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Found 77 results

  1. Mr Maniac

    Review: Deep Sea Refuge

    Hello everyone! Long-time lurker, (relatively) first-time poster! With LEGO's latest Deep Sea lineup having taken longer than planned to come to the U.S. (wonder if there's any world events that might explain the delay?), I decided to browse through some of the old 1997 Divers sets earlier in the summer to see if anything caught my eye. Sure enough, I happened upon a MISB edition of Deep Sea Refuge on eBay. Having played with it at a friend's house as a kid, I decided to snap it up. But with the newest sets having a state-of-the-art underwater research station, does this original model still hold up? Let's find out as we go beyond the sea (just kidding, we're going under it. Sorry Bobby Darin.) Info Set # - 6441 Name - Deep Sea Refuge Theme/Subtheme - Town/Divers Year - 1997 Piece County - 433 Minifigures - 5 Price - MSRP $60 US Links Brickset, Peeron, Bricklink, Bricksafe Box Aside from a few minor dents and scrapes, the box still looks pretty good. Love that sunshine pattern on the seafloor. Definitely way more inviting than the box art for Aquazone, Atlantis or recent Deep Sea sets. It gives off that peaceful tropical island vibe that quite a few of the 90s sets gave me, although it probably helps that the only foliage available at the time were palm trees or those little conical and spherical versions. We also have the very cool Divers subtheme logo in the upper right-hand corner, along with an old price tag sticker that's still on the box. I won't say how much I paid for this thing unless asked, but I can assure you it was far from the original $59.99 shown here. That said, that logo continues to be great, reeking of atmosphere. You can practically hear the Jaws theme playing as Mr. Mask and Snorkel here looks to the surface and sees the shark silhouette, wondering if it saw him, if he can make it to safety... Moving on, the back of the box gives you some very fun alternative LEGO models, including a goofy little water slide and diving board setup, along with a larger (and smaller) undersea research station. Overall, they all seem pretty good to me, even if the boat on the largest alternative model picture looks a little strange with the bubble windshield. But that's the fun of LEGO. Now here's the good stuff. Like most boxes from this age, we have a great inner flap with more set pictures and some flavor text to help unleash your inner Jacques Cousteau, which I transcribed for all of you lovely people. "The ocean depths hold many mysteries and dangers. Sharks, stingrays and possibly sunken treasure! With building sets from the LEGO SYSTEM Divers collection, only you, the LEGO MANIAC, will find the secrets of the deep." The same flavor text is also available in French and Spanish for those in the multilingual crowd. We also have the customary (for the time, at least) plastic window which has some of the specialized parts on the left, with a random assortment of parts in bags to the right, complete with fun little scenes of the divers trying to outswim an octopus while a possible Captain Redbeard shipwreck lingers in the background. I understand why LEGO doesn't do this anymore, but man, it'd be great to bring this back. The top of the box feature some attractive water patterns, complete with rays of sun hitting the waves and the top of the ship's antenna and flag, which suggests the boat sank. Guess the pilot should've read the legal notice on the side of the box, which clearly states "NOT FOR USE IN WATER." The bottom of the box has some more of that big beautiful water pattern, complete with a porthole-like window design for viewing the diver minifigures and all that sweet, sweet animal life. Plus a now-useless barcode. Finally, the sides of the box both feature another angle of the set, with a captured shark and a sawfish that's getting a little too close for comfort for one of the divers. Once you open it, the seafaring fun doesn't stop at the exterior of the box, with a blue tray that helps contribute to the aquatic atmosphere. Take all the bags out of the right partition and you get the instructions plus a small catalogue which shows the hottest sets of 1997. Had to take a photo of the Divers page, as it looks great, with none of the obvious computer backgrounds that most promotional art has now. Instructions No surprises here. It's about the same as the box front, except without the name or age range. On the back are those wonderfully goofy alternative models again, along with a small blue tag in the lower left corner, which would be cut out and sent to LEGO for a magazine subscription. It may be repetitive, but I'll take this over Win-Shouty Kid any day of the week. Here's a random page in the actual instruction booklet. As you can see, no call-outs for individual parts, although submodels do have little yellow boxes. This can make for a more challenging build if you're not paying attention, though it's what I'm used to, so no problems there. Given the limited color palette, you get very good color differentiation, along with some fun graphics of schools of fish swimming around behind the instructions. Pieces Here's the eight bags that'll make