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Found 187 results

  1. mktechniccreations

    [MOC] Ford F-150

    Hello everybody, my latest iteration is the pick up truck. The ford F-150. I am questioning a bit if its Creator or Technic, but chassis and power train is technic aspect and body is made of system bricks to deliver that specific look. It has 2 RC functions, drive and steering, steering is possible by virtual pivot point for narrow fenders look of system bricks, and only few manual options, as openable doors and rear cargo door. More photos are either on my FB page or Bricksafe page Bricksafe page Facebook Page most of all, from my MOC´s sales i am able to continue to build more creations, so it would be great if you support me this way if you like the model. Instructions are available here : Iinstructions Also can be fitted with Buwizz for more power : Buwizz
  2. This topic has a lot of photos inside, to make it easier for everyone to see the latest version of my MOD, I have editted this first post to show version 4, 8th Sep 2020. Your feedback is welcome or share your MOD ideas Please! bow port by R Y, on Flickr port view by R Y, on Flickr stern starboard revised by R Y, on Flickr My Lego collection consisted mainly of SW sets and its MOCs, I was tempted to get the 21322 Barracuda Bay when it came out in April but decided to save up for the UCS A-Wing, which I still haven’t got around to build yet, I have been modify the 75175 A-wing. A-Wing Mod by R Y, on Flickr I wasn’t too keen on the 31109 Creator Pirate Ship when I first saw its photos, especially the brick-built sails. During the Queen’s Birthday long weekend, I was reading posts on OZLUG of buying multiple sets to make it a bigger ship; that grabbed my attention as I mod all Lego sets where possible after I figured out Bricklink. However, at RRP of $160 AUD each, I might as well just buy the 21322 for $300 AUD; then again thanks to OZLUG, I realised that they are $119 at Kmart, meaning $238 worth of investment, no brainer! I quickly read up on reviews from Brickset and Brother’s Brick, how the completely brick-built design is its selling point, instead of using specialized boat hull pieces. My local Kmart had no stock, so I went to the next nearest one, nothing on the shelves again and a store girl told me all they have is already on the shelfs even though the online stock check shows limited availability. Disappointed, I was about the leave the store empty handed before I talked past the customer service counter, there was only one person in line so I decided to wait and check. The service girl was very helpful and checked the stock room for me, it turned out they do have three at the back, which I gladly picked up two; she told me apparently people try to steal Lego all the time, so they keep the good stuff at the back. I had to wait for my baby to settle and sleep before started building that night. As the original model is built in 3 sections: bow with forecastle, waist, stern with captain’s cabin; I decided to build 2 x waists sections and have 3 masts. I always build repetition sections step by step simultaneously instead of finishing one section and start another, personally I find this method quicker. My aim is to stick to the original Lego design and finish the hull asap, redesign the masts into foremast, mainmast and mizzen mast, and use the remaining pieces to touch up and make the 2 waists transition smoothly. 31109 Long Side View by R Y, on Flickr I wanted to rig the ship from the bowsprit to the stern flagpole, I had to move the “Plate Round 2 x 2 with Pin Hole and 4 Arms Up” to the mainmast beneath the lookout so the arms are equal distance to the diagonal spars from the foremast and mizzen mast. I spent more time on the foremast and rigging than any other sections. I tried a few different arrangements before settled down on the current layout, where the rigging goes down to the bowsprit from the upside-down diagonal spar. I used light bluish grey Technic Bush instead of the yellow ones provided. The hose piece is still slightly short and the bowsprit is pulled upwards, but the jib sail hides most of it. Overall, I was happy that I achieved my goal. Masts and Rigging by R Y, on Flickr I added a 1 x 2 red brown plate to each of the gun port openings so they are not too close to the waterline, I initially wanted to add 2 pieces per opening, but they were too high and affected the guns inside. You can tell where each of the section ends with the breaks from the 3027 6 x 16 plate in dark tan secured with 2 x 2 blue round tiles. I made sure the 1 x 4 special plates overlap the gap to secure the sections. The alternating red and light orange strip along the deck worked out perfectly, I was initially worried that I may get a double up of same coloured plates with my MOD. Joins of the Sections by R Y, on Flickr As Lego only gives half the number of guns compare to the gun ports, having 2 sets gives me 4 guns to fill up the front gun deck, squeezed 2 minifigs inside with torches. Gun Deck with Baboon by R Y, on Flickr I plated over the opening next to the gangways on the 2nd waist, to make it look like a quarterdeck, but not really raised due to the limitation of my skills in the mod. I really like the brick-built rowing boat from the alternative Skull Island bult, I made it longer using 2 x 2 slopes at the stern and made other changes as certain parts were already used in the main ship built. I also built a boat rack with 4 cheese slopes and some plates. The rowing boat fills up on the empty quarterdeck perfectly, I really like how it turned out. Rowing Boat by R Y, on Flickr With the 2 sets of 3 human minifigs, I swapped around their outfits, brought in a pair of black legs to swap out the peg leg. Now I have 6 different minifigs, I left out the epaulette for the officer to differentiate him from the captain. a9 by R Y, on Flickr a8 by R Y, on Flickr I built the red/green parrot and blue seagull according to the instructions, again had to use some different pieces due to availability. Lastly, I added the pet baboon hanging off the shroud, it’s a really fun build where its arms and waist are twistable to get a good pose. Baboon by R Y, on Flickr I really liked how this MOD turned out, this is probably the cheapest and easiest way to get a Lego 8-gun full-rigged-ship (three or more masts), even the 21322 only has only two masts. It’s around 58cm long from the tip of the bowsprit to the edge of stern flag, around 36cm tall from the tip of mainmast to the bottom of the hull, 19cm wide at the horizontal spars. With the elongated waist, it makes the forecastle and poop deck seem small in comparison, a bit out of proportion to be honest; but at this stage, I don’t have the skills to design and make them bigger. Side Front View by R Y, on Flickr Top Front View by R Y, on Flickr Back View by R Y, on Flickr
  3. C-Model for Creator set 31085 (Mobile Stunt Show). An oversized hot rod for stunt shows, spewing fire, going fast and loud and getting some nice air time after jumping from ramps. Features: - individual suspension for each wheel (hard front and softer rear for crazy landings) - minifig-scale cockpit with steering wheel, gear shifter and mock gauge - small but openable and functional trunk (set's wrench would fit, or maybe two pizzas?) Pictured is the render of exact .io model of the physical build (aside from the rubber band for the rear suspension) - I don't have enough space and proper lighting to make some good photos.
  4. Hello dear Lego fans, After having signed up here in the Eurobricks forums in 2011, I posted a new thread in the "Hello my name is..." section about my plans to create my own Lego City layout. Now almost 9 years later, I can finally show you some of the progress that has been made just at the beginning of the new decade :) Good things come to those who wait. Renovations on the attic are finally complete (apart from the lighting) and we now have around 110 m² to unleash our imagination. The current plans of the Lego city layout add up to around 60m² in size and they are, as you can see in the video, far from finished. However, I thought you might be interested in some of the things that my girlfriend and me were designing in the last couple of days. The name of the city is still unknown, but the overall design has started to take shape with a downtown area, which includes all the modulars, and shops, a residential area, an amusement park, a winter village, a train yard and a harbor/beach area. I would also like to add an airport to the city and some of the classic monorail tracks have been placed already. We are also getting into MOC a little bit and we will add our own creations to the layout as soon as they look nice! The commentary of the video is in German, but I am trying to add English subtitles into the system. Please let us know what you think here in the forums or in the comments section of YouTube. I will keep you posted on future updates if you like :) Note: All of the parts used in this layout are original Lego parts, except for some of the baseplates. I thought that lime green in the Hogwarts castle area might look cool, but I will probably exchange it for regular grass green baseplates in the near future. Thank you so much for taking a look! :) Christof
  5. Hello everyone, in the near future I would like to show you a little bit of my Lego City, which is still under construction. To begin with, here is a video about the beach area I made yesterday. What do you think? Beach Area - Bricksonville Edit: latest video added (17.07.)
  6. stef2280

    [MOC] Old Town Hostel

    Hello! I am here with another nice MOC. I hope you like it! It is a "Old Town Hostel" modular building here some features: 5283 Bricks Perfect Modular building dimension!!! Perfect compatibility with Lego® Modular Buildings Divided in 4 layers like all official Lego® Modular Nice scenario “broken window” Nice hidden garden behind the building with a barbecue and a chimney Nice tall city tree Ground Floor is furnished with a Reception Hall scenario First floor is furnished with curtains and tiles with a very nice spiral staircase Second floor furnished just with tiles Possibility to furnish first and second floor as you want You may get my instructions here: Stebrick.com Some other pictures at my Flickr page: Stebrick Flickr
  7. Franzplus

