding job adding details, now go another extra mile and design some cool new Technic figures. I am not a big fan of models with link tread, except for RC ones (8043 is probably still me favorite model). The reason is that they tend to lack playability, especially on smooth surfaces. The slide over the surface, instead of driving. This bothers me. Luckily, this set contains the new rubber attachments, to make up for that. Obviously the total amount of grip depends on the number of attachments. You can add two to each tread, one on each tread, etc. This set doesn't have one on each tread, so it still slides over smooth surfaces. The weight of the vehicle does help though. I was surprised to see the kids drive the vehicle through the entire living room and kitchen. Apparently there is enough drivability in this vehicle, more than I expected. Fun fact is that the mother of the 7 year old and his 4 year old sister was picking them both up, so she was also looking at the models. She loved the purple look and figured it must have been used to appeal to girls as well. I am pretty sure this is not the case, but it shows what goes in the mind of potential customers. The 4 year old girl loved the Extreme Adventure, she couldn't stop playing with it. Technic Mini-dolls anyone?! All in all we had great fun and it was interesting to see these kids playing with both models (hadn't built the 42068 yet). The All Terrain Tow Truck required alternating turns, but the Extreme Adventure offered the possibility to play simultaneously. They liked both models, but they all prefered the 42069. And I did get the impression that having the jerrycans and the other playable extra's did the trick. I highly recommend TLG to motivate the designers to do this more often. B-MODEL The Mobile Base Vehicle looks interesting enough to give it a go. I am tempted to buy an extra set so I keep the main model built as well. The vehicle has a base which can be deployed. The base can open and close, and it even packs a crane. SUMMARY This set absolutely takes the cake. I was a bit hesitant about the playability with the treads, but my test team has proven me wrong. When you hear kids asking if they can play with the set again, you know you did a good job as a designer...and me as the cool uncle An impressive list of functions and features: Ackermann steering geometry 4x4 Suspension using live axles Winch Foldable roof/tent Opening bonnet Coolest door opening mechanism ever Opening rear door Rear door lock Opening side compartments Sliding rear compartment Added LEGO System details (jerrycans, medkit, fire extinguisher) I am starting to like the vibrant colors more and more after each build. Black and purple work really well together. Besides the color scheme, the design of the model is outstanding. From the well formed chairs to the jerrycans, the details are amazing. Even @Kitty (my partner) is very enthusiastic about this set and she is not into Technic at all. I am not allowed to put the wheels back on after switching back to the treads. Even though this model doesn't contain as much gears as the flagship, this still was a very enjoyable build. The cool mechanisms definitely make up for the lack of gears. Technically it's a very sound build as well. This set offers outstanding playability and at a total price of € 139 (5,8 cent per part ) you just can't go wrong with this set. We've lost a lot of good men out there! Milan Reindl a.k.a. grohl was one them. I feel sorry we lost him from our community, but I am very happy that he started working for TLG. As a wise man once said: "the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few". I really liked his Heavy Lift Helicopter and the Extreme Adventure is definitely a winner too. Please, do bring back the Technic figures SCORE How do I rate this set? 9 DESIGN Absolute eye-catcher. 9 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Lots of cool techniques used. 9 FEATURES Long list of cool features. 9 PLAYABILITY Playability proved to be endless. Treads do somewhat limit drivability. 8 PARTS Nice collection of parts, albeit mostly common parts. Does have a unique purple selection. 10 VALUE FOR MONEY Can't go wrong for 5,8 cent per part. 9,0 ANOTHER HIT BY MILAN EXTREME ADVENTURE ON WHEELS As promised I have added a bonus section to this review, showing you different wheeled setups. This is how the front and rear axle look like. It took some time to come up with a proper solution. I am pretty sure there will be better solutions, but this one does use four Technic 5.5L Axle with Stop, in order to prevent the wheel from falling off. I started with a different setup just to shoot the wheels, but since I had me nephews around, I needed a more "kid-proof" setup. I haven't had any problems with the setup below. As you can see I have also changed the antenna setup. They kept falling off, so I ran them through the connectors. The front and rear axle setup. The next pictures still use the old setup where I used yellow axles. POWER PULLER TIRES AND RIMS Technically these are the 8466 - 4x4 Off-Roader wheels, but people like to call them Power Puller wheels. These wheels do touch the chassis when steering. TUMBLER TIRES AND BLACK RIMS Batman just isn't up for this job. 4x4 CRAWLER TIRES AND BLACK RIMS These look okay, although we might need to try yellow rims. CLAAS TIRES AND RED RIMS Somehow red does look okay, but we would need some more red details in the car itself. These wheels do touch the chassis when steering. CLAAS TIRES AND YELLOW RIMS A little bit too much, don't you think. These wheels do touch the chassis when steering. With hub caps. I cheated a bit here UNIMOG TIRES AND SILVER RIMS I do like the Unimog tires for this vehicle. UNIMOG TIRES AND YELLOW RIMS Now this is what I'm talking about. I really do like this setup. Big wheels and yellow rims, but not exaggerated. With minor details (pulleys) in the rims. BACK TO TREADS Although I absolutely love some of the setups, I have come to the conclusion that this model is better with treads. Maybe not for playability, but they make this a unique set, instead of yet another 4x4. Thanks you for reading this review. All pictures can be found here.
