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  1. The GG-1 was a class of electric locomotives built for the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) for use in the northeastern United States. 139 GG-1s were constructed by General Electric and PRR's Altoona Works from 1934 to 1943, although mine is used by Brick Railway Systems on the New York - Chicago route. The real GG-1"s never traveled that far west in service, due to the overhead wires ending at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The GG-1's served under the PRR, then Penn Central, and onto Conrail and Amtrak, until finally a few went to New Jersey Transit, with some of these units served from 1935 on the PRR to to retiring with NJ transit in 1983. The model seen here is painted in this fictional Brick Railway Systems blue and red color scheme. This means the engine will be pulling some stretched 1980's style passenger car painted like the ones in sets 7715 / 7718. Unlike my previous model of a GG-1, this one has no interior details. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the one opposite the direction of travel would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp the the repair shop. The loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The coaches this engine will pull are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The doors should be printed like these: http://alpha.brickli...Color=5#T=C&C=5 and http://alpha.brickli...e?P=4182p05#T=C I already have 75% of the parts for this model, including all but one door. Here is the LDD file for the engine by itself: http://www.moc-pages...1461783587m.lxf ...and here is one with the coaches and engine: http://www.moc-pages...1461783797m.lxf According to a Facebook comment made to my post on the LEGO Train Fan Club page, the engine I built look similar to this bi-centennial Conrail-era unit: Comments, complaints and questions are always welcome! (This page will be revised again when the cars are built In Real Life.) Recently, I discovered this neat website on the GG-1's, called the GG-1 homepage, which was last updated in 2002. It features some cool stuff and hard to find info though so here is the link: http://www.spikesys.com/GG1/
  2. The coaches are inspired by train sets 7715 / 7718 from the 4.5 Volt era in the early to mid 1980's. The Lego Land Railway runs the train from World City to Heartlake City with stops at Classic Town, Paradisia Coast, Duplo-Ville, Ninjago City, (where the electric loco is replaced by a steamer or vise versa for the rest of the trip) Fabu-Land, Technic Town, Fort Legoredo and the Castle Realm. (with extensions into the Forest of Failed Themes and the Outer Dimension of Galidor at certain times of the year.) This loco's styling of the steam loco was inspired by the two Dreyfuss Hudson locomotives by Anthony Sava. The rear of the engine has a ladder, two hand rails and a red marker light. The electric loco features Anthony Sava's sliding middle axle design. This means the middle axle out of the three on the bogie closest to the middle of the loco slide laterally back and forth to allow the engine over switches and curves that would be normally to tight to maneuver. These special bogies are used twice of course: one for each half of the loco. The two outer wheels closest to each end are connected to the inner bogies via cup-and-ball parts. This allows them to swing freely and not bind up while still representing the right amount of wheels for a GG-1 loco. The engine features moving panto-graphs for picking up (imaginary) electricity from the overhead wires. They are both in the raised position here, though normally the rear one would be used. The exception to this was if the rear panto-graph was knocked off or damaged by overhanging debris, which the engine would then have it's lead panto-graph raised in order to limp to the repair shop. This baggage / passenger car is called a combine which is short for "combination". All the doors can open on this train, even the sliding ones shown here. The three coaches are identical in every way. The observation car, the rear-most coach on the train, features a platform for sight seeing. Comments, questions, and complaints are always welcome! EDIT 6/25/17: Added real life pictures!