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Found 32 results

  1. Darkkostas25

    [MOC] Sapphire dusk

    It`s a Tornado? no, It's a King Edward II? no, It`s a Princess Royal? NOPE It`s a Sapphire dusk. (Coz TLG came on! gives us the next Emerald Night! or its successor or even dump cousin of it :\ ) (yeah I know it`s the best fitting place for my cry for new train XD ) 7 stud wide, British-style locomotive with golden standard of wheel arrangement 4-6-2 (or 2-3-1) Passenger wagon(carriage) just to emphasise that it`s a passenger engine. On Briklink: https://www.bricklink.com/v3/studio/design.page?idModel=356662
  2. The Lego Railway Series

    A series of trains from a Lego Railway!

    Hello there! I'm The LEGO Railway Series! For those of you who don't know me from twitter, I model characters from The Railway Series (Thomas the Tank Engine) but I do so as realistically as possible using the actual basis for the characters. So I posted here on Eurobricks once before and just never kept up with the site or the thread. So I'm just gonna start over again! I'm gonna be using this thread as a central place to post all of my stuff to make things easier for myself. So what better model to get this started off with than Thomas! Everyone knows Thomas is an E2, so that's what I've built. He's got as many bells and whistles as I could cram onto the model. He's fully motorized using Power Functions (IR receiver and an M motor) and is powered by a 9v battery in the firebox area. (it needs a custom wire adaptor to transfer the power to the PF components) He also has an entire cab interior with controls and everything. Aside from the side rods which use modified liftarms to attach the flex tubing, the 9v battery adaptor wire, and some custom wheels (I plan on using Breckland Bricks wheels), the entire model is Legal and buildable. Unfortunately I've not been able to physically build this model yet, but I plan on it by before the year is up! Thomas by The Lego Railway Series, on Flickr Thomas_2 by The Lego Railway Series, on Flickr Thomas_3 by The Lego Railway Series, on Flickr Thomas_4 by The Lego Railway Series, on Flickr
  3. Ever since buying my first copy of Toy Story 3 LEGO set 7597 in May / June 2010, I've wanted to make the steam engine in the set look more realistic. The lack of tender bothered me greatly, and so did a few other things I talk about below. I created my first steam loco MOC I could call my own from it's framework, but that failed hard to even make turns at all when built in real life. (I suspect R120 wouldn't even work with that model.) So, it was scrapped in 2012 after sitting around for two years despite my best attempts to get it working. The Lone Ranger sets came out the following year, and I forgot about the odd 7597 engine as years went by and my skills increased. Then, in July / August of this year, a decade after I bought the original copy, I saw set 7597 sitting complete in a window of my local LEGO resale store. It was purchased, and I started working on a design soon thereafter. Of course, the person who purchased it for me (It cost a bit) wouldn't let me get at it physically until November, but nonetheless, here is that design all polished up and ready to roll into your collection via the free LDD file you can find at the end of this post. The locomotive as it is in LDD upon opening the file, which you will find at the bottom of this post. Almost all the needed parts for this MOD are grouped in the file. Everything else should already be on the stock loco model from the set, though it will need to be mostly taken apart to allow you to rebuild it with my changes. if you are building the MOD from set 7597, there are only two printed 1 x 4 green bricks on the tender that should be printed like so. However, if you are building the loco from scratch, use four of the above parts, (two on tender, two on the loco) and one of these 2 x 2 red printed bricks for the number on the headlight. 99.8% of the parts needed for the conversion from the set are shown above. The printed parts are unprinted as shown, and the red wheels are shown, but not available from BrickLink. You will need need one of these custom wheel parts packs in red color (plus 4x part 2878 for holding said custom wheels) for the tender wheels from BrickTracks to complete the tender. Among my changes, I lowered the loco cab floor of my copy of 7597 (Western Train Chase) loco by a brick or so to compensate for the roof being a brick fewer height-wise and to better match the floor of the tender. This still allows for the taller 2010 Toy Story figures to still fit inside the loco cab, and also making for a smoother transition from train cars to steam engine. This change also made the left-to-right swiveling driving wheel section impossible to keep, (I didn't like it anyway!) and by extension the front bogie had to change too. Thus, the connection to the leading wheels from the driving wheels was changed to a 10194-syle design to allow for you to push the train on the track without derailing. I also never liked the awkward original piston design in 7597, so I changed it to have a more stable, non-floppy connection to the engine via a double Technic pin connector. Actual working cylinders connected to the new side rods will never be a thing on this engine due to the way the pistons are attached to the new moving front bogie instead of the boiler, but I can mimic the effect pretty well with the design I have here. You can find the LDD file here at my Bricksafe page for it. I haven't quite finished taking pictures of my version of the model, but this photo of it and it's sister loco (dark blue steamer NOT Included in file!) will do for now. Please note, the model shown has color changed side-rods and "pistons" due to parts I had on hand from my collection. It isn't quite like the LDD file because the parts in said file are cheaper when colored like they are. (Thought I'd save you guys a couple dollars / yen / rubles / euros, etc.) Plus, it makes my different than everybody else's! Thoughts?