up the whole set, still freshly sealed from all the way back in 1997. While LEGO doesn't use the bags with holes in them anymore (presumably to ensure the parts stay fresh), they still have a nice tactile quality to them. As far as loose parts go, all we've got here is one long string that will make up the winch and one lone LURP, which were everywhere back in the day. Two tan 32x16-stud baseplates make up the last loose parts in the box. Not as exciting as some other aquatic baseplates, but does provide plenty of room for staging little dioramas. Here's my first attempt at creating a photo grid in PhotoShop, with four of the bags open. Again, much like the instructions, no neat and orderly numbered bags like they make now. Chaos reigns when it comes to what parts are in what bag, so you just have to open all of them. Depending on your point of view, it can be either incredibly frustrating or incredibly rewarding to scrounge around until you find the exact piece you're looking for. And here's my second attempt at creating a photo grid in PhotoShop. With another four bags open, we can get started...almost. In case you couldn't see what was in the one plastic window, which so ably displayed all the cool new parts from this subtheme, worry not, as I took another photo of the parts after peeling the film away. We get some more sea life, some seaweed, two minifigures that have been tragically bisected by the sawfish and a few printed parts. As for the parts of interest, we have not one, not two, but three light-blue bubble windscreens, which were the most common versions according to Bricklink and mostly appeared in Divers sets (and were always excellent to have). We also get some neat modified bricks which were quite rare, only appearing in two sets in white and five sets total. The white and yellow panels 4x3x3 with portholes are also somewhat rare, having only appeared in five sets total, and only two sets in the color white, both from the Divers theme. As for the white panel 4x4x6 concave, these parts only appeared in seven sets, including some older ones from the space theme. Both the white and yellow 3x3x3 corner convex parts are probably one the more unique items here, having solely appeared in divers sets, while the minifigure handjet was sprinkled among a number of themes and subthemes (no pun intended), including an Aquazone set and Alpha Team: Mission Deep Sea one. Perhaps one of the more surprising finds here was the bow top, 6x6x1, which only appeared in two Divers sets. All told, quite a catch. As befits LEGO's generosity, we get two separate DSS for this set. I opted to leave off the marine life ones that go on the LURP since we now have actual molds to fill the gap, but I ended up using all the ones on the larger sheet, as it helps give the set some more character. Fortunately, LEGO's not a complete monster, and does give us plenty of excellent printed parts to make up for all the stickers, including control panels, a diving flag and three fun sea life tiles that will be part of a play feature. While I don't think it's to the same level as Adventurers, we still get lots of nice accessories for the minifigures to use as they explore the depths, along with two baseball hats to wear when they're not. Minifigures After getting the minifigures into emergency surgery (otherwise known as my hands), they're back together and ready to go! While they work well enough as generic figs to play around with, the May/June 1997 issue of Mania Magazine saw fit to give them all names that, depending on your perspective, are either endearingly silly or irritatingly cute. From left to right, we have Cora Reef (I think), twins Tug Topside and R.C. Scooter, along with Diver Dan and Scuba Sandy. As befits minifigures from this era, no backprinting exists for any of these characters, although the front of their uniforms are on-point, with great little sub logos that suggests a level of financing and organization the blue divers from the same subtheme simply don't have. Here's the gang with all their uniforms and scuba equipment on. Now we have a little more differentiation among the identical ones, and some of the flippers come into play. Love how the red and black flippers contribute to the overall look of the uniform. A rear shot of Cora and Dan with their oxygen tanks on. Kind of wish LEGO still used these ones, instead of the dual tanks from space sets, which are smaller and less detailed. We also get plenty of aquatic life for this set, including two stingrays, the happiest (and rarest) dolphin I've seen, the common sawfish and octopus, plus a white shark that may or may not be great. Hard to say with the newer one from this year. The Build We start by building the boat, which fits in nicely with the color scheme of the overall set. Even the 1x4 red brick works given the color band that makes up part of the actual Refuge structure. Build it up some more with a crane boom and some steering... ...then after tying off the string to the winch and hook, which is one of the two most frustrating steps in the world... ...you'll have a boat! Though something's still missing. So, after the second most frustrating step in the world... The boat is complete! While I don't have too many of the larger