    Victorian House

    https://ideas.lego.com/projects/2fc13079-3c2b-4037-b71e-66b0904e7ca2 I love the modular buildings of the Creator Expert Line, this project is inspired by model n 10228 Haunted House. My construction is perfectly adaptable to the other Modular Buildings. Normally Lego Modular are made up of 3 or more blocks with a top view. I prefer to open the construction halfway to the side because it allows for greater playability and a better view of the internal rooms. Obviously it's my personal opinion. I have used Lego Digital Designer for the project while for the rendering Studio. The building consists of 2384 bricks and is divided into 3 levels. Ground Floor: Living Room First Floor: Kitchen Second Floor: Bedroom and Bathroom Measures 15.4” (39cm) high, 9.4” (24cm) wide and 9” (25cm) deep. Recreate the charm of a Victorian-style home that you might discover in many European villages or cities. The 3-storey house has many fun and surprising details, including a beautiful garden with barbecue, an elegant living room, a functional kitchen, a relaxing bedroom and a refined bathroom. Includes 2 minifigures. Collectors will love to display this large set with pride alongside other modular buildings.
  8. Captained by a Scottish fellow named Albert McCartney, this ship, the "Kintyre", originally operated out of what became one of the Southern-most English Colonies. There mission was as a privateer to harass any Spanish ships coming from the Caribbean to the old world with gold and silver, (plus harass and steal from the French), for around five years, starting in 1705. But eventually, McCartney grew tired of paying his due of treasure to the English crown, and set off to make his own way in the world "free" of any government. He moved his base of operations to a small island in the Caribbean with his crew, where there resided a abandoned French attempt at a fort from years prior. He got his crew to complete the fort, and used it as his base of operations. He plundered many a French, Spanish, and other nations' ships, along with his former comrades in the English navy. In early summer 1717 the Kintyre was last seen by some trappers on land (near what later became the port of Savannah, Georgia) sailing low in the water, going north, unknowingly into the path of a massive hurricane. The resulting wreck has never been found, and it was rumored to have been loaded to the gun-ports with gold and silver taken from a Spanish treasure ship by Florida's southern coast. (which had been found empty of most of it's treasure in the 1960's.) This could explain the heavily laden shape of the Kintyre that day in June 1717. As to what happened to the ship after it left the later-day Savannah area is anyone's guess, as it seems to have vanished without a trace off the face of the Earth. This ship is named the Kintyre, and is a recolor and MOD of set 31109 (3-in-1 Pirate Ship) in the Creator theme. She is captained by a Scottish fellow named Albert McCartney (nicknamed McCartney the Green for the color of his ship and clothes), a former (fictional!) privateer turned pirate. Some parts are missing, as the plastic pirate flag from Ninjago, 12 lattice window pieces, etc. And yes, the name of the ship and it's Captain are both Paul McCartney references. (The Mull of Kintyre and Uncle Albert / Admiral Halsey songs along with their creator's last name inspired the names of the ship and it's captain.) This MOD was also inspired by this very similar model by Eurobricks user @Wurger49. The name of the ship is supposed to go on the back of the captain's cabin spelled out in 1 x 1 printed tiles, located just below the flag pole. The Captain's cabin has a desk and chair. Eight cannons are ready for firing on the Kintyre. It was said by the trappers that last saw the Kintyre afloat that one or two cannons were pushed overboard to make the ship more buoyant. (Most likely against the weight of the treasure they had just stolen from the Spanish ship in Florida.) Excavations for enlarging the port of Savannah in the 1970's found two such cannons buried under two hundred year of ocean silt. These were confirmed by the proper authorities to be of the same age and type used by the English Navy around the time of Kintyre's construction in 1699. The only question remains is this: where is the rest of the ship and it's treasure? Questions comments, and complaints are always welcome!
  9. It's been a while since I had a finished Modular to share. Here's a new 16 wide - City Pizza & Hacker Space. Like my Bookshop, the architecture is based on buildings in Montreal. The first floor is "City Pizza" and utilizes a some of the stickers from the Lego accessory pack. Yes, I also took a Sharpie to three tiles to create some art for the walls. Those are some rather old windows in the front with the shorter height. Upstairs is a Hacker Space were some young people are up to who-knows-what. The top floor is a dorm with four bunks. As always - Thanks for looking!
  10. If you're a big fan of tall structures and buildings, then this set is for you. Measuring 1 meter tall, this towering wind turbine used to be a limited-release set only available for Vestas employee. In November 2018, LEGO will re-issue set # 4999 to make it widely available to more collectors and LEGO enthusiasts. Thank you for the LEGO Group (TLG), LEGO CEE and our very own Eurobricks Ambassador, Jim, in making this review possible. Without further delay, here is my 17th RA review, LEGO Creator - Vestas Wind Turbine, set # 10268. Overview Name: 10268 - Vestas Wind Turbine Theme: Creator Year: 2018 (2H) Pieces: 826 pcs Minifigures: 3 (+1 dog) Price: USD 199.99 / EUR 179.99 / GBP 159.99 The set will be available in LEGO store and shop.lego.com starting 23 November 2018. Introduction First thing first, I am traditionally taking pictures of smaller builds so taking a full-size photo of a 1-metre model is quite a challenge. Nevertheless, I am sticking to my traditional white-on-white background. You'll notice that even if most of the parts are white, they look "off white" due to shadows. That's just the nature of plastic white balance. Now that it's out of the way, enjoy the walkthrough of the building process and my thoughts about this set. Frankly, I have no interest in the original set 4999 because its price in the secondary market is very cost prohibitive. Now that it is available to a larger audience for the suggested retail price, or even cheaper, is this set worth all the hype and buzz generated around it? I'll answer that towards the end but first, let's start with the box art. Front Panel This set is branded under the Creator Expert line. Also included in the box art is the "seal" of plant-based plastic elements. These elements made from plants together with the renewable energy such as wind turbines are perfect fit for TLG's green agenda. It is not a secret that TLG has investments in wind power. Therefore, if there is any set worth releasing again to make that widely known, is the Vestas Wind Turbine. Power Functions are already included in the box as prominently shown at the right side of the front panel. Back Panel The back panel shows the power function features including the rotating turbines and porch lights of the house. Again, you will see the "This Element is Made from Plants" seal to remind us that TLG is really concerned about the planet. Not being sarcastic here -- but how many companies are pushing green and sustainable energy? I can't recall much. Perhaps the seal will help embed the idea to younger minds so TLG will be known as a company who cares about the environment. Side Panels Here are the side panels. You can spot the seal once more on one of the side panels. Top Panel Since this is a creator set, of course it will be criminal not to print the parts on the box. You can check out the parts here in bigger resolution. Speaking of parts, let's unbox the set already. Inside, we get a very high-quality manual. Several pages are dedicated for Wind Energy and plant-based plastic. A version of LEGO Planet Promise is also included in the booklet but the version in the booklet is far more interesting. Without giving away too much, one of the trivia included in the booklet is that 90% of the LEGO packaging sets is recyclable and 1 million plastic trays were already saved from replacing the plastic Advent Calendar trays with recyclable paper-pulp version since 2017. There are more snippets of information included in some pages. For example, in page 35, it says "A Vestas wind power plant can be up and running in less than 12 months, defying the longer lead times involved with conventional fuels." Other pages that include snippets of information are pages 69, 75, 114, 135, 136, and 142. Now, let's go straight to the parts! Parts "Ok. What is this? There are no numbered bags?" Hard mode activated! --- this is my initial reaction. For sure, this set is not the biggest set without numbered bags but it's probably in the top 10 -- Tower Bridge is one of the biggest as far as I know. Also, based on this review of the Medieval Market Village, and as confirmed by my dear friend WhiteFang, that set does not have numbered bags as well. I have also confirmed that the older set 4999 has the same plastic bags without numbers. So, who am I to complain? You can check bigger photos of the bags below if you wish -- they look quite randomly packed together, just like the old version of the set. Although, if you look closer, you'll see that most of the parts are related to the elements needed to complete a certain section of the build. Nevertheless, they look like a mess to the untrained eye. As suggested by the instruction booklet, the only solution is to prepare all of them in a manner that will not make you insane: Note: the clear plastic containers are not included in the set. Here are the notable parts included in the set. All the printed parts are notable specially the smaller panels: Did I not mention that there are no stickers in this set? Hurrraaay! There are 4 green BURPs included in the set. Some of the advanced builders don't like this part much. However, in this set I can tell you that using this part makes a lot of sense because the hollow part of the BURP helps conceal the wiring underneath. More about that soon. Speaking of wiring, there are 2 sets of wires included. And then, here's the motor. Don't ask me why TLG did not put the most recent version of Power Functions. To me, as long as this baby runs fine, I'm okay whatever motor function version comes with it. Build The first small build is the Vestas van. If my sources