  4. I've already built the Conjunction Junction freight train and The Caboose Who Got Loose (a MOD of a @zephyr1934 model), which you can see in the topics linked and in the pictures directly below. Until recently, however, the fact this freight train had no engine had been a major stumbling block: I looked up the 4-6-2 "Pacific" steamer from The Caboose Who Got Loose book, but it wasn't very eye-catching in the all-black color scheme. I also watched the Conjunction Junction music video and realized the engine pulling the cars is never actually seen / mentioned. This is just about where the steam engine I started this topic about comes in. Originally I had found a late-1930's 7-wide 2-8-4 (the link is to the designer's Rebrickable page) to pull this special freight train, but then I found out how expensive the eight driving wheels would have been from Bricklink. (two blind drivers by themselves are CRAZY pricy - about as expensive as the pre-packaged bag of one blind and two with flange!) So, late last week I went back to the drawing board, taking my set 7597-style MOD engine and tinkering with it. It emerged from the shop a late 1880's 2-6-0 instead of a mid-1870's 4-4-0 as it originally was. Adding working pistons is what forced me to stretch the frame and thus add in two more driving wheels. (NOTE: A four-wheel bogie truck can be easily added instead of the two-wheel one seen above... I just wanted to be cheap and not have to buy more small train wheels than was the bare minimum.) Here is the steamer as far as can be assembled right now. I'm only missing 36 parts until the loco can be completed, and another one part for Katy Caboose. (I slimmed down Katy's roofline to be 6-wide to keep it more in line with the majority of my rolling stock. I also added printed 1 x 1 letters saying "KATY" on the long sides... Not very accurate to the book I know, but it makes for people to understand what it is better.) I also took apart the original, generic green caboose I made for the Conjunction Jct. consist as I needed the parts, and because it was being replaced by the Caboose Who Got Loose. Also, if you are wondering what "WFP" stands for, it is a nod to the 12-inch gauge steam railroad I've ridden on MANY times as a child and adult. I've even displayed there some of my LEGO trains in the past as a part of Gateway LUG displays. To read more about the real Wabash Frisco and Pacific Railroad, check out their website with awesome 15 engine roster and history sections. NOTE: They don't have a 2-6-0 at the real WFP railroad or a engine numbered 289. This was a gap I naturally filled in, kind of like a fan-fic story but with a steam engine instead. Two boxcars from a part of the Schoolhouse Rock educational cartoon series. This specific early 1970's Grammar-themed rock-n-roll music video featured a diminutive stereotypical train conductor, two hobos (one fat and tall, and one small and skinny), and a train with words on it... not just any words, but CONJUNCTIONS, as the name of the video and location is Conjunction Junction. A tanker and a third boxcar. Refrigerated boxcar and stone hopper. Heavily inspired by Zephyr1934 / Trained Bricks MOC of "Katy" from the classic children's book "The Caboose who got Loose" by ex-Disney animator Bill Peet. Zephyr's version can be seen here. I didn't want to use stickers for Katy's eyes like what's being done by the original builder, so I decided to use the eyes from set 43186 (Bruni the Salamander buildable character) from the Disney Frozen II line . I also added a actual mouth, as just the two eyes without something between them looked kind of odd, most likely because of the specific eyes I chose. The MOC I based this on used a different method for the mouth using a lot of SNOT-work.... I used a brick with 2 studs on the sides and two quarter tiles to give her a open mouth. The "rear" of the caboose is the forward facing part closest to the engine, which is a part of Katy we never see in the book. Confused yet? I took some liberties with Zephyr's design, such as changing the ladders at each end to black from red, removing two wheelsets + the roof chimney, and redoing the roof itself to be much simpler. (This last one was done because I couldn't figure out the original MOC roof's curved design!) I did keep the basic SNOT-work design for the body, but made it so both halves would be stud-inwards. I also changed the roofline to be six wide instead of eight as on my inspiration's model and added the name KATY to the left and right sides. All of this makes the models less accurate to the book it's based off, but I don't really think anyone in the general public will notice. (The general LEGO community might know of some discrepancies and fellow train modelers not of the LEGO-type will not care even if I did make it accurate, as it's not a "real" train.) - More to come when the engine is completed, hopefully by March 1st! - Comments, questions, suggestions and complaints welcome!