brick-built boats from this theme, the design of the cabin is particularly nice with the raised platform for the sonar dish. Not to mention the stern of the boat works better than the one from Shark Cage Cove, which always seemed a little low. Some other angles of the boat. One thing I like here is how the number on the side corresponds to the set number, something that still gets done anytime you pick up a set that has a vehicle in it. Now to move onto the main course that is the Deep Sea Refuge itself. I was surprised the instructions had you start on the main model immediately after building one of the two vehicles, but so it goes. We start by building the base. The blue hinge brick in the center is part of a play function that we'll come back to later. Add some flooring and the all-important chrome silver knives... ...followed by some furniture and hooks that will make up the changing room for divers... ...and we're well on our way. But first, a sub-model in the form of an X-ray machine. Obviously sleeker versions can be made now, but it works just fine and fits in nicely. Now it's starting to take shape. The machine on the opposite side of the X-ray machine is supposed to be a microscope, though it may not be the best version I've seen. The changing room for divers looks good, and fits all the extra scuba accessories that come with the set. Once that's complete, the Refuge gets closed up and we start working on the rock formation. Add a LURP and a roof to the Refuge... ...and we're done! While Sebastian and Flounder may be missing, there's still plenty of room on the two 32x16-stud baseplates for the sea life and divers we do get from the set. Some more angles of the Refuge itself. While it's quite bulbous, the shaping actually works for the structure, even if the greenery is a little samey compared to the diversity of parts we're spoiled with now. Now that we've gotten through the appetizer and main course, time for dessert, in the shape of a yellow submarine. We start with the base... Add in some branded compartments and that fishy computer screen in rear... ...and the sub starts to take shape once we add the last bubble windscreen and the porthole panels. Much like Aquazone sets, this sub comes with two moveable arms, even if it's missing a magnet hand. Unlike Aquazone sets, the joints that make up the arms seem to be slightly sturdier and less breakable, since they use fewer finger hinge parts. Guess time will tell if they break as readily. Also of note are the parts they use for the hands of the arms. I've only seen the towball piece used as part of a winch before, so it's cool to see a different use for it here. And there we are, one yellow submarine! While not as fancy as the one used by The Beatles, it still pops nicely. Another two angles of the sub. If you can ignore my crooked sticker placement on the rear and the shoddy PhotoShop job I did, you'll see this is one sleek machine, a far cry from the Crystal Explorer Sub's bulbousness. The fence pieces on top, along with the light gray bar adds some nice greebling detail. Hats aside, the two spare parts here include a Technic axle and a trans-clear 1x1 round stud. Pretty basic. Play Features While lacking in such traditional fun-filled action features from our "enlightened" age like flick-fire missiles or stud shooters, there's still some good solid stuff here. The most interesting feature that springs to mind is how easy it is to get inside the Refuge. With two hinge bricks, the structure easily swings open. There we go! Plenty of room for Sandy to do her research and for Diver Dan to get a new oxygen tank. Here you can see the cleverness of using trans-light-blue for the bubble windscreens, making it seem as if they're actually underwater, instead of an ad hoc photo studio. The placement of seaweed right outside both of the windscreens is also a solid design choice, giving the illusion of swimming to a stingray on the left and Cora on the right. So I'm cheating here, but didn't want to figure out the proper exposure for a printed tile on black under a dark blue window, so I'm stealing from the instructions. All three tiles, much like the Exploriens gimmick (and maybe a few others) look scrambled under normal light, but once you look at them through the dark-blue window, you can see bones and other fun-filled secrets. Curious about what the Refuge looks like when closed up? Simply open up the roof and you'll be able to see the structure the way the minifigures would. Kudos to the designer for making the entrance to the Refuge four studs by four studs to fit an actual minifigure, although they lose a few points once you realize there's no easy way into the structure given the placement of the struts. The bubble windscreens are also big enough to accommodate a minifigure as well, which probably comes in handy if you want to do some lounging, and can open up. Much like the Refuge, accessibility is the name of the game with the sub too. The bubble windscreen opens wide to place R.C. in his comfy blue chair... ...and thanks to four hinge bricks in the rear, it's a snap to place another minifigure in the back, although this is clearly the less comfortable position given how there's no chair. And if a diver finds