are correct, it is supposed to be modelled after Mercedes-Benz® Sprinter Van. The build is a decent representation of the actual vehicle. I like its simplicity. Moving on, the main build starts with the construction of the small cottage house using the 32x32 green base plate. Nothing fancy so far. Move along, move along... Once you start working at the back of the house, where you use the BURPs, you will realise that the fixture holding the turbine tower is only 4 technic pins held by 4 brackets on the base plate! At this stage, you cannot judge how strong the build is, but you'll be surprised later. The set 4999 has something similar but this improved build reduces the wobbles in my experiment. It does not make the build indestructible though. The build becomes more interesting once you build the actual tower. Even if the process here is repetitive, you make a very substantial progress because the parts are quite big. Now, with the tower erected and with the power source ready, it only takes a few more steps to complete the build. Power test. The lights are on! Constructing the nacelle (house of the turbine) is like building a technic set that you'll forget for a moment you're building a Creator set. Obviously, this section is the most mechanical part of the build so it's not surprising to see mostly technic parts. The housing is also using technic bricks to form a SNOT technique where you use the large 6 x 12 modified tile with studs on the edge, printed with big "Vestas" logo to complete the enclosure of the motor. To avoid the nacelle from spinning out of control and twisting the wire running inside the tower, there is a tan (sand) coloured technic pin that prevents the housing from turning 360 degrees. Probably the most satisfying part of the build for me is when I plugged the motor function connectors to the small motor -- this marks the completion of the actual turbine motor and we're getting closure to spinning the turbine! Building the rotor hub is quite straight forward. Using a 3-rotor blade technic plate in light bluish grey colour, 3 sections are created for each turbine blade. As for the turbine blades, all of them are exactly built the same. Here's a view of the turbine blades in different angles: You'll notice that there are 2 technic pin holes available in one of the technic bricks at the end. This make it possible to attach the blades in two configuration: flat or angular position. I think the blades look best in angular position because they resembles real-life turbine blades more when attached that way. To give you an idea how really big the turbine is, here's a picture with the minifigures next to it. It's huge! Once the rotor hub and 3 blades are connected, it's a matter of pushing the protruding black technic pin inside the housing to complete the top. All wire cleanly tuck inside and ready to be covered. Alas, we're done! There are so many anti-studs at the back of the tower but that one is fine. Oh wait, what about the exposed back? Zooming in, perhaps, the only ugly part of the set is the back of the hill where all the colourful bricks and pieces are exposed. It's quite easy to cover and I don't understand why this re-released version did not put those extra bricks to make the model more presentable when viewed at the back. The good news is that it's fairly straight forward to replace the colourful bricks at the back to cover the exposed area if you wish to make the set more pleasing to the eye when viewed at this angle. This is not an issue to me but someone has to mention it. Here is the complete set in its full glory! Minifigures There is nothing much to write about the minifigures included. In the original set 4999, there are also 3 minifigures. However, there is one notable aspect in the minifigures that makes this re-release special. Front view with head gears / hair piece Unlike the original minifigures that came with set 4999, the Vestas employee minifigures in set 10269 comes with printed "V" torso, not stickers! This is a very big improvement over the older version of the minifigures. Back view No dual face print or back printing for the guys. There's only 1 back printing, which is the torso for the girl minifigure -- Halter Top with Green Apples and Lime Spots Pattern, found in 3 other sets at the time of this review. Green energy is the best! Right, doggy? I'll be back! Conclusion So, is it worth the re-issue? I think it is. Set # 4999 is madly expensive in eBay or Bricklink so this makes set # 10268 fairly "cheap". I know that is a very subjective statement depending on how financially gifted you are, but you get the point. Could this set be any cheaper? Probably yes. The original set 4999 has motor function included so it is not a proper re-issue if the motor functions are removed just to cut cost, but it could been one of the option. For the volume of the build and overall size of the structure, the big parts compensate for the poor price per piece ratio so I think the price is fair. If you look at the price per piece ratio alone then you're going to miss out on a lot of good sets. I mentioned about the fixture of the base and how fairly strong it is. I think it is sturdier than the older version but as I mentioned earlier, it is not indestructible. I was able to lift the wind turbine by holding the tower several times without any issue. It holds firm and it can lift the weight of the whole build just fine. The problem is when it oscillates and wobbles several times -- no matter how much stronger it is than the original set, the tower can still collapse on its own weight. Based on my first-hand experience, using my car, I transported this set simply by removing the turbine blades. I thought that the tower can hold firmly because the top is already much lighter without the blades. To my dismay, a few humps and gentle turn broke the tower from the base because the structure simply cannot handle the shakes and wobbles in its original configuration. So, if you're crazy like me and you wish to transport this set-- kindly ask someone to hold it so that the tower won't wobble or just transport the tower and the base separately. Frankly, this is not a problem if you will only display the wind turbine. I think the structure is strong enough that it won't collapse on its own weight in a very long period of time as long as you put it in a very stable cabinet. If you put it on display inside a shaky cabinet, overtime, the connection might loosen up at the base, increasing the risk of the set from breaking apart. You've been warned, so get a sturdy cabinet for your LEGO set displays. Having said that, it is a marvellous set. It is big and tall. It's even taller than my desk fan and dinning table. Besides, who doesn't like green energy inspired building set? I also think it is a very educational set and could inspire young builders about sustainability and renewable energy. This set, along with the campaign of using sugarcane based plastic that is sourced sustainably, gives TLG a very strong statement about their support for sustainability and renewable energy. I mean, how can you not like it? Review summary Playability: 7.5/10 - it's not as playable set as much as it is a great display set but it is clearly aimed at older kids and collectors. Design / Building Experience: 8/10 - The original design 10 years ago is still great, with some colour swaps and small alteration here and there. However, I think the base could be more reinforced. Minifigures: 7/10 - No more stickers, yey! Other than the unique torso, everything else looks generic hence the score. Price / Value for money: 10/10 - Goodbye scalpers, welcome true collectors! Overall: 8/10 - Wait no further. Get this set and forget about the older one that you cannot afford. There is always a case for making a set available once again. If it is truly in demand and there are willing buyers for the product, then it is always possible to produce the set once more. TLG keeps the BOM (bill of materials) and moulds so they can produce the sets if all the right parts are available. Reissuing is a common practice in other toy lines so I don't understand the hate TLG is receiving for "running out of ideas". I am one of the firm believer that LEGO sets, as toys, should be made available to everyone in any way, shape or form. Therefore, the re-release of this set is a big slap to hoarders and investors, who are capitalising on "limited release" sets. I truly commend TLG for re-issuing this set to a wider customer base, with or without the green agenda. Once again, thank you for reading. If you wish to view all the images used in this review and some extras, you can view my Flickr album for set 10268. Always enjoy building. Until next time! I wish you were here... P.S. Here's a video of the wind turbine spinning --
  11. It's been four years since the last classic European car graced the CREATOR range, and I said then I'd be delighted to see more of them. Since then we've seen the handsome Mustang and the sleek Aston Martin DB5 - technically a European classic car but I haven't counted that one! The range's latest offering, the Fiat Nuova 500 ('Cinquecento'), fits neatly into the category of small cute classics previously epitomised by 2014's 10242 Mini Cooper and 2016's 10252 VW Beetle. I was delighted to see the widespread use of a rarer colour (dark azure) in the Beetle; now Bright Light Yellow takes centre stage for the Italian classic. The Fiat 'Nuova' 500 was launched in 1957 as a successor to the 500 Topolino and was designed as an inexpensive, practical city car with a rear-mounted engine following the style of the successful Beetle. Its 479 cc engine boasted a stunning 13 horsepower (my lawnmower is 430 cc). Just short of 4 million were produced until the model was succeeded by the Fiat 126 in 1975. Earlier models featured rear-hinged 'suicide' doors; these were replaced with conventional front-hinged doors with the release of the 500F in 1965. Review: 10271 CREATOR Fiat Nuova 500 Parts: 960 Price: £74.99 | $89.99 | €79,99 | AU$139.99 Like the Beetle and Mini, the LEGO Fiat no steering, but aims at a realistic body for display with authentic features. Coming in at the same price as the VW Beetle (in the UK; the latter is pricier in most regions), the Fiat consists of over 200 fewer parts. Let's see if that price hike is worth it. Box I confess that at first glance at the box i thought this set was ordinary LEGO yellow, and it was only in looking at the little painting on the box that I noticed the paler tones of Bright Light Yellow - it's particularly noticeable when you compare