  18. REVIEW - 75144 - SNOWSPEEDER INTRODUCTION The year is 2005. I am in a toy store looking for the Mindstorms set, unaware of the fact that the average toy store only sells the mainstream retail sets. I go home with a large Technic crane to fullfill my needs, basically ending my dark ages. At that time, the 10129 - Rebel Snowspeeder had been on the market for about 3 years (release date 2003), retailing for around 130 euro. After my dark ages, my passion for LEGO mainly focused on Technic, although I was (and still am) a big fan of Star Wars. To make a long story, I didn't get the Snowspeeder. I even skipped the 10179 - Millennium Falcon, although I'd rather not talk about that. Hopefully I can correct my worst LEGO decision later this year. In the meantime I have been able to correct my Snowspeeder mistake. For me the Snowspeeder (or T-47 Airspeeder) is one of the iconic Star Wars vehicles, together with the beforementioned Millennium Falcon, AT-AT, X-Wing and Tie Fighter. Lots of other cool and well known vehicles can be added to that list, but these probably end up in the Star Wars Top-5. We haven't seen an official UCS AT-AT yet, but the X-Wing and Tie Fighter both have a very cool UCS model. For now, we will be focussing on the 75144 Snowspeeder. Lots of Snowspeeder models have been released over the year, but we're talking UCS here! PICTURES Pictures can be clicked to view hi-res versions. More pictures can be found in my Flickr album. DISCLAIMER This set has been provided by TLG. It's not my goal to promote this set. It's my goal to give you an honest opinion about it. Therefore, the opinion in this review is my own and is in no way linked to TLG. SET INFORMATION Number: 75144 Title: Snowspeeder Theme: Star Wars Released: 2017 Part Count: 1703 Box Weight: 2529 gr Box Dimensions: 57,5 cm x 37,5 cm x 8,0 Set Price (MSRP): £169.99 / $199.99 / €199,99 Price per Part: £0.100 / $0.117 / €0,117 Links: Brickset, Bricklink THE BOX The box is the same size as the box for the Tie Fighter and Slave 1, which seems logical, since these sets share more or less the same part count. The front of the box shows the Snowspeeder in actions, with some AT-AT's in the background. This is reminiscent of the iconic battle scene on the planet Hoth. The front of the box also shows a top-down view of the model. Looking at both images, I am really anxious to start building. BACKSIDE The backside is filled with lots of smaller images, showing all the functions. Apparently, the Snowspeeder has a lot of functionality. Hopefully this will result in some playability. SIDE One of the sides shows the dimensions of the finished model. It will be 30cm wide and 40 cm long, so it will more or less cover two A4 (or Letter) sheets. Unlike the previous UCS Snowspeeder, this set comes with two minifigures, designated Rebel Snowspeeder Pilot and Rebel Snowspeeder Gunner. CONTENTS OF THE BOX After turning over the box, you will find this heap of bags and parts. 1 x Bound book 1 x Sticker sheet 13 x Numbered bag 1 x Black tile 1 x Grey plate SEALED BOOK AND STICKER SHEET STICKER SHEET BOUND BOOK BAGS The box contains 13 bags, numbered from 1 to 13. This means each bag represents a separate step during the build. PLATE AND TILE The tile (16x8) for the UCS plaque and a light bluish grey plate (16x8) are provided loose in the box. HIGHLIGHTED PARTS This section describes the unique and/or highlighted parts. Other than that, this set doesn't contain a lot of special or new parts. WINDSHIELD Like the 10240 - Red Five X-Wing Starfighter, this model introduces a new unique Windshield part. PART LIST Here's the complete part list, consisting of 1703 parts. MINIFIGURES This set contains two minifigures, designated Rebel Snowspeeder Pilot and Rebel Snowspeeder Gunner. Each of the minifigs has two