something they want to stow away safely, all they have to do is open one of the two boxes on either side of the sub. Admittedly, I don't know if the printed tiles would fit in here, but the coins definitely would, along with whatever other knicknacks they happen to come across. The arms on the sub are also just as capable as a minifigure's, and can grasp a number of things. You'll also notice that there's plenty of room to display the sub on the baseplate without needing to take something else out. And thanks to the miracle of trans-clear bricks, I can make it seem as if the boat is floating on the surface of the water, where our last few play features reside. But before I forget, the boat does have a nice little compartment near the bow for placing spearguns, hats, and whatever other accessories aren't in play. While lacking a hatch on the top to seal the compartment (along with an accessible way for the pilot to get to the compartment short of clambering around the outside of the bow), it's still nice to have. Last but not least is the boat's winch, which has plenty of string to reach the (imaginary) seabed. That 41L string piece can also attach quite easily to the roof of the Refuge, even if it's not exactly clear what it's function is. If you're a fan of the movie The Abyss, you could treat it as an electronic tether and recreate the scene where the drilling platform slides deeper into the oceanic trench by pushing the set off the table. Final Thoughts Pricing and Value - According to Brick Insights, which I use for this sort of thing because I'm lazy, the price-per-part for this set is $0.22, which is a slight improvement over its price-per-part back in 1997, when it was at $0.24, which makes it good overall. That said, I think this set was still worth it even if the score was worse, given how many rare and exclusive parts you get in this set. Speaking of... Pieces - You get three bubble windscreens, eight panels with portholes, some parts that are nice to have such as an anchor and a chain, along with plenty of seaweed, string and sea animals. I'd say that's a pretty good deal, especially when you look at how much you get, and the rarity of some of these parts. Design/Build - This might be one of the more satisfying builds I've gone through recently. With two vehicles, you have something to show for your efforts without it taking too much time. With a lack of small plates and tiles, you can quickly assemble one model after another, and it's all well thought out. The sub is longer than some of the other ones from this...ahem...subtheme, but still looks sleek with plenty of room to access the interior, and the Refuge is similar. No matter if your hands are large or dainty, LEGO made sure grubby digits of all sizes can get into the Refuge. While lacking some of the more homely touches that make up 2020's Ocean Exploration Base such as a bed, coffee maker or lamp, this one has the edge by actually making it seem watertight, something that is frustratingly lacking in more recent underwater sets. And the boat is a nice addition that didn't need to be included in a set whose main focus is underwater anyway, so adding one in is a nice touch, which I can't say for the more recent line. Playability - This review took me a little longer than planned, since once the Refuge itself was complete, it was hard to get back on track and finish the sub. There's so much to do, with all the divers, accessories and sea life that you can have a number of adventures and not once get tired. Swoosh the boat. Swoosh the sub. Swoosh the aquatic animals into the Refuge. Even if this is the only set you have, it's still enough to have a good time (although I might have to recommend picking up a set that comes with a shark cage). Verdict: There's a reason this is a flagship set, one that, judging by The Brickster's review, is still widely loved and appreciated. If you compare the more recent Ocean Exploration Base to this set, it's almost no contest in terms of what you get. LEGO Divers may not always sell as strongly in the aftermarket as other retired themes, but it's well worth your while to seek this set out. Heck, it even integrates quite nicely with more modern underwater City subthemes, yellow colorschemes and all. While this set wasn't the first one from this subtheme I was looking to buy, when I saw it, I figured it was worth the price. And boy was it ever. I suspect this will stay in my collection for quite some time. Thanks for reading! Comments and questions always welcome!
  2. Eurobricks community, It has been many years since I’ve been active on the forums as I used to be an extreme regular user. Pushed my LEGO collecting days aside years ago and getting back into it. I’m specifically looking for Wooden LEGO early toys from the 1930’s -1940’s - mainly the pull along animals. Is there anyone that specializes or is extremely familiar with this sector of LEGO and the value of each item - give or take condition and model? Also, could someone please give their opinions on the year estimates for these toys and what they are worth in the condition. I’m looking to buy them. Thanks again Eurobricks community. All comments and assistance is welcome and greatly appreciated. LegoKing
  3. Norton74