to the yellow round tile on the artist's palette. The box art mimics approximately the scene of the painting, with the car posed attractively in front of Rome's iconic Flavian Amphitheatre, or Colosseum. I was disappointed not to see a tiny easel in the painting. Some lens flare adds sparkle. Cobbled streets abound. The box rear shows off the car's attractive rump, along with the set's other features which exceed the bounds of their respective insets. The car stands out beautifully in the otherwise nondescript and unidentified back street; a pronounced sepia filter provides a warm which contrasts but complements the dark blue of the CREATOR Expert range box trim. Sadly, thumb tabs are the designated means of opening - disappointing for an adult-oriented set such as this. I am pleased to see some schematics along with real set reference images on the box top: This saves me the job of sourcing my own reference images! They've even produced a LEGO schematic. The box contains some nine polybags - three modules with three bags each, the instructions, and a separately-packaged fabric part, which you can see here. Instructions The manual comes in a separate polybag which also contains the sticker sheet. There's no cardboard backing but the wrapping has in my case done a good job of preserving the booklet. I love this! The square manual evokes an old Polaroid photograph, and if that weren't obvious enough there's a rotated panel within the picture like a photo within a photo. The faded colours and dress provide the perfect 60s vibe and (even though I'm not that old) have me pining for family holidays long-since passed. Interestingly the car featured in the picture is an older model with rear-hinged doors. I think this is the first time I've encountered a LEGO instruction manual that doesn't feature the set on the cover. A downside to the cute square booklet is that it doesn't stay open, and I wasn't about to go breaking the perfect-bound spine just for the sake of some photos. The instructions are clear against a duck-egg blue background, with suitable callouts, and extra guidance for the few tricky bits. Some four double-pages at the front provide some interesting history into the car and the FIAT company. I'm a big fan of these educational instructions - what a fabulous way to preserve our cultural heritage. Also in the instruction pack is one of the prettiest sticker sheets I've ever encountered. The decals for the car are reasonably easy to apply, though the smaller square ones all go onto curved parts. They are well colour-matched. The 5x5 square painting is gorgeous. As is customary, a variety of nationalities are featured in the car registrations. The Danish (DK) and German (PN) plates both feature the set number formatted to a realistic registration number (although in Denmark, 10.xxx numbers were for motorcycles I believe). PN is not an obscure region of Germany but instead refers to the set designer Pierre Normandin. The Italian plate is worthy of note. 'TO' is the area code for Turin (Torino; the 'T' in FIAT and the firm's city of origin); 'F01965' can only refer to the 500F model which was released in 1965 and was the first to feature front-hinged doors, as does the LEGO version. Parts The three modules' parts are shown in the thumbnails below: click the pictures to see larger versions. I didn't identify any new moulds in this collection, but the headline is the shear number of parts appearing for the first time in bright light yellow. This colour has been in the ascendency for a few years, featuring for example as panels and bricks in Friends sets, or as the secondary colour of the new livery of the CITY fire sets, but I have not previously encountered such a fine spread. This extends too to the SNOT parts; there are SNOT brackets and bricks of various conformations all in BLY - contrast the Beetle whose extensive SNOT pieces were for most part grey. Otherwise, the 10x4x1 windscreen and the 4x2 2/3x1 trans-clear curved bricks are found only in the Old Trafford set, and there are three (one spare) 1x1 round tiles with a lovely FIAT logo - see later. The four medium dark flesh arms-with-pins in the centre photo took me a while to identify; they are originally Nexo Knight parts found more recently as ice cream cone limbs. Build I won't go through this exhaustively; instead I'll just try to give you a feel for the build and highlight some interesting bits. We join here fairly early in module 1. Of some interest is the construction of the chassis: In the centre are dark grey 2x4 plates with pins on each side, usually used as wheel axles, here connecting to the technic beams on either side. The centre beams are connected to the outer beams and the black 2x2 plates with technic hole via 3L pins. The result is a strong floorpan only a brick high. The underside is reinforced; see here. The rear bumper and lights is attached via SNOT plates, and also unusually with the 2x3 clippy-tile. I remain uncertain of the purpose of the two blue stud-pins on either side of each end of the chassis; they serve no apparent purpose except possibly to help put the axles into the right holes. If that's the case, I can't help but feel a little patronised. Next we build up the rear, at the start of Module 2. You get to see how the wings are attached at a slant using hinge-plates in a technique that will be familiar to anyone who has ever built an X-wing. See here for a part-assembled view. Above these slanted sections, SNOT-attached curved plates help define the car's double-curvature. Note the small 2x2 with corner cutaway, which attaches solely to the single stud of the grey headlight brick you can see mounted on its side - it's next to the turquoise brick if not immediately obvious. I always like headlight bricks used this way. You can also see the gearstick and handbrake, along with the bars to which the chairs will be attached. Up till now the build has been enjoyable, without being especially challenging. It starts to go up a gear at this point. r The dashboard section is a SNOTty conundrum that requires a bit of mental gymnastics to keep oriented correctly. This is made harder by the fact that a sticker needs to applied to one of the inverted 2x2 curved plates, seen here at the base of the dashboard but will face to the rear of the car when mounted - and it will be all too easy to set it upside down. The black block seen here is the fuel tank, which will attach to the visible forward-facing yellow studs of the dashboard section therefore reverting to studs-up. Towards the front are two black 2L pin joiners, the purpose of which is a little mystifying at this point. I (wrongly, as it transpired) assumed they were to attach the headlights. Next come the doors. I've part-deconstructed one here to show how it's made. 1x2 SNOT brackets - regular and inverted - hold some 1x2 clicky-hinges; these attach to 2x1 clicky hinges to produce a half-stud offset to which the contoured door upper is attached, delightfully smooth with curved plates on inverted tiles. Note the 1x1 corner panel brick just in front of the door hinges, and the 1x4 brick-with-slot at the base of the door - these are significant as will be explained later. On the right is the rear window made out of a door panel. The result is slightly asymmetrical, but it's barely noticeable. Moving into Module 3, the front panel is attached to the the inner studs of the 1x2 SNOT bricks, and the two 1x1 grey inverted brackets. You might think this would be a little weak, but the headlights help to keep it attached. Here you can also see that the black pin-joiners have nothing to do with the headlights, which instead will attach to the forward-pointing bars of the black 1x1 round-plates-with-bars (these things) sandwiched between 1x2 round-end plates. Why the round-end plates? And, for that matter, the heel-print tiles? Answer: they allow the wings to attach at a slant. Regular plates or bricks would interfere with the square front ends of the wings. Here, also, the purpose of the black pin-joiner part is made clear: the wings are seven studs long, and the 1x2 curved-top bricks require a 1x2x(4/3) curved brick to fill the gap. This has a protruding plate, and the black cylinders accommodate and also support this. Note the as-yet-unattached wing at the bottom of the picture. The free end of the hinge will be mounted on the black and yellow studs just in from the door hinge, and this reveals the reason for the 1x1 corner panel: it accommodates the rounded pivot of the hinge plate. Kudos to the designer for the problem-solving skills on display here . Finally, the secret of the folding roof is revealed to be more of those mini-frying pan pieces, this time in BLY. They leave a small visible irregularity in the roof edge, but I'm glad they are at least colour-matched. It is then a little tricky to attach the windscreen and the luggage-compartment cover without breaking it, but when it's done, plus wheels and the set's extra bits, we have a finished car. Overall, the build is deceptive. Apart from a few tricky bits, it is smooth and easy to follow, but enjoyable; it is all too easy to miss some wonderful design touches that help recreate the car's curvy outline. I'd rate the difficulty as 'Expert' (harder than Average but not Master or Legendary ) The Complete Set First impression: yup, it's definitely a Fiat 500. I think the LEGO version has the iconic double-curved bodywork down pretty well. I was pleasantly surprised by the slanted front and rear wings, which help to recreate the ovoid shape of the Fiat, and weren't immediately apparent from the box art or my brief look at the promotional pictures before receiving the set. It looks great in Bright Light Yellow which I think was the perfect choice: whilst the car would look stunning in a bright mid-blue tone, or dark blue or green, these have been used recently for CREATOR cars; possibly the only other colour I could see making such an impact here is the very rare Medium Green. The head-on view isn't the car's most interesting angle. The windscreen is perhaps rather obviously too rectangular, a flaw of the medium of course. There should be a curve to the top edge, and the screen of course should bow slightly. The front is nicely contoured, and I like the use of the unicorn horns to mimic the flashing here. I'm not quite so keen on the headlights, which I think might have been better made with inverted domes. You can see I've put on the Italian plated for the Italian car. A three-stud-long tile is used (3x2 at the back) which works well. The curvy rear has I think turned out