different faces, a grin and a somewhat scared face. Both torsos are identical. The only difference between the minifigs is the type of helmet. THE BUILD The build consists of 13 steps, corresponding to the 13 numbered bags. But before the build commences, there are several pages with lots of cool content about the design process. STEP 1: REAR COCKPIT SECTION The build starts with the rear section of the cockpit and fuselage, using the parts below. The end result of step 1 is shown in the image below. As usual with UCS models there is some color vomit comprising the innards of the model, although it seems to be less vomit than other UCS models. STEP 2: FRONT COCKPIT SECTION Next you will build the front section of the cockpit and fuselage. This is where the front and rear section team up. The hinge in the middle is where the front landing gear is connected. Although "landing gear" is a bit exaggerated. When the front and rear are connected, the cockpit and fuselage are taking shape. This is how the bottom of the fuselage looks. STEP 3: COMPLETING THE FUSELAGE In this step more parts will be added to the fuselage. Upon completion of this step, the cockpit with control panels is almost finished. The front of the cockpit contains two 2x1 slopes and a 2x2 slope. The 2x2 slope, like the ones in the rear, are printed, while the 2x1 slopes are using stickers. You'd expect a UCS model to have printed 2x1 slopes as well. In the rear you can see an axle protruding the fuselage. It's connected to the Hinge Cylinder in the back of the cockpit. This is the mechanism for the gunner to operate the rear mounted gun. STEP 4: COCKPIT INTERIOR AND NOSE You can already see some of the orange parts, used to build the nose of the vehicle. Here's the finished cockpit, where you can clearly see the slopes with and without stickers. The finished fuselage with cockpit and interior. Two seats, one facing forward and one facing rearward, for the pilot and gunner respectively. The front wing is attached to the fuselage using two ball joints. The little side wings need to be positioned when both main wings are finished. At the rear of the cockpit you can see the controls for the rear (harpoon) gun, consisting of a steer and a screen with aim assist. The video below shows the controls for the rear gun in action. STEP 5: UCS STAND Mostly black parts. This can only mean one thing. Yup, it's the stand commonly used for UCS models. STEP 6: BOTTOM WINGS AND AIR BRAKES The paper container is packing two elastic bands. The two bottom wings are attached with hinges, but they are kept in place using elastic bands. I am not a big fan of these bands. They tend to turn brittle after a couple of years. The flaps on the backside are used to manoeuvre the vehicle. STEP 7: RIGHT WING A collection of plates used to build the right wing. The complete wing is pretty big and it has a sturdy feel to it. STEP 8: RIGHT WING LASER AND ENGINE I Parts for building part of the laser and engine. At the rear you can already see the mechanism to operate the air brakes. STEP 9: RIGHT WING LASER AND ENGINE II These parts are used to finish the laser cannons and air brakes. Here you can see the complete right wing. It sure does look cool. The wing is attached using the hinges on the fuselage. STEP 10, 11 AND 12: LEFT WING The next three steps (10, 11 and 12) are (mirrored) duplicates of steps 7, 8 and 9. Except for the 4x2 slope, the left wing is an exact copy of the right wing. Attaching the left wing to the vehicle can be a bit tricky. You need to firmly grip the speeder to be able to attach the wing. This can result in some parts coming loose. When you do succeed, you will see an almost finished model. The video below shows how to operate the air brakes. STEP 13: CANOPY, GUN AND FINS These are the remaining parts to