  5. Dear trainheads, Finally, my new locomotive is ready! This time, I chose a prototype from quite a distant edge of the world - an articulated narrow-gauge (1067 mm) 0-6-6-0T "Kitson-Meyer" engine belonging to the Chilean "Ferrocarril de Taltal" (FCT; written as "Ferro Carril Taltal“ on locomotive number plates), or "Taltal Railway". Ten of these locomotives were delivered to the FCT by Kitson & Co. (Leeds, UK) between 1904 and 1907, and further eight engines later acquired second-hand. Over the years, several modifications were carried out: For example, all engines were converted to burn oil soon. Water and fuel capacity of some locomotives (including No. 50, the prototype for my model) were increased by adding welded enlargements on top of the side and rear tanks. "The Railway Magazine" gives a short description of the FCT (Vol. 90. No. 551, May-June, 1944, pp.158—159): More detailed information can be found in the books "The Taltal Railway" and "Kitson Meyer Articulated Locomotives", both by Donald Binns, which were my two principal sources. In general, very few technical information about the FCT locomotives can be traced. Despite searching for months, I wasn't able to find a detailed drawing. So I had to largely rely on taking measures from photos and on one single, distorted sketch on a data sheet describing the near-identical engines from the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco" - see below. (While there are numerous photos of the sole surviving FCT Kitson-Meyer, no. 59, nearly all of them were taken during the engine's last years in service, when it was already in a very poor state of maintenance, or since it has been on display as a monument. Because of that, it's difficult to conclude how it looked in better days. Nevertheless, I hope - and believe - that the model's overall impression comes close enough to the real locomotive's appearance.) The model is held in accurate 1/22.5 scale. It consists of quite exactly 3,000 parts and weighs in at 2.4 kg. The engine is powered by two L-motors (one mounted vertically in each bogie); each motor has its own BuWizz as a power supply and R/C unit (technically, one BuWizz would suffice, but this configuration allows for longer running times). The wheels come from BBB and the lighting equipment was purchased from Brickstuff, as usual, while the rods are 3D-printed parts of my own design. Enough said – enjoy the photos! Data sheet for the similar engines (though with different brake equipment and cab) of the "Ferrocarril Tocopilla al Toco": Detailed cab... ... and also smokebox interior, showing the exhaust nozzle, the base of the chimney and the boiler tubes: The cab roof is detachable. The ventilation flap really opens, you can see the lever for the steam whistle through the hole: The top of the Belpaire firebox is also detachable, giving access to the charging sockets and the power buttons: The lower part of the cab ladder is attached to the bogie and turns with it. Note also the chain which prevents the bogie from jackknifing in case of a derailment. Advanced lighting functions, controlled via two BuWizz channels: Before starting their daily trip into the Andes, engineer and fireman still have enough time to pose for a photo with their trusty old lady... ... while one of the brakemen uses the unexpected spare time in a different way. Well, but not for long. Soon "El Jefe" arrives in his flashy Chevrolet and critically watches his employees' activities... A few shots from the building phase, showing further details. First, the bogies with the motors. You can see the leaf springs underneath, as well as the brakes and (as on the real thing) only one single sanding pipe in front of the first wheel: The firebox once again: The main frame. The ashpan contains two weight bricks, which help to keep the centre of gravity low and thus to prevent the model from tipping over. And a view of the complete technical layout with batteries and motors. The multi-coloured bricks underneath are just the building stand. Full-resolution images can be found in my Bricksafe folder. At the moment, it’s too hot in my attic for filming, and I’ll go on holiday next week; but when I’m back, of course I'll shoot a video of the locomotive and its train, so stay tuned! Last but not least, I'd like to give my heartfelt thanks to all those AFOLs who attended the development of this model with their feedback and encouragement; and especially (though we've never met in person) to my dear "pen-friend" Sergio Monai @monai, whose multilingualism and commitment were an invaluable help during the research phase. Comments and criticism are of course most welcome! Thanks for stopping by! Best regards, Sven Edit: Video now available here!
  6. I've been a long time lurker here and decided to finally bite the bullet and post. I don't know how tagging works or what the etiquette is for this site yet, so feel free to yell at me for that stuff it I miss something or whatever. Anyway I've been posting stuff on twitter and other places for a while now but I thought I would break the ice here finally. So here is my most recent build, its all digital for now until I have the funds to actually start building my models. But here is my Railway Series inspired Thomas the Tank Engine. 31.5 studs long buffer to buffer. he's a long boy, so the couplings swivel atm to make it around bends with rolling stock. currently I doubt they will work for pushing, but ill find a solution to that when I build the model physically. pulling should be fine. 15 stud wheelbase from the center of the wheels. (I know the middle isn't a blind in the images and that a physical build would require it) Fully motorized with a PF M motor and an IR receiver and powered by a normal 9v Battery with an adaptor wire. Full decorated cab interior. I've also done my best to make sure he's build out of parts that actually exist and actually physically buildable and legal. This model does have a single illegal technique, the hands holding the flex tube on the left side of the boiler.
  7. These two trains comprise my space-train fleet for the Nexus Force, one streamlined passenger train, and one generic freight train. You can see more the Nexus Force stuff in this thread here in the Space sub-forum. It features a modular base, trucks, crawlers, and several spaceships, along with the mini-figures. (human or otherwise!) The Moonlighter train is owned by the Nexus Force, and is a retro-futuristic stream-liner mix of old-school steam technology, but with hyper-modern safety features designed specifically for use by Nexus Force personnel as a very high-speed, high-security ground transport between the northern-most city of St. Nicklaus and north-pole-hugging outpost of Ice Station Odyssey, around 500 miles away. (this all takes places on the ice-bound planet of Beta Polaris, which orbits what we here call the North Star, far away from Earth.) Thus this makes it a space train! Unlike the slower Earth trains, the Moonlighter type of space-train is super-streamlined, and can go up to speeds of up to 110 MPH (135 is the loco's top possible speed) on it's special track, with super-elevated curves and long straight-away's over hundreds of miles, all while using Positive Train Control (PTC) on the the mostly double-track mainline, where all vehicle crossings are flyovers and switches virtually non-existent once out of St. Nicklaus city limits. This train runs along with nine other identical versions of this train (10 total trains in all) on the route with up to seven in running order on the route and at least two in the maintenance shed / in emergency backup storage at any