nicely, helped by the stickers which are a reasonable representation of the vents for the rear engine. I'm not so keen on the flare of the wheel arches form these angles, but they are less obvious from any other viewpoint. Ideally, the lip of the wheel arches should extend all the way round, but no such part exists. You might also notice that the construction differs front to rear: Inverted slopes are used at the rear, but I think the SNOT-mounted cheese wedges at the front give a smoother more circular outline. The contour of the roof toward the rear is a little fussy from the side, with an obvious step between the roof and rear window. I do like the double-curve of the sides, but this comes with slight problems: notice the half-stud gap behind the door handle, caused by the upper bulge being offset, but this improves the front edge of the door, where the cut corner almost perfectly matches the rake of the windscreen. Ideally the top line of the upper curve would be continuous with the curve of the front luggage compartment; it's close, but not quite matched, and interrupted by the windscreen. The tricky curves of the rear have provided a significant challenge, which the designer has worked hard to overcome. The result is mostly successful: The convex engine compartment cover works superbly, and the light clusters look great and are instantly recognisable. The transition from the rear curve to the side is a little awkward: above the light clusters, there are two 45-degree slopes topped by a 33 degree cheese wedge, then moving to the almost-vertical bottom end of the yellow curved brick: the 33 degree cheese looks a little incongruous and I wonder whether another 45 slope would work better. I like the way the 45 slope echoes that of the cut-corner curved slope on the side, but below this the curved end of the rear wing ends a little messily. I can't suggest how to improve this though, and I am being super-picky here: the overall result is lovely. The birds-eye view really emphasises the car's ovoid outline. From here almost everything is smooth, and I hope you agree that the slanted wings are a triumph. I also like the minifigure skates as door handles. Here's a real one, in a similar colour, for comparison: The LEGO version has managed to reproduce the double-curved body sides pretty well, with only the step at the sides of the windscreen interrupting the curves. Missing are the tiny wing indicator lights, which i believe were standard on the 500F (correct me if I'm wrong), and the door mirror, which does not appear to have been mandatory and may even be a later addition. The lack of door mirrors does make the LEGO car look a little odd, conditioned as I am to seeing them on all cars these days. Features The luggage compartment cover lifts to a maximum of about 45 degrees to reveal a poky space taken up almost entirely by the fuel tank and spare wheel. No room for picnic baskets in this car. On the plus side, the spare wheel is the same size as the other wheels, unlike the Beetle's. I've switched to the German plates for this section. The inset shows a close-up of the 1x1 round FIAT tile, which is pretty and much nicer than the VW equivalent. You might notice here a slight quirk of the construction: the front panel sits half a plate height proud of the main body; the 1x8 tile on the top therefore half a plate behind. The latter lines up perfectly with the compartment cover when closed. It's barely noticeable, and if anything helps to smooth the contours. I'm not so keen on the black bars to which the headlights are attached, and wish they'd used light bluish grey. The doors open wide - really wide. On the inner aspect of the door is some dark red to match the seats, a telephone handset for the inner door handle, and an antenna to mimic the window handle (not a winder: it rotates the quarterlight window). Recall that I mentioned the 1x4 brick with groove at the bottom of the door: here you can see the reason for its use: it allows the door to close around the protruding pivot of 2x2-2x2 hinge plate at the rear (second panel). Again, an ingenious solution. The front seats flip forward, as you can see, using the ice cream cone arm pieces. True to life, the dashboard is rather Spartan body-coloured painted metal, and the steering column features an indicator lever and a single speedometer. You may just be able to make out some cheese wedges under the steering column to represent pedals. Compared to the real thing, the LEGO version is reasonably accurate. There's even a white round-end plate behind the speedometer, which would a more impressive nod to accuracy were the steering wheel also white. The wheel should probably be larger, but having seen the problem of the oversized steering wheel in the Mini, I think too small is better than too big. I've taken the roof off to give a better view of the interior. The decal does a good job of imitating the real dashboard switches, though there should be one more and some indicator lights. Here too you can admire the handbrake and gearstick, the latter crudely but effectively realised from a flick-fire pin in a ball joint. There's a surprising amount of space for such a dinky car; you could even sit two adults in the back, provided they have short legs and don't mind getting intimate. I'm not sure how authentic the white tops of the seats are; I can't find a reference image to a car which has them, except for this model. The rear engine is also given a bit of detail. True to life the cover opens downwards; the cover is perhaps a little thicker than necessary, but the effect when closed is pleasing. Here the engine looks like a rather randomly thrown-together collection of parts, but when compared to the reference image below, you can see that the designer has gone to some effort to make it accurate: Bonus points for the gold flower piece to match the oil filler cap! Finally we should look at the accessories. There's a sturdy travel case, emblazoned with national stickers of Switzerland, Sweden, Italy, Denmark, Poland, France, Germany, and Somewhere; there's a tall easel on which can be mounted the really quite beautiful artwork on a 5x5 grey tile. The accompanying artist's palette sports four paint colours only one of which (red) features in the painting: the yellow is regular yellow. Only the palette and brush fit in the trunk, requiring the easel to be stowed in the passenger footwell and poking out of the roof. The automotive masterpiece, meanwhile, must be thrown unceremoniously onto the back seat like grocery shopping or children. The trunk mounts easily onto the rear luggage rack, where the combination of reddish brown and MDF colours complement nicely the light yellow of the car. Comparison So how do the European small cars compare? Bear in mind that while the Beetle and Fiat and built at approximately the same scale (the VW Beetle is a metre longer than the 500), the Mini should be the same size as the Fiat. I now notice that somebody, probably a small child, has tipped both the Fiat's seats forward. I'm really quite positive about the Fiat, but I can't help feeling that it looks a little bland compared to its older siblings. Perhaps it is because the front is relatively featureless. The (intentional and authentic) lack of door mirrors is particularly noticeable here. All three look amazing from the rear. The Mini again has an unfair size advantage, and I am perhaps not doing the Fiat justice by showing it straight on where its narrow profile makes it seem that much smaller. However you feel, I think you will agree that the three make a great collection. Conclusion I really like this car. The slanted wings and double-curved bodywork help to capture the essence of this automotive classic, working well despite the constraints of medium of LEGO. The bright light yellow livery helps emphasise the car's playful nature, whilst bringing yet another peripheral colour to the LEGO mainstream. Realistic features abound and add to the display potential, and it will sit happily on the shelf by itself or in the illustrious company of any of the CREATOR Expert cars, including the Mustang and Aston Martin. The selection of BLY pieces will delight any parts-collector or MOCer, especially given the array of SNOT pieces. The build process is satisfying, and in the latter stages both entertaining and somewhat challenging, with interesting techniques from which I've certainly learned a thing or two. And now I find I have a conundrum. I reviewed the Beetle in 2016 and was quite critical; it is for the most part a great set, and an interesting build. It is currently still available, and in the UK is the same price as the Fiat, despite some 200 more parts; it is perhaps more interesting to look at, and not just because it is physically larger. On paper, the Beetle is the better set of the two. However, there is something about it which didn't sit right with me, and still doesn't: mostly it is the steep rake of the windscreen which resembled more a 2CV than a Beetle, but also the chunkiness of the wheels and wheel arches always felt a bit off to me The Fiat doesn't really suffer any of these issues. Aside from a few minor cosmetic substitutions, I don't think I would change anything about the set as it is, with the currently available parts, and I don't have any major criticisms of this set. And yet, if you asked me which of the two you should spend your hard-earned £75 on, I would have to say ... the Beetle. If you can afford it, get both. The Fiat is a better rendition of the original car, and has a wonderful informative instruction manual usually the preserve of Ideas or Architecture sets. Design 9 There's very little I would have done differently. Build 8 A little mundane at the start, but gets interesting from Module 2 onwards, with some mind-screwing SNOT work and some fascinating solutions to tricky problems. Parts 8 Lots of useful SNOT parts, and a ton of parts that are new to Bright Light Yellow. If you need BLY, get this! Play/Display 8 The car's small size and narrow profile might make it look less imposing compared to the Mini and Beetle, but its colour and curviness do make it stand out. Value 7 Parts per pound, it is still great value, although perhaps not compared to the Beetle. Whether this difference is due to licensing (TLG has a long history of licensed VW products) or the extended manual, I don't know. If the latter, I will just quote myself: Overall 80% My score 9/10 I love this set. Fiat or Beetle? Follow your heart. Oh, and TLG? More classic cars please! Rufus's 10252 Beetle Review Fiat 500 on Wikipedia
  12. LegoV94