    [MOC] General Store

    GENERAL STORE: A TIME CAPSULE General Stores were very common in the US back in the 18th and 19th century, especially in rural areas or in small towns. Actually, there are few of them along old nearly-forgotten interstate highways, they are like old treasures to preserve. Their main feature was carrying a general line of merchandise to remote populated places where mobility was limited and a single shop was sufficient to service the entire community. In the early twentieth century general stores often sold gasoline too. My latest diorama represents a classic general store depicted in a sixties scene somewhere in the heart of America with many elements easy to spot back then. Take a moment to appreciate all the small details that all add up to this vintage scene; the rusted pump abandoned on the ground, the phone cab, soft-drink dispenser, the gumball machine and many others. The old white-bearded man sitting in his rocking chair keeps watch carefully who arrives helped by his loyal dog. On the left a little shop for quick repairs equipped with different utensils.All around I added many details like the water tower, the phone box, the gas pump and so on. I’m very satisfied with this creation even if it’s much better live than depicted by a photo. It was very funny building this and even more catching the details to insert via period pictures spotted on the web. Hope you like it!
  4. The latest incarnation of my VW Beetle MOC, in minifigure scale. Incorporating new backend shaping to assist with the difficult matter of the curves. Enjoy
  5. My latest MOC, inspired by computer rooms from the 60s and 70s. You can find more of my MOCs on my Instagram.
  6. I was about 11 year old in 1996, doing a twice daily paper round and saving my, I guess near £20ish a week, wage from it when I bought the 8480 Shuttle set. It was something I had coveted for a long time when I first set my eyes on it in the Toys R Us Lego aisle. I had been indoctrinated with Lego from a young age, so the 8480 wasn't especially daunting, but it was exciting. I'm now 34, and I don't buy Lego half as much as my 11 year old self, but recently I bought the 42096 for Christmas which I'm near finished with building and it brought back the joy I experienced as a youngster. Having gone back to my childhood home for Christmas, I headed to the attic to look at my large stash of Lego and specifically 8480. I found it, still built, missing the odd plate (a flap plate), though perhaps the gearing not working exactly and my woolworths batteries still keeping the motors whirring. it was also yellowing pretty badly. I was never very good at applying stickers, even on my 42096 build, my stickering is pretty poor, so many bricks will have stickers that overlap to other bricks. I'm thinking of bringing it back to London, cleaning it up and giving it a rebuild. What advice would you give me? I don't think any major parts are missing, and I'll have spares of quite common parts easily available. Can I de-yellow it? https://twitter.com/jarede/status/1210524288857657344 memories.
  7. bricksboy