one time. They are numbered 200 through 210. The Nexus Force logo on the nose of the Moonlighter streamlined casing, (near the smokestack) and the rear of the observation car, while the engine's number (207) goes under the cab windows. The two forward tanks are for oil, and the rear tank is for water. The engine is equipped with a water scoop (like on the old New York Central steam locomotives) for refilling the water tank on the fly. There is a ladder from the tender-top deck to the coupler level behind the engine for access to the trailing passenger cars, and two ladders on either side of the steam loco for entry into the enclosed control cab. Three of these passenger cars go on the Moonlighter, with two before the dome car and one immediately after it. The recessed panels are the platform doors. One of these vista-dome cars goes in the middle of the train. (You may have noticed there are no exterior platform doors on this car. I decided not to add them because they didn't look good with the dome.) The rear observation car is currently missing it's rear curved windows, but it will have them when built IRL. The Nexus Force logo goes on the rear of this car, as previously mentioned above. After 45-ton locomotive 2011 has arranged a freight train in the Nexus force spaceport's yard, a electric main-line loco has arrived on scene to pull it's train to the some 500+ miles distant city of St. Nicklaus. This larger locomotive is numbered 99, and is running with a mobile armored cannon unit for the journey ahead, as it runs through some areas that could be ripe for an ambush by enemy forces, as you never know where the Maelstrom might have agents in deep cover or have planted ambushes alongside the line. A train was derailed and attacked last month in Avalanche Canyon by pirates, which is why the railroad is taking no more chances while it's position is being currently fortified all along the route. The other cars being pulled are: a flatcar carrying Commander Bob's 1960's sports car (going for it's yearly tune-up in town), a fully-loaded gasoline tanker, bathtub gondola with ice boulder load, and a bay-window caboose for the train's rear-end crew and a few more soldiers... just in case! This orange and white electric locomotive was inspired by the preliminary version of set 60198. (2018 Freight train) The inside is accessible via the removable roof sections. This model was inspired by this armored train MOC, that was itself inspired by the movie "Castle in the Sky" and it's armored train therein. The road vehicle model is partially inspired by Lola the car from the TV show Agents of Shield. (although this one doesn't fly) The sports car doesn't have great off-road capabilities, so it has to be trucked in on a flatcar to the remote space base. This fuel tanker is filled with gasoline or diesel fuel for use in the space base's land vehicles. Usually two or three tanker cars are sent into the base every couple weeks for refueled the on-base supply. This bathtub gondola is filled with ice boulders that have frozen ancient lifeforms trapped inside. The Nexus Force is sending them to a specialist laboratory off-world to have the DNA decoded and the beings themselves studied. Due to height clearance issues in St. Nicklaus city, regular-height cupola caboose types are forbidden. So, the bay window type is used instead. This moon base-like space base model is where the Moonlighter travels to, and was inspired by set 60036 (Arctic Base Camp), with a rooftop shield generator partially lifted from set 75098 (Assault on Hoth) and a sensor array inspired by set 76157 (Wonder Woman VS. Cheetah) The base consists of eight separate, interchangeable, modular sections, all of which have opening roof / wall sections for ease of access. These sections include (but are not limited too): a common bunk room, a spaceship control tower, a fusion generator, communications room, break room, and several more. As you can see, I joined the base to the rail-line with a short siding for freight deliveries, and for the servicing of steam locomotives on services such as the Moonlighter.
  8. Greetings, Train Tech! Here's a model of the BR24 steam locomotive from Germany, built at my usual 15 inches / stud scale: The BR24 (or "DRG Class 24") were a standard class of German locomotives built in the 1920s and 1930s. As was the case with most standard German designs, plans were drawn up and orders were placed from various manufacturers. They served through World War 2, and continued to serve into the 70s in West Germany, East Germany, and in Poland (as the Oi2 class) Most photos of the locomotives show them fitted with the larger Wagner smoke deflectors (the "elephant ears") -- I've chosen to model the locomotive with the smaller Witte deflectors, which were fitted on a few examples later in their life. I was motivated to build this locomotive for two reasons. First, I wanted a suitable locomotive to go with the Umbauwagen I had built. Secondly, I hadn't seen many new takes on this model since Ben Beneke's version from the early 2000s! There are many builders who have modified Ben's design, often substituting BBB medium wheels for the rare large wheels from the set 7750. However, my typical scale is larger than the scale of Ben's model, and I also wanted to leverage some new parts that have come out since. Like most of my locomotives, this model features Power Functions. A single M-motor beneath the cab powers the drivers at a 5:3 reduction ratio. The locomotive is fairly light but pulls adequately, and there's room in the boiler for additional weight if needed. In a way, this model helps to understand and demonstrate how little weight and torque you can get away with; I see a lot of builders cram extra motors into their locomotive, when the torque can't be transmitted due to a lack of weight. The tender houses the Power Functions receiver and battery box. The 3-axle tender has a rigid frame, with the center axle sliding to negotiate curves (I used a similar geometry on the TP56 locomotive). The body of the tender lifts off for access. The battery box is mounted sideways to better take advantage of the shape of the tender. Coupled together, the locomotive has decent reception from all angles except the front, where the cab blocks the receiver. Incidentally, my model of the 2MT, which exhibited similar reception characteristics, happened to fall off the table during prototyping of this model. About 60% of the 2MT's parts wound up in the BR24, which is actually a pretty good recycling rate! I took the model to Bricks By The Bay 2017, where it spent many hours pulling the Umbauwagen around BayLUG's display. It also won "Best Machine" in the "Scale Models" category: Thanks to anyone who came by to see it, and the rest of the display! Here's the full Brickshelf gallery, along with some Work-In-Progress pictures. I've also brought you some footage of the locomotive in action: Thank you for reading! EDIT: I finally made instructions! https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-106527/NonsenseWars/148-br24-drg-class-24-power-functions-powered-up/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- One final note: Ben was one of the builders who had been active around the time I first started buidling Lego train MOCs -- so in a way, this model is an homage to him. A few of the design techniques used in this model are based on techniques in his models -- the hinges angling the sides of the cab, the 11-plate-diameter boiler, and the way the smoke deflectors are attached. If you're still out there in the hobby, Ben, thank you for inspiring me and a whole generation of builders.