    Kenworth K100

    American truck Kenworth K100. The model is made in the scale of 1:22. Has a suspension on all wheels. Two l-motors are used for driving and a servo motor for steering model. The truck is equipped with an automatic trailer hitch. Thank you for watching.
  13. LegoModularFan

    Inspirational Modular and Castle MOCs

    Hey guys, I decided to create this topic and the main idea came from this and this post (so special thanks to @danth and @Digger of Bricks!). I would like to highlight three things before I start to post inspirational MOCs: I’ll post three staff picks everyday! Please feel free to post your favorite MOCs! Have fun admiring and taking inspiration from those great MOCs Top three MOC’s IMO in Baroque architecture: 1. This incredible Baroque Church by @Jellyeater! 2. This amazingly detailed MOC by @pj_bosman! 3. This greatly shaped modular by @cimddwc! Here are the three best Baroque MOC’s IMO! What do you think about them? Would you buy modulars like those if TLG made? Here are the Steampunk ones: 1. This incredible layout made together by @castor-troy and @domino39 (they also made one MOD of the PR and the MS and two MOD’s of the CC included in this layout. But they look so different that they are more MOC then MOD). EB topic here and Flickr albums with more photos here, here, here and here. 2. These great Steampunk modulars by @adde51! 3. These very interesting modulars by @Zilmrud who as well made great MOD’s of the PC and the BB! Here are the three most gorgeous Steampunk MOC’s IMO! What do you think of them? Would you buy modulars like those if TLG ever made?
  14. Then and Now - Comparing 4892 Prehistoric Power and 31058 Mighty Dinosaurs Just to provide an initial image of both sets together, please find below the main model of the 31058 with my MOC of a T-rex from 4892 using 85% of the available pieces. There are more pics of both sets along the post, which goes through Facts, Commercial, Parts&Techniques, Models & Community and Conclussions Now and then I buy old sets and they surprise me how archaic they look in respect to more recent ones. I am not trying to review boths sets here but to remark the changes in Lego across the years using these sets. Specially in the ball joints or articulation elements. If the Lego-volution topic is of your interest, please do not take this post as a comparison skipping to the end to find a winner because for me the meat is in the discussion so please feel free to share your thoughts. And my final conclusion is that both are excellent, “Each, in its own way”. I am publishing here to enable an open dialogue and your opinion is welcomed. Then and Now: Facts Year: 2006 2017 Set number: 4892 31058 Set name: Prehistoric Power Mighty Dinosaurs Branding: 8in1 3in1 Piece count: 380 174 (2.2 times) Weight of the pieces (grams): 381 108 (3.5 times) By the way, I am convinced that set size, part count and weight are only considered by AFOLs during purchase consideration, and not by children who are more comfortable with smaller sizes and sturdier and lighter models. Then and Now: Commercial Both Creator sets belongs to the 3in1 lineup, although the old one was advertised as 8in1. They are obviously similar because of the theme but going into the substance, both sets are alike because they were designed to build several brick-built creatures using articulated joints and giving them an organic look with wedges and slopes. The Creator line is now well established and there is a yearly spot for a “small brick-built 3in1 creatures set”, whereas in 2006 it was starting to understand its space in the product lineup. In fact it was its first year of life as we know it today, replacing the “Designer’s Set” range. The modern 31058 fills a spot in the 15 €/$ low range and the old Triceratops 4892 was positioned in the middle size spot of that year with a suggested price of 20 €/$. Do not get fooled by the proximity of the above numbers. Prices have changed in 11 years so the double box-size and piece count - and triple weight - puts the older set in the range of 2017’s 31064 Island Adventures or 31068 Modular Modern Home of 30 to 35 €/$. Pictures reflects clearly the differences in size. Then and Now: Parts&Techniques The old set has bigger, sharper and heavier pieces. By 2006 there were no small smooth curved slopes, as the 2008’s curved 4x1 no studs 61678, the 2013’s Curved 1x2 no studs 11477 or the 2014’s Curved 2x2 no studs 15068. So the organic shaping was achieved by straight slopes, being the smallest available the 45º 2x1, but in general by 4x1 and 4x2 wedges. This requires a bigger scale to achieve relatively smooth shapes and as a result the old set feels bulky, heavy and sharp in every ridge and corner whereas the new one is light and comfy to the hand allowing better child play. Even the old brick separator included in 4892 is heavier and sharper! Well, 31058 does not include the orange one but you get the point. The solutions for the articulation of limbs and jaws shows an even more drastic change. Joints have evolved greatly in 11 years. I suggest to have a look to the following links for further detail in joints: link1, link 2 (Mecha builders are the experts in this topic) My understanding is that the families of joints are, from strongest to weakest and from more degrees of articulation (flexible) to less: Special - as the “AT-AT leg joint” or compass seen in V-shape in the image Rackets - also known as Exo-Force joints, now discontinued and the 4892 main solution in red and grey Bionicle balls -could be “Big balls” but I am not looking for jokes- these are present in 31058 Hinges, as the yellow example, in many variations Mixel joints or “Small balls” also known as, small cups, also included in 31058 Old style turntables in various formats The old cups for small balls, in old grey in the top-left corner The infinite possibilities of bars and clips When I started with Creator animals I was a bit puzzled on how many solutions are available to provide articulation, the above pic is my effort to make sense of them. I think that Lego just produced different solutions at different moments in time for different needs/product lines (Exo-Force, Bionicle, Mixels…) Yes, the Lego brick is 60 years old and its patent has expired; that applies just to the old 2x4 brick. Joints and slopes in 31038 are designs of the recent 21st century, just around the corner; and I do not think that it was possible to produce them with quality even in 2006, comparing the loose grip of old cups with the nice one of the new small balls.This and the bigger one in black in the top-center of the image was one of the hardest family to distinguish across sets inventories and in bkicklink. The bigger is a bit stronger but both are excellent, the smaller is also simpler to use. Variations of SNOT pieces have been released in these years as well. Not sure what has refrained Lego from making available all variations at once from the beginning, apart from brackets which might have required additional technology to avoid cracking. The fact is that from the 2006 set we just get three models of 2-ways SNOT elements in small quantities which pales in comparison with the assortment of 2-ways and even a 3-ways pieces in the modern set. Then and Now: Models & Community At that time the AFOL community had not available all current tools and cameras, so 4892 reviews are not as detailed as the ones for 31058. Brickset’s Review 31058 and Eurobrick’s Review 4892 Jangbrick’s video review 31058 and Video for 4892 Regarding alternates or C-models, both sets are designed for this purpose offering each a huge number of possibilities. The old one missed a T-Rex among the 12 suggested in the instructions’ booklets, maybe because there was one as the main model of 4507 - Prehistoric Creatures from 2004, under the “Designer’s Set” range. I had filled that spot, which can be found in rebrickable , and anyone could make another dozen of excellent models. It is the first alternate to that set in rebrickable, a symptom of what was going on online in 2006. The instructions include 8 models but I’d say just 3 use 75% or more of the available pieces. The new one seems to “only” include instructions for 3 models in the box but there is a fourth one (diplodocus) available for download by Lego (plus some additionals!?) In addition to that it was the star of a contest for alternatives in 2017 and as a result it showcases 24 excellent MOCs in rebrickable and there should be many more in youtube and other pages. What I read from the above is that the Lego effort in producing alternatives /C-models has been substituted by the community activity, with an astonishing improvement. I do not mean that Lego is not doing nothing to promote, create and provoke us, the community, just that the move has been good and it is providing more “play” for all. Due to its nature and parts selection, there has not been any problem in finding examples or ideas to make equivalent models for both sets.I picture here the official main models for each set with the other set matching the “challenge”. I have enjoyed this a lot!! Then and Now: Conclusion Both sets are excellent but if you are used to the 2010’s Lego experience the old set feels … old Despite the new slopes giving a better look and the new SNOTs allowing amazing solutions, there is a complaint I keep on reading from AFOLs feeling a bit cheating in respect to the old times.That is because there are too many specialized pieces. There is a blurry border between a prefabricated plastic toy to be assembled once and played and a construction blocks toy to be built and rebuilt. And the line might be drawn based on the number of available elements and its ability to be used in several builds, fostering or killing creativity. I would say that yes, we have 10 times more parts than before, but the way they are designed to be combined gives as well 10 more models out of the same pieces, keeping the level up. I would say that creativity is king in both sets and the “specialized elements” in 31058 provides lots of opportunities,more than the old blocks from 4892. The main reason for that is the flexibility added by the small joints and the variety of SNOT elements. Anyhow, I am extremely happy with my old triceratops and its bulky and heavy feel fills me with nostalgia and joy.
  15. Hi Everyone I'd like to share my first MOC design which I've been working on over the past few weeks. I decided to set myself a challenge to see if I could create a Modular building using just the parts taken from 3 of my existing sets. All the parts I used were taken from the 3 Creator sets above, 31036, 31050 and 31065. The only extra thing I added was a green 16 x 32 baseplate but apart from that, everything else is taken from those 3 sets. So here is my very first MOC - The Modular Convenience Store As you can see the model is 16 studs wide and is designed to fit in with the Modular building series. There are 3 levels and although it's essentially one building, I wanted to give the impression from the outside that it consists of 2 narrow buildings side by side with the main shop on the left and the tall blue section to the right. Level 1 - The Convenience Store The first level of the building is the Convenience Store itself. Outside on the front we have a bench, street lamp, flower display and a fire hydrant. The main door at at the base of the blue tower gives access to the inside of the store. Inside the store there is a cash desk, fruit and vegetables and shelves with various items for sale. I also built a small shooping trolley for the minifigs to use with their shopping. A door at the back of the store gives access to the rear of the building. At the back is a staircase leading to the second level. Level 2 - Apartment On the middle level is an apartment / studio flat. On the outside is a large Bay window and a door with a Juliet balcony looking out on to the street below. The inside of the apartment is pretty small but I have managed to squeeze in a kithcen, TV, bed, lamp, shelves, table and stool. Level 3 and Roof Outside again the only way for the minifigs to reach the next level is via a ladder on the back of the building. The top level consists of a small building and a roof top garden. The roof top building is extremely small (6 x 4 studs) but the roof can be removed and inside is a table with binoculars, a lamp and a brick built sweeping brush hanging on the wall. A door from this small building leads out in to the roof top garden. Here we have a BBQ, seat, plants and a glass covered vegetable patch. Displaying the Model Here are a selection of pics showing the model on display alongside Parisian Restaurant and Assembly Square. Thanks for reading and I hope you like the model, feel free to let me know what you think. If you want to see more pics then head over to my Flickr page where I've added loads more. https://www.flickr.com/photos/140122416@N02/albums
  16. Discuss everything pertaining to sets released for the LEGO Creator theme in 2019 here, whether it be for the "Three-In-One" or Expert subthemes. If you wish though, discussion of the annual Expert subthemes for Modular Buildings, the Fairground sets, Landmark builds, Expert-scale cars, and the Winter Village line particularly can take place over at these respectively linked topics instead: Eurobricks - Modular Building Sets - Rumors and Discussion Eurobricks - Fairground Sets - Rumors and Discussion Eurobricks - Creator Expert Landmark Buildings - Rumours and Discussion Eurobricks - Creator Expert Cars - Rumors, Discussion, and Speculation Eurobricks - Winter Village Sets - Rumors and Discussion This post will be updated as further information arrives, including official set numbers, names, and images. Futuristic Flyer (31086) Dune Buggy (31087) Deep Sea Creatures (31088) Sunset Track Racer (31089) Underwater Robot (31090) Shuttle Transporter (31091) Helicopter Adventure (31092) Riverside Houseboat (31093) Race Plane (31094)
  17. Hi. I'm a Lego Technic MOC builder but when I got into Lego years ago I have got a lot of sets and made some... interesting MOCs. I'm considering to change up my display setup to make it look better, and I thought asking for advice and suggestions would be a great idea. Here's the collection as of now: The left shelf has my MOCs and the right shelf has sets and space MOCs. (The posters above are going to be removed) Left Shelf On the top of the left shelf are cars I made over 3 years ago. They're not pretty, and I probably won't be taking them apart for new builds since I'm giving my full time to Technic. On the middle of the shelf is some custom Bionicle figures I made as part of a weird story I made on the now defunct Lego.com gallery. On the bottom of the shelf is a... quirky house with a living room, kitchen, closet, bathroom, and bedroom that I made probably four years ago, broke, and rebuilt. It serves no use and its use as a display piece is kind of worthless, but it's one of the biggest things I built at the time. The playground on the middle shelf used to be connected to the right of the house. It hurts to remember having it on my dresser not playing with it because the house wasn't pretty. I should rebuild the house into something new but I'm keeping it as a memory and since all the pieces are a different color and I have no idea what to build. MineCraft Display A ton of MineCraft sets I got to connect to each other and make a cool display. Unfortunately I ignore it often and never got to my plans to put a MineCraft wallpaper up to make it look like a set box, but I'd like to. Right Shelf Just built sets and space MOCs I made forever ago. Top Shelf I expanded the shelf above by placing two poster frames and holding them up with a bar mounted in the wall, making it easy for removal and since I don't want to use a permanent structure. I like it but it's impossible to see items placed all the way back, so I don't know if I want to keep it or not. Here's the bar it was on... And here's the shelf I put the boards on top of. A lot of the items on the shelves are builds I don't have as much interest in as the large Creator cars I want to display here so I'm open for ideas. If this was your space to display your Lego collection, what would you do? How would you display creations you like and the ones that are not as interesting?
  18. Bricked1980