    [MOC] Vintage Bus

    [Updated] This bus was not selected to be final 15, but I submitted it to Lego Ideas. Please support it if you like it: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/e9b3598f-db12-4b90-aca9-206872843695 This moc is for LEGO Ideas contest "BUILD A VINTAGE CAR TO CRUISE THE STREETS OF LEGO® MODULAR BUILDINGS!" . I will design several more for this contest :D https://ideas.lego.com/projects/e9b3598f-db12-4b90-aca9-206872843695 In the old days, not many people owned a car. Bus was important transportation for people. So a vintage bus should be included in every Lego city. The vintage bus I designed has many playable features. The engine hood, passenger, driver, and back door can be opened. I also added a luggage rack on the top of the bus. Some passengers' accessories were placed on the rack, including two cute pigs. The vintage bus dimension is 6x18x8 bricks. I hope you will like my bus :D My other MOC models: [MOC] Vintage Stylish Convertible [MOC] Vintage Bus [MOC] Halloween Pumpkin Horse Carriage [MOC] ISUZU NPR Light Duty Truck [MOC] Karsan Jest Mini-Bus [MOC] Ford F150 XLT [MOC] London Double Decker Bus Dennis Enviro 400 [MOC] Lada VAZ-2105 [MOC] Subaru WRX [MOC] Classic Cadillac Convertible [MOC] Toyota 6th Gen. HiAce Van [MOC] James Bond Aston Martin DB5 [MOC] Toytoa HiAce van [MOC] Toyota GT86 [MOC] Office Desk [MOC] Ferrari F355 [MOC] Toyota AE86 Coupe (2018 version) in Initial D Animation [MOC] Police Motorcycle #2 [MOC] Sport Bike Stop Motion Speed Build [MOC] New York City Police (NYPD) Car [MOC] Lego Mini Cooper [MOC] Japan Tokyo Taxi vol.1 東京無線タクシー [MOC] Ice Cream Truck [MOC] LEGO California Highway Patrol [MOC] LEGO Police Car [MOC] Police Motorcycle [MOC] New York City Taxi / Cab [MOC] LEGO NYC News Stand [MOC] New York City Transit Bus [MOC] Newspaper Rack [MOC] Coke/Beverage Cooler Initial D AE86 Racer AC Transit Bus AC Transit Bus Short Version Ice Cream Van
  8. My entry was selected to the Fan Vote phase of "Build a Vintage car to cruise the streets of LEGO® Modular Buildings!". If you like it, please vote it before Dec-4th, to be an official "LEGO Gift with Purchase" set: https://ideas.lego.com/challenges/bafd4186-bb49-4eb0-903f-910415f04391/application/080bc359-fa49-4bd9-894c-2b627ba2abc7 More details: The title came from the movie "Jailhouse Rock" because of the striped T-shirt of the "bad boy". It is a late 50's muscle car tuning. On the main picture the couple is watching the freshly installed supercharger and on the last one the first try is visible :) One of the most interesting thing about this car is the brickbuilt flame decoration which was inspired by one of my Matchboxes from my childhood. Some tricky solutions were used to build the flame decoration on the hood especially without the supercharger which is visible on one of the pictures. I prefer this solution instead of stickers to keep the flexibility of the used parts in further builds. It is (mostly) a studless build in Speed Champions style which means a 6 studs wide car with a 4 studs wide windscreen. However the front wheels came from a City set to make them similar to the rear ones which are a bit bigger Creator wheels to make the car more dynamic. I hope you enjoy this car. Many thanks for your votes and comments! Jailhouse Romance 01 by László Torma, on Flickr Jailhouse Romance 02 by László Torma, on Flickr Jailhouse Romance 04 by László Torma, on Flickr Jailhouse Romance 03 by László Torma, on Flickr Jailhouse Romance 05 by László Torma, on Flickr All of the selected entries (15 pcs from appr. 1100 entries, sorted by random): https://ideas.lego.com/challenges/bafd4186-bb49-4eb0-903f-910415f04391?challenge_phase=5b9699a1-1e1c-4a9a-896f-d74f4d778836&query=&sort=random
  9. klockizbroda

    [MOC] The Old School Caravan Trip

    Hello, With this first post I wanted to share with you my latest MOC which I call The Old School Caravan Trip. It is my humble tribute to the classic 'car and caravan' sets done in a bit old fashion way, with a tiny vintage car towing almost equally tiny caravan. The caravan is fitted with a foldable bike rack, a roof rack for the luggage and it has just enough space inside to fit a bed for one minifigure. As an experiment, I decided to submit this MOC as a product idea on LEGO Ideas, so if you fancy supporting it, you may find it here. Hope you'll enjoy it! The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr The Old School Caravan Trip by Michał Piotrewicz, on Flickr
  10. BendCityAuto