finish the model. They are used to build the Canopy, rear mounted gun and the heat radiator fins. From wookieepedia: Hoth's extreme cold temperatures were too severe for these craft; the power generators would lock up since they ran hot, requiring a large bank of heat radiator fins for essential cooling. Rebel technicians modified the T-47 airspeeder by insulating each radiator fin with side panels to decrease the heat exchange in order to better suit the new environment. The canopy is decorated with several stickers. Although, we obviously would love to see a printed canopy, I find this solution much more elegant than the one used for the X-wing. The rear mounted gun is operated from the cockpit. The canopy can be opened to reveal the interior of the cockpit. The sides of the canopy are made of two large windshields, also found in the Mini. COMPLETED MODEL After several hours of enjoyable building time the model is completed. I absolutely love the looks on this model. Granted, I am a pretty big fan of the T47 Airspeeder. Lots of stickers are used, which is always a point of debate. I'd rather see printed parts on UCS models, even if that means the price will increase. I simply adds value to the model. Here's the completed model placed on its stand. REAR The rear of the vehicle, showing the characteristic cooling fins. The vehicle also looks stunning when seen from the rear. FRONT Two big laser blaster cannons and the peculiar setup of the wings, give this vehicle its distinctive look. SIDE One of the Minifigs is left in the dark. I guess he needs to accept the fact that he is playing the second fiddle. BOTTOM The bottom view where you can clearly see the ice skating minifig accessories. I like this detail, but they tend to fall of easily. And a video: ADDITIONAL Here are some additional pictures for your enjoyment. FEATURES AND FUNCTIONS The Snowspeeder is part of the Ultimate Collector's Series, which mean that it's mostly a display model. This model does however pack a few functions. Canopy opens up, revealing the cockpit Rear set has controls to operate the rear mounted (harpoon) gun Turn laser cannon to operate the air brakes Manually adjustable flaps Manually operated front landing gear B-MODEL There's no B-model for this set, which is in line with the other UCS sets. SUMMARY So, what do I think of this model? Obviously, this version will be compared to the old UCS version and people will ask whether this version is better. I don't think it's really fair to compare both models, given the number of years in between. LEGO has evolved since the previous version, so yeah, this model looks better. Whether it's actually better...I don't know. And to be honest, I don't really care. What I do care about, is that this is a fantastic set! After the Hoth playset of last year, it was time for TLG to release a proper UCS set. This Snowspeeder definitely fits that bill. The build is enjoyable, even though it is somewhat repetitive. After all, three of the 13 steps are duplicates. This didn't botter me at all. If I had to mention something negative, it would be the rubber bands holding the lower part of the wings in place. Oh, and it includes two blaster pistols! PROS Awesome looking iconic model Several functions New canopy part Includes two blaster pistols CONS Attachments (wings etc) are a bit flimsy Elastic bands SCORE How do I rate this set? 9 DESIGN Stunning. 8 BUILDING EXPERIENCE Enjoyable build, although the bottom is somewhat flimsy. 7 FEATURES Acceptable for a UCS display model. 7 PLAYABILITY UCS sets hardly provide any playability, but this set still has some functions. 7 PARTS Contains a wide variety of (mostly) common parts. 9 VALUE FOR MONEY Must have for every fan. 7,8 WORTHY SUCCESSOR FINAL WORDS Below is the official designer video published by TLG.
