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Found 7 results

  1. Jeffinslaw

    [MOC] Southern Pacific 4-10-2

    The 4-10-2 wheel arrangement, often referred to as the Southern Pacific for the railroad which put it to use most successfully, was a unique design that utilized three-cylinders instead of the traditional two. In terms of steam locomotive evolution, it followed the 2-10-2 Santa Fe but the American Locomotive Company's (Alco) desire to advance three-cylinder technology proved somewhat problematic, at least for the Union Pacific (which referred to its roster as "Overlands" for its Overland Route main line). The SP on the other hand found their fleet quite useful and reliable in regular service and continued to use them for nearly 30 years until diesels finally took over. Hey guys! I wanted to share my completed model of Southern Pacific's 4-10-2 steam engine. I designed this model myself taking inspiration from brass models of the engine and techniques from various builders here on EB and Flickr. This model took me several months to design, build, and test but it is finally completed! The best part? You can purchase your own set of instructions to build the same model! Yes, that's right. Have all of those amazing BMR rolling stock and maybe one or two of my SP & UP PFE cars but no engine to pull it? Well now you can build an expertly modeled steam engine that will fit in with your rolling stock perfectly. Instructions can be purchased here: https://www.bricktraindepot.com/product-page/southern-pacific-4-10-2 The model is powered by two XL PF motors, and a AAA battery box in the tender. An SBrick is housed in the tender as well. Features side rods by @zephyr1934. This engine can haul a LOT of rolling stock. Was going to test with all 45 of my train cars here soon but I am positive it will work exceptionally well. Let's get on to some pictures! Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Southern Pacific 4-10-2 by Jeffinslaw, on Flickr Hope you guys like it! Let me know what you think. -Jeffinslaw
  2. The Spirit of Legoredo was my one of my first big trains, and was built in 2011 with a baggage car, three passenger coaches, and observation car. It looked good to me at first, in nearly all black with a red stripe at the base, but over the years was quietly forgotten about, as it was quite dull-looking to others and hard to take pictures of. Then I switched magnet types to the newer ones, and it became even harder show off as it didn't match the rest of my newer train fleet. That is, until I added a new locomotive to the head end and one more passenger car. (changing the colors up a bit from mainly black to mostly red doesn't hurt much either!) This model was originally made out of @SavaTheAggie and his wonderful Emerald Garratt instructions, as seen and purchased here at his store. I turned the eight wide locomotive into a six wide one, and added a brick of height to the whole model in total. I then used the original red parts from my now-dark red 4-10-4 to build most of the model in real life, which as you can see, took a bit longer than I'd hoped when i posted it originally on the 5th of May. Fictional history of the engine type: In late-1929, Thomas Carter was Chief Mechanical Engineer for Brick Railway Systems (BRS), and on vacation to visit family in New Zealand. He was about to get on the train in Christchurch, when he was passed by a new NZR "G" class 4-6-2+2-6-4 Garratt steam engine. Remembering how he was having problems getting the next "big thing" built back in America, he contacted the engine's manufacturer, Beyer, Peacock and Company, and talked about a possible contract in America using the New Zealand "G"class as a starting point. Once he got home to BRS company HQ in St. Louis, Missouri, he got the upper management's final okay, and began final design on the new "DP" class of Garratts. (DP standing for Double Pacific, as it is really just two pacific type loco wheel-set's back-to-back with one boiler.) The engine's entire wheel-width was widened from 3 feet, 6 inches (narrow gauge) to 4 feet eight 1/2 inches (standard gauge) The mechanical stoker was kept, but the piston count was reduced from 6 to 4 in keeping more with American practice. All in all, 10 of these were made as a trial run in 1930, but the Great Depression worsened in 1931-33 so no more were ever ordered. (originally, 15 locos more were planned but never built, which would have brought the grand total up to 25 engines.) (The real world NZR "G" class on which Anthony Sava based his original design can be found here on Wikipedia. Sadly, none were saved for preservation.) The baggage car. These cars were all inspired by The Santa Fe Super Chief cars (10022 and 10025) and the Emerald Night's coach. (10194) The four streamlined coaches of the train. Each car on this train is 28 studs long, which is longer than my usual 24 studs long standard. Observation car of the Spirit of Legoredo passenger train. The original way these cars were styled had them all black and with a red base stripe, but I have added dark bluish gray fluting and a lot more red to the mix to make them easier to take pictures of. The whole train together. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome!
  3. This model is the last of the original Museum of Transportation vehicles I have planned on buying, but that doesn't mean I won't have more in the future... who knows what may happen. This model will be built at some point in 2019. Real World Background: Here is Union Pacific rotary snowplow 900081. It was designed and built in 1966 at the UP Omaha shops, and is the heaviest rotary snowplow ever built, weighing 367,400 lbs. Three or four diesel locomotives, which were controlled from the non-propelled plow, pushed it at four to six mph. The snowplow is powered by an EMD 16 cylinder 3,000hp turbocharged diesel engine that drives an electric generator, which provides power to turn the 12’ rotary blades at up to 150 rpm. A steam generator provided heat to the cab and can thaw out the blades if they became frozen. This rotary snowplow was last used in Green River, WY in the mid 1980’s, and it was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, Missouri in 1994 by the Union Pacific, where it is still seen today. LEGO model notes: I was inspired by Dr_Spock_888 and his rotary snowplow to build my own way back in 2014. Needless to say, it the originally 8 wide model didn't come out quite right at that time, so I put it aside for quite some time. I just recently remade the model into a 6 wide body with a 10 wide blade section, and have have smoothed out the roof studs with tiles. As before, the words "UP" (the initials of the former owner Union Pacific) should go on the studs towards the middle, while "900081" should go on the studs in the center in printed 1 x 1 tiles, right below the two UP tiles. The blades are actually part of Dr_Spock_888's design, but mine do not move with the train like his... mine are not connected to the wheels on the track, and do not move unless you spin them with your hand. Inspiration: (Photo by Wampa-one from Flickr, not me) Complaints, suggestions, thoughts, & compliments are always welcome!
  4. Please NOTE: There never was a Ohio Pacific railroad in the real world, but in my fictional universe, it never made it to the California coast, just to Denver, Colorado at it's western-most terminal with New York City being it's eastern-most point. As such, this locomotive is entirely fictional, with the paint scheme for the coaches inspired the real-world Missouri Pacific. This model was inspired by user @brickblues and his 4-6-2 Mallard-styled steam locomotive. My version of the engine is a 4-8-2, which means it has four leading, eight driving, and two trailing wheels, making it a Mountain type locomotive. The engine is streamlined with a blue shell around the boiler with tan and white stripes in places. The tender is supposed to say "Ohio Pacific" in printed 1 x 1 tiles, while the cab is supposed to say 6093 (also in printed tiles). The cab of the loco should features this print for the firebox door that is lacking in the LDD file. The baggage car features opening double doors for the baggage end and single doors for the passenger end. The three coach cars are identical with two opening doors at either end. The observation car features a open-air rear platform for looking at the passing scenery. This train is on the to-build list (which is getting longer all the time!) in real bricks. As usual, comments, questions, complaints, and suggestions are always welcome!
  5. ritzcrackerman