    Bend City Auto Garage

    Hi, I'm new here and still trying to figure this all out! I wanted to post pictures of my project but only very low resolutions can post here. I am linking my Lego Ideas page and Flickr for better images. Flickr Photosteam Lego Ideas Project Page
  11. Fill 'Er Up! A while back I presented the Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix pictured being unearthed in an elderly farmer’s barn. This time the little Bugatti is ready to be "fueled up" in a period gas station. Back in the twenties gasoline was sold in quite simple shacks, at times they were drugstores, at times they were pharmacies. What it's sure the early gas stations were very different from modernist or art déco ones. Recently Blocks magazine featured my Bugatti in haystack with step by step building instructions (below) and few days ago I uploaded the pics on my flickr photostream. So if you can't buy a classic racecar you can build it from LEGO! Thanks for stopping by!
  12. This is my humble tribute to the Classic Town Promotional MAERSK Truck sets 1651 from 1980 and 1552 from 1985 adjusted to my favorite 4-wide studs mocs. Both the Maersk Blue and the Old Light Grey colors were really hard to find nowdays .. :-) 11 by George Legoman, on Flickr 02 by George Legoman, on Flickr 10 by George Legoman, on Flickr 03 by George Legoman, on Flickr 02 by George Legoman, on Flickr 03 by George Legoman, on Flickr 04 by George Legoman, on Flickr 04 by George Legoman, on Flickr 16 by George Legoman, on Flickr 18 by George Legoman, on Flickr
  13. Classic Town 4-studs wide, 2-axle European style Truck (5-studs wide for the semitrailer). 001 by George Legoman, on Flickr 01 by George Legoman, on Flickr 02 by George Legoman, on Flickr 04 by George Legoman, on Flickr
  14. Classic Town 4-studs wide Truck and MEILLER Tipping Semitrailer 01 by George Legoman, on Flickr 006 by George Legoman, on Flickr 37 by George Legoman, on Flickr 10 by George Legoman, on Flickr 21 by George Legoman, on Flickr
  15. Hi everyone You may have seen my MOC modular buildings on here recently, The Queen Bricktoria and Brick Square Post Office. For my new project I've decided to build something completely different. This is also my first ever entry as a Lego Ideas project. "A roaring fire and a full head of steam, the old traction engine is ready for work!" I have created a scene set some time during the early 20th century. Farmers are working in the fields with their steam traction engine, affectionately known as "The Old Workhorse". The model includes a detailed mini fig scale traction engine, a wagon and various other accessories and mini builds. THE TRACTION ENGINE The main feature of the model is the traction engine itself. I've used a classic green and red livery with polished brass lining and details. There are several interesting parts used to create this engine including paint roller handles and mini fig syringes used to create the piping around the boiler and inside the cab. A system of cogs ensures that the flywheel spins around as the traction engine is pushed forward. A detailed cab interior includes steering wheel, controls and a firebox door that can be opened and closed to reveal the burning fire inside. The front wheel axle can be pivoted left and right. THE WAGON I've also included a wagon/trailer that can be coupled to the back of the traction engine and used to carry the various accessories included with the model. The sides of the wagon can be dropped down to provide loading access for the mini figs. There is space at the front of the wagon to hold tools and mini fig accessories. MINIFIGURES & OTHER ACCESSORIES Included with the model are 2 mini figs, a dog, a rat and several mini builds including tree stumps, logs and rocks. These are all designed to be carried and towed in the wagon. THE FINISHED MODEL The overall model contains 480 pieces. Here is a shot of The Old Workhorse, steaming past the buildings in my MOC modular street. LEGO IDEAS As mentioned earlier this is my first entry as a Lego Ideas project. If you like what you see then I really would be so grateful if you could please support my project on Lego Ideas, and help The Old Workhorse to gather steam. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/2a2ec583-9836-4868-8dc7-6b3bb0a2fe80 Thank you very much for taking the time to read this and I hope you like the model. Feel free to let me know what you think. If you'd like to see more pictures, there are many more on my Flickr page. Edit: I've added a new brick built version of the model on page 2 of this topic.
  16. I've rebuilt this after a break of around 30 years. As a 9 year old I always wanted to do something more with the car and here it is, back seats. Hopefully, I'll motorise it and change the gear ratio so all 3 gears work.
  17. LegoRckstar

    Fiat 500 L

    (this is my first post, so if there's something wrong, please help me) Hi, I'm relatively new with this MOC thing, but I decided to try something about a car I know very well and love: the Fiat 500L. Let's start with some little tips and and story: "born" in 1968 this model of 500 is called "L", where the L stands for lusso (luxury), because this version has some beter refinitions, like chromed bumper reinforcement, moquette, an heater and some other tecnic improvements. The MOC has very similar dimensions to the green Mini Coper Creator kit, and comes with openable doors and hoods, front seats are reclinable and djustable,and the roof is not openable but it can be sustituted with an open version I'm posting here this MOC because I'd like to collect some fedbacks and advices about the building, and if you find this MOC good enough, or if you love it like I do, you can also vote it on Lego IDEAS here: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/13656e47-8f4b-4813-a138-f240f0909681 I'll appreciate every tip you can give to better this model. I'm also working on a 500R version and a 500 Jolly version, and I will post them sooner. in the meantime,thank you for watching!
  18. When I was cleaning up my working place today I rediscovered one of my very early mocs, a Ferrari F2002. The scale is about 1/12 and by today's standards you have to describe its look as very vintage: looks of studs exposed, countless illegal building techniques and some parts in wrong colours because I could not just order them on bricklink. But there is one part of the build I am still proud of today: the (not working) rigid suspensions. It is very funny how things can change in about a decade. I hope you like it. http://Ferrari F2002-3 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-2 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-1 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr http://Ferrari F2002-5 by klingen_guru, auf Flickr
  19. Count Sepulchure