  19. Lego 5005358 Minifigure Factory As part of the 40th Anniversary celebration by Lego, they're giving this set as a freebie with $75 purchases in April 2018. I got mine for buying some sets I wanted and figured I'd share this cool free set. Name: Minifigure Factory Set Number: 5005358 Pieces: 86 Price: $Free (with $75 purchase) Minifigs: 1 (plus 5 microfigs) Theme: n/a Year of Release: 2018 Links: Bricklink Brickset The Box An unusual box, since all the normal print is a paper wrapper around the actual box. The Back of the Box That is a massive number of warning languages. The Wrapper and Box The wrapper slides off, revealing a printed box underneath. The box itself is not sealed at all - it just has a tab in a slot on the top. The Contents Inside are the manual, a printed interior, a grey plate that's glue into place in the box, a printed card, and the bag of parts. Interestingly, the bag is not the normal type of plastic that Lego uses. This plastic is softer and not crinkly. The Minifigs The Lego worker is a GREAT figure. The choice of yellow for the shirt is awkward though. I know it's the standard employee shirt (such as in Lego stores), but on the yellow-skinned fig it's weird. Is it a long sleeve shirt? If it was short-sleeved would we even know? Or is it sleeveless? But enough about him. Check out those microfigs! I think the white "hat" on the policeman is weird since it's not an actual hat, but I can overlook that. The Minifigs' Backs There's no second face on the figure, and limited printing on the microfigs, but I can't complain. The Build, 1 Not shown, you first build a little red cart. The main part of the build is shown like this - building on the grey plate - but the actual plate is glued into place in the box. Makes things a little more difficult for the big-handed among us, but nothing too hard. The Build, 2 The Build, 3 The assembly line itself. 2 of the 3 printed parts are shown here. The set includes 1x2 printed tiles in the yellow/black stripe pattern (4 of them), a 1x4 tile in the same pattern, and a 1x2 tile with a segmented arrow that's from the Boost and Ninjago City sets. But why green paint on the brush? They made a new paintbrush with medium azure paint on it for the Easter set - why not make that set and this one share a brush in a more common color, like red or blue? I'm thinking there must be another use for the medium azure brush coming, but that's just me thinking Lego wouldn't have made a custom printed brush for that one freebie set. Then again, they did custom print the egg for it.... The Build, 4 The assembly line sits onto the base and then pins are inserted from the back.... I sense a play feature coming! The card goes onto the pins and is held in place by Technic half bushes. Unfortunately, the card covers up the 2 printed photos on the back of the box (or at least one a time, depending on how the line is positioned). I love the detail Lego put into these - it wouldn't be a Lego set without a coffee cup, and they tied the green paintbrush in with the left picture. The Build, 5 This is why that card was added. As you slide the line back and forth, the picture in the window changes to match the microfig below. Simple but so cool of a feature to add. And nice representation of the minifigure patent hanging on the wall. The Build, 6 And we have the figure in his spot, working hard inspecting the microfigures. Not shown is one big flaw that I can't believe made it to production. You cannot slide the line far enough to the right to have the Pixal image fully in the window. It needs to go another stud over, but it can't. There's a stop on the underside of the line, plus it's hitting the side of the box. The End of the Manual The end of the manual has a 2 page spread of the history of the minifigure. The End of the Manual, 2 This page covers some more recent minifigure advances. Short legs, baby figs, but why is Mr. Gold on here? He was part of Series 10, so not the start of the collectible lines, and he's a figure that many fans are bitter about since he was so hard to find. The Conclusion I love this freebie. The microfigs are great representations of classic figures (well, most of them - I'm not sure that Pixal is worthy of inclusion) and it's a clever set. It closes back up nicely for storage, but this is one that will be sitting out on a lot of shelves I'm sure. The Ratings Value: 10/10 - It was free with purchase. And you get a custom box, custom printed microfigs, a cool minifig, and nice play features. Design: 8/10 - The box is great, but the line can't slide quite far enough to the right. Minifigs: 10/10 - IMHO, Pixal should have been something else. A castle fig would have been better, but I suspect Pixal was chosen both to represent Ninjago AND because the purple stands out. Playability: 8/10 - Small and simple, but clever design. Parts: 9/10 - I always love having the printed hazard stripe tiles, but these will be staying in this set. Otherwise nothing special, but nothing more was really needed. Overall: 9.5/10 - It's hard to complain about a freebie, but I do wish the line slid over further and they'd picked a different last microfig.