  9. Hello everyone!! I hope I'm right in making this a new topic - and that it should be in train tech and not in licensed. I've been working for a while on my own Hogwarts Express MOC. I know I'm not the first person to do this and I bow before many people who've done superb jobs - but here's my take on it! I've linked the two YouTube videos I've made about the locomotive and the carriage so feel free to have a watch. Or if not, there are a few photos which show what I've made. I'm very happy to answer any questions, as well as pointing people in the direction of my inspirations if they're looking for some themselves. Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr Lego Hogwarts Express Moc by Will Norris, on Flickr
  10. Hi everyone! Today I am sharing an updated version of an old MOC from 2013 ! It's based off an Engine from a long gone railway in my hometown, a GSR J26, or Irish Terrier as the type were nicknamed. It's a turn of the century tank engine, that operated on a branch line that wasn't connected to the rest in Ireland. I'm quite proud of how far its come from its first incarnation, which can be found here : Without further ado, here it is ! I got Big Ben Brick medium wheels as i found the official Lego large scale wheels looked great but made it monstrously large. Newer pieces of recent years made for nice rear windows, those 1 x 1 round tiles. And finally the engine from the front solo. Those smaller 5 link chain pieces are great! Thanks for looking ! Please let me know what you think!
  11. Craig Strader

    Canadian Pacific G2

    At long last I present to you all my second steam engine: The Canadian Pacific G2 Pacific I was pleased with how this one turned out especially the smokebox on the locomotive. It took longer than I wanted and that is because I had other things around me to consider. But I would see to it that it would get through for you guys. Runs of 2 L motors housed in the boiler with the IR receiver and battery box in the tender. I know it is rather bulky for a small steam engine. But I wanted to make sure that I could get in as much details as possible.
  12. Hello everyone, today I would like to show my second locomotive built from Lego (the BR E18 047 was my 3rd) with 7 contemporary apron cars. The locomotive is a special steam locomotive: it is the fastest German steam locomotive. The sister locomotive BR05-002 holds the official speed record for German steam locomotives (200.4 km / h, 1936). But I chose the BR05-001 because this locomotive can still be viewed in the Nuremberg Transport Museum. For my Lego version, it quickly became clear: a steam locomotive chassis and streamlined cladding are not possible in 8w. And since you can't see the wheels anyway, I used normal Lego train motors for PowerUP and normal Lego train wheels. Since the BR05-001 is a express train locomotive and I also want to pull an entire train quickly, I spend 3 train motors and 3 PowerUP HUBs for the locomotive. Power full ... This left also enough connections for the lighting. BR05-001: - 1468 Lego parts, no custom parts, no clue - some 6er axis cut to 5,5 axis (for R40 curves). - Decals and the yellow stripe: self made - 3 PowerUP Hubs, connected to one PowerUP handheld - 3 PowerUP Train motors - 3 PowerUP LEDs Three working front lights: working rear lights: Fire (difficult to see in the sun ;-) ): Open roof for access to the HUBs: underside view, the blue brick is no intention... But a locomotive without coaches is not a train... Luggage cart: - 1203 Lego parts, no cutting, gluing and so one - decals selfmade, "Deutsche Reichsbahn"-Logo printed by "Steindrucker" two first class coaches: - 1182 Lego parts, no cutting, gluing and so one - decals selfmade, "Deutsche Reichsbahn"-Logo and class-numbers printed by "Steindrucker" all coaches are equipped with boggies from type "Görlitz III leicht": For place minifigs inside: all passengers coaches have a removable roof: my favorite: the "Mitropa" restaurant waggon: 1259 Lego parts, no cutting, gluing and so one - decals selfmade, "Speisewagen" and "Mitropa" printed by "Steindrucker" kitchen inside: two second class coaches: - 1134 Lego parts, no cutting, gluing and so one - decals selfmade, "Deutsche Reichsbahn"-Logo and class-numbers printed by "Steindrucker" last but not least: the first and second class final car: - 1198 Lego parts, no cutting, gluing and so one - decals selfmade, "Deutsche Reichsbahn"-Logo and class-numbers printed by "Steindrucker" - light self-made working lights: the lights can turn off/on at the underside (black 2x AAA batteriebox): overview: The complete train is nearly 3,5 meters long and I don´t have a big table for this... I hope you like the train as much as I do... In 2019 I was allowed to drive this train at two exhibitions in Germany: 2019 Bricking Bavaria Fürth: Video shows a collections of trains from the train layout Bricking Bavaria 2019. 2019 Deutsches Dampflok Museum / German steam locomotive museum "Tag der Modellbahn": Thomas
  13. Craig Strader

    Northern Pacific Z-6 Challenger