    SP 4449

    I've posted this elsewhere on social media, so apologies if it's been shown before. Here's me with my copy of Tony Sava's SP 4449, alongside the real locomotive in Portland, OR. Daylight, meet Daylight by Ritzcrackerman_22, on Flickr The SP 4449 recently completed its federally mandated 15 year boiler inspection and remains in permanent display at the Oregon Rail Heritage Foundation. Aside from Thomas the Tank Engine , the SP 4449 may be the most photographed locomotive in the world. She is arguably one of the most beautiful locomotives ever built, and kept that way by the all-volunteer Friends of SP 4449. Many thanks to Mr. Sava for making these instructions available - and as you can see for yourself, his rendition is nearly perfectly proportioned to the real-life locomotive. Next on the docket for me will be to complete some 8w coaches to go along with her.
  6. Anduin1710

    James Cook and the HMS Endeavour

    [pid][/pid] LDD 17A Hi everyone, I made a lego HMS Endeavour with the LDD. You can vote for it on lego ideas. All images are on Flickr.
  7. I downloaded this magnificent model MOCpages' JD Davis. He designs HUGE engines over there. (Check him out here: http://www.mocpages.com/home.php/31000 ) Anyway, JD Davis based this one off Anthony Sava's Daylight, and then I modified it to better represent the Southern Pacific #4460. Eventually, the original model merged with my previous version of the 4460. Long story short: The tender is from the other 4460, while the loco is new. It will be bigger than the Berkshire that I made from Sava's instructions a while back by about 8 or so studs. The engine will have "SOUTHERN PACIFIC" in printed tiles on the tender sides, with "4460" on the cab sides and tender rear. Here is a comparison picture of the real deal (from Wampa-One's Flickr page) Locomotive history / background: During World War II, the US Government controlled the railway locomotive builders, one of which was Lima. Southern Pacific submitted a order to Lima Locomotive Works for 16 new 4-8-4 steam engines, (known as Daylights) which was turned down. Southern Pacific reworked the blueprints to have little streamlining, and not feature the Daylight's color scheme of orange, red and black. These new engines were painted in silver and black, and were also smaller. Lima finally green-lighted the order in 1943, but with one condition: Six engines would be taken from the order and given to the power-starved Western Pacific Railroad. Because of their smaller size and the fact they were built during WWII gave these engine the names "Baby Daylights" and "War Babies". Officially, they were called GS-6 and numbered 4460 - 4469. (GS meaning General Service or Golden State, and 6 because they were the sixth batch of engines.) What makes #4460 so unique is that it pulled the final movement of steam on the Southern Pacific in 1958. The engine was donated to the Museum of Transportation in St. Louis Missouri on April 16th 1959, where it sits today. The only surviving cousin of this engine is GS-4 #4449, which is better known and actually still runs. That's where the 4460's nickname of the 'Forgotten Daylight', comes from. Also, I got this reply to my first version of the 4460 on MOCpages (seen here: http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/368617 ) NOTE: The driving wheels used on this model are supposed to be Big Ben Bricks XL wheel, both flanged and un-flanged. They are not included in the model, (as they are not in LDD) but some stock official wheels are there instead. They must be removed before building, unless you want some extra drivers that don't touch the track. EDIT: I have updated the model's LXF to be more stable when built it real life. I also updated the pictures! EDIT #2: I have fixed an error with the smoke box where the single 1x1 headlight worked in it's spot in LDD, but not in real life as far as I could tell. This meant taking the smoke box apart, and gave me a chance to strengthen it. I have attached the fixed LXF for the locomotive for any who wish to build it as I am going to sometime around Christmas 2014. EDIT#3: I added the newly updated pictures for the loco & coaches. EDIT #4: I redid the photos and ldd file, plus adding four more studs of length to the model. It is now 102 studs long with the tender attached. I am also attaching the passenger cars that #4460 will pull: The train consists is one baggage car, three coaches, and one observation car. A side view of the cars. The LDD file for the 4460 (without cars) is here: http://www.mocpages.com/user_images/80135/1419022605m.lxf The LDD file for the cars (without 4460) is here: http://www.mocpages....1406567506m.lxf Comments, Questions & complaints welcome!