  20. Hi everyone. It had been a while anyone posted any written review anywhere in the internet. The trend goes to video reviews instead of written ones, but I'm going to continue the effort of making written reviews and hopefully I can get more support as 'You can't save the world alone' quoting Justice League. Like my previous post, I am doing this one as a two in one combo. Don't Freeze. I NEVER freeze. Introduction The Black Panther himself is T’challa, the king of Wakanda, a mythical African nation that also happens to be the world’s most advanced civilization. He first appeared in Captain America 3: Civil War avenging his father thinking Bucky is responsible for the bombing in the UN causing the death of his father King T'Chaka. In this movie we will know more about Wakanda. Let's indulge in these vibranium rich LEGO sets. Overview Name: 76099 Rhino Face-Off by the MineYear: 2018Pieces: 229Minifigures: 3Price: £19.99 / $19.99 / 24.99€ Name: 76100 Royal Talon Fighter Attack.Year: 2018Pieces: 358Minifigures: 4 Price: £29.99 / $29.99 / 34.99€ The Box I got my copies from my local TRU and they are packed nicely with the plastic wrap which is very neat. The Royal Talon Fighter is with Wakanda city background and the Rhino scene took place in the vibranium mine. I always love the blue glowy color that represents vibranium. At the side of the box, you can see the minifigures are fighting between the good and the bad. (I still reluctant in removing the plastic wrap, they are so nice!) The Content Here for 76099 you get one sticker sheet, two instruction booklets and three numbered bags. For 76100, you get a thicker book for the fighter, and three numbered bags. I'm very happy that I did not see any stickers here thinking that this set has all the printed parts. I was wrong. It was hidden at the last page of the book. The Build The very elegantly designed Royal Talon Fighter and it looks very Wakandan I would say. This is the result of building bag one, bag two and bag three in 76100. My favorite part of this build is the rear thruster where the base brick is purple in color. It really resembles the scene where it flew in Wakanda, charging through the misty forest as in the trailer. There are 12 side wings in this fighter but unfortunately they are fixed. Curves are quite rare in LEGO but the ship looks nicely rounded. At the bottom the trans clear round plate is nicely used as the bottom thruster. I like the combination of technic elements with bricks to have such amazing design of the ship. The cockpit is quite spacious and the center cockpit is designed for Killmonger but I don't remember he is inside the ship at all. After all the center cockpit is empty, so you can put anyone inside. Nakia is piloting the ship. Let's go to the mine and play with the Rhino. The mine cart is full of vibranium(three trans blue 2x2 plates). I love the trans blue vibranium transport cart so much! The wheels fits perfectly on the railway and the only disappointment is the railway is too short! This cart is built from bag one of 76099. This Rhino actually reminded me of LEGO Chima. I love the build especially the head. It is built by sandwiching the center bricks with left and right side of the face. Okoye can ride one it and there will still be plenty of space left for other minifigures. The tail is cute, and this is built from bag two and bag three. War of the beasts! The Rhino is much sturdier than Fenris the skinny wolf. Little tips I learnt from the Internet. If you are frustrated in applying stickers, fret no more! This technique allows you to apply the stickers accurately! First you take out the sticker from the sheet, put it at the corner of the sticker sheet, then you can hold the large sticker sheet and apply it at the correct angle. Thanks to a person whom I forgot where he posted this trick in the internet. This is how it looks like when you paste it at the corner. The Minifigures Let's look at the main attractions of these two sets with seven great exclusive minifigures! Here we have our Wakandan King T'Challa in the Black Panther suit. This suit is quite old fashioned and manually worn. The prints is very detailed and you can see the eyes showing through the helmet. The teeth necklace around the chest are silver printed and very iconic to the character. In the trailer, the suit is purple, but why is this blue? This suit is enhanced and it is more advanced compared to the first suit and more complex design of the torso and the back. I love the color here but does anyone here agree that purple is nicer? Killmonger the villain. He got hold of his black panther suit (I wonder where it came from. A spare?). This suit is very nice in gold but looks villainy. The head looks like an alien head if you look closely. They call it the Golden Jaguar suit. Where are the prints on the earpiece and the legs? But their head and torso prints are amazingly detailed. You can appreciate more of their head prints after removing their