    A 4-6-6-4 type steam locomotive. First conceived by the Northern Pacific in the 1930s, they were among the steam locomotives that represented "super-power" where engine builders learned to create locomotives that combined both power and speed. The first batch of 12 of these engines were first delivered in 1936 to replace double-heading methods. The locomotives please Northern Pacific so much in fact that 9 more were ordered in 1937. They could be found all over the NP's divisions hauling fast freight trains and reefer trains. Their 69 inch drivers allowed them not only strong pulling power but also the ability to go 60 miles per hour. I thought it could bring a real "challenge" to those who want to build it. It has OVER 2000 parts total. It has a side rod system that needed to be reversed engineered a few times to perfect it to where no 3rd party elements are required. Unlike most other articulated steam engines I have seen on YouTube and other places, mine has a FIXED rear engine unit and a front free swinging engine unit just like Union Pacific 4014 that was restored in 2019 if I am correct. Description: Locomotive is powered by 4 LARGE motors, these sit inside the boiler and provide the means of going forwards and backwards. Both the IR receiver and battery box sit inside the tender. I would recommend some extension cables given the fact that the locomotive itself is very long. The IR receiver also plays a part in the tender for the locomotive is designed to look like an oil burner. The bogies on the tender are specially designed to not only to look realistic but also to take turns at the same time. And the same can be said on the lead truck in front of the first engine unit. The cab will actually let you house an engineer and fireman to simulated them driving the locomotive. To look at my other creations go to BrickLink and search under Strader987 https://www.bricklink.com/v3/studio/design.page?idModel=160723 This locomotive is also on The Lego Ideas website, here is where to find it: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/7a2adb34-7fc5-401a-aa28-c8eddd37480c Please help me get 10,000 supporters please.
  14. As seen here on EuroBricks, user @Carefree_Dude tried his hand at making the new Disney train have working pistons and getting rid of the hideous no-metal-axle wheels. I was very much impressed with the results, and took the pictures and reverse engineered them to have a similar 4-6-0 of my very own. (If the tender looks familiar, it hasn't changed at all from the last version.) However, as you may have noticed, the pistons are different, as they gave me a ton of trouble figuring them out, so I imported a design of my own previous use that I know works. The rear of the loco features a ladder to the tender-top, where the hatch to the water tank is found and also where the neatly stacked wood pile is located . These passenger cars were mostly inspired by set 10014 (Passenger wagon) but repainted red instead of green and with fancy part 30613 "Brick, Arch 3 x 6 x 5 Ornamented" on the end of the cars. I might be mistaken, but Flickr user The Shubes (Isn't he on Eurobricks too?) may have been the one to inspire these coaches with his own red versions of set 10014 as seen here. The end of my passenger train features this little four wheel caboose. It was designed after set 10015 (Caboose) with some features taken from set 7597 (Western Train Chase) This design is now finished in real life, after a record six days from designing on 10 / 20, ordering on 10 / 21, to being built on 10 / 26. That's really fast service by my standards!
  15. Mr. Kleinstein posted very nice James Watt's steam engine to lego Ideas. And he shared the digital file, so I have slightly modified it and made instructions. This is a working model of James Watt's steam engine. The model represents a beam engine, with an upright cylinder and a large flywheel. The to-and-fro motion of the piston inside the cylinder is taken up by the large beam, and then converted to a rotary motion by planetary motion gears. To make the piston rod on the end of the rotating beam travel in a completely straight path, a system of levers called Watt's parallelogram is employed. A sliding valve driven from the main crankshaft steers the intake and outlet of steam. The machine also includes a speed governor, an air pump for the steam condenser, and a feed water pump. The model actually runs on a gentle vacuum, as provided by carefully approaching the steam outlet with the hose of a vacuum cleaner. There are 1152 bricks in this model. The build is quite challenging; the hardest part is adjusting all the parts to move really freely, and then centering the motion of the slide valve. When finished, the rigid frame stabilizes the engine so it can easily be picked up and handled without coming out of adjustment. The model contains also a fireplace, boiler and a heap of coal. The modeled steam engine would typically use a Cornwall-type boiler, which would be even longer than the machine (at the same scale). The engine frame would be at floor level. The instructions were generated in Studio, and contains also description of steam engines, Watt's inventions, properties of the model and some pictures of real beam engines. My own photos are quite bad, so you see only render or Mr. Kleinsteins original video. However it is fully working, and my older boy likes to play with the large wheel, he likes to watch sliding valve moving, and placing spiders all around. See Mr. kleinstein's video on flickr: Rebrickable: https://rebrickable.com/mocs/MOC-22090/ All model files (.io, .ldr, .odt, .pdf) can be downloaded here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/owccc09eev0kxg6/AAA5W0qkzNCR-yM4odlq9Zo2a?dl=0 I was not sure if put it into technic forum or scale modelling, however the funcionality is the main thing so it seems to fit technic forum.