    [FIGS] Vintage Droid CMFs

    Hi all! Recently I cooked up something unusual. What happens when you put together the new and the old? Pieces and ideas, that is? I have never owned any of the droids or even been into Space sets and whatnot, so wasn't infatuated with these three classic buggers until I picked them up very recently. I also own UFO droids, but those aren't as charismatic or distinctive. By combining mostly vintage Lego pieces and sneaking in a few new ones, I made a custom "VHS" trio complete with printed stands to resemble the CMF series. One thing to note: times have changed, and so has the trio's purpose... First: the white Exploriens Droid. Enemies will not be walking - heavy hammer does the talking! Second: Insectoids Droid. The menacing cannon's electromagnetic, the enemies better be very athletic! Third: Spyrius Droid. Tracking foes with recon bot, slashing them with plasma sword! That's it, folks! Weaponizing the trio was not my aim, but it just so happened that everything fell into place this way. Cheers, and comments are welcome!
  20. When I saw the pictures of this train in @HoMa:s Lego Trains Book. I simply couldn't resist the temptation (particularly not after having seen TLGs miserable train news for 2018 ...) So I built it myself. A true pleasure with a very high degree of satisfaction. And another beautiful contribution to my train collection: A big praise to Holger for this very nice MOC which wakes many train memories back in the years when I grew up in Switzerland. This train is a 9V version with a total of four 9V motors mounted on the first two coaches. The interiors of the locomotive are therefore empty, i.e. no PF stuff. The Be 6/8 is built in Reddish Brown to match the colours of the Swedish iron ore train with the Dm3 and the Da locomotives. In addition, it is adapted to the challenges of the 9V Extreme layout, in particular the humps at the level transitions. And the rods by Trained Bricks really put the dot over the i ... PS: Imagine - a Swedish iron ore train together with a Swiss Crocodile in the midst of the Swiss Alps - goose bumps all over again ...
  21. thomassio

    Cool Oldtimers on Lego Ideas

    https://ideascdn.lego.com/community/projects/bf2/fd2/5379251-o_1cbfnmj3r1q3tfpo1ijnmj19cds-NHSISQ5XhODY0w-thumbnail-full.jpg So I started a Lego Ideas Project. I have no idea if this is gonna make it. I thought of all my Mocs the oldtimers would be the most suitable for Ideas. Special thanks to Mahjqa for helping with photographing and photo-shopping. - Link Removed - Please support, vote and share if you like. Thanks for looking!
  22. There has been some rumors that I am not capable to make new quizzes. This is NOT true! I come back with new quizzes. For warm-up, let's stick to 4.5v battery wagons again! After the successful quiz N1: which was followed with a new item on bricklink: https://www.bricklink.com/v2/catalog/catalogitem.page?P=x488c03&idColor=5 now again: what do you find uncommon in this photo? I have told the answer to few friends. Please do not spoil. If you know the answer, you can pm me then I comment that you know the answer so that people can think about this photo for few days. There are gonna be harder quizzes, so prepare for them! ;-) :-) Have fun.
  23. My version of the famous bug, Wip, as never satisfied, so keep on updating This is based on my real build beetle moc, all comments welcome, old rear end. rally version (i believe this is Gulf oil racing colours) classic version
  24. Hello, I own a 070 universal building set from 1967 or so (photo1), but this one has cardboard inlays instead of the plastic ones you can commonly find (photo2). Does anyone has an idea whether it is an older type, or some transition box? I cannot find more info on this. Except: the set 050 from 1964 has similar inlays (photo3)... Thanks for helping me out!
  25. Hey guys new to the forum but not to lego. Just started a new Youtube channel where Im speed building all the old sets i got when i was a kid. They range from about 1990-2009. Im just getting going on the channel so the list of sets will build as I go. I have roughly 2-250 sets so if you're a fan of older sets check it out. Thanks Travis