ears. Done with the panthers. Now let's look at Okoye, She is the general of the Dora Milaje and the head of Wakanda's armed forces and intel. She is wearing brownish outfit with a belt that has a panther buckle. She is wielding a spear but I would prefer the spear to be chrome in color instead of this old common spear. Don't you think so? Nakia. She is wearing the red uniform of Dora Milaje, wielding her Ring Blades. You get three rings here, Thanks LEGO! Her uniform is also with a panther buckled belt and she is permitted to keep her hair because she is a spy. Her hair is also unique here in LEGO. She has a smiling face as the alternate expression. Erik Killmonger in his mercenary outfit and his special mask. Some say the blue outfit look similar to one of the Dragon Ball character. He is holding a blaster, quite uniquely designed. He has only one facial expression despite his mask covering the back of the head. The mask is rubbery and not rigid. These minifigures are great! Oh wait, I forgot the other villain in the movie. Did you forget him too? Too much Killmonger? Ulysses Klaue was a black-market arms dealer gangster who wanted to expose Wakanda to the rest of the world, with Klaue stealing a stockpile of Vibranium as a result. During an encounter with Ultron, Klaue sold all of his Vibranium to Ultron before losing his arm during an argument. Here you can see his left arm is equipped with a special weapon which will surprise you in the movie. He has two facial expressions and the white and blue shirt is very accurate to the movie. This is a new part representing the arm weapon. The hand will hold on the bar like other LEGO weapons. Where is our beloved Everett Ross? Bag end? Andy Serkis is a great actor! Who is the richest of them all? Conclusion Both are very nice sets in terms of minifigures and the builds especially the fighter and the Rhino. These two are smaller compared to Thor Ragnarok sets but still a good buy for the exclusive minifigures especially the Black Panthers. Review Summary Playability: 6/10 - Both sets are packed with play feature but the pretty low score is due to the features are quite simple. Design / Building Experience: 9/10 - The design is very iconic to Wakanda. The fighter is amazing and I love the Rhino. Only the vibranium cart is too small but still very nice. Minifigures: 10/10 - Great minifigures! All the printings and the details are marvelous! Overall: 9/10 - Get these two sets and you are complete for Black Panther. Oh wait, where is the Civil War Black Panther? Hope you enjoy the review, do share your thoughts in the comments!
  21. I'm not entirely sure this is the right forum section for this review, but I couldn't find anywhere better :)
  22. Hello My review of 42077. There is a lot of thoughts and ideas there. So I translated it to english (turn on subtitiles). Contents of review 1) foreword 1:00 2) exterior 1:18 3) functions 6:18 4) designer 11:05 5) set contents 11:57 6) cosmetics promotion 13:00 7) adding stickers 16:16 8) modifiсations 17:27 9) pros :34 10) cons 20:04 11) Alternative model thoughts 25:55 12) final thoughts 26:26 In the end, set is very good as resource set for buulding cars (especially if you have other DARK Azure sets like 42077). And you can add a lot of mods here: that's much better to do mod with such hatchback than with Le-Man or F1 racer. You can add saloon, dashboard, rear seats, move engine to front, even 4sp gearbox can be placed here. Thanks for watching
  23. 1:21Lego Forbidden Island 6270 Timelapse Review by JackyWackySmacky 7 views19 hours ago Classic 1989 Forbidden Island review. Hope you enjoy, and I will gladly accept any suggestions/constructive criticism.
  24. mandaci-customs

    mandaci-customs: review

    Hi Everybody, I want to show you my reviews about LEGO Minifigures, Sets etc. LEGO Robin Hood Minifigure Review: LEGO Mexican Minifigure Review:
  25. (Review) 21309 NASA Apollo Saturn v By: StangMan302 I recently bought this Lego set #21309, and ever since I got it I have wanted to review it. Some main points. Very strong construction. Great building techniques. Very fun building experience. Excellent scale for viewing/ playing. Box. Great artwork. Shows detail Apollo mission. Breaks down the rocket into stages. Gives some info on the 1969 moon landing. Construction overview Bag 1 This was the construction of the inner fuselage of stage 1. This part is very fragile but the second bag brings the whole thing together to make it super strong. Bags 2-6 Adding covering to stage one. Bag 7. Start of stage 2 construction. Bag 8-10. Stage 2 strengthening. Bag 11. Stage 3 construction. Bag 12. Lunar module and final stage assembly. Final thoughts. Building Experience: 9/10 Play ability: 9/10 Price per piece value: 9/10 Display ability 10/10 Details: 9/10 I would definitely recommend this set to anyone with a passion for space or rockets in general. Props to the designers of this set it is one of the best sets I have ever owned.