  16. Hi everyone You may have seen my MOC modular buildings on here recently, The Queen Bricktoria and Brick Square Post Office. For my new project I've decided to build something completely different. This is also my first ever entry as a Lego Ideas project. "A roaring fire and a full head of steam, the old traction engine is ready for work!" I have created a scene set some time during the early 20th century. Farmers are working in the fields with their steam traction engine, affectionately known as "The Old Workhorse". The model includes a detailed mini fig scale traction engine, a wagon and various other accessories and mini builds. THE TRACTION ENGINE The main feature of the model is the traction engine itself. I've used a classic green and red livery with polished brass lining and details. There are several interesting parts used to create this engine including paint roller handles and mini fig syringes used to create the piping around the boiler and inside the cab. A system of cogs ensures that the flywheel spins around as the traction engine is pushed forward. A detailed cab interior includes steering wheel, controls and a firebox door that can be opened and closed to reveal the burning fire inside. The front wheel axle can be pivoted left and right. THE WAGON I've also included a wagon/trailer that can be coupled to the back of the traction engine and used to carry the various accessories included with the model. The sides of the wagon can be dropped down to provide loading access for the mini figs. There is space at the front of the wagon to hold tools and mini fig accessories. MINIFIGURES & OTHER ACCESSORIES Included with the model are 2 mini figs, a dog, a rat and several mini builds including tree stumps, logs and rocks. These are all designed to be carried and towed in the wagon. THE FINISHED MODEL The overall model contains 480 pieces. Here is a shot of The Old Workhorse, steaming past the buildings in my MOC modular street. LEGO IDEAS As mentioned earlier this is my first entry as a Lego Ideas project. If you like what you see then I really would be so grateful if you could please support my project on Lego Ideas, and help The Old Workhorse to gather steam. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/2a2ec583-9836-4868-8dc7-6b3bb0a2fe80 Thank you very much for taking the time to read this and I hope you like the model. Feel free to let me know what you think. If you'd like to see more pictures, there are many more on my Flickr page. Edit: I've added a new brick built version of the model on page 2 of this topic.
  17. Tenderlok shared his Flensburger Kreisbahn's No. 1, a 0-8-0T narrow gauge locomotive. It includes working lights and even a Seuthe smoke generator. Most of the 'Southern' European AFOL's know exactly where Flensburg is since you pass it just at the border with Jutland, the Danish part were Billund is located. Take a look at this marvel in Train Tech.
  18. I was inspired by a failed Ideas project railroad round house and shed from this builder to make this Wild West armstrong turn table in LDD. I'm thinking of doing this model instead of the the two track shed, as it is a bit smaller than the twice-as-tall shed. As this a mechanical table powered by brute force and not steam, electric, or pneumatic means, the table has four angled "iron" bars for mini-figures to grip to pretend-turn the table manually. (This type of table is called an armstrong turn table.) The two sets of tiles on the middle of the table should have this GREAT and this WEST prints from the Toy Story 3 line. NOTE: The flex tracks are supposed to be taken apart into two halves for them to fit on the table ends. You should only need one flex track instead of two as shown, as one whole equals two half units. The 3 and 1/2 track long table has eight tracks radiating outwards on it, with the possibility of more or less tracks if needed being an option in the future. If this was built in real life, the four main locomotives will enter on the bottom-most track and proceed to be rotated to the correct stub-end track for storage. However, the BTTF Time Train cannot fit on the rotating table, (it's just a bit too long) so it will sit on the straight-through track and just run across the table to get off at the other side. (All the items but the blue steam engine and table itself have been bought and built in real life.) As usual, comments, questions, suggestions, and complaints are always welcome!
  19. Just found this new video of a Polish Pm36-1 steam locomotive by Fasolic ( @solic ). I've not seen any coverage given to it, and it is a marvellous model, very much got LNER A4 vibes! Love the Dark Blue colour and the integration of full PF in the loco! Anyone know its history?
  20. Hi I'm new in this forum (well, actually I have been reading here for a year) so I'll do something myself. Here I am presenting my Lego Thomas and Friends range that I have designed totally in LDD. It took me about 1 year till now (or even longer) to design all the engines. First we start with Thomas Then Edward, I designed the driving wheels higher as I would use Big Ben Bricks medium drivers for that model. Henry follows Then Gordon the Express Engine Duck the Great Western Oliver Arthur Molly Stanley Annie and Clarabel to go with Thomas The red coaches A well wagon Bulgy Maithwaite Station (not finished) And finally non-Thomas related stuff A narrow gauge train layout with the existing lego track A big train station And at last a GNR C1 Atlantic engine. That is the only engine that I actually have in real bricks, however the LDD model is a little bit different - I don't have green wheels and am planning to buy the XL Big Ben Bricks drivers which should look better. I built the model out of 2 Emerald Nights, however I don't have actual pictures for the real version. I hope you enjoyed it! ScotNick P.S.: I actually wanted to upload my Thomas model on Cuusoo, but as someone else made a (not the best) Thomas model before me they didn't allow me to. P.P.: Sorry, I tried to upload the pictures here but it didn't work so I put just the link there. Edit: Found out how to post the pictures directly.
  21. Greetings Train Tech, This MoC was actually built over a year ago! I originally designed and built it for use as a "demonstrator" model for a how-to post on Power Functions steam locomotives that I haven't gotten around to writing (although the precursor post is available). While we're waiting on that, I figured I might as well post this model. Prototype History British Railways built this class of 2-6-2 tank engines for a mixed traffic role. Apparently they were very similar to the LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2T, from which they were derived. While none of the class survived into preservation, The Bluebell Railway is rebuilding one of the related 2-6-0 tender locomotives into an example of this class. Engineering Details Usually when I build a MoC, I start with the prototype in mind, then work towards the model. This model began with the desire to build "a small steam locomotive to demonstrate Power Functions", which then determined the choice of prototype. The Standard/Ivatt Class 2 has a number of helpful features in this regard: Small tank engine Large bunker could hide a Power Functions receiver Side tanks can cover up other Power Functions components And indeed, that's how the locomotive is laid out: Even so, the locomotive is quite cramped -- there wasn't enough room for an M-motor based transmission, so I went back to the trusty 9V gearmotor. The output shaft of the motor is very close to the driving axle: ... and it took me a couple tries before I found a good solution: The side tanks contain a channel that allows a cable to pass through, connecting the motor and receiver: The power button is on top of the smokebox and is only held in by gravity: Thank you for reading. Full Brickshelf gallery here.