    [MOC] VINTAGE YELLOW TAXI

    Hi everyone This is my new MOC. A vintage taxi loosely based on American style taxicabs from the 1950's / 60's. The model is 6 studs wide and contains 187 parts. I've designed this model as my entry in a contest currently running on LEGO Ideas. The brief is to design a vintage car to compliment the style of the LEGO modular buildings. i felt that a taxi would fit the bill pretty well, especially with the more recent American style modulars like Downtown Diner and Corner Garage. Anyway It's a long shot but if I was lucky enough to win the contest then this model would be released as a future gift with purchase set. Here's the link to contest entry over on LEGO Ideas. VINTAGE YELLOW TAXICAB The trunk can be opened to provide plenty of space for luggage. there is enough space inside the taxi to seat three minifigures. Here's a pic showing the taxi alongside 2 of my MOC modular buildings which are both also on LEGO Ideas, Bricks & Blooms and Brick Town Police Station. I hope you like the model, feel free to let me know what you think.
  19. LEGO MOC #44 Vintage Stylish Convertible What thing can be cooler than driving a stylish convertible in Lego city. This convertible has a working convertible roof !!!! Also the hood, door and trunk can be opened. It is definitely a dream car for your minifigures. Please support this project and let you minifigures have a chance to drive it :D It is another project for LEGO Ideas contest "BUILD A VINTAGE CAR TO CRUISE THE STREETS OF LEGO® MODULAR BUILDINGS!" . Ideas: https://ideas.lego.com/challenges/bafd4186-bb49-4eb0-903f-910415f04391/application/d3de2218-e220-41a0-8e65-af4fc7642a95/comments_tab#idea-tabs My other MOC models: [MOC] Vintage Stylish Convertible [MOC] Vintage Bus [MOC] Halloween Pumpkin Horse Carriage [MOC] ISUZU NPR Light Duty Truck [MOC] Karsan Jest Mini-Bus [MOC] Ford F150 XLT [MOC] London Double Decker Bus Dennis Enviro 400 [MOC] Lada VAZ-2105 [MOC] Subaru WRX [MOC] Classic Cadillac Convertible [MOC] Toyota 6th Gen. HiAce Van [MOC] James Bond Aston Martin DB5 [MOC] Toytoa HiAce van [MOC] Toyota GT86 [MOC] Office Desk [MOC] Ferrari F355 [MOC] Toyota AE86 Coupe (2018 version) in Initial D Animation [MOC] Police Motorcycle #2 [MOC] Sport Bike Stop Motion Speed Build [MOC] New York City Police (NYPD) Car [MOC] Lego Mini Cooper [MOC] Japan Tokyo Taxi vol.1 東京無線タクシー [MOC] Ice Cream Truck [MOC] LEGO California Highway Patrol [MOC] LEGO Police Car [MOC] Police Motorcycle [MOC] New York City Taxi / Cab [MOC] LEGO NYC News Stand [MOC] New York City Transit Bus [MOC] Newspaper Rack [MOC] Coke/Beverage Cooler Initial D AE86 Racer AC Transit Bus AC Transit Bus Short Version Ice Cream Van
  20. Instructions here: http://bit.ly/utb-boston-terrier
  21. Elysiumfountain

    [MOC] Cliffside Villa

    Well, after a long period of not doing much besides the giant Eleitian Central Command model, I present to you my newest model, The Cliffside Villa! The idea came about last Sunday, I was procrastinating on doing stuff I was supposed to, as one does. I decided to expand on the bridge, which I had been building as a standalone concept but couldn't figure out what to do with. I was going to build a fairytale castle on the cliffs that I eventually made behind the bridge, but then it morphed into an entirely different building altogether! The porches, stained glass window, and other elements of the actual pavilion came about next, after I'd laid the groundwork (literally) in the form of the cliffs. I then decided to make it into a combination of my previous Temple of the Moon Maiden MOC and something more open to interpretation. So it could be used, (it sits on a baseplate totaling 32 x 48) as an addition to a modular city! Perhaps a large city park with a pavilion, or some form of garden! From my official description: It's a fine spring day at the Cliffside Villa! The Moon Priest contemplates the deep questions of life on the porch, while his daughter strolls the elegantly appointed walkways of the garden. Two guards stand sentry by the staircase, protecting the inhabitants of the Villa from harm. Explore all the secret nooks and crannies of this large set, from the bell tower to the fish pond to the stained glass window behind which the statue of the Moon Maiden is placed! Set features: - 2568 Pieces - 7 Minifigures: The Moon Priest, Moon Priest's Daughter, Statue of the Moon Maiden, (2) Garden Statues, (2) Guards - Villa features a large stained glass window, metallic Statue of the Moon Maiden on a raised pedestal, and two spacious porches. Upper story features a movable bell! - Elegant bridge crosses a large frog pond filled with lily pads and other aquatic plants. See if you can spot the frogs hiding down there! - Statuary adorns the garden, which is built onto the cliffs with beautiful brick-built birch and cherry trees in full bloom. - Relax on the small bench set below one of the statues! - Features multiple unique pieces, such as the Ornamental gold fish adorning the roof, the Moon Priest's staff, and much more! - Spacious basement level beneath the Villa is perfect for placing hidden treasure or whatever you need for added suspense! But don't just follow that one story for this model, use your imagination to make it your own! This model, on baseplates totaling 32 x 48, can be placed as a standalone model or a complementary model for your modular city! Use it as a pavilion, a city park, or a historical monument in your LEGO town. This MOC is now on LEGO Ideas! If you want to, please help support it, I'd love for it to be one of the lucky few that makes it! The Cliffside Villa: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/4bfda07a-beb1-440e-bcfe-d9742e9d3746 Feel free to leave any comments below, and keep on building, everyone! :)
  22. bricksboy

    MOC#37 Isuzu NPR Light Duty Truck

    MOC#37 Isuzu NPR Light Duty Truck Isuzu NPR is a very popular truck in many countries. The cabin doors, back doors and lift gate can be functioned. My other MOC models: [MOC] Halloween Pumpkin Horse Carriage [MOC] ISUZU NPR Light Duty Truck [MOC] Karsan Jest Mini-Bus [MOC] Ford F150 XLT [MOC] London Double Decker Bus Dennis Enviro 400 [MOC] Lada VAZ-2105 [MOC] Subaru WRX [MOC] Classic Cadillac Convertible [MOC] Toyota 6th Gen. HiAce Van [MOC] James Bond Aston Martin DB5 [MOC] Toytoa HiAce van [MOC] Toyota GT86 [MOC] Office Desk [MOC] Ferrari F355 [MOC] Toyota AE86 Coupe (2018 version) in Initial D Animation [MOC] Police Motorcycle #2 [MOC] Sport Bike Stop Motion Speed Build [MOC] New York City Police (NYPD) Car [MOC] Lego Mini Cooper [MOC] Japan Tokyo Taxi vol.1 東京無線タクシー [MOC] Ice Cream Truck [MOC] LEGO California Highway Patrol [MOC] LEGO Police Car [MOC] Police Motorcycle [MOC] New York City Taxi / Cab [MOC] LEGO NYC News Stand [MOC] New York City Transit Bus [MOC] Newspaper Rack [MOC] Coke/Beverage Cooler Initial D AE86 Racer AC Transit Bus AC Transit Bus Short Version Ice Cream Van
  23. Bricked1980