  22. These buildings were inspired color scheme - wise by set 7222 and the steam locos of the 12v era, which later became Brick Railways Systems main colors. This model was originally built by my father around 2005 / 2006 for an old-style MOC steam engine we built together based off set 7722. It was three tracks long and one track wide at first, but recently I reworked it to be five tracks long and two tracks wide, and with a completely new removable roof. This model can hold any of my steam engines (okay, maybe not the western one, as it is pretty tall), although it is probably too short in length for my diesel units. The rear of the shed. The building is 5 tracks long, which is 80 studs in length. The maximum side clearance is good enough for a 10 stud wide model while the trains can be no more than 11 bricks tall. The original model's roof is permanently attached, while the remake features one large removable section. My father built his original old grey water tower way back in the 1990's back when 9V was king. When he built my first LEGO train (it was a set 7722 inspired steamer, which gave me the idea for my red & black color scheme) in 2006, he built me the water tower to go with it. It wasn't until 2014 when I built myself a long-awaited coaling tower using inspiration from the website called LGauge (link: http://lgauge.com/ ) Anyway, these models are built to be sat the correct height for most official engines, such as the My Own Train series, along with all my custom engines such as my 4-8-2 "Mountain", 2-8-2 "Mikado", 2-6-0 "Mogul", 4-4-0 "American", and so on. The coaling tower features a movable chute to load the (imaginary) coal into the engine's coal bunker or separate tender. The Forgotten Daylight 4460 is a oil burner, so it does not use this particular tower. The girders on the rear of the coal tower are supposed to represent real-world idea of housing a bucket-conveyor system to load the bin inside the tower. Here, in LEGO, it is just for looks. The water tower features a movable spout to fill up the engine's tanks / tender. Here are the LDD files for the buildings so far: LDD file for the double track shed: shed with doors ldd file LDD file for both refueling towers: refueling towers file NOTE: This thread is a W-I-P: the shed parts have been ordered as of 2/3/16, but the switch tower is a ways off into the future. I should have the shed built by this time next week or the week after! EDIT 2/22/16: The shed is finished, while the switch tower is pushed back some.. it won't be built for a while. EDITED 1/14/17: As of January 2017 the shed now has opening engine doors which are colored to match the red stripe on the walls. They will be added to the real life model as soon as funds allow, but there is a sneak peek in the latest post! (The LDD file has been updated as well with the doors.)
  23. Legownz

    0-4-0 Steam Switcher

    Hello all! I build mostly City style 6-wide trains. I have been building a lot of trains on LDD recently, and I just joined Eurobricks a couple of weeks ago. So I found this to be the opportune time to share my newest creation. A 0-4-0 Steam Switcher Engine. For the models I've been designing on LDD, I have been using a color scheme of blue with a white stripe. It looks a little cartoony, but until I find a better combo, I'm going to stick with this one. I based it off the countless models of switcher that Lionel likes to do with their O Gauge trains. A rear view of the switcher. It is worth noting that this probably isn't possible to build since I built it in LDD Advanced Edition. Therefore, I could put all the parts in any color I wanted, regardless of if they've even been made in that color. For example, the robot claws on the back of the tender have never actually been made in blue. So if I actually wanted to buy this model, I'd have to use a different color scheme. What little interior i did. If I started building in 8-wide, I probably could get a full cab in, but I'm happy with my 6-wide trains for now. Hopefully the formatting isn't too messed up, since this is only my second post. Here is a download link if anyone wants the LDD file. NOTE: If anyone wants to redesign this model or make it better than it is, I'd love to see it!
  24. Hi everyone, this is my first post here (besides comments made). I have been working for a few months on a LEGO train model with the help of Lego Digital Designer and other third party softwares to build this. This is the famous Class J 611, currently under restoration and scheduled to be back in service starting May 30, 2015. To celebrate I have been working on the LEGO version of the 611 for a few months and I think its a thing of beauty and I am very pleased with the results. Note: The wheels are not correct because i haven't quite figured out how to manually add BBB XL wheels to my LDD file to make the renders with them on it. I started out using LEGO's train drivers but found they were too small for what the 4-8-4 should have. Class J runs on 70" drivers in real life so they had to be big! I am not quite finished with the running gear yet but I am hoping to start build this soon and would like everyone's opinion on the design and what I should change or suggestions to improve. I also made some other train models (see attached below)
  25. Legotron (Panzerbricks)

    2-8-2 BR 86

    Hello, Some weeks ago I built some train elements to be used as "atrezzo" in my pictures, they were intended to be decoration elements, but friends suggested me to build the complete engine and wagons, so I did it and this is the final result. The pictures are a bit blurry due the lack of light, sorry.