    [MOC] THE QUEEN BRICKTORIA PUB

    Hi everyone I'd like to share with you my second MOC which I have been working on over the past few weeks. For this project I decided to tackle a subject very close to my heart - the Great British Pub! So without further ado... Grab yourself a pint and join me for a guided tour of The Queen Bricktoria! As you can see this is a modular style corner building with 3 floors built on a 32x32 base plate. The design is intended to be reminiscent of British town centre pubs or more specifically the style of pubs we'd see in London. The Minifigures There are 7 minifigs with the model. The 3 characters below are the pub workers. From left to right we have the Owner/Landlord and his daughter the barmaid. The guy with the guitar is a local singer who has been booked to play a gig at the pub. The 4 figures below are the pub regulars. The guy with the beard is the typical sort of old gent we find in many pubs propping up the bar and boring everyone to death with their stories of the good old days. The guy in the green top and the girl are boyfriend and girlfriend. Level 1 - The Bar Outside the building we have a busy street corner. I've included an iconic British red phone box and an outside covered seating area. There is also a sign board advertising events etc at the pub. The main entrance leads us in to the bar/lounge area. Inside we have a well stocked bar and a cozy fireplace. There are also tables and bar stool for the minifigs to sit and enjoy their drinks. Brown carrots make pretty good beer pump handles. At the back of the bar is a staircase leading us up to level 2. Level 2 - Pool and Darts Room On the second level is a games room featuring a Pool table and Dart board. There is also a pool cue rack and a shelf with trophies won by the resident darts team. At the back of the room is another staircase that leads to level 3. Level 3 - Live Music Room Level 3 has a stage for Live Music gigs and Karaoke. On the stage we have a keyboard, guitar, amps and microphone. Also on this level is more seating for the minifigs and a door that leads to a small balcony seating area. Oh dear!!! The singer seems to be a bit of a hit with the ladies. The Finished Model Here is a picture of the Queen Bricktoria next to my first MOC design, The Convenience store, as you can see my new MOC is much much bigger. Another picture below shows the pub next to one of the official modulars, to help give a sense of the size of the model. Thanks very much for reading and I hope you like my newest MOC. There are more pictures of it on my Flickr page so feel free to check them out and let me know what you think.
  24. The red double decker bus is one of the iconic London symbol. My model is base on Enviro 400 bus in a minifigure scale. It is 8 stud wide The top and the second level can be easily detached for more playability. The front, rear, and the engine compartment door can be opened. I also designed the London phone booth and the bus stop in this Lego set. This bus does not only fit in London, it can also fit in every kids' Lego city. If you like my design, please vote and suppport my project. Thanks! Lego Ideas link: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/51819e3c-ab50-47aa-b219-724108ac65c4 I have slightly modified the London double decker bus. 1. Raised the base by 1 plate height. 2. The front grill and bumpers have been changed. London Hop-on Hop-off Sightseeing Bus: Stagecoach Bus Company livery: First Group Bus Company livery: Metroline Bus Company livery: Central Bus Company livery: Eight stud wide, in minifigure scale: Engine compartment door can be opened: Detail interior: Bus stop and phone booth: Bus is full!! Vote this project and bring them home :) : My other MOC models: [MOC] London Double Decker Bus Dennis Enviro 400 [MOC] Lada VAZ-2105 [MOC] Subaru WRX [MOC] Classic Cadillac Convertible [MOC] Toyota 6th Gen. HiAce Van [MOC] James Bond Aston Martin DB5 [MOC] Toytoa HiAce van [MOC] Toyota GT86 [MOC] Office Desk [MOC] Ferrari F355 [MOC] Toyota AE86 Coupe (2018 version) in Initial D Animation [MOC] Police Motorcycle #2 [MOC] Sport Bike Stop Motion Speed Build [MOC] New York City Police (NYPD) Car [MOC] Lego Mini Cooper [MOC] Japan Tokyo Taxi vol.1 東京無線タクシー [MOC] Ice Cream Truck [MOC] LEGO California Highway Patrol [MOC] LEGO Police Car [MOC] Police Motorcycle [MOC] New York City Taxi / Cab [MOC] LEGO NYC News Stand [MOC] New York City Transit Bus [MOC] Newspaper Rack [MOC] Coke/Beverage Cooler Initial D AE86 Racer AC Transit Bus AC Transit Bus Short Version Ice Cream Van
  25. 31078 Treehouse Treasures Creator 3-in-1 INTRODUCTION Ooooh, a pirate boat? No, a treehouse! Wait, it's a pirate boat again... wha - it's a treasure cove now? Aaaah, it's a 3-in-1! What a lovely set, great parts, lots of play value. It immediately caught my attention when I was trodding along the aisles of my local supermarket. Who doesn't love pirates, anyway? And don't you dare to say "Nay" when I swing my rapier in your general direction... Arrrr! Having built 6289 Red Beard Runner lately, I just can't wait to get this started, so let's set sails and head over to the -> SET SPECS Number: 31078 Title: Treehouse Treasures Theme: Creator 3-in-1 Released: 2018 Part Count: 260 pieces Retail Price: DE - 29,99 € GB - 29,99 GBP US - 29,99 $ DK - 270,00 DKK With 260 pieces, the retail price of 29,99 € equates to a price of 0,12 € a piece. This is in the higher range for 2018 creator sets. In comparison, set number 31072 Extreme Engines comes down to 0,09 € per piece. And the 31074 Rocket Car is even down to 0,08 €. Well, I'm not sure the parts of latter set will be of versatile use with those strange colours... Funny enough, all 3 sets have been designed by the same person: Jeremy Luettgen. He has also been active designing some of the Mixels. Anyway, given the basic and tuned down colours of this set I think it's worth buying it for the retail price. LINKS 31078 @ brickset.com 31078 @ rebrickable.com LEGO PRODUCT SUMMARY Set out on pirating treehouse adventures! Enjoy imaginative pirate adventures with this LEGO® Creator 3in1 31078 Treehouse Treasures set, featuring a 3-level pirate ship treehouse with a ship deck, ship’s wheel, treasure chest hideaway function, bowsprit with flag and teddy bear, crow’s nest, tire swing and an upper-level den. Pirate accessories include a hat, telescope and 2 swords. This 3in1 model rebuilds into a Pirate Ship or a Skull Cave for more pirating fun, and includes 2 minifigures rigged out for pirate adventures, plus a scary spider figure. THE BOX As with all the Creator 3-in-1 sets, the front features the LEGO logo, set number and the main model in all it's glory, claiming three quarters of the available space. To the right we can have a look at the two alternative models. The age range is given as 7 to 12 years. While the lower limit seems quite fitting, the upper limit makes me wonder if I'm really too old to play with it... *makes sad face* The back shows the play features for each of the 3 sets and a link to the LEGO Creator homepage. You can also see the tabs to press in when opening the sets. I have to say that I am impressed by the simple look of the packaging. Nothing too distracting, nothing much to shift your attention away from those wonderful builds. THE PARTS After prying open the side, we have 3 bags with pieces, 1 Green plate 8x16 and 3 instruction booklets in our sweaty hands (or, hand and hook if your name is Captain Red Beard). We will get to the instructions later, so let's take a look at the pieces now. The Arch Bricks 1x5x4 in Dark Brown are nice parts for castle or ship builders. The Wedge Plate, 8x8, Cut Corner in Dark Azure is unique to this set. The Round Corner Tiles, 4x4 (called Maccaronis as I understand) in Medium Dark Flesh are also unique to this set. The wood planks are prints, overall there are NO stickers in this set. The decors are all printed. The short wood plank (1x3) together with the longer ones pictured here (1x4) can also be found in 21310 Old Fishing Store. 2x3 Tiles are quite new to me, while in fact they have first appeared in 2016. There's also a treasure chest in Medium Flesh in this set, which adds to the play possibilities. However, I do have a bit of a problem with it: You can close the lid, but as there is no resistance while closing it opens on it's own if you turn it upside down. Having some old-time sets around here and also a chest in brown (from the 80ies or 90ies?), I was wondering if they had the same problem? Well, nope. They do have a bit of a resistance while closing, maybe related to that pin on the lid, and they definitely do not open themselves without assistance. Seems LEGO employed some mold change, as the older ones are also missing those 2 ridges at the inside front. MINIFIGURES This set features 2 minifigures, a boy and a girl. Both minifigs have a single sided head, yellow arms, short legs (non-posable) and torso prints on front and back. The boy has a lime hoodie, while the girl features a white shirt with green print. It also includes one of these nice little teddybears with a torsoprint. While both minifigs are unique to this set, both torsos have seen use in other sets too - the boy's torso in 10260 Downtown Diner, the girl's one in 10261 Roller Coaster. As accessories, there is a pirate hat with a feather. 2 spare feathers are also included, which is a nice treat as those small parts have an affinity to getting lost. The plume feathers are not on a sprue, as LEGO has done in the past with Pirates or Castle sets in the 90ies, but come loose in the bag. However, there is no "normal" hair piece included for the boy, if you decide to make your place somewhat less pirat-ey. 2 pirate swords are present along with a golden telescope and a printed 2x2 tile with a treasure map pattern to complete the play experience. INSTRUCTIONS Overall, the instructions are nice and clear to follow. No printing errors or other mishaps. Instructions of the main model start with building the minifigures and continue with a somewhat ridiculous Step 1... When you are finished with building model A, the play feature is explained on the left side. On the right we have some more models available from the 3-in-1 series as house advertising (Avast ye bastards, look at that Pirate Coaster set ... ahem... Excuse me for getting a wee bit distracted here....). The parts list is in the back of model B. MAIN MODEL - TREEHOUSE Building goes along without any troubles. As stated in the last paragraph, the instructions are easy to follow. Progress goes bit by bit, sometimes only 1 or 2 bricks per page. Alas, I'm getting older and older, so I won't complain about that. There comes the day when I'll be happy about it :D What amazed me is the stability of the construction. I had the opportunity to build set 31080 Modular Winter Vacation and that thing just disassembled itself after 5 minutes of play time. In stark contrast, the Treehouse is rock solid and will surely be better suited for heavy play. Nice little details here and there, like the little rocks in the water and the spider waiting to catch those nasty little ki... err, let's just say it is waiting for prey. Here are the left-overs after building the main model: PLAY FUNCTIONS Play feature No. 1 definitely is the hidden treasure cache in the tree trunk. There is a little flap with a lock on it, which can be raised manually. The flap itselfs sits on a bar which is held in place by 2 blue technic pins. Behind that flap is space to hide the treasure chest. This chest can be ejected with the help of technic axles and axle connectors at the other side of the trunk. Other play functions are the openable top room (sides and rooftop) with crows nest atop, the tire swing and the ships bow with the steering wheel. Not to forget the slide at the side of the treehouse, which can be raised to be used as a plank. B MODEL - PIRATE SHIP A lot of parts are left unused, which could have been integrated easily. Therefore it's a pretty straightforward build experience and the B model is thus lacking a bit in play value. There is the crows nest and the lower deck with the spider in it. A posable rudder is present at the back and the steering wheel is now in the right place. I wonder why the treasure chest is placed on the deck, it may better be kept below deck. Oh well, as luck would have it our unexperienced seamen have a rather unpleasent encounter at sea. Seems someone else noticed that treasure chest too. Some useful armament wouldn't go amiss on this little bark. Maybe throw that teddybear over to soothe those angry pirates? SUMMARY & RATING PROS: + Adorable A and B models + Lots of play value + Nice, tuned down colours + 3 full grown instructions booklets + All prints, no stickers! CONS: - B model could have been better - C model does nothing to me... - Somewhat higher part price ratio Design: 8 / 10 Build: 8 / 10 Playability: 9 / 10 Minifigures: 7 / 10 Price: 7 / 10 Overall: 7,8 / 10 I couldn't be bothered assembling the C model, it's just too plain and definitely not a cave at all. But the treehouse and ship have been great fun to build and play with. While this set overall may not be outstanding to me, I would definitely put it into the "Above Average" category. It's play features and overall value due to the parts and colours and the fact that there are 3 full blown instruction booklets makes it worth. I can repeat it over and over again: All prints, no stickers! I guess that's also the reason why the price per part ratio seems a bit unfavourable. All in all a very nice set. To err is